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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  September 24, 2019 9:00pm-10:00pm BST

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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern and this is outside source. a unanimous verdict from the 11 judges of the supreme court — they say the government acted unlawfully when it suspended parliament. the prime minister's advice to her majesty was unlawful, void and of no effect. mps celebrate outside court and will go back to parliament tomorrow. boris johnson says he'll abide by the ruling but he's not happy about it. i have the highest respect of course for ourjudiciary and for the independence of our courts, but i must say, i strongly disagree with thisjudgment.
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we'll be bringing you all the reaction and analysis from that unprecedented supreme court ruling. also on the programme. we'll be live in new york where world leaders have gathered for the un general assembly. borisjohnson has only been in powerfor two months. but in that time he's lost six votes in parliament, misled the queen and now he's broken the law. we've said it before about brexit — and we'll say it again now. today brought a political earthquake, because the uk's highest court has ruled the prime minister's decision to suspend parliament
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for five weeks up to the brexit deadline was unlawful — and now void. the government says the prime minister has spoken to the queen since the ruling, but his problems won't end there. tonight boris johnson is facing calls to resign — and tomorrow he'll be back in the uk to face parliament. first, here's how he took the news in new york. obviously, this is a verdict that we will respect and we respect the judicial process. i have to say i strongly disagree with what the justices have found. i don't think that it justices have found. i don't think thatitis justices have found. i don't think that it is right but we will go ahead and of course parliament will come back. i do think there is a good case for getting on with the queen speech anyway and we will do that, but i think the most important thing is we get on and deliver brexit on october 31 and clearly the claimants in this case are determined to try and frustrate that and stop that. i think it would be very unfortunate if parliament made that objective, which the people
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wa nt that objective, which the people want delivered, more difficult, but we will get on. so the queen's speeches when the government lays out the priorities that mrjohnson mentioned. before we go any further let me bring you up to speed with what happened in the supreme court today — because it's political and legal dynamite. here's the supreme court president, lady hale delivering the judgement. this was not a normal prorogation in the run—up to a queen's speech. it prevented parliament from carrying out its constitutional role for five out its constitutional role for five out of the possible eight weeks between the end of the summer recess and exit the on 31st october. prorogation of parliament is quite different to going into recess. while parliament is provoked, neither house can meet, debate or pass legislation. neither house candidate government policy, nor may members ask written or oral
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questions of ministers or meet or ta ke questions of ministers or meet or take evidence on committees. in general, bills which have not yet completed all of their stages are lost and will have to start again from scratch after the queen speech. during a recess, the house does not sit back parliamentary business can otherwise continue as usual. so take a look at this. this is the judgment in full. it's a bombshell. all 11 justices are unanimous that it was wrong to stop mps from carrying out their duties in the run—up to brexit. lady hale didn't mince her words. her ruling said the "effect on the fundamentals of democracy was extreme". she also had this to say. this court has already concluded that the prime minister's advice to her majesty was unlawful, void and of no effect. means the order to which it led was also unlawful, void and of no effect and should be quashed. this means that when the
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royal commissioners walked into the house of lords, it was as if they had walked in with a blank sheet of paper. the prorogation was also void and of no effect. parliament has not been prorogued. this is the unanimous judgment of all 11 justices. as for parliament and in particular the speaker and the lord speaker to decide what to do next. u nless speaker to decide what to do next. unless there is some parliamentary rule of which we are unaware, they can take immediate steps to enable each house to meet as soon as possible. it is not clear to us that any step is needed from the prime minister but effort as, the court is pleased that his counsel have told the court that he will take all necessary steps to comply with the terms of any declaration made by this court. the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, was one of the first to react.
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i invite borisjohnson, and the historic words, to consider his position. applause and become... i got that message! and become... i got that message! and become... i got that message! and become the shortest serving prime minister there has ever been. so obey the law, take no audio of the table, and have an election to elect a government that respects democracy, respects the rule of law and brings power back to the people, not usurp that in the way boris johnson has done. jeremy corbyn brought his speech forward by a day. gina miller is an anti—brexit campaigner who brought one of the cases against the prime minister to court. she called it a landmark verdict.
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do not let the government played down the seriousness of the judgment today. a unanimous judgment. down the seriousness of the judgment today. a unanimousjudgment. they have spoken unequivocally, and what i say to the prime minister is to repeat lady hale's words. the author was a blank piece of paper. parliament was not prorogued. mps should turn up for work tomorrow and get on with scrutinising this government. and they plan to. we will talk more about that any moment. outlines the government's priorities on october 14th. boris johnson suspended parliament for five weeks on september 10th — arguing it was necessary before a queen's speech, which outlines the government's priorities on october 14th. but by doing that, mps were restricted in their ability to work on brexit before the deadline on october 31st. remember there are only 37 days until the uk leaves the eu on october 31st — with, or without a deal.
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mrjohnson‘s opponents accused him of trying to stop mps scrutinising his brexit plans. and they're now demanding he quit. here's the leader of the scottish national party in the house of commons, ian blackford. what we wanted to do was make sure we didn't crash out on 31st october. this is a prime minister who doesn't have the dignity required for office. he has acted outside his powers, we want to get rid of him, we want to make sure in the first instance that we don't leave the european union on a new deal basis. i want to thank everybody who has come together, those who have brought the legal action. this is a brilliant day for democracy and congratulations to everyone. unusual to see different parties having their arms around one another outside the court. parliament will now reconvene on tuesday —
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at 11:30am local time. some mps showed up after the supreme court verdict anyway. here's one mp, tom tugendhat — in the empty green benches today. one opponent of the suspension of parliament is the house speaker, john bercow. here he is calling mps back to parliament. in the light of that explicit judgment, i have instructed the house authorities to prepare a not for the recall, the prorogation was unlawful and is void, to prepare for the resumption of the business of the resumption of the business of the house of commons. jessica parker is in westminster. how much of a political earthquake is this?
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are there after—shocks you're still feeling? perhaps put it in context for global viewers. feeling? perhaps put it in context for globalviewers. it feeling? perhaps put it in context for global viewers. it was com pletely for global viewers. it was completely bizarre today. the ruling from the supreme court left many jaws dropped to the floor, and i went into the house of commons to see whether it was still setting in what was going on and i went on to the commons chamber because during prorogation or a recess, those areas open up to tourists, and sure enough there are lots of visitors walking around taking audio tours, and the odd mp popping in for a selfie to make the point that they want the commons to be setting, but it has been a seismic day. things quieting down this evening, gearing up for tomorrow which is going to be another big day with mps returning to westminster, proceedings getting under way at around 11:30am. we understand the leader of the house is setting out the business of the house of commons. it will be interesting to see whether the government tries to apply for a recess so
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government tries to apply for a recess so that they can party conference, due to start on sunday and run until wednesday, can go ahead, and then piece i have spoken to on the opposition bench hadn't obliged to oblige the governing party on that one. also whether borisjohnson party on that one. also whether boris johnson might be party on that one. also whether borisjohnson might be making a statement to the house of commons following the un general assembly. he is heading back from that. so if he does come before the house of commons i suspect mps will want to get him quite a grilling. stay with hours because we want to get to you that some other questions we have while we have you. lady hill said the ruling today was not a bit brexit but about the decision to suspend parliament. no—one from the government is giving interviews — but we've had this reaction from a number 10 source who tells the bbc the supreme court "made a serious mistake in extending its reach to these political matters" and had "made it clear that its reasons were connected to the parliamentary disputes" over brexit.
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talking about how they felt about that particular ruling. so that's number 10 pointing the finger at the supreme court. but according to this buzzfeed article, others are looking closely at the advice given to the government by the attorney general geoffrey cox. his office has responded "the government acted in good faith, and in the belief that its approach was both lawful and constitutional. these are complex matters on which senior and distinguished lawyers have disagreed." so should borisjohnson be worried? he seems to be taking it in his stride. let's watch. there are many ways in which new york and london are not
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just similar but actually united. both cities obviously share a language, kind of. we have a basic idea of freedom. we have a basic idea of freedom. we have a basic idea of freedom and that is very simple, common to our democracies, and that if you obey the law and you do no harm to others you can come and live your life as you please without being judged or censured. back tojessica. so boris johnson doesn't seem too worried there — but lots of finger pointing going on — who is taking the blame? it is interesting. borisjohnson, let's just take a moment to consider what happened today. the highest court in the land has found his prorogation of parliament, his advice to the queen, was unlawful. he has been forced to recall parliament pretty much against his well as a result. the government said it would abide by the law and by the supreme court ruling even
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though it doesn't agree with that. and you have opposition parties calling for his resignation saying his position is basically untenable and he has got that date of october 31 where he says he will deliver brexit do or dry. it is fair to say the recall of parliament could make life more difficult for him in that vein. those who were suspicious of the government's motives as to why they prorogued parliament, thought it was partly about trying to stop mps from frustrating the brexit strategy, and certainly mps will try to frustrate the brexit strategy, but he seems quite bright and breezy about the whole thing. what will happen next, as i mentioned before we understand he is likely to make a statement to the house of commons tomorrow. he seems pretty determined tomorrow. he seems pretty determined to stick to the 31st october deadline. we have that other deadline. we have that other deadline of 19th october. this was to do with the hilary benn act that
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mps passed, where borisjohnson has to have a deal approved by that date 01’ to have a deal approved by that date or he could be mandated to seek a delay to brexit. something else to point out, we had the supreme court ruling today but of borisjohnson‘s government somehow tries to find a loophole in that law, you could see further court challenges towards the end of october. we were mentioning that at 11:30am tomorrow is when parliament reconvenes. usually that would be a day when there would be prime ministers questions. do you expect him to turn up, just briefly? there is some expectation he might make some sort of statement to the commons of the back of the general assembly. no prime ministers questions but i think what tomorrow might be as a series of difficult questions, maybe not even about brexit but to do with thomas cook, with iran as well, so it could actually and a weird way be like
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business as usual in the commons that it was setting. it definitely wasn't business as usual! we will speak to you later in the programme, thank you. stay with us on outside source — still to come. we'll be live in brussels to get the reaction from the eu after uk's supreme court says boris johnson's prorogation of parliament ahead of the brexit deadline is unlawful. bbc is finding out the views and concerns of people in stoke—on—trent all week and we have been asking them their opinion on today's ruling in the supreme court. brexit has been going on forfar too in the supreme court. brexit has been going on for far too long in the supreme court. brexit has been going on forfar too long and it needs sorted out but the simply way to go in general. we seem to be living in a world where comedians are intellects and politicians are clowns. to be honest, i have lost confidence in the people in charge
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andi confidence in the people in charge and ijust confidence in the people in charge and i just think confidence in the people in charge and ijust think going forward, who do you trust? it is good that it has been proven unlawful because i get that parliament has its opinions and that parliament has its opinions and that may be something the prime minister feels is getting on the way of the process of brexit, but silencing them is not the way to go about it. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story. the british prime minister, borisjohnson, has defended his decision to suspend parliament but said he would respect a ruling from the uk supreme court that he had broken the law in doing so. let's ta ke let's take a look at some of the other stories being followed by the world service newsroom. italy has allowed 182 migrants to come ashore
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from the rescue vessel ocean viking after they were picked up off libya. since a new centre left coalition took power this month, italy has relaxed the previous interior minister matteo salvini's policy of closing italian ports to rescue ships. that's on the world service. at least 19 people have been killed and several hundred injured in an earthquake in pakistani—administered kashmir. the pakistani security forces have reached the worst affected areas to help with rescue and relief efforts. people in cities as far away as islamabad and delhi felt tremors. bbc urdu. a woman travelling on a thomas cook flight organised an impromptu whip—round for staff after the firm collapsed on monday. elaine kerslake said cabin crew on the flight from dalaman in turkey were "heartbroken" after losing theirjobs. she announced over the plane's tannoy system that more than £650 had been raised for the staff. that's on our website.
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let me return to the supreme court. were going to do a lot of angles on the story throughout the hour. in europe there've been a variety of responses of the supreme court decision. a spokesperson for the european commission declined to comment, saying "we have all seen the news but it is not for us to comment on the internal constitutional matters of the united kingdom." but the president of the european parliament david sassoli welcomed the ruling, tweeting "any brexit agreement needs to be approved by both uk and eu parliament, so proper democratic scrutiny on both sides of the channel is essential." the pa rliament‘s brexit coordinator guy verhofstadt was not so restrained, saying, "at least one big relief in the brexit saga: the rule of law in the uk is alive & kicking. parliaments should never be silenced in a real democracy. i never want to hear boris johnson or any other brexiteer say again
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that the european union is undemocratic." here's katya adler in brussels on what else the eu had to say. the ruling today of course raises all sorts of questions for the eu. well borisjohnson, there brexit negotiating partner, stay in his job? when might that be a general election? what i'm hearing mainly today as the eu trying to put its hands over its ears and block out all the noise. it sees the ruling today and what happens next in the uk as today and what happens next in the ukasa today and what happens next in the uk as a domestic political matter. that is why the european commission didn't want to comment on it today. the eu prefers to concentrate on the it does have a role to play and that is in negotiations. today's ruling doesn't really change very much. under eu law, the eu's negotiating partner as her majesty's government and boris johnson are partner as her majesty's government and borisjohnson are still the head of that. eu leaders still want a brexit deal. they would love it
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signed, sealed and delivered by the middle of next month, as boris johnson wanted as well, but they remain highly sceptical, as we heard today from the eu's chief brexit negotiator. simply the two sites are still very far apart and the ruling today by the supreme court did nothing change that. so what does all this mean for brexit? well, for the most part, nothing has changed. that's because brexit largely depends on whether the prime minister can secure a deal with the eu at the summit on october 17 and 18. it also depends on him getting a majority of mps to back that deal. today'sjudgment has no bearing on that, but it makes a no—deal brexit far less likely because it makes it much more difficult for the pm to ignore a law passed this month — requiring him to ask for yet another extension if a deal cannot be agreed at the eu summit. mrjohnson may have considered ignoring that law, to take britain out without a deal. but as you can see here,
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it would probably end up back in the supreme court — which already ruled against him today. the other options are mrjohnson‘s resignation — or seeking a delay from the eu, which has four possible outcomes — a delay, a no—deal brexit, brexit with a deal or a vote of no confidence. let's bring up rory stewart, you remember he was going for leadership of the conservative party. former cabinet minister rory stewart says "no—deal is now impossible...." but can mrjohnson bridge the gap in brexit negotiations in time? let us take a look at some of the possibilities, these are some of the key dates. mrjohnson still wants to hold a queen's speech, which lays out the government's priorities, on october 14th —
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which means he may try to suspend parliament again, just for a shorter time — in the days before the 14th. then there's that eu summit on the 17th and 18th. mrjohnson has until october 19 to either pass a deal in parliament or get mps to approve a no—deal brexit. a lot of options. dr hannah white from the institute for governmentjoins me now. so when you take a look at some of these scenarios, what do you think we should be thinking about, of what the next step might be?|j we should be thinking about, of what the next step might be? i think the key date now really is the 19th october. that is the date, as you said, that payments that either has to get the prime minister to agree a deal by our to leave with no deal, and to agree a deal he has to get the eu to offer him a new deal and offer something different he can bring back to parliament and say,
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vote for this, it is not what you saw before, and it deals with some of your concerns and there is therefore something you can support. if you can't do that and hasn't done that by 19th october, which is obviously very soon after that summit in the eu, then he has to write and ask for an extension, and thatis write and ask for an extension, and that is the thing he has been seeking to avoid having to do. he said he would rather die nadh than lead the country to not leave on 31st october. —— would rather die in a ditch. some were bringing up today that issue of the court getting involved in the politics of the country. do you think there are constitutional implications of this ruling? the courtjudgment made it really clear that a lot of the time when courts are deciding things there is a political angle to the decisions the courts are asked to make, and it said this was really no different to all those other
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circumstances. i think it is a really significant judgment because what it does is define more clearly the relationship between parliament, government and the courts, and it says to the government, you do not have an unfettered power to just to spend parliament when you like, because the court will take an interest in that and they will see it as their role to look and see whether that was a reasonable thing for you to do. so for parliament thatis for you to do. so for parliament that is that additional protection that is that additional protection that the courts see it as their business to take a view on whether it is right for parliament to be suspended or not. it is interesting, we have just got 30 seconds, but the ruling, even though it has wide—ranging implications probably won't change anything specifically on brexit immediately? that is right, and it is only if parliament comes back in the parliamentary rebels decide to do something else dramatic, some new tactic, that anything dramatic will happen on brexit. i can't see that really happening between now and the end of
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october. interesting, thank you. joining us on this day we are taking a look at this uk ruling that took place. good evening. low pressure will dominate the weather in the uk this week so more rain to come. elsewhere around the world, stories of wet weather, even in some areas where it is normally dry. let's head to the caribbean first. a couple of tropical systems and this cloud, tropical systems and this cloud, tropical storm jerry, very close to bermuda. this area of cloud is a wea k bermuda. this area of cloud is a weak storm called karen. that will bring heavy rain to puerto rico and into the virgin islands, could be something like eight of rain. looking into north america, at the beginning of the week, this was the scene in phoenix, arizona. flash flooding a result of some heavy and sundry downpours. this rain doesn't
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soak away into what is normally a dry part of the country, hence flash flooding. we had some tropical air from a system moving up from the bar happen and sure, maybe more sharers in the next few days. wet weather moving across the northern plains and great lakes into eastern canada, and great lakes into eastern canada, and ahead of that a lot of warmth and ahead of that a lot of warmth and sunshine, and it really is going to be quite a contrast by the end of the week with the south—east of the united states hot where towards the north—western pacific northwest, very cold and the temperature in calgary may not get up above freezing. that is the story as you can see here, 32 fahrenheit, 0 celsius on saturday, but compared with atlanta and phoenix where it is going to be hot and should be dry by the weekend. this area of cloud was quite a powerful cyclone for a while, came all the way across the arabian sea from india and has since made landfall in south—eastern parts
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of allman and is weakening. may be a few showers heading towards yemen. dust storms more of an issue by this stage. this scene here and indonesia likened to mars, the redness caused by the scattering of sunlight by all the air pollution we got from the fires. and looking at this area of cloud close to borneo, that will be pushing its way toward sumatra and may be bringing heavy rain later on this week. a number of showers elsewhere but still looking largely dry across japan for the rugby world cup. heading down under, we have seen cup. heading down under, we have seen some cup. heading down under, we have seen some rain recently and areas that are normally dry. alice springs had some significant rain, the first time for three months. that area of cloud has since moved away and the temperature is really going to rocket and alice springs ig with expect this time of year. still some
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rain and snow for new zealand, shouldn't feel quite as cold by the end of the week.
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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern, this is outside source. a unanimous verdict from the 11 judges of the supreme court — they say the government acted unlawfully when it suspended parliament. the prime minister's advice to her majesty was unlawful, void, and of no effect. cheering mps celebrate outside court and will go back to parliament tomorrow. boris johnson says he'll abide by the ruling but he's not happy about it. i have the highest respect for our judiciary in the independence of our courts, but i must say i strongly disagree with this and judgement. facing a congressional backlash, president trump says he'll release the transcript of his phone call
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with the ukrainian president. we'll be live in new york where world leaders have gathered for the un general assembly. today's supreme court ruling has also created a whirlwind in westminster. tomorrow morning parliament will resume. and today, the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, told the labour party conference boris johnson should resign tomorrow, parliament will return. cheering. the government will be held to account of what it has done. borisjohnson has been found
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to have misled the country, this un—elected prime minister should now resign. cheering. chanting. johnson out was the call there. the calls for borisjohnson to quit don'tjust come from the labour party, here are two more. he has acted unlawfully in trying to silence parliament, trying to silence the voices of the people, because he does not want to be held to account. he does not want that to answer questions about his disastrous brexit policy. in doing so, he was prepared to mislead queen and to mislead the whole country.
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in light of this judgement today, a prime minister with any honor would tender his resignation. we have a prime minister who has been found by the supreme court to have acted unlawfully for no good reason and to have a prime minister continuing the office in those circumstances is unthinkable. borisjohnson received the news of the supreme court ruling 5,000 kms from london, over in new york forthe un summit. but there he got some words of encouragement from donald trump. for the first couple of months, i think we were 0—7 with the supreme court. since then, we won the wall, we won asylum, we won some of the biggest ones, we have a great streak going. but we started off, we were 0—7, the first time we won, you were shocked that we won. and since then, we have run the table. we have won a lot of decisions. i'm sure that will happen to you. well, we're not
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counting our chickens. we're full of respect for the justices of our supreme court. but we will push on and respect what the court had to say but we will get on and deliver brexit. i think that is what the british people want. in other words, he has been very nice to the courts. he has total respect for the court. the opposition did not unite over brexit, but they are together in their desire to return to parliament. here's the reaction of one former conservative mp anna soubry, who left the party over its brexit policy. parliament is not suspended. it has not even adjourned. effectively, it is still sitting. the sooner we get back into that chamber, the better. what will you do now? i have already contacted the speaker on behalf of all the opposition parties that are here. and we have said we are here and we are willing or ready to get into the chamber to hold this government to account. here's is the view of a conservative mp who is still in line with the party, and chairs the group
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of brexit hardliners called the european research group or the erg. it is an earthquake moment, and yet we must uphold parliament democracy in the rule of law. but the real problem we have here, the true problem beneath all of this is that parliamentarians have not accepted referendum result and we need a general election to sort this out. it is very clear to me that this has profound political consequences and you can hear that in the jubilation of the opposition politicians. they don't want to leave the european union. they don't want to stand on manifestos on which they stood for election. this is a rotten parliament. it needs to be brought to an end. i very much hope that borisjohnson tables another motion for an early general election so that we can challenge all of those politicians who say they want to remove him from office, challenge them to vote then for a general election. here's laura kuensberg on where today's events leave the prime minister.
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certainly there is never anything like the kind of surprises on this whole political process at the moment. thingsjust seem whole political process at the moment. things just seem to whole political process at the moment. thingsjust seem to be getting more dramatic and more serious. the court today stop short of accusing boris johnson serious. the court today stop short of accusing borisjohnson personally of accusing borisjohnson personally of misleading the coin. basically calling him a liar. other than that, thisjudgement was calling him a liar. other than that, this judgement was about as bad for the government as they could have have jumped of their worst nightmare. by any normal comparison, this is a terrible defeat. —— misleading the queen. a really bruising event they could do great damage to his reputation, and a lot of mps in his own party or extremely worried about the message this sends. remember, we are not living in normal political time. people inside borisjohnson's in normal political time. people inside boris johnson's bunker believe that actually, this does and could in time help them make the case they are trying to put to the country at large which is that boris johnson they claim is the only person who is absolutely determined to get brexit done whatever the
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cost, that is what he said they got him into numberten, cost, that is what he said they got him into number ten, elected by the tory membership, command that is what he how he will be true to the promise that he made. anybody standing in his way, where the opposition mps come everybody in this building, or thejudges of the road in the supreme court, they only add to the impression of him trying to bouts of these obstacles to try to bouts of these obstacles to try to keep his promise. but to say that isa gamble, to keep his promise. but to say that is a gamble, that strategy, is a serious understatement. it is ruthless perhaps, risky certainly, but don't build out more audacious moves, but mps will be back here tomorrow morning, no doubt asking more questions and trying to put him under more pressure over his brexit strategy and just as boris johnson and team as thick determined to carry on like this, plenty of people who way back here in parliament determined to make life as hard for him as they possibly can. in14 hours,
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in 1a hours, the mps will be back in the chamber. dozens of world leaders are in new york for the annual united nations general assembly. it's day one of four — and as per tradition brazil's leader kicked off the speeches. jair bolsonaro has faced international criticism over the handling of the amazon fires and deforestation. he hit back with this. translation: these sensationalist attacks that we have suffered coming from a large part of the international media due to the fire outbreaks in the amazon region have aroused our patriotic sentiment. it is a fallacy to say that the amazon is the heritage of humankind and a misconception confirmed by scientists to say that our amazon rain forest are the lungs of the world. using and resorting to these fallacies, certain countries, instead of helping, embarked on the media lies and behave in a disrespectful manner.
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and with a colonialist spirit. mr bolsonaro also said this about foreign countries: "those who attack us are not concerned about the indigenous people but rather the mineral riches and biodiversity." bare in mind there've been more than 80 thousand fires in the rainforest this year, let me show you these images. the majority of the fires that cause this kind of devastation are believed to be caused by human activity. and environmentalists say mr bolsonaro's policies actively encourage farmers to clear large areas of land. the amazon is a vital carbon store — it's one of the world's last natural protections against climate change. but of course mr bolsonaro is a notorious climate sceptic, just like his us counterpart donald trump. and president trump was the next to speak — he began with this attack on iran. no responsible government should subsidize iran's bloodlust. as long as iran's menacing
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behaviour continues, sanctions will not be lifted. they will be tightened. president trump also attacked china's trade practises and called on leaders to reject globalism and embrace patriotism. but many people thought he seemed bored and unenthusiastic. jon sopel said... while mr trump was addressing venezuela and its humanitarian crisis, one of their representatives was reading a book and one of his supporters tweeted "ok even i laughed at the woman from venezuela reading a book while trump speaks to #unga".
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not sure what the book is. laura trevelyan is at the united nations and joins us now. good to have you with us. first, i'm curious how mr trump was received. he spoke for a long time. on a lot of issues but his delivery was so muted. it was subdued for him. and his topics were more campaign rally like, being tough on trade with china, talking about immigration, and the southern border. and of course, his main topic was the future belongs not to globalists as he calls them, but the patriots. it isa he calls them, but the patriots. it is a little bit hard to get a more global exciting instead of the united nations, which is the multilateral corporation. very much this is the president looking forward to 2020, also somebody who these past 2a hours in new york has been inundated with questions by reporters wherever he goes about
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impeachment and whether he improperly pressurise the president of ukraine to investigate a political rival. wouldn't be surprising if he was a bit tired. but yes, it was a trump performance with an eye more to the audience outside of the hall that inside the hall. we will talk a little later with gary about those impeachment discussions taking place today. in a very busy newsday. and also, we saw of borisjohnson sitting down with us president donald trump. does that meeting help either man? when they sit down together, it helps them with their audiences who see them as the populace, taking on the globalist, are taking on those who wish to frustrate the will of the people. in britain by stopping brexit or america by cockily turning to the courts to frustrate the trump agenda. in that sense it does. —— by co nsta ntly agenda. in that sense it does. —— by constantly turning to the courts.
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interesting borisjohnson talking about the health service. president trump is not popular in britain. the national health services but the one thing i know about by covering the angle in the us if the americans when a trade that would britain at the brexit, what they want is access the brexit, what they want is access the health service and access to our defence industries into our agriculture. that will be the price of any trade deal after brexit and borisjohnson is of any trade deal after brexit and boris johnson is right of any trade deal after brexit and borisjohnson is right to be cautious there about the nhs. stay with us for one moment. i want to bring a little too are viewers of that sit down between prime minister borisjohnson that sit down between prime minister boris johnson and the that sit down between prime minister borisjohnson and the president. as we've been hearing he's facing the supreme court's ruling over his unlawful suspension of parliament. mrjohnson was asked by an american reporter about his response to critics who want him to stand down. we respect the judiciary in our country and we respect the court, i disagree profoundly with what they had to say,
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i think it was entirely right to go ahead with a plan for a queen's speech. this is the longest period we have not had a speech for 400 years. we have a dynamic, domestic agenda we need to be getting on with. more police on the streets, investing in our national health service, improving our education, we need to get on with that. and frankly, i think we need to get on with the brexit. that is the overwhelming view of the british people, whether they voted to leave or remain, they want thing done by october the 31st. that is what we will do. mr president... that was a very nasty question from a great american reporter. laughter. was that an american reporter? a good one. i think he was asking a question that a lot of british reporters would be asking. now that we have that out of the way... he is not going anywhere.
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let me return to that. veryjovial. mrtrump came back let me return to that. veryjovial. mr trump came back to life after that address. it is hard to know exactly what a future relationship may look like. people are talking about mrjensen calling for him to resign. and whether that relationship could be a great trade deal. —— mr borisjohnson. does mr trump talk about it openly? only in general terms come as as is his way. donald trump tends to speak in 30,000 foot type of emotions and he said that there will be a great relationship after brexit and a great trade deal with britain and borisjohnson is a great leader. what that mean specifically we don't know but interesting here at the united nations behind the scenes all week because you have had executives from britain's national health service out here, talking to big american management consultants come about what the future could look like. looking for whether there is a investment that could be made in the
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national health service and very much they sort of subtext of this meeting here, selling britain. british officials, eitherfrom meeting here, selling britain. british officials, either from your 01’ british officials, either from your or the health service or top companies, trying to look beyond brexit and they general assembly is an opportunity to representatives of the mystic britain to come out here and meet with people whom i want to invest after brexit. that is happening behind the scenes. but now so happening behind the scenes. but now so much else uncertainty with the supreme court ruling and what that means for brexit in the future of borisjohnson means for brexit in the future of boris johnson that literally everybody and me says that he tell us everybody and me says that he tell us what is going on and i say i wish i could. laughter thank you for the information you have given us. while they were meeting, opposition leader jeremy corbyn was giving his speech saying the nhs is not for sale. all going on. thank you. stay with us on outside source — still to come... we'll be live with our correspondent in washington as president trump says he'll release the transcript
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of his phone call with the ukrainian president. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn addressed his party's conference this afternoon, a day earlier than scheduled following this morning's supreme court ruling against the government. criticising the prime minister over the unlawful suspension of parliament, mr corbyn called on the pm to resign. here's our chief political correspondent vicki young. he wants to be prime minister. they are desperate for him to be prime minister. and many here think that day has just come closer. it's been a difficult conference forjeremy corbyn but today he got plenty of new material for his hastily rescheduled speech. tomorrow, parliament will return. cheering. the government will be held to account for what it has done. borisjohnson has been found to have misled the country.
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this unelected prime minister should now resign. cheering. and there was more. he thinks he's above us all. he's part of an elite that disdains democracy. i will tell you this, i don't think he is fit to be prime minister. applause. so, what is mr corbyn going to do next? he could hold a vote of no confidence in boris johnson but for now he is reluctant to act. things are going badly for the prime minister but it has not been plain sailing for the labour leader either. here, the crowd absolutely adore him, but back in parliament he's a much more divisive figure. he cannot unite the opposition parties behind him and that makes getting rid of borisjohnson a whole lot harder. and jeremy corbyn is convinced there is an appetite for change.
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vicki young, bbc news, brighton. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is? the british prime minister, borisjohnson, has defended his decision to suspend parliament but said he would respect a ruling from the uk supreme court that he had broken the law in doing so. let's move onto to the story. the controversy over us president donald trump's phone call with the ukrainian president is heating up — with increasing calls from democrats to begin impeachment proceedings. a few hours ago, president trump announced he will release a transcript of the call with president volodymyr zelensky, tweeting. ..
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that came not long after the house speaker nancy pelosi announced she'd be making a statement about the investigations into trump in the next hour or so. here she is speaking earlier today. and if that is the case, that the president of the united states would ask a foreign government to assist him ina ask a foreign government to assist him in a political way, that would be wrong. would it be impeachable? laughter. let mejust be wrong. would it be impeachable? laughter. let me just say that everything we have been doing up until now is about preserving that republic. speaker pelosi has since said there'll be a vote on wednesday on a resolution regarding a whistle blower report — and that's what kicked off this story last week. the whistle—blower alleged that in a phone conversation, mr trump asked mr zelensky to investigate his democratic rival
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joe biden and his son, hunter biden, who became a director at a ukrainian gas company in 2014. democrats said that if the president did ask mr zelensky to investigate him, it's tantamount to promoting foreign interference in the 2020 election, and that impeachment may be the only way forward. well now mr biden himself has just added his voice to those calls. the president should stop stonewalling this investigation and all the other investigations into his alleged wrongdoing. using its full constitutional authority, congress, in my view, should demand the information that it has a legal right to receive. if congress does not, and the president does not comply with such a request from congress, he continues to obstruct congress and flaunt the law.
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donald trump will leave congress with no choice but to initiate impeachment. that will be a tragedy. but a tragedy of his own making. gary o'donoghue is in washington. thank you forjoining us. a lot of this is happening but that we expect in the next hour or so, a statement by nancy pelosi. any idea?|j in the next hour or so, a statement by nancy pelosi. any idea? i think most people with inside the beltway here in washington, dc are expecting here in washington, dc are expecting her to give the go—ahead to four more impeachment proceedings. it is something she has been under pressure for a long time to do. from oui’ pressure for a long time to do. from our own members of the democratic caucus inside the house of representatives she has resisted if i long time because she thinks the potential political downsides to our risky. but she believes and she said this today, that this particular example as she describes it, a president the ringing up a foreign leader and asking him to investigate
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somebody for his own political gain, asa somebody for his own political gain, as a potential viable in next year's election, she thinks that is different. she believes is different because she thinks it is understandable by the american public. not complicated, not long and drawn out, not hugely intricate like the whole russian investigation was. a simple, phone call if you like putting pressure on somebody to try and stymie your potential political adverse every. all that is going to play out in the next few minutes. —— adversary. we expect that announcement from her and then to be honest, we are in two months of investigations and hearings, and a vote in the house and possibly a trial in the senate and it will go on and on and on. this really could be the start. i was reading somewhere that it would be unlikely for miss pelosi to begin this inquiry unless she thinks she could to bring it to fruition all the way. look, impeachment is a political process. she will get the vote
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through in the house, that is for sure. she had a decent healthy majority there. the difficulty comes in the senate where you have a child. you have a trial on the articles of impeachment in the senate, and that requires two thirds of that body to vote for those articles of impeachment to remove a president. as we know, the republicans have a majority come if you wanted to get two thirds to impeach and convict the president and the senate, 20 of those would have to change sides. pretty unlikely. the question is though can the process of exposing what they believe is wrong doing is in the evidence, the documents, the months and months of hearings, carrying that damage the president so much that damage the president so much that in a sense, it doesn't require a conviction in the senate and that is what happened to richard nixon backin is what happened to richard nixon back in the early 70s. after watergate. he threw the towel, when republicans decided they would in the towel, when republicans decided they would impact him. thank you,
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gary. we are seeing the senate agree to call for the whistle—blower complaint to be turned over to the intelligence committee. we will leave it there on outside source. hello there. a pretty potent area of low pressure, which contained the remnants of what was hurricane humberto brought a very wet day on tuesday. in particular across parts of england and wales. one or two locations, getting nearly a month worth of rainfall. water fields there in derbyshire and london in the home counties as well. minor flooding on some of the roads there, through tuesday morning. this is the cold area of low pressure which brought a suede of strong winds to southern portions of britain during tuesday night. on wednesday, slowly clearing away and between weather system. it should be quieter and more settled wednesday afternoon.
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wednesday starts off pretty unsettled again across southern southeast, quite windy, rain, they tend to ease down and clear away into the afternoon and hang back a cloud and rain which was seen through central scotland. we should see lighter winds, more sunshine, and we might feel a touch warmer with a temperature of 20 degrees. short—lived fine spell, the next area of pressure frontal system will sweep through during wednesday night. the wet and windy weather should eventually clear away from area stew thursday morning into the afternoon in improvement with sunshine and appearing but plenty of sunny showers pushing into the western areas and temperatures will be and temperatures will be around average. ending the week, remains unsettled. we started the week on low pressure. all tying in with the jet stream which will be moving across the north atlantic west to east firing these weather systems. signs of it as we end the week.
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next area of low pressure for friday might be introduce something a little bit cooler to the northern half of the country. this feature will bring another spell of wet and windy weather heading into sunday. for friday, pretty much slap bang on top of us, the centre just of the north feeling a west wind, plenty of showers across the north and the west. probably the best of the sunshine, southern and eastern areas come into the start of the weekend, saturday looking not too bad. some fairly cool cloud across scotland and northern ireland. for england and wales, around average temperatures, may be a few degrees below, 16—18 degrees, low to mid teens further north. further showers across western areas, sunday, the area of low pressure sweeping and bringing wet and windy weather to england and wales. then parts of northern ireland, central and southern scotland, here temperatures in high teens, turning to the seasonal, still something fairly chilly but drier across the north of
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scotland. and then sunday into next week, looks like low pressure will tend to clear away. the current thinking now is that high—pressure may building for the start of october. instead of low pressure. that could settle things down. initially, it could start off fairly cool. despite there being high—pressure and more sunshine, perhaps a little bit warmer moving in as well. so, if high pressure builds and it's likely now, it will settle down, turning dry and we should see more sunshine, it will get warmer, temperatures a few degrees above the seasonal normal. join me tomorrow for another weather for the week ahead.
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the decision to advise her majesty to prorogue parliament was unlawful, because it had the effect of frustrating or preventing the ability of parliament to carry out its constitutional functions without reasonable justification. tonight at ten, the highest court in the land delivers a crushing defeat for boris johnson and his decision to suspend parliament. 11 justices of the uk supreme court ruled unanimously that his decision was designed to prevent parliament from doing itsjob in the run—up to the brexit deadline. the effect on the fundamentals of our democracy was extreme. outside court, there was jubilation among supporters

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