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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 25, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning from westminster withjon kay. the house of commons‘ doors will re—open today after the dramatic supreme court ruling that the prime minister's suspension of parliament was unlawful. borisjohnson has cut short his trip to the un and he's flying back now to face mps, but has rejected calls for his resignation. i have the highest respect of course for ourjudiciary and for the independence of our courts but i must say, i strongly disagree with thisjudgement.
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and this is louise minchin in the studio, also this morning president trump is facing an impeachment inquiry over allegations he tried to get the ukrainian government to dig up dirt on one of his political rivals. inmates take over a wing of long lartin prison after attacking prison guards. more questions for thomas cook. the company's pension scheme is now under scrutiny — over fears staff could receive far less than expected when they retire. a huge upset in the league cup as tottenham are beaten on penalties by the league two side colchester united, in what is the biggest shock of spurs boss mauricio pochttino‘s career. good morning. after yesterday's torrential rain, we still have some rain to clear the east. the wind will drop and then we are in for a day of sunshine and showers before more rain comes in from the west later. maureen ten minutes. it's wednesday september 25th. we're live from westminster
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where mps are returning to work this morning. it follows that dramatic and historic ruling by the supreme court — that borisjohnson‘s decision to suspend parliament for five weeks was unlawful. the prime minister said he profoundly disagreed with thejudges — but would respect their decision. a senior government official said borisjohnson spoke to the queen after the ruling, but would not reveal any details of their conversation. our political correspondent jessica parker has been following events. parliament is opening up again. the media ten are making a return, westminster coming back to life. media ten are making a return, westminster coming back to lifem wasn't his plan... i have the highest respect of course for our judiciary and the independence of oui’ judiciary and the independence of our courts but i must say, i strongly disagree with this judgement. and, in the end, it wasn't his call. the decision to
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advise her majesty to prorogue parliament was unlawful. after the supreme court ruled that suspending parliament was unlawful. so mps are coming back to this place. now what? wings are pretty changeable but you can expect, as the commons chamber reopens for business, that there will be efforts to lob some difficult questions of this covenant and put boris johnson difficult questions of this covenant and put borisjohnson under intense pressure. however it appears the opposition may refrain from trying to bring down the government and trigger an election right away but mps who felt silenced are ready to make some noise. parliament has to exert now its authority, it has to be brave and bold and the prime minister has to reach out because there isn't any other way across the aisle to seek a compromise. have you embarrassed the queen? borisjohnson is resisting calls to resign but
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returning to westminster today, he will have to face the music. jessica parker, bbc news. i'm joined now by our political correspondent chris mason for more on this. good morning. he is flying home, he's going to face mps, and then what? it will be another fruity day at westminster. jessica was saying it is changeable, the odd scoop of british understatement in that. we will get a resumption of where we we re will get a resumption of where we were a couple of weeks ago. remember those chaotic scenes at one in the morning? people opposed to this suspension, this prorogation, which now never happened. the common speakerjohn bercow was even wearing the same tie he was wearing on the night parliament was suspended. we will hear from the leader of the house, jacob breeze rees—mogg. in a phone call, he described what
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happened as a constitutional coup so there are some within government to feel the judges have frankly gone too far. the question then will be what kind of rhetorical grenades are thrown by the opposition parties. i suspect you can expect plenty of really awkward questions. but does anything does anything actually change? we had days of huge import in jeopardy change? we had days of huge import injeopardy and change? we had days of huge import in jeopardy and noise change? we had days of huge import injeopardy and noise but change? we had days of huge import in jeopardy and noise but not that much has changed. i wonder if the last 2a hours might fall into that category. the prime minister will be going to the eu at the end of next month and parliament does not want that to happen. we could even get a queen's speech and we could even have another proroguing. we would need a queen's speech because that is the way you get one. if the proroguing was short within the confines of what the court says is
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legitimate, but you don't want to do it straightaway? bubbly not. there isa it straightaway? bubbly not. there is a party conference meant to be starting on saturday. parliament is in recess for such comp is. i can't see it anywhere here. this fruity morning in westminster, thank you, chris. we can go now to louise who's back in the studio in salford for the rest of today's news. democrats in the us congress have announced a formal impeachment inquiry into president trump. mr trump is accused of violating the constitution and betraying his oath of office over allegations he sought help from a foreign power to damage a political rival. mr trump has called the claims "garbage". our north america editor jon sopel has more. new york in september, when the leadership of the world
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converges on the un to speak, but one conversation is causing donald trump extreme difficulty and the heat is intensifying. injuly, he phoned the newly elected ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky and it's alleged donald trump demanded an investigation into his democratic presidential rivaljoe biden and his son's business dealings in the country as the price for receiving us military aid. no dirt, no aid is the suggestion. the president denies wrongdoing but his account of the call has changed continually as the questions have piled up. i think it's ridiculous, it's a witch—hunt. i'm leading in the polls, they have no idea how to stop me, the only way they can try is through impeachment. this has never happen to a president before, there has never been a thing like this before, it's nonsense and when you see the call, when you see the readout of the call which i assume you will see at some point, you will understand. that call was perfect. joe biden is the democratic
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party frontrunner. he is leading donald trump in the polls and says the president this time has gone too far. the president does not comply with such a request from the congress, he continues to obstruct congress and flout the law. donald trump will leave congress, in my view, no choice but to initiate impeachment. that would be a tragedy, but a tragedy of his own making. with the pressure is on donald trump, he's said he will declassify the phone call and release the full transcript but too little, too late. it won't be enough to stop the democrats pressing the nuclear button and pushing for impeachment. scientists have been meeting in monaco to finalise and publish a report on the effect of rising temperatures on the world's oceans. the report, set to be published later today by the intergovernmental panel on climate change, is expected to warn that hundreds of millions of people could be threatened by rising sea levels before the end of this century. prisoners at long lartin jail in worcestershire have taken over
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a wing of the building after a disturbance . a prison guard was injured after staff were attacked with pool balls. specialist officers have been deployed to the jail which holds more than 500 of the country's most "dangerous and serious" offenders. one of northern ireland's biggest manufacturing firms is expected to go into administration today. wrightbus, which is based in county antrim, employs around 1,400 people. it's suffering from cashflow problems and has been looking for investment or a new owner. the spanish tenor placido domingo has withdrawn from all future performances at the metropolitan opera in new york. he's been accused of sexual harrassment by several women, which he denies. in a statement, the singer, who's 78, said he was concerned his presence on stage would have distracted from his colleagues' work. council charges for collecting garden waste are deterring some people from recycling, according to environmental campaigners. analysis by the bbc found that while one in four local authorities provide a free service,
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some charge up to a £100 a year for kerbside colllection. but councils say the service is not statutory and home composting is a cheaper alternative. the largest collection of pink diamonds in the world is heading to auction in london, where they could fetch up to £100—million pounds. the mine in australia, which produces virtually the entire world supply of the precious stones, has depleted and is set to close next year after 37 years of production. this will make pink diamonds the most sought after gem in the world. sally is here. sorry, a little bit distracted. my goodness. i got a brilliant story for you this morning, certainly if you are a colchester united fan. just look at the joy. colchester united last night beat spurs. big fancy
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fantastic spas. that's colchester united who beat them on penalties last night stop a terrible night for spurs fans. it was goalless after 90 minutes, so on to penalties it went and it was the league two side who held their nerve. tottenham boss mauricio pochettino says he needs time to overcome the "different agendas in the squad". the rest of the night's results are on the bbc website and app. we're not ranging ——we are not running pictures of it because we don't have the rights. wembley stadium's going to host the 2023 champions league final the original empire stadium opened in 1923. andy murray won his first match at tour level since january, beating tennys sangren at the zhuhai championships in china. continuing his comeback from hip surgery, murray beat the american over three sets .
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have a look at these awful conditions. 0rganisers were criticised for not cancelling the under 23 men's individual time trial at the road world championships in harrogate . denmark's johan price—pejtersen came off his bike in torrential rain. he was able to continue, hungary's attila valter was also caught out. he got back on to finish 28th, but headed straight for hospital after crossing the finish line. mikkel berg won the time—trial. being cyclists, they get up and carry on mostly. it will be interesting to see what the forecast is like. it was horrendous. heavy rain has led to flood warnings across england, with more areas being told to prepare for possible problems later today. in london the rainfall affected commuters and flooding was also reported on roads in southampton, birmingham, and liverpool. carol's here to tell us more. lots going on for people and it
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looks like it's not going to be good today. there is some rain in the forecast this morning but we will see a slight improvement, certainly compared to yesterday but to be fair, that wouldn't be difficult. we mentioned london in the introduction. we had almost 22 millimetres of rainfall in just one hour. the highest rainfall totals we had, 59.4 hour. the highest rainfall totals we had, 59.1; millimetres in boscombe down in wiltshire. that is almost bang on the amount we would expect for the whole of the month of september. all we have is the rain in the east. the wind that is quite gusty at the moment. this is the culprit that brought the rain yesterday. we can see how we still have the package about front to clear away. when it does, things
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quietened down for a time. introducing thicker cloud, rain and strengthening wins. some of us in parts of southern england, parts of the midlands in north—east england, as that goes, it will brighten up, at times a bit of cloud around and we will see sunny skies and a few showers breaking out in a few of those we heavy and thundery. through the afternoon, we start to see the cloud can in northern ireland, south—west wales and england and then some rain coming our way. through the evening and overnight, the rain will continue to push through the west and east, eradicating the dry start to the evening. behind it, stilla eradicating the dry start to the evening. behind it, still a few showers around. with all this going on, it means it's not going to be a cold night. most of us staying in double figures. northern ireland, temperatures might be a bit lower. today, mist and fog around in
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places, north—east scotland and northern ireland, tomorrow morning, with more of a breeze, we shouldn't have that as an issue. as we go through the course of wednesday evening into thursday, you can see how the weather front does continue to push away, heading off into the north sea. the remnants of that front, those fronts, moving away as we go through thursday morning stop taking time to clear the far north—east of scotland and behind it, once again, a day of bright spells, sunshine and showers but quite blustery winds. 12 in the north, 19 in the south. another system coming in from the rest will bring in some showers. some of those merging to give longer spells of rain at times on fridays going be quite a windy day across england and also wales. notjust around the coasts but also inland. again, something you will notice. temperatures coming down, 12—17. the
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output remains unsettled. rain or showers at times but writer spells. look at the trend of those temperatures. as we head towards next week, they are on the slide. thank you. let's take a look at today's papers. there's one story on all of the front pages today. the guardian says borisjohnson has misled the queen, the people and parliament after the suspension of parliament was deemed unlawful. "pm flies back to chaos" is the headline in the times, as mrjohnson prepares to head back to london from a united nations summit in new york. the daily mail says the prime minister has declared war on thejudiciary, asking "who runs britain?" it claims jacob rees mogg, the leader of the commons, has described it as a constitutional coup. and the mirror compares borisjohnson to some of the shortest serving prime ministers, suggesting he will soon join their ranks after what they describe as a shambolic and disastrous term the latest developments in the supreme court are not
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the only thing grabbing people's interest, twitter has became obsessed with lady hale's brooches. she's the court president who announced the judgement yesterday wearing this spider brooch. and it would appear lady hale has a track record for sharp jewellery. actually i think it's a different one. lots of people talking about this. among a dozen different brooches she's been seen wearing, there's been a centipede and a frog. it was quite a brooch, wasn't it? we will talk about the implications... i love it! i think it was a different one. a different spider. i don't know which one it was but i imagine people do know, have said and it can be told to me. a big one! the implications of what happened at the supreme court will be the main focus of our programme this morning and jon is at westminster with lots
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of people talking to us through the programme. shall we have a break? i wa nt programme. shall we have a break? i want to talk about thomas cook, it's been the big story. the dust settles on getting people back and big questions about the future of staff, the nearly 9000, and the role of the auditors, why didn't they spot the problem earlier? this is the front of the telegraph business sector. it had debts, you may remember, of {1.6 billion so how was it allowed to get into that state? that's the big question. later we will talk about the company's pension fund because this morning big questions over whether staff at the firm will get out what they expected when they come to retire. the big picture is of adam newman, the founder of wework, the global chain of serviced office space. it's been the darling office space. it's been the darling of the stock market, or wanted to be, with some crazy valuations on its stock market listing, $47
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billion, but it hasn't yet made a profit, in fact making a huge loss. it has been slashed. he will step down but remain as chairman stop the big concern in the united states about whether this company can make money. very interesting. sally? lots of your... all of the papers picking up of your... all of the papers picking up on the tracey neville interview yesterday? yes, she was so honest, andi yesterday? yes, she was so honest, and i love about the factory was so matter—of—fact and really positive and she said she didn't want it to bea and she said she didn't want it to be a sob story or for anyone to feel sorry for you, she was just really honest in telling her version of events and lots of women have responded in a positive way because we can all relate to that. it was great. in lots of the papers today. in the times, rumours of an england legends football team. i won't dwell on this for too long, but there's talk of a european championship for
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basically retired former footballers. i think that's brilliant. isn't that amazing? you could have paul scholes, david beckham and steven gerrard. it's happening! is it really? coming out of retirement to keep playing. it would be for charity.|j of retirement to keep playing. it would be for charity. i would love to that. this is in the daily telegraph today in their sports section, the rugby world cup, japan playing ireland this weekend and at the press conference yesterday, the japanese coach was asked about preparations, a throwaway question, and it transpires that in order to get pumped up for their rugby world cup match, i listen to a particular piece of music, an unlikely one, the backstreet boys, i want it that way. in the telegraph, they have put the words in. how do they go? i'm your fire, you're one desire, yes, i know it's too late but i want it that
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way! isn't that great? i love using it, sally! they have listed other songs that have got teams ready for big games. no—one else admitting to loving the backstreet boys! one from the inside pages, a judge at a court in germany is ruled a hangover is actually an illness, which people might like. this is an interesting story, north sea coast is off the menu at fish and chip shops. stocks have halved in two years according to the marine stewardship council. it was thought that cod stocks were in good health but new advice setting international standards from them paints a different picture. the figure was 180,000 tons, now the revised figure for stocks of cod in the northsea is 81,000 tons. we have to be more adventurous when ordering fish and chips. may be something like pollock, hake, whiting, something different. thanks for
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keeping me company! we can go back now tojon kay who's live in westminster for us this morning as politicians head back to work after yesterday's historicjudgement. morning, jon. i would love to be able to hold up some newspapers for you here but they would disintegrate and get very 5°99)” they would disintegrate and get very soggy, because it is pouring down yet again in westminster. look at that! not a great start to the new term, or the resumed term, as mps get back here. as louise has been saying, mps back here after that historicjudgement that saying, mps back here after that historic judgement that said rogaine parliament never really happened and what boris johnson parliament never really happened and what borisjohnson chose to do a couple of weeks ago was unlawful —— rogaine parliament. here to explain arejoelle grogan, a lecturer in constitutional law, and maddy thimont jack, from the independent think tank institute for government feels like we are on a horrible camping holiday in our little tent! we hearjacob rees—mogg described
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the decision by the supreme court yesterday as a constitutional coup. is he right? that is an unusual statement but very simply what happened yesterday was the supreme court doing theirjob to tell parliament to do theirjob and you also say government powers are limited in theirjob. we don't really have a constitutional coup when we have the court, the supreme court, saying in a unanimous judgement of 11 judges, "here are two foundational principles of our legal system, parliamentary sovereignty and parliamentary accountability". that's not a constitutional coop, that is constitutional coop, that is constitutional fact. what does this change, not just with constitutional fact. what does this change, notjust with brexit now but in the years and decades to come? this is the biggest statement of constitutional law in the country we have had... almost even bigger than the miller decision three years ago. we have a clear statement from the courts saying firstly whether our legal —— where there are legal
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powers of government, they are limited and can't be used for any purpose and these legal powers to and can be supervised by the courts and can be supervised by the courts and the courts will look at them and say, do you have reasonable justification for this, where you have powers that can frustrate, undermine or stop the democratic will of parliament. mps come back, proroguing never happened, they get on with business, what are they going to do with this extra time? it's a really good question. looking at the order paper today, the answer isn't very much at this stage, it's empty because we haven't had prime minister's questions, as we would expect and there is basically an option for mps to have urgent questions or emergency debates but today, not very much. going forward, it's a bit more uncertain. from the prime minister's perspective, we know he still wants to have an early election and he might try again to have a vote on that, expecting to be
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u nsuccessful. have a vote on that, expecting to be unsuccessful. there's suggestion they might hold a vote on a short recess for the conservative party conference. in terms of backbenchers, firstly while they we re backbenchers, firstly while they were prorogued, the government published the yellowhammer contingency planning for no—deal document, so mps can ask follow—up questions for that and scrutinise government ministers. and johnson prorogued parliament before appearing before the liaison committee, all the chairs of the select committees in the house of commons, so we can expect a session with him shortly. stuff to get their teeth into but in terms of brexit and what happens with brexit, it is hard to see how anything has really changed despite the momentous decision in the court? exactly, i agree. the momentous decision in the court? exactly, iagree. i don't the momentous decision in the court? exactly, i agree. i don't think much has changed. they passed the bill they wanted to pass to take no—deal of the table before prorogation on the 31st of october and the decision to prorogue might have sped things
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through. johnson still wants to get a deal, so he doesn't have to ask foran a deal, so he doesn't have to ask for an extension, so that will be ongoing. the biggest thing parliament can do is scrutinise what the government is doing both in preparing for no—deal and in negotiations. it will be interesting to if they concerned about what johnson has been saying about the fa ct johnson has been saying about the fact there are loopholes in the benn act and whether they will legislate to shore it up. this is the act to stop him having a no—deal, and he would have to come back to parliament to extend ? would have to come back to parliament to extend? don 's and has consistently said we will refuse to ask for an extension and there's suggestion about getting round it, and mps will try to legislate to shore up the benn act —— boris johnson has consistently. many things has changed but in many ways nothing has changed. we will get our heads around it through the morning. we have lots of guests on
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brea kfast morning. we have lots of guests on breakfast from all sides of the debate to talk about what they will do and how they will use the extra time as mps get here this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. victims of modern slavery are being left without the help they need, because of the difficulties they face accessing government support, that's according to campaign group voice of domestic workers. they say many are scared to come forward often because of the threat to deportation. new guidelines introduced in 2015 did allow more people to be referred as victims of slavery. police are investigating two fatal stabbings in west london yesterday. one man was stabbed to death during a fight on the platform of hillingdon tube station at around 4pm. a second died a few hours later near ealing common. one of only a few people to have received a leg amputation on the nhs for a neurological condition has spoken of her relief of being able to have
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the procedure carried out. 21—year—old helena stone from islington developed complex regional pain syndrome after a minor kayaking accident, a condition where the patient feels pain in a limb for no obvious reason. i was desperate stop the i was crying. i was in tears and i couldn't leave my bed and i was watching my friends go through university, they were travelling and graduating and then i thought i can't do this for 60 plus years, but i knew it was against the guidelines, so i wasn't going to openly ask for it until i was absolutely certain that's what i wa nted absolutely certain that's what i wanted to do. let's take a look at the travel situation now. a look at the tube now. severe delays out of stratford. no problems on the train network,
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though. but on the roads, this is the a4 piccadilly underpass. it remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs. and in the city, new bridge street is closed southbound from ludgate circus to queen victoria street, also for gas main repairs. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. some pretty intense rainfall around yesterday and today it's not looking quite so bad but there's also some wet weather, notably this morning, thenit wet weather, notably this morning, then it will turn drier into the afternoon. it's also rather blustery with a brisk south—westerly wind. it's a mild, rather murky and also wet start to the day. we'll see outbreaks through the morning rush—hour. that's all pushing east. plenty of cloud around, possibly one or two lighter showers falling from the thickness of the cloud but the cloud will break up into the afternoon and we should get brighter spells of sunshine with top temperatures of 19 or 20, and the wind will start to ease down to two through the afternoon. still watch
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out for one or two showers, can't rule them out totally. through the evening and overnight the cloud will thicken from the west with another weather front coming through, a thicken from the west with another weatherfront coming through, a mild night ahead but a wet start to the day with poor visibility and lows between 14—15. tomorrow it is windy again, sunny spells, lots of dry weather but showers and unsettled for the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now it's back tojon in westminster and louise in the studio. see you soon. plasma grade hello, this is breakfast withjon kay in westminster and louise minchin in salford. it's pouring down so we should probably call it wet—minster. it's the day when mps return to work after that supreme court ruling that boris johnson's
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after that supreme court ruling that borisjohnson's suspension of parliament was unlawful. the prime minister said he profoundly disagreed with thatjudgement but that he would respect the decision. a senior government official has told us that borisjohnson spoke to the queen but wouldn't reveal any details of the conversation. this is a verdict we will respect and we respect the judicial process. i have to say i strongly disagree with what the justices have found. to say i strongly disagree with what thejustices have found. i don't agree that it's right but we will go ahead. i think there is a good case for getting on with a queen's speech a nyway for getting on with a queen's speech anyway and we will do that. but the important thing is we get on and deliver brexit on october 31. the claimants in this case —— case are determined to frustrate that in strands stop that. it would be u nfortu nate if strands stop that. it would be unfortunate if parliament made that objective, which is what the people
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want, to deliver it, and we will get on. he is flying home to westminster. but this doesn't affect just the parliament in the course —— the courts, it affects all of us.|j went to swindon to find out what people voted on. we were given the opportunity to vote for what we want and whatever we vote for, appears to not happen. you think exit is being blocked? yes, i do. they seem to have all forgotten that they act for us and they are acting for themselves. forgotten that they act for us and they are acting for themselveslj think they are acting for themselves.” think you should resign. absolutely, no question of a doubt, he should resign. he's a dictator. boris is boris so boris will carry on, that's boris. it leaves him as the prime minister and he will stay as the prime minister and i think people
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feel at the moment is the best of a bad bunch. i don't really want to vote anymore. i don't know who to go for, i don't know i can trust stop it's all a bit of a mess, really. it is not really any solid party. they've all fallen out with each other in the party. it's like, can we go with, who's going to be suitable? we go with, who's going to be suitable ? we we go with, who's going to be suitable? we just don't know. i'm joined now by our political correspondent chris mason for more on this. borisjohnson boris johnson returns borisjohnson returns but no prime minister ‘s questions. boris johnson repatriated back to the uk. leaving new york early, coming back to face the music here. no prime minister questions, the pause button has been lifted, nothing really stopped in theory but they decided they won't be pmq. there will be plenty of other stuff. we will hear from jacob rees—mogg, he said he was told there
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isa rees—mogg, he said he was told there is a conference call, and what happened in the court up the road was a constitutional coup surreal angerfrom some was a constitutional coup surreal anger from some in was a constitutional coup surreal angerfrom some in government was a constitutional coup surreal anger from some in government about the action of the judges. as has often been the case, it never rains, but it pours. it's been another one of those days of huge noise, in jeopardy worth reflecting that some of the fundamentals remain as they've always been. the government wa nts they've always been. the government wants us to leave the european union at the end of next month. plenty of people in there simply don't. chris mason, thank you. that is it from 5°99y mason, thank you. that is it from soggy westminster for now. let's go back to louise in salford. back with you throughout the programme this morning. lots of politicians to speak to morning. lots of politicians to speakto an morning. lots of politicians to speak to an analysis of what it all means. democrats in the us congress have announced a formal impeachment inquiry into president trump. mr trump is accused of violating the constitution and betraying his
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oath of office over allegations he sought help from a foreign power to damage a political rival. mr trump has called the claims "garbage". look, it's just a look, it'sjust a continuation look, it's just a continuation of the witch—hunt. it's the worst witch—hunt in political history. we have the strongest economy have ever had, the best unemployment numbers with ever had. one of northern ireland's biggest manufacturing firms is expected to go into administration today. wrightbus, which is based in county antrim, employs around 1,400 people. it's suffering from cashflow problems and has been looking for investment or a new owner. the spanish tenor, placido domingo, has withdrawn from all future performances at the metropolitan opera in new york. he's been accused of sexual harrassment by several women, which he denies. in a statement, the singer, who's 78, said he was concerned his the spanish tenor, placido domingo, has withdrawn from all future performances
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at the metropolitan opera the duke and duchess of sussex and their four—month—old son archie are continuing their tour of southern africa — their first official tour as a family. the couple visited the country's oldest mosque as part of their ten day tour. during the trip, prince harry will also visit malawi, botswana and angola, where he'll highlight his mother's work to tackle landmines. you are right up—to—date with all the latest news. sally, you got an item early in sport. a great story, great thing to talk about, particularly after some penalty shootout drama. colchester united players, that is the moment they knew they had beaten spurs in a brilliant night for colchester. it really was a big upset. it was nil—nil after 90 minutes, and it was the league two side who held the nerve on penalties. the spurs boss mauricio pochettino had this to say.
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it's not so positive, we need to stick altogether and be strong and try to give analysis and try to find a solution. that defeat for spurs extends what is an awful run for them. since mid—february they've played 26 matches, lost 0ne, eight, just eight games. they somehow managed to get to a champions league final. the reason we're not showing penalties is we don't have the rights to those penalties. forfans don't have the rights to those penalties. for fans at home, don't have the rights to those penalties. forfans at home, i am really sorry. we are showing you absolutely everything we can. lots of other fixtures. a big shock in the efl cup last night. premier league giants
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tottenham hotspur were knocked out in the third round by colchester united. goalless at full time, the league two side won on penalties. elsewhere southampton beat bitter rivals portsmouth 4—0 at fratton park. the league one side began the stronger but were two—nil down by half—time thanks to goals from danny ings. for all the results go to teh bbc sport website. wembley will host the 2023 men's champions league final. it's going to be held during wembley‘s centenary year, with the original empire stadium having opened in april 1923. it's also been confirmed that windsor park in belfast will host the 2021 super cup final. andy murray has won his first match at tour level since january, beating tennys sangren at the zhuhai championships in china. continuing his comeback from hip surgery the former world number one took the first set before the american levellled the match. murray says this was, in many ways, one of the best performances of his career given where he's coming back from. he'll play australian alex de minaur in the second round. 0ne game already underway at the rugby weorld cup this morning as fiji play uruguay. xx mins gone, the score is xx.
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0h england meanwhile have named their side for their second match of the tournament. they play the usa tomorrow, and head coach eddiejones has made 10 changes to the team that beat tonga. he also wants to get points on the scoreboard quickly against the americans. we wa nt we want a fast start against the usa, we deliberately roped the diaper bit against tonga, let them play for the first 20 minutes and our intention was to come home strong against usa. we want to take a different approach, take them at the start of the game, go out pretty hard, attacked them a bit more and see where it leads us. nigel benn is returning to boxing, and is the "fittest 55—year—old on planet earth" according to his promoter. the former world champion has not fought professionally since 1996 but will resume his career in november. the british boxing board of control is against the fight, which will be sanctioned by the british and irish boxing authority. benn is expected to fight the 40 year old former world champion
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sakio bika. and stand by for some traditional yorkshire weather at the road world championships in harrogate. this is furing the men's under 23's time trial race — the huge amounyts of standing water causing denmark's johan price—pejtersen to come off his bike. he was ok and able to continue. he wasn't the only one having problems — incidents all over the course. 0rganisers have been criticised for allowing the race to go ahead in the first place. cani can ijust can i just say, can ijust say, that looks bonkers. would you race in that weather? would you race in that weather? would you race in that weather? would you want to? you know me, sally. probably. with trepidation. i was watching quite a lot of it yesterday, the weather was appalling. chris bormann making the point that cyclists cycle in that kind of weather a lot. day in, day out. we'll talk about that as well and safety. it's really exciting.
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band fantastic. one story really dominating the news today, what happened in the supreme court yesterday. we've sentjohn to westminster to get the in—depth analysis of what it all means. good morning. a lot of cyclists will be looking out the window and thinking, goodness me, the roads look dangerous. we've had a downpourfrom the skies and a political constitutional downpour as well in the last 24 hours. we thought we would stand back and try to take stock and ask what are the constitutional and political ramifications of that ruling in the high court yesterday. a ruling which said the prime minister, boris johnson acted unlawfully, that he shouldn't have shut down parliament and that's why mps are hiding back here today. our reporter graham satchel has been taking a look at all of this.
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this is an extraordinary moment, a huge moment in british constitutional history. historians in the future are going to look back and discuss this and infinitum because it lays down very clearly that parliament is sovereign. because every time we have had a debate between who is sovereign, is it the monarch or the prime minister or parliament, parliament always wins. parliament is sovereign, suspending it was illegal and boris johnson gave unlawful advice to the queen. the verdict of the supreme court was clear and devastating. some also believe it will have a dramatic impact on the future relationship between prime minister and monarch. traditionally, the queen relied on the prime minister ‘s advice and we now know for the future, for the queen, for the monarchs that follow, that if it comes down to a choice between what parliament wants and the prime minister wants, it turns to parliament and therefore at some stage, the queen or any other
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monarch is now empowered to ignore the advice of the prime minister if he or she feels it is not commensurate with what parliament wa nts. commensurate with what parliament wants. throughout history, suspending parliament for long periods is never really work. we go right from the magna carta right up to what is seen as the most celebrated moment of prorogation which is when charles i propagated parliament because he didn't get what he wanted out of mps or taxes, and caused such a great controversy that pitched britain into a civil war. and took his head off. and charles i was executed eventually for proroguing parliament. that won't happen to the current prime minister but outside the supreme court, the anger is clear. there are those metaphorically calling for mr johnson's head. if the prime minister had any principles or integrity he would resign but i don't expect that to happen, frankly. the elephant in the room
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here is brexit. 0fficially frankly. the elephant in the room here is brexit. officially the referendum was advisory but the question for some is this. in practice, did parliament give away its sovereignty to the people wanted its sovereignty to the people wanted it called the referendum? the people spoken they made theirjudgement that we have a political class, we have a ruling class which i include thejudges here that have a ruling class which i include the judges here that decided they would thwart that result at every turn. the issues at stake could not be more fundamental. the sovereignty of parliament, the will of the people, the rule of law. as graham explained, thejudges made clear this wasn't a decision about brexit and yet it has great implications for brexit. let's find out what both people's sides think. joining us now is femi 0luwole, a remain campaigner from our future 0ur choice, and steven edginton who's a former staff member for the leave means leave campaign. good morning to both of you. i
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wonder weather you can initially sum up wonder weather you can initially sum up where you were and what you thought when you got this supreme court ruling yesterday. stephen? i wa nt to court ruling yesterday. stephen? i want to congratulate femi on this huge win for remainers, this is a huge win for remainers, this is a huge moment for them and yet again they have one on process to try to stop brexit but this is a huge victory for brexiteers and boris johnson because it shows how far the establishment are willing to go. this will come back to bite people like remainers and femi, these are unelected judges and they've made another decision to overturn the will of the people. femi? if the courts had done anything other than declaring the shutting down of parliament unlawful it would set a precedent where all future prime ministers will be able to shutdown a directly elected sovereign parliament whenever it got in the way, creating a dictatorship. the idea of questioning the legitimacy ofjudgements idea of questioning the legitimacy of judgements is —— judges
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idea of questioning the legitimacy ofjudgements is —— judges is worrying and dangerous. what is worrying and dangerous. what is worrying about saying our elected prime minister is a dictator is bad. he was... remainers like to use language like a croup or a dictatorship and we have an elected parliament. we've had a democratic referendum in 2016 and my view is that should be enacted, that's a moderate, democratic view and people on the other side think we should overturn the referendum and they wa nt to overturn the referendum and they want to use every means possible, whether the establishment, the civil service, the ports, the media or the speaker, breaking precedent, they are using every trick in the book to overturn the will of the people. femi, what do you make of this argument, you might have won the battle in the supreme court is wading thejudges but battle in the supreme court is wading the judges but you battle in the supreme court is wading thejudges but you might still lose the war, brexit might still lose the war, brexit might still happen and it might have helped boris johnson still happen and it might have helped borisjohnson in the long—term? helped borisjohnson in the long-term? let's not forget, this idea you need to get brexit done...
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what stephen is pushing for is a no—deal brexit, that is what boris johnson try to shutdown parliament to achieve. he says he wants a deal. he says that but he's not arguing for it and the eu hasn't received any proposals, he is biding his time hoping we crash out on october the sist. hoping we crash out on october the 31st. as with no—deal, you are a former leave means leave person, leave means leave put out graphics saying 69% of leave voters want a no—deal, 69% of 52% is a minority. with democratic legitimacy, in the 2017 general election, the only opportunity we have had to say what kind of brexit we would want, 40% voted for parties whose manifesto is ruled out no—deal, so that would be undemocratic to leave the eu without a deal. have you been out out manoeuvred by remain, have you lost it in the last couple of weeks?
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looking at remainers in parliament they refused to go to a general election because they don't want to be voted out by people who don't wa nt to be voted out by people who don't want to carry on brexit. look at what femi is saying, every chance british people have had to vote for brexit they have done so. in 2015 we voted for david cameron, who voted for a referendum. 2017, 80% of people voted for parties who wanted brexit. this year the brexit party won the european elections by a landslide. every opportunity we've had has been to vote for brexit, and you can see why remainers like femi and people in parliament are terrified of a general election. and people in parliament are terrified of a general electionm we leave the eu with a deal we have negotiated, will you be happy? yes or no? i don't agree with the deal theresa may did. i don't agree with it. many brexit vote as will be angry with theresa may... that means
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there's versions of brexit that don't have majority support. as i said, if that's the case, the only opportunity we've had to say what kind of brexit we would all wouldn't acce pt kind of brexit we would all wouldn't accept is a general election with a majority... the election is always talked about. the majority voted for parties who specifically said in their manifestoes we won't take us out of the eu without a deal. we wa nt out of the eu without a deal. we want return to this at some point in the future. thanks for that. unanimity among the judges yesterday at the supreme courtjustice up there a short walk from parliament, but clearly nothing unanimous on the two sides as far as brexit is concerned —— just up there. i can tell you without any doubt it is very wet in westminster, carol? it is, and notjust in westminster ‘s. we have the remnants of yesterday's rain yet to clear the east. it will, gusty winds around us, especially around the coastlines
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and the winds will ease, followed by sunshine and showers and a few will be heavy. yesterday evening you can see the rain and thunderstorms that pushed across the uk. this morning we've got rain moving from the west to the east, heavy rain currently around for example london and through kent, the wash wash, the north midlands and north—east england and that's courtesy of this front, which will take to around lunchtime before clearing completely into the north sea and later, the next array of fronts come our way. as the rain continues to push away, clearing canned by lunch, skies brighton and this means there will be areas of cloud. scattered showers across scotland. one or two in england and wales could be heavy, possibly thundery. in northern ireland, after a few showers and a fair bit of sunshine, the cloud will thicken from the west introducing rain and that cloud thickening in
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south—west england and south—west wales, heralding the arrival of the weather fronts. temperatures, 13—19 north to south. through this evening and overnight, we start on a mostly dry note in the east but all those fronts coming in from the west will bear rain. blustery winds pushing steadily eastwards. this morning we've got fog in north—east scotland and northern ireland and what you will find tonight ‘s there will be too much of a breeze around, so we shouldn't have any issues with that and it will be a mild night. tomorrow we see the rain clearing into the north sea, takes a wee bit longer to clear the far east of scotland. drier and brighter behind, but still some showers around and some of those again will be heavy. a blustery day with temperatures ranging from 12—19. by friday, more fronts coming our way. they will bring in some showery outbreaks of rain and at times they will merge to give longer spells of rain as they too push towards the east. in
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between, though, bright skies and indeed sunshine. windy and noticeably so across england and wales, especially around the coasts. less so in northern ireland and scotland. note those temperatures, they are starting to slip, and that's a trend we are looking at into next week. ok, we will watch them slide. thanks, carol, see you later. more questions for the bosses of thomas cook today over the state of the company's pension scheme. ben is taking a look. such a worrying times for everybody who has worked for them, and presumably this adds to those? 9000 staff in the uk and big questions about what they will do next, finding anotherjob about what they will do next, finding another job if about what they will do next, finding anotherjob if they can but now questions about the pension fund and whether they will get out what they paid in at the end of it. thanks very much. as the emergency flights continue to bring back stranded holiday makers, there's now a focus on just what went wrong at thomas cook and the thousands of workers who lost their jobs. and today, there are big questions about their pensions too.
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let me run you through what we know. the company had four final salary pension schemes, with around 13,000 members. some were already getting their pension, but most still paying in, since they hadn't reached pension age. the scheme was thought to be in surplus, that's to say, pretty well funded. so far, so good. but the pension protection fund, the industry lifeboat, is now looking into it. sara protheroe is the chief customer officer for the ppf. seesin sees in our studios in central london. good morning. as i said, in surplus, it's rare we are talking about a pension fund that has a surplus and not a big deficit. that sounds like good news on the face of it? i very much hope so. the really important thing is to remember that members will be fully protected by the ppf should our protection be needed. the evidence so far is, as
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you say, these schemes are reasonably well funded and they will enter a ppf assessment period, which typically ta kes enter a ppf assessment period, which typically takes about 18 months and during that time the current... will be fully established and we will work out what happens next. but whatever happens, schemes only tra nsfer to whatever happens, schemes only transfer to the ppf if they receive more generous levels of benefit from us than they would otherwise buy from an insurer. it will always be the best outcome for members. give us the options, clearly quite unsettling times for staff looking for anotherjob. they unsettling times for staff looking for another job. they will unsettling times for staff looking for anotherjob. they will have concerns if a scheme is closed there are no new people paying in, no new money, so that causes its own problems. could this be sold to someone else who could safeguard it? that's always a possibility. the assets of the pension scheme are incensed, fully secure for the benefit of members and the ppf itself is extremely well funded with
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£32 billion in assets, including £6.1 billion in reserves. if our protection is needed we will be more than ready to support the members of the thomas cook pensions schemes. reassurance for them but i want to get to the bottom of what they should do next, because clearly 9000 staff and not all of them in the scheme, of course, but nonetheless 9000 staff with a very uncertain future. do they need to be worried here? they don't, absolutely not. their pensions are fully protected by the ppf. the trustees of the pension schemes wrote to members yesterday, so those letters should be landing in the next couple of days and they will give more details about ppf compensation with a website members can look at to find out more. we are very keen along with the trustees to make sure members feel fully reassured. a word on people close to the retirement age. you say your review will take up to 18 months, what about people about to retire? for those about to retire, things
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will continue as they did before very much. they will be able to retire as planned. the benefits they receive will be at ppf levels, which for those under 60 in these schemes typically, will be 90% of what they previously expected. good to speak to you, sara, sarah protheroe, chief customers officer at the pension protection fund, we are grateful for your time. at the pension protection fund, we are gratefulfor your time. good news coming out of the chaos from the thomas cook collapse. flights for people on holiday back to the uk, another successful day yesterday getting people back stop the investigation into the pension fund and also the role the regulators had —— getting people back. more from me after 7am. more also about the supreme court
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ruling on boris johnson's prorogation of parliament. we will speak to prorogation of parliament. we will speakto gina prorogation of parliament. we will speak to gina miller, she led that challenge of the suspension of parliament. we will speak to her in about ten minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. ggood morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. victims of modern slavery are being left without the help they need because of difficulties accessing government support. that's according to campaign group voice of domestic workers, which says many are scared to come forward often because of the threat of deportation. government's referral scheme, which was only for trafficking, was expanded in 2015 to include other forms like domestic servitude and forced marriage —— the government's. police are investigating two fatal stabbings in west london yesterday. one man was stabbed to death during a fight on the platform of hillingdon tube station at around 4pm. a second died a few hours
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later near ealing common. one of only a few people to have received a leg amputation on the nhs for a neurological condition has spoken of her relief of being able to have the procedure carried out. 21—year—old helena stone from islington developed complex regional pain syndrome after a minor kayaking accident, a condition where the patient feels pain in a limb for no obvious reason. she had to give up university and became totally housebound until she had the amputation. i was desperate. i was crying. i was in tears when i couldn't leave my bed and i was watching my friends go through university, they were travelling and graduating and then i thought i can't do this for 60 plus years, let's take a look at the travel situation now. a look at the tubes now, and there are severe delays on the overground out of stratford. good service on all other lines and no reported problems on the train network at the moment either. in lewisham, this is the a20 lee high road. one lane is closed westbound
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at the junction with belmont hill due to gas mains work. the a4 piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs. and in the city, more gas mains works. new bridge street is closed southbound from ludgate circus to queen victoria street. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. some pretty intense rainfall around yesterday and today it's not looking quite so bad but there's also some wet weather, notably this morning, then it will turn drier into the afternoon. it's also rather blustery with a brisk south—westerly wind. it's a mild, rather murky and also wet start to the day. we'll see outbreaks through the morning rush—hour. that's all pushing east. plenty of cloud around, possibly one or two lighter showers falling from the thickness of the cloud but the cloud will break up into the afternoon and we should get brighter spells of sunshine with top temperatures of 19 or 20, and the wind will start to ease down to two through the afternoon.
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still watch out for one or two showers, can't rule them out totally. through the evening and overnight, the cloud will thicken from the west with another weather front coming through, a mild night ahead but another rather wet start to the day with poor visibility and lows between 14—15. tomorrow it is windy again, sunny spells, lots of dry weather but showers and unsettled for the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. good morning from westminster withjon kay. the house of commons' doors will repoen today after the dramatic supreme court ruling that the prime minister's suspension of parliament was unlawful. borisjohnson has cut short his trip to the un — he's flying back now to face mps, but has rejected calls
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for his resignation. i have the highest respect of course for ourjudiciary and for the independence of our courts but i must say, i strongly disagree with thisjudgement. and in other news today, president trump is facing an impeachment inquiry over allegations he tried to get the ukrainian government to dig up dirt on one of his political rivals. homas cook holidaymakers claim they are being pressured —— thomas cook holidaymakers claim they are being pressured into paying hotel bills after the company went bust. making mental health a priority. our business is doing enough? i will look at what impact it is having at work. a huge upset in the league cup. tottenham are beaten on penalties by the league two side colchester united, in what is the biggest shock of spurs boss mauricio pochettino's career. good morning. we still have some
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heavy rain to clear eastern parts of the uk this morning. when it does, we looking at a day of bright cells, sunshine and scattered showers, some of which will be heavy before the next band of rain comes in from the we st next band of rain comes in from the west later. more details in 15 minutes. it's wednesday september 25th. we're live from westminster where mps are returning to work this morning. it follows that dramatic and historic ruling by the supreme court — that borisjohnson's decision to suspend parliament for five weeks was unlawful. the prime minister said he profoundly disagreed with thejudges — but would respect their decision. a senior government official said borisjohnson spoke to the queen after the ruling, but would not reveal any details of their conversation .
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our political correspondent jessica parker has been following events. parliament is opening up again. the media tents are making a return, westminster coming back to life. it wasn't his plan... i have the highest respect, of course, for ourjudiciary and the independence of our courts but i must say, i strongly disagree with thisjudgement. and, in the end, it wasn't his call. the decision to advise her majesty to prorogue parliament was unlawful. after the supreme court ruled that suspending parliament was unlawful. so mps are coming back to this place. now what? things are pretty changeable but you can expect, as the commons chamber reopens for business, that there will be efforts to lob some difficult questions of at this government and put borisjohnson under intense pressure.
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however it appears the opposition may refrain from trying to bring down the government and trigger an election right away but mps who felt silenced are ready to make some noise. parliament has to exert now its authority, it has to be brave and bold and the prime minister has to reach out because there isn't any other way across the aisle to seek a compromise. borisjohnson, have you embarrassed the queen? borisjohnson is resisting calls to resign but returning to westminster today, he will have to face the music. jessica parker, bbc news. where does this leave parliament and brexit? let's speak to chris mason was here for us. what do you think? what will happen once borisjohnson gets back to new york? pretty unpredictable. i was chatting to one senior mp a couple of minutes ago. a
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plan, plan? he said, we willjust kick the ball when it lands the mps the house are making it up as they go along. they want to cause as much trouble as they can, and it's the view of some which is being actively talked about this morning to try and bring down boris johnson talked about this morning to try and bring down borisjohnson and install some sort of caretaker prime minister but labour are not keen on that, they don't want to back a vote of confidence, they say that their focus has to be ensuring that brexit is delayed again, forcing boris johnson to request an extension against his wishes. borisjohnson back your lunchtime, as soon as this afternoon. remember, from all this noise, some of the big fundamentals remain the same. borisjohnson wants to ta ke remain the same. borisjohnson wants to take us out of the european union with no deal if necessary. the majority and there are did against the idea. checking whether the act
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that was passed a few years ago is actually a starter. i think it is for now. we had all those headlines yesterday, being called a momentous decision, this changes everything but politically, brexit wise, nothing has really changed yet. it was an unprecedented moment, deeply orchid. clearly a kick in the teeth orchid. clearly a kick in the teeth or borisjohnson. orchid. clearly a kick in the teeth or boris johnson. but he comes back here, acknowledges what the court has said, with the party conference in manchester, a technical level today, involving officials trying to reach a brexit deal. nothing really has changed. in that sense, as is so often been the case, you get a huge amount of noise in jeopardy.
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often been the case, you get a huge amount of noise injeopardy. a often been the case, you get a huge amount of noise in jeopardy. a few days later, you think what has actually changed ? the days later, you think what has actually changed? the answer to that is, not a lot. this mps slowly returning to parliament. taking their seats in the chamber. the protesters are back, so life resumes as normal but how we proceed, we will find out in the next few hours. democrats in the us congress have announced a formal impeachment inquiry into president trump. mr trump is accused of violating the constitution and betraying his oath of office over allegations he sought help from a foreign power to damage a political rival. mr trump has called the claims "garbage". our north america editor jon sopel has more. new york in september, when the leadership of the world converges on the un to speak, but one conversation is causing donald trump extreme difficulty and the heat is intensifying. injuly, he phoned the newly
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elected ukrainian president media you volodymyr zelensky and it's alleged donald trump demanded an investigation into his democratic presidential rivaljoe biden and his son's business dealings in the country as the price for receiving us military aid. no dirt, no aid is the suggestion. the president denies wrongdoing but his account of the call has changed continually as the questions have piled up. i think it's ridiculous, it's a witch—hunt. i'm leading in the polls, they have no idea how to stop me, the only way they can try is through impeachment. this has never happen to a president before, there has never been a thing like this before, it's nonsense and when you see the call, when you see the readout of the call which i assume you will see at some point, you will understand. that call was perfect. joe biden is the democratic party frontrunner. he is leading donald trump
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in the polls and says the president this time has gone too far. the president does not comply with such a request from the congress, he continues to obstruct congress and flout the law. donald trump will leave congress, in my view, no choice but to initiate impeachment. that would be a tragedy, but a tragedy of his own making. with the pressure is on donald trump, he's said he will declassify the phone call and release the full transcript but too little, too late. it won't be enough to stop the democrats pressing the nuclear button and pushing for impeachment. jon sopel, bbc news, new york. more customers and former employees of the collapsed holiday firm thomas cook say they're being threatened and mistreated by hotel staff. as the operation to bring more than 150,000 people back to the uk, after the collapse of the tour operator, thomas cook. a group of cabin crew in cuba say they are effectively being ‘held hostage. a government—funded operation to bring thousands of holidaymakers back to the uk is continuing,
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but some customers say they are being thrown out of their rooms or prevented from leaving until they make direct payments to the hotels. the civil aviation authority says people should not make extra payments. a disturbance at a high—security prison in worcestershire, which began yesterday evening, has been brought to an end. specialist prison guards were deployed to long lartin after officers came under attack from inmates throwing pool balls at them. one prison officer was hurt and taken to hospital. the jail holds more than 500 of the country's most "dangerous and serious" offenders. one of northern ireland's biggest manufacturing firms is expected to go into administration today. wrightbus, which is based in county antrim, employs around 1,400 people. it's suffering from cashflow problems and has been looking for investment or a new owner. scientists have been meeting in monaco to finalise and publish a report on the effect of rising temperatures on the world's oceans. the report, set to be published later today by the intergovernmental panel on climate change, is expected to warn that hundreds of millions of people could be threatened by rising sea levels before
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the end of this century. the spanish tenor, placido domingo, has withdrawn from all future performances at the metropolitan opera in new york. he's been accused of sexual harrassment by several women, which he denies. in a statement, the singer, who's 78, said he was concerned his presence on stage would have distracted from his colleagues' work. the duke and duchess of sussex and their four—month—old son archie are continuing their tour of southern africa — their first official tour as a family. the couple are now in cape town but prince harry will also visit malawi, botswana and angola, where he'll highlight his mother's work to tackle landmines. let's speak to our correspondent pumza fihlani. morning. what you have behind you. tell us a little bit about how they are being received ? tell us a little bit about how they are being received? they have had a very warm are being received? they have had a very warm welcome are being received? they have had a very warm welcome here from all the communities that they visited in the last 2.5 days. it marks the third
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day in the last day for the royal couple here together in cape town but it means they will get an opportunity, the first stop will be a visit to the archbishop desmond tutu foundation where they will have a chance to have a cup of tea with the archbishop in recognition of the work is done over the years which has been recognised by her majesty the queen in bringing together communities in the uk and across pa rt communities in the uk and across part of the world. there will also bea part of the world. there will also be a separate intimate gathering with just the duchess, be a separate intimate gathering withjust the duchess, she be a separate intimate gathering with just the duchess, she will get to meet entrepreneurs late in the afternoon and mothers living with hiv and find out what they are doing for communities living with the disease. lovely to speak to you. a bit of sunshine as well. the largest collection of pink diamonds in the world is heading to auction in london, where they could fetch up to £100 million. the mine in australia,
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which produces virtually the entire world supply of those precious stones, has depleted and is set to close next year after 37 years of production. this will make pink diamonds the most sought after gem in the world. it is 7:13am. yesterday's supreme court ruling marked the second time businesswoman gina miller has legally challenged the government over brexit and won. but the leader of the commons, jacob rees—mogg, has reportedly called the verdict a constitutional coup. mrs millerjoins us now from westminster. good morning, thank you forjoining us. so much to talk to you about. it's been described byjacob rees—mogg is a constitutional coup. is it? that comment is the most irresponsible i've heard, and there are quitea irresponsible i've heard, and there are quite a few in this saga but this is a person who went up to see the queen and gave her the unlawful advice and if anything, he is the one who should be considering his position here. but to call the 11
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most seniorjudges in our country in an independent court, and suggest they are biased, is actually damaging our democracy because what happened yesterday in the judgement, defined the separation of powers and it really is not the way to go about this. to actually throw mud at our democratic institutions. you talk about the separation of powers, who is in charge here? is it parliament, is in charge here? is it parliament, is the government, is the courts? no, nobody is in charge. this is about checks and balances. you have the prime minister behaving as if he isa the prime minister behaving as if he is a senior partner. he is not, he is a senior partner. he is not, he is answerable to parliament. this is about parliamentary sovereignty, which is the core principle of our representative democracy. the courts only intervene when they do something unlawful, which is the case when i went to the supreme court the first time and then again yesterday so both prime ministers
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put themselves above the law. neither one is above the law. prime ministerjohnson is not a law unto himself either. there are separations of powers in the territory is very well—defined. yesterday's ruling will not change that. boris johnson has said he is not going to resign. he said, i think the most important thing is we get on and deliver brexit and there is clearly claimants in this case determined to frustrate that and stop that. mrjohnson again is trying to play down the significance of this. he has been found... a unanimous ruling as having given the queen unlawful advice. he has broken the law, that is what he has done, and now he is trying to deflect blame. there's no way in this case. we talked about exit, this is about the fact he abused his power. this is not about brexit per se, it does mean mps are put back in the position they should be, in
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parliament, scrutinising him about what he's talking about with the eu, the revised yellowhammer paper, the brexit select committee, legislation that might be needed if there is no deal. he is back where he should be in parliament, and so are mps. let me ask you about other wider political ramifications, so does it allow the prime minister to argue, and this has been argued before from the government point of view, the establishment is ganging up against people specifically who voted to leave ? people specifically who voted to leave? this is so dangerous. what people are saying like mrjohnson and people against parliament is they are undermining the whole system. they can't go around throwing mud like this because they are behaving in an unconstitutional and now unlawful way. this isn't how politics works. lady hale said this is unique yesterday and one reason it is because no prime minister has
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tested the constitution like this and behaved like mrjohnson, and that's why i brought the case. if he was obeying the law and playing by the rules, as it were, they would be no need for me to go to the supreme court or indeed bring any action at all. they are now back and discussions are continuing, what is the way out of this? there's people frustrated who voted remain and leave, there's so many divisions within the country, within government and parties themselves. what is the way through here? i'm as frustrated as everyone else, especially as i've used my time and resources to put two cases on the boards to get mps back to parliament. for the rest of today and the short period we have, they have got to be bold and brave and come to a solution. we can't carry on like this as a country. mps have to step up and do a betterjob than of late.
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the prime minister said over and over again that he will take the uk out on the 31st of october, deal or no deal. what are your plans with regard to that? all i will be doing, asi regard to that? all i will be doing, as i have done for the last few yea rs, as i have done for the last few years, is keeping a legal watch, if you like, on the government. they are promising things i believe they can't deliver, and they may be tempted to go beyond their powers and abuse their powers again. my tea m and abuse their powers again. my team and! and abuse their powers again. my team and i will be keeping an eye on them. i hope the ruling yesterday is a huge warning shot to the prime minister that however difficult this gets, he cannot abuse his powers and break the law. gina miller, thanks for your time on bbc breakfast. we are speaking to politicians from most parties this morning and we have put in repeated calls to the government to ask for a representative to talk to us, but as yet that is a no. we will keep you up yet that is a no. we will keep you up to date. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. louise is right, the
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rain in westminster is starting to move to the east, but we do still have heavy bursts at the moment, particularly in north—east england, the north—east midlands, wash, london and the south—east. that's what will clear away and behind it it brightens up with showers, the winds will ease as that clears. we've had a deluge of rain in the last 24 hours. in london last night, between 4pm and 5pm, we saw almost 22 millimetres. boscombe down in wiltshire saw 59.4 millimetres in 24 hours. this is the front that will clear that rain away, still a lot of surface water and with large puddles around and later on, the next array of fronts will come our way. we think it will take to around lunchtime until the rain completely clears from the east and behind it, we're looking at variable amounts of cloud, some sunny skies also some
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showers. low cloud, mist and fog in parts of eastern scotland this morning producing drizzle even through the afternoon and the fog in northern ireland should lift, you'll see skies and a few showers and in england and wales, we are looking at it brightening up behind the rain with bright skies, sunny spells and scattered showers. not a lot of them but some could well prove to be heavy. later on, as our new france approach, you can see the cloud thicken and the rain coming in from the west. temperature—wise, 13—19 top to toe. through this evening and overnight, we start on a largely dry note in the east but it's not long before our array of fronts zoom in from the west and they will push steadily east through the night. it's going to be breezy. we might see pockets of mist and fog or low cloud for a time for example in south—east scotland, but temperature—wise, quite a mild night, remaining in double figures. tomorrow we lose the rain from
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eastern england first of all and it pushes north across north—east scotland. behind it, a bit of a respite in the sense it will be drier and brighter with sunny skies around an few scattered showers here and there, with again the potential for some to be heavy and thundery, and a blustery day, 12—19. on friday, as yet another front comes our way, it will bring some showers and some will merge to give longer spells of rain. it will be noticeably windy across england and wales, not just noticeably windy across england and wales, notjust on the coasts but inland as well with temperatures 12-17. inland as well with temperatures 12—17. jon, if you're out and about in the next few days, feeling cooler thanit in the next few days, feeling cooler than it does this morning for you. not feeling too cool, itjust feels very wet, it feels like the sony, summary weather from a few days ago is long gone! reassuring to know it will get a bit better! westminster is waking up this wednesday morning and coming back to
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life. that's after the prime minister prorogued parliament for the last couple of weeks, no mps or lords or ladies have been here, empty, not functioning, but yesterday the decision of the supreme court that it was unlawful, the suspension, and parliament would have to reset means they are coming back to their offices and taking their seats in the chambers today and life get back to normal, whatever normal is in these times! the brexit party's nigel farage has branded the unlawful suspension of parliament as the worst decision politically ever. his call for boris johnson to offer his resignation. —— he's called. hejoins me from our westminster studio. some people will be surprised for you to call for borisjohnson to think about his position, because only a week ago you were offering the hand of friendship? oh, no! for right or wrong now we have a supreme court set up by tony blair, it is a
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political court and it has made a political court and it has made a politicaljudgement but if the highest court in the land says you have acted unlawfully in your advice to the queen, as a matter of honour you have to at least offer your resignation to the house of commons and ask them to vote on it. i'm not against borisjohnson at all. in fa ct, against borisjohnson at all. in fact, he's one of the few people in parliament that seems to want to get brexit delivered but that's where we are. however, the political decision to call a queen's speech while in most yea rs to call a queen's speech while in most years would be a normal thing to do has had a catastrophic effect of uniting the remainers, uniting the establishment, and it's allowed those who have spent three years trying to stop brexit from happening now claiming they've got democracy on their side. from everywhere you look at this, politically it was an appalling decision. i have to pick up on what you said at the beginning, that this is a political court. that is rated by some people as a dangerous and irresponsible thing to say. this is
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an independent court, the most eminent, independentjudges in the land. are you saying you know better than them? i'm saying tony blair changed them? i'm saying tony blair changed the way we operate our legal system in this country by setting up a supreme court, who, since they first came into being, havejudged on political matters in a way we've never seen before. i'm not surprised in the least by the judgement yesterday because that court is representative of the political class. i think over the months and yea rs class. i think over the months and years that go by from now, we have to decide, can we have a supreme court acting in this way without having a written constitution? but that's a debate for later on. i don't think at this stage there is any point anyone questioning the judgement. it is what it is. where does this leave your vision of brexit? do you think no—deal is off the table on the 31st of october? we have a parliament made up of people who want to stop brexit from
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happening. a conservative party who pretend they want brexit, but actually over the half of the mps are sitting in westminster for the tories don't want brexit to happen. we need a general election and we need the public to express their will. what's really interesting is the gap between people's opinions on brexit and pa rliament‘s the gap between people's opinions on brexit and parliament's opinions has got even wider. we will not get brexit, certainly not a meaningful brexit, certainly not a meaningful brexit, without a general election and without real political change. a general election, talking to mps and commentators here today, that seems as far away now as a couple of weeks ago. parliament doesn't want that either. here is the outrage, we have parliament. and. us from having a general general election to judge them. the whole thing is an outrage and the smug, contented people outside the supreme court yesterday, great,. brexit, isay
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outside the supreme court yesterday, great,. brexit, i say get outside of london, go to where the real people are. mercifully, we are not by the french and putting on yellow and writing, but we are waiting patiently for a general election where we can judge them and when that moment comes, people will be very surprised. i don't live in london i and i was out of london yesterday in swindon talking to people about this and lots of people said borisjohnson people about this and lots of people said boris johnson is people about this and lots of people said borisjohnson is standing up for brexit. borisjohnson will do whatever it ta kes borisjohnson will do whatever it takes an boris johnson borisjohnson will do whatever it takes an borisjohnson will deliver it, challenging the courts. isn't the reason you are so sore this morning is that he has outplayed you and take in your role? he's leading and take in your role? he's leading a party that doesn't want to deliver a party that doesn't want to deliver a clean break brexit and he himself in the last couple of weeks has gone back to mrs may's failed new european treaty. if boris goes on trying to get mrs may's deal through
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parliament, that will not be brexit andi parliament, that will not be brexit and i think if the public realise that's what he wants to do, he will be furious. however, given the events of the last 24 hours, may be borisjohnson when the election comes will choose to strike a bolder course. i certainly hope so because one thing is for certain, people who voted leave voted not to be part of the single market or customs union. it couldn't have been clearer during that campaign. nigel farage of the brexit party, thanks forjoining us on breakfast. live from westminster, louise will have all the headlines for you in louise will have all the headlines foryou ina louise will have all the headlines for you in a few minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. victims of modern slavery are being left without the help they need, because of difficulties accessing government support. that's according to the campaign group, voice of domestic workers, which says many are scared to come forward often because of the
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threat of deportation. the government's referal scheme, which was only for human trafficking, was expanded in 2015 to include other forms such as domestic servitude and forced marriage. police are investigating two fatal stabbings in west london yesterday. one man was stabbed to death during a fight on the platform of hillingdon tube station at around 4pm. a second died a few hours later near ealing common. the first victim was attacked on the platform at hillingdon tube station just before 4pm then at 6pm a man in his early 20s was killed in a fight near ealing common. one of only a few people to have had a leg amputation for a neurological conditionhas spoken of her relief after having the procedure. the 22—year—old from islington developed complex regional pain syndrome after a minor kayaking accident. it's a condition where the patient feels pain in a limb for no obvious reason. i was desperate. like, when i was crying...
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i was in tears when i couldn't leave my bed and i was watching my friends go through university, they were travelling, they were graduating and then i started to think i can't do this for 60—plus years. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes you can see there are severe delays on the overground out of stratford. good service on all other lines though and no reported problems on the train network at the moment either. this is the north circular westbound towards henly‘s corner at new cross. in lewisham, this is the a20 lee high road. one lane is closed westbound at the junction with belmont hill due to gas mains work. the a4 piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. some pretty intense rainfall around yesterday and today it's not looking quite so bad but there's also some wet weather, notably so this morning, then it will tend to turn drier into the afternoon. it's also rather blustery
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with a brisk south—westerly wind. it's a mild, rather murky and also wet start to the day. we'll see outbreaks through the morning rush—hour. that's all pushing east. plenty of cloud around, possibly one or two lighter showers falling from the thickness of the cloud but the cloud will break up into the afternoon and we should get brighter spells of sunshine with top temperatures of 19 or 20, and the wind will start to ease down too through the afternoon. still watch out for one or two showers, can't rule them out totally. through the evening and overnight, the cloud will thicken from the west with another weather front coming through, a mild night ahead but another rather wet start to the day with poor visibility and lows between 14—15. tomorrow it is windy again, sunny spells, lots of dry weather but showers and unsettled for the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now it's back to louise in the studio and jon in westminster. see you soon.
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you hello, this is breakfast withjon kay in westminster and louise minchin in salford. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. mps will return to westminster today, after the supreme court ruling that borisjohnson's suspension of parliament was unlawful. the prime minister said he profoundly disagreed with the judges but would respect their decision. a senior government official said that borisjohnson spoke to the queen after that ruling, but would not reveal details of the conversation. obviously this is a verdict we will respect and we respect thejudicial process. i have to say i strongly disagree with what the justices have found. i don't think that it's right but we will go ahead and of course, parliament will come back. i do think there is a good case for getting on with a queen's speech anyway and we will do that. but the most important thing is we get on and deliver brexit on october 31 and there's clearly the claimants in this case
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are determined to frustrate that and stop that. it would be unfortunate if parliament made that objective, which the the people want delivered, more difficult, but we will get on. democrats in the us congress have announced a formal impeachment inquiry into president trump. mr trump is accused of violating the constitution and betraying his oath of office over allegations he sought help from a foreign power to damage a political rival. mr trump has called the claims "garbage". look, it'sjust a continuation of the witch—hunt. it's the worst witch—hunt in political history. we have the strongest economy we've ever had, the best unemployment numbers we've ever had. —— two days after the collapse of the holiday firm thomas cook, there are still reports of customers and former employees being thrown out of their rooms or prevented from leaving hotels unless they make extra payments. the civil aviation authority says more than 70 flights are scheduled for today to bring 16,500 people home. our europe reporter
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gavin lee is in alcudia now. a beautiful day there but what are people telling you about their experiences? it's idyllic here. basically, the spanish tourism minister is talking about the effect to spanish islands of the collapse, saying something like 200 million euros, about £118 million, is owed by thomas cook, the domino effect, towards those groups that are attached to the company and that is starting to put real pressure because some have paid for their hotels and are not guaranteed to get that money back by atl —— atol. we know to hotels in majorca have asked people for money and would come to one place here because the hotel, the customers in there telling us they felt like squatters, but they
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we re they felt like squatters, but they were being kept in rooms until they paid their money and we're trying to get a sense of what's on here. the peer the papers are talking about the risk to closure of lots of hotels in majorca. the workers who risk not being paid for september. we know the cleaner of this hotel, people being charged. saying we can't afford to pay. just tell me first of all your situation. we got this letter here to say that we owed £900. we sat down and tried to work out how we were going to pay it. and we got onto the cia which told us basically don't pay anything. which we didn't. this came through your
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door? yes. what is the atmosphere like? we've had lots of support from other guests at the hotel. we haven't actually spoken to the staff. but we all rallied around in been supporting each other. have you booked a holiday at all? no, we're grateful we got here. it's on your mind, but you just go out. another letter this morning say prove that you got a atol certificate. you say you got a atol certificate. you say you feel like squatters. you feel a bit more comfortable? we feel fine now. we've got to take this back into the hotel to say we have the ato l into the hotel to say we have the atol certificate. once they've been reassured we have it, we will be fine. we're not going to pay
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anything. you refusing to? we spoke to the hotel staff, but the staff say they have been lost, they don't know who is atol protected, whether they will get any money back so they sent these notes to people's door, sometimes for 300, 1000 euros. i said what happens if people walk away? we can't do anything. we are aware that we are as flustered as anybody else. we are waiting to hear from the owner. there was one in cuba overnight where thomas cook staff stayed in the hotel feeling like they were hostages, not allowed to leave. it is a little more calm today. that is good to hear. it's nice that we have a bit of sunshine. supermarket giant sainsbury‘s is to close up to 100 stores but open around 100 more. ben can explain. it sounds a bit strange. i've been
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speaking to sainsbury‘s. they are looking their entire store portfolio of all the stores they got around the country and what they've told me, they are going to close 10—15 of the big supermarket. sainsbury‘s owns argus. putting them into sainsbury‘s, into the reception, the lobby areas. a big question about the high street, convenience, sainsbury‘s, local stores, they were close about 30—40 of those but interestingly, they will open 110. they were close somebody opened 110 in different locations. they might have different things for them. what they've said is, that will save about £20 million. interestingly,
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they've also had a review of the bank. they are not going to offer mortgages in their bank anymore. they don't make very much money on it right now because interest rates are so low. they are going to stop selling mortgages. ultimately, about 100 more stores across the country. given that battle they've got. the duke and duchess of sussex and their 4—month—old son archie are continuing their tour of southern africa — their first official tour as a family. the couple visited the country's oldest mosque as part of their ten day tour. during the trip, prince harry will also visit malawi, botswana and angola, where he'll highlight his mother's work to tackle landmines. we'll catch up with the sport, sally is here to talk about a great read. colchester united, real night of drama. you get an idea from the picture behind you the delight on
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those boys bases. is that winning penalty went in. not such a great night for spurs. a brilliant night for colchester. in the upset of the night. it was nil—nil after 90 minutes, and it was the league two side who held their nerve on penalties. a disappointed spurs boss mauricio pochettino did his best to stay positive after the match. disappointed, oof course, we are very disappointed. but in football, sometimes it goes like this. it's not so positive, we need to stick all together and stick and be strong and try be hard and have analysis and try to find solutions. that analysis will surely look what has been a really bad recent run for spurs. since mid—february in all competitions they've played 26 matches, lost 12, drawn 6 and won just 8 games. remember they somehow managed to get to a champions league final
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in that time. loads of other fixtures last night including a south coast derby at fratton park. premier league side southampton thumping portsmouth who are now in league one by 4 goals to nil. danny ings and nathan redmond both on the scoresheet. all the results are on the bbc sport website and app. wembley will host the 2023 champions league final. it's going to be held during wembley‘s centenary year, with the original empire stadium having opened in april 1923. it's also been confirmed that windsor park in belfast will host the 2021 super cup final. andy murray has won his first match at tour level since january, beating tennys sangren at the zhuhai championships in china. continuing his comeback from hip surgery the former world number one took the first set
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before the american levelled the match. murray says this was, in many ways, one of the best performances of his career given where he's coming back from. he'll play australian alex de minaur in the second round. he one game already underway at the rugby world cup this morning as fiji play uruguay. me they're into the second half, uruguay lead 24—17. england meanwhile have named their side for their second match of the tournament. they play the usa tomorrow, and head coach eddiejones has made 10 changes to the team that beat tonga. he also wants to get points on the scoreboard quickly against the americans. we want a fast start against the usa, we deliberately roped the dope bit against tonga, let them play for the first 20 minutes and our intention was to come home strong against usa. we want to take a different approach, we want to take them at the start of the game, go out pretty hard, attack them a bit more and see where it leads us. and stand by for some traditional yorkshire weather at the road world championships in harrogate.
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this is during the men's under 23's time trial race. the huge amounts of standing water causing denmark's johan price—pejtersen to come off his bike. he was ok and able to continue. he wasn't the only one having problems — incidents all over the course. organisers have been criticised for allowing the race to go ahead in the first place. will talk about it later.” will talk about it later. i am a little bit obsessed with sport like that. they had the team time trial mixed relay. i just that. they had the team time trial mixed relay. ijust looked up the rules. for them to explain how it works. more of that, please.
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we can go back now tojon kay who's live in westminster for us this morning. morning, jon. the fallout after that supreme court ruling yesterday. imagine you've got five weeks off work in two weeks into that holiday, you suddenly get a call saying, no, you got to come back, its back to the office. that is what happened to mp5. they were told that the holiday, that proroguing was being cancelled. but rather than trudging back to work through the rain this morning, mps have come with a spring in their step because they think they have power back. they think they are back in control after this the court judgement. where does all this leave the relationship between government, mps and the courts. let's talk to a couple of people who know. joining me now is former supreme courtjudge lord sumption and david leakey who's a former black rod, who was responsible for keeping order in parliament. thank you for coming in. if you had
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been there on the panel, making this decision, would you have been unanimous as well that this was not unlawful? i suspect so but i didn't listen to the arguments i can't be sure. i certainly approve of the result. when you hearjacob rees—mogg calling this a constitutional coup, nigel farage calling it a political decision, what do you think your poor former collea g u es what do you think your poor former colleagues will be making? water off a duck ‘s back but the suggestion it isa a duck ‘s back but the suggestion it is a constitutional coup was nonsense. the position is that parliament is absolutely central to our system of government and this government sought to marginalise it in the supreme court have reinstated it in its proper place. they couldn't be anything more conservative. it's perfectly true they have invented a new legal doctrine to achieve that result but the result itself is clearly admirable. what were your thoughts
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when you heard this result?” admirable. what were your thoughts when you heard this result? i wasn't surprised, and my thoughts moved to what would happen next in parliament. clearly mps and peers in the house of lords coming back today... there are some practical things that would have gone on in parliament because we have to rememberthe parliament because we have to remember the conferences are going on at the moment, so even if there hadn't been prorogation, the likelihood, not the certainty, is that parliament would have been in a recess for the conferences and when parliament comes back today they will discuss all sorts of things. the thomas cook disaster, what's going on in the middle east, except of course, ministerial... plenty of things to do today —— brexit. the interesting thing will be whether parliament breaks for a recess for the conservative party conference this weekend. borisjohnson is this weekend. boris johnson is flying this weekend. borisjohnson is flying back this weekend. boris johnson is flying back from new york from the united nations early, he won't be back for prime
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minister's questions but he will be facing mps. should he stay in his job? there are calls this morning for him to resign. if he was the leader of any public company, use university, nhs trust, charity, having done something unlawful and having, as the courts in third, misled parliament and the people and the queen, any other leader from any other organisation would resign. in my view, he's not properly a leader, he lacks the integrity to be a leader and the difference between an organisation and a politician is politicians have to be populists as well in order to be elected. they have to be popular and get the votes, that's what he's relying on. he isa votes, that's what he's relying on. he is a combination of populist and leader. if you can combine populism and good leadership, that's great, but he only has populism in my view.
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do you think he will go? it will be up do you think he will go? it will be up to the tory party and eventually the country as to whether he will go. where does it leave the country after this? is it stronger or weaker? what has happened is our famously inflexible constitution has responded to an abuse by restoring the previous position. that is how constitutions develop. governments have powers, they abuse them, people shift the goalposts. you know there will be people watching this this morning listening to you and others and saying, "you are the establishment, you are standing in the way of what the people voted for and in the way of brexit". what do you say back? my response is under our constitutional system, 52% of the electorate simply cannot have 100% of the spoils. they have to engage with the rest, and parliament is the vehicle by which they do
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that. that's interesting. say the leave campaign had won by a bigger margin, say they got 60%, 70%, would have no eroding parliament been all right? the referendum is a political fa ct right? the referendum is a political fact —— have eroding. prorogation, whether they try to prorogue, would have depended on the political situation they were addressing but it would have been illegal in either case it would have been illegal in either case “— it would have been illegal in either case —— tried to. it would have been illegal in either case -- tried to. another wet and fascinating day in westminster. one in the history books for over about what happened at this moment. but what will happen to the weather? carol? lots . some fog around, mist and low cloud and for some it is a murky start, we've even got some rain but it will brighten up. some heavy rain
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in north—east england, the north—east midlands, parts of the wash mother example, the london area, moving out of london now into the south—east —— the wash, for example. thundery downpours yesterday and through the latter pa rt yesterday and through the latter part of the evening and this morning, we've seen more rain coming in across southern counties and again, that is heavy and it will probably take until around lunchtime until it eventually clears away completely. its because of these fronts here, they are moving into the north sea, taking the rain with them, and later in the day we have more fronts coming in and if you look at the isobars, that's telling you it's also going to be quite blustery. blustery day generally but the wind will tend to ease as the rain clears. then we are left with brighter skies, sunny spells and a few showers, some of which could indeed be on the heavy and thundery side. temperatures in scotland, 16-18. side. temperatures in scotland, 16—18. largely dry when we lose the showers and fog in the morning from
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northern ireland but you can see how the cloud thickens here in through south—west england and wales through the afternoon, heralding the arrival of another band of rain. for most in england and wales, it's going to be dry and bright with some sunny skies and just a few showers. as we head on through the evening and overnight, well, our band of rain in the west will continue to push steadily eastwards, eradicating the brighter, drier start to the evening. then behind that, what you'll notice is there will be a fair bit of around, some breaks, some patchy mist and fog, particularly across south—east scotland, but it's not going to be a cold night with most staying in double figures. then through tomorrow, the rain clears eastern england. slower to clear the north—east of scotland and behind that, back into that regime of bright spells, sunshine and showers. not all of us catching a shower and it will be quite a blustery day once again with temperatures between 12 in the north and 19 in the south. by
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the time we get to friday, we've got another weather front coming our way, it's an occlusion, here it is, moving from the west to east. it will produce showers but some of those showers will merge, giving us some longer spells of. in between them, there will be some bright skies but note the temperature, it is starting to slip. as we head into saturday, once again, a fairly showery, blustery day, particularly in the south but note the change in the wind direction in the north, so things are starting to cool down, especially in the north, louise. there's definitely a chill in the air. thank you and we will see you in about half—an—hour. 7.301am. here's a question. are firms doing enough to help staff facing mental health issues? ben's looking at this. something a lot of employers are getting wise to about the support they need to give their staff, but weather you feel you can speak out at work is a big question when it comes to a mental health problem.
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this comes from a new report by the banking giant hsbc. it found thatjust half of staff felt they could take time off because of a mental health problem. only 60% said they felt confident discussing it with their manager. and so the bank is encouraging its staff to open up about their issues at work. and it's already made a difference for one member of staff. ona day on a day where i'm struggling a little bit, and i know i've got to go into work, i will make my lunch, make sure everything that i need for the day is in the bag i'm going to ta ke to the day is in the bag i'm going to take to work and make sure i'm outwardly presentable, so i appear like a person who's got their stuff together. for a little while, whenever i was... felt like i was unable to get to work, i told them i had a cold or i wouldn't be honest with them. it took me a while of working there before i decided it's the best thing for me to do to just be honest. it's literally weaved into the fabric of
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who i literally weaved into the fabric of whoiam, literally weaved into the fabric of who i am, so i think talking about it with someone who is effectively responsible... in part responsible for my well—being is a must. one case there of lil and for her summer work was part of the answer. louise aston, wellbeing campaign director of business in the community, a charity that promotes responsible businessjoins me now. louise, good morning. good morning. in that case, it was interesting work was part of the answer. many might think work is the cause of the problem with lots of stress and anxiety and worry, but work could be one of the solutions? yeah. we know good work enhances physical and mental health, and obviously if employers design good work, in the case of lil, it has positive outcomes. out this week is the business in the immunity partnership, launching a new piece of research —— community. we know
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good work is good for health and well—being but from ourfindings, two in five employees actually develop poor mental—health caused by work. obviously you don't expect to be psychologically injured when you come to work in the same way as you don't expect to be physically harmed. so there's really a lot that used to happen in terms of getting that equality between physical and mental health. that's what's so interesting about this, because physical health is something that is nurses now know that they have to look after. health and safety regulations make it very clear that if you are injured then there are penalties —— businesses. there's very little measure of mental health, is there? there isn't, and one of the really interesting things that came out of our research is there's an absolutely massive disconnect between how well the senior bosses think they are doing in terms of great rhetoric in terms of the mental health of their people with
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the reality on the ground. actually what we are advocating in this new report, mental health at work, is all employers should publicly report on their well—being. it's about accountability, about transparency, but it's also about responsible business. it's tough, though, isn't it? if you come into work and break your leg, it's quite opposite no obvious you tripped over something and break your leg in the office. it's hard to pinpoint what is causing mental—health problems, may be anxiety at home or other challenges in your life, and they come in with you to work. what can we do to make sure the workplace helps and improves and looks after staff in that way? we need to move the debate on. up until now it is, yeah, we know there's been slow incremental improvement, but we're not really tackling the root causes. we need to look at mental health more systemically, and that's about
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creating good work that enhances well—being for everyone and obviously one size won't fit all, but it's about looking at the root causes. if there is an employer watching this ina if there is an employer watching this in a big small organisation, where do they need to start to get the culture right? that research was so interesting from hsbc, people we re so interesting from hsbc, people were so worried about being able to talk to their boss and worried about being able to go to them and say, "i think i have a problem and i might need time off". this is about cultural change and that starts with leadership. this is about positioning mental health as a boardroom issue, about real, authentic leadership and actually operationalising that in terms of accountability through the dna of the organisation, and that's wehrlein managers are so incredibly important in terms of being able to spot those early warning kind of signs —— where line managers. it's
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also a culture where it's ok not to be ok. and that's the message, isn't it? louise, thank you, gratefulfor your time. really important issue and one we will talk a lot about on this programme, getting help when needed. more from me after 8am. interesting to hear all of that and good advice as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. borisjohnson has called for the release of nannies in zadari ratcliffe during a meeting with iran's president. —— nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. the british—iranian national from west hampstead is half way through a five—yearjail term after she was convicted of spying, which she denies. the prime minister spoke to hassan rouhani at a un summit in new york. victims of modern slavery are being left without the help they need because of difficulties
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accessing government support. that's according to the campaign group voice of domestic workers, which says many are scared to come forward often because of the threat of deportation. the government's referal scheme, which was only for human trafficking was expanded in 2015 to include other forms such as domestic servitude and forced marriage. one of only a few people to have had a leg amputation for a neurological conditionhas spoken of her relief after having the procedure. 22—year—old helena stone from islington developed complex regional pain syndrome after a minor kayaking accident. it's a condition where the patient feels pain in a limb for no obvious reason. i was desperate. like, when i was crying... i was in tears when i couldn't leave my bed and i was watching my friends go through university, they were travelling, they were graduating and then i started to think, "i can't do this for 60—plus years." let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes, you can see there are severe delays
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on the overground out of stratford. and minor delays also on the overground out of new cross gate. in kennington, this is the a202 camberwell new road. it's very slow westbound towards oval station after a serious accident. in lewisham, there's one lane closed on the a20 lee high road westbound at the junction with belmont hill. that's for gas mains work. and the a4 piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge, also because of gas mains repairs. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. some pretty intense rainfall around yesterday and today it's not looking quite so bad but there's also some wet weather, notably so this morning, then it will tend to turn drier into the afternoon. it's also rather blustery with a brisk south—westerly wind. it's a mild, rather murky and also wet start to the day. we'll see outbreaks through the morning rush—hour. that's all pushing east. plenty of cloud around, possibly one or two lighter showers
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falling from the thickness of the cloud but the cloud will break up into the afternoon and we should get brighter spells of sunshine with top temperatures of 19 or 20, and the wind will start to ease down too through the afternoon. still watch out for one or two showers, can't rule them out totally. through the evening and overnight, the cloud will thicken from the west with another weather front coming through, a mild night ahead but another rather wet start to the day with poor visibility and lows between 14—15. tomorrow it is windy again, sunny spells, lots of dry weather but showers and unsettled for the rest of the week. i'll be here with all the latest in half an hour. see you soon. good morning from westminster, withjon kay. the house of commons' doors will re—open today, after the dramatic supreme court ruling that the prime minister's suspension
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of parliament was unlawful. borisjohnson has cut short his trip to the un. —— to the united states. he's flying back now to face mps, but has rejected calls for his resignation. i have the highest respect, of course, for the judiciary and that the independence of our courts but i must say, i strongly disagree with thisjudgment. and in other news today... president trump is facing an impeachment inquiry over allegations he tried to get the ukrainian government to dig up dirt on one of his political rivals. thomas cook holidaymakers claim they are being pressured into paying hotel bills after the company went bust. a shake—up at sainsbury‘s. the supermarket giant will close more than 100 stores, but at the same time, open 100 more. why? i'll explain a little later. a huge upset in the league cup... ..as tottenham are beaten on penalties by the league two side colchester united, in what is the biggest shock of spurs boss
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mauricio pochettino's career. good morning. a murky start to the day in some eastern and southern parts of the country with low cloud and some rain. that will clear and then we will all have a day of bright spells, some sunny skies and some showers before the next band comes in from the west later. more in15 comes in from the west later. more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday september 25th. hello, good morning. we're live from westminster, where mps are returning to work this morning. rather unexpectedly. it follows that dramatic and historic ruling by the supreme court — that borisjohnson's decision to suspend parliament for five weeks was unlawful. the prime minister said he profoundly disagreed with the judges, but would respect their decision. overnight, a senior government
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official said borisjohnson spoke to the queen since the ruling, but would not reveal any details of their conversation. our political correspondentjessica parker has been following events. parliament is opening up again. the media tents are making a return, westminster coming back to life. it wasn't his plan... i have the highest respect, of course, for ourjudiciary and for the independence of our courts but i must say, i strongly disagree with this judgment. and, in the end, it wasn't his call. the decision to advise her majesty to prorogue parliament was unlawful. after the supreme court ruled that suspending parliament was unlawful. so, mps are coming back to this place. now what? well, things are pretty changeable but you can expect, as the commons chamber reopens for business,
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that there will be efforts to lob some difficult questions of at this government and put borisjohnson under intense pressure. however, it appears the opposition may refrain from trying to bring down the government and trigger an election right away but mps who felt silenced are ready to make some noise. parliament has to exert, now, its authority, it has to be brave and bold and the prime minister has to reach out because there isn't any other way across the aisle to seek a compromise. borisjohnson, have you embarrassed the queen? borisjohnson is resisting calls to resign but returning to westminster today, he will have to face the music. jessica parker, bbc news. borisjohnson is boris johnson is on borisjohnson is on a plane back from new york at the moment. mps from new york at the moment. mps from constituencies right across the uk are on trains and buses and heading back to this place to take their positions in the house of commons and then what? we have had a
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slight indication in the last few minutes. michael gove has been speaking to bbc radio four‘s today programme reacting to the court ruling because there has been no comment from any member of the government until now. this is what mr gove has had to say. i think it's absolutely right the supreme court should take a view on a matter of this kind. it was done in absolutely the proper way but i'm just contextualising things because i think it's important to stress while the supreme court was clear, there was a respectable legal opinion which disagrees with that view and it's perfectly possible in a democracy to say you respected judgment and will comply with the judgment, but you also note there area judgment, but you also note there are a range of views about the appropriateness of a particular course of action. i'm not criticising the supreme court, wouldn't criticise the supreme court but simply pointing out in england and scotland, very seniorjudges took the view this was lawful.
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michael gove explaining to the bbc in the last few minutes how the government came to that decision to prorogue and what they made of the judges' decision it was unlawful. i'm joined now by our political correspondent chris mason for more on this. you thought you might not be here for a little bit, like most mps! what are they going to do, how will they use this time they've got? they are making it up as they go along. i just bumped into a senior mp and said, what's your plan? plan, plan? he said. we'rejust said, what's your plan? plan, plan? he said. we're just going to said, what's your plan? plan, plan? he said. we'rejust going to kick the ball where it lands. plenty mps we re the ball where it lands. plenty mps were of the very strong conviction they thought it was absolutely wrong they thought it was absolutely wrong they had been forced to pack up their bags and leave westminster and have been arguing very strongly they should come back. now they are back, they have to work out what they are going to do. in broader terms what they want to do, they want to scrutinise the government, that is theirjob. in specific terms, things get a little more vague. there is a hope for many that borisjohnson himself will be in there this afternoon once he gets off that
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plane from new york, plane expected to land around lunchtime. beyond that, we know there won't be a prime ministers questions but he could still be brought in, mrjohnson, to give a statement to mp5. there is some concern amongst mps who are desperate to ensure they had an act to no—deal brexit next month, to make sure that act is watertight. there is some concern it might not be. expect plenty of noise, but expect also that as so often in this brexit process, you get a lot of noise but not much changes. we hear about this momentous decision from the supreme court yesterday that changes everything, changes the way we are governed and run as a country that as far as brexit is concerned, nothing really has changed yet, has it? exactly, the bank of superlatives journalists often fall back on has been exhausted yet again. it was an extraordinary moment in court and yet the brexit fundamentals remain the same. the government wants us to leave the european union at the end of next month with or without a deal.
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negotiations are continuing in brussels at a technical level today. opposition parties in their say absolutely must not happen, that there is a no—deal brexit. that is there is a no—deal brexit. that is the tension, that is the battle that is going to be resumed, with that big summit coming up in brussels on a couple of weeks' time forced by the way, the conservatives hoping to have their party conference starting inafew have their party conference starting in a few days' time in manchester. how does that work? it is due to start on saturday and i think it will. it's possible the government could ask for a recess, not a prorogation or suspension but a recess next week to make it happen, then again, they might not ask, given what's happened, and labour might make things difficult and try and hold ministers down from manchester to answer questions. yet again plenty of questions we can't answer. thank you. i'mjust again plenty of questions we can't answer. thank you. i'm just thinking what does this remind me of? tents for the media, people arriving with bags all the time, mad, it's
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glastonbury! political glastonbury. chris mason, thank you. louise, back to you. thank you very much. democrats in the us congress have announced a formal impeachment inquiry into president trump. mr trump is accused of violating the constitution and betraying his oath of office over allegations he sought help from a foreign power to damage a political rival. mr trump has called the claims "garbage". look, it'sjust a continuation of the witch—hunt. it's the worst witch—hunt in political history. we have the strongest economy we've ever had, the best unemployment numbers we've ever had. customers and former employees of thomas cook say they're still being threatened and mistreated by hotel staff, two days after the holiday firm collapsed. a group of cabin crew in cuba say they are effectively being "held hostage." a government—funded operation to bring thousands of holidaymakers back to the uk is continuing, but some customers say they are being thrown out of their rooms or prevented from leaving until they make direct payments to the hotels. the civil aviation authority
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says people should not make extra payments. supermarket giant sainsbury‘s is to close up to 100 stores, but open around 100 more. ben's here to explain. it seems a bit weird, doesn't it? these stores are closing in some places that are doing less well an opening in places they think they will do much better. a bit of a breakdown from the supermarket group this morning. they said they will close 10—15 of the big supermarkets, open ten more somewhere else. argos stores, sainsbury is them a few yea rs stores, sainsbury is them a few years ago, they will close 60—70 of those on high streets at the moment, stand—alone stores, and open 80 in the reception areas of sainsbury supermarkets. that is quite a big change. not great news for the high street. the local convenience stores sainsbury is has, it will close up to 40 of them. but here is the big improvement as far as they are concerned, open 110 more and they have said they will do them in
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different locations and look at who looks in the surrounding area and change the format of the store accordingly. they say they are doing this to save about £20 million a year, which will help cut their costs. we also heard today they will have a review of their bank, the sainsbury bank and stop offering mortgages. that is quite a big turnaround for them. they had said simply does not make them much money, low profit margin on that. as far as the stores are concerned, lots of closures but they said overall, they should end up with 75-100 overall, they should end up with 75—100 more, which is important in that battle with the likes of aldi and lidl. thank you, ben. the spanish tenor, placido domingo, has withdrawn from all future performances at the metropolitan opera in new york. he's been accused of sexual harrassment by several women, which he denies. in a statement, the singer, who's 78, said he was concerned his presence on stage would have distracted from his colleagues' work. the duke and duchess of sussex and their four—month—old son archie are continuing their tour of southern africa — their first official tour as a family.
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the couple are now in cape town, but prince harry will also visit malawi, botswana and angola, where he'll highlight his mother's work to tackle landmines. lets speak to our correspondent, pumza fihlani. she is in cape town for us with a lovely view behind you. tell us what they are doing today and how they are being received ? they have been received very warmly here in cape town by the communities they have visited over the last two and a half days. today's particular programme has focused on a visit to the archbishop desmond tutu foundation where they will get to interact with the archbishop and talk about the work he has done over the years to bring reconciliation in various communities across the world. they also want to learn how they can take those lessons and help younger generations to continue with that legacy. and at that point, the schedule between the duke and duchess then split. he proceeds to
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botswa na duchess then split. he proceeds to botswana where he will carry on with the rest of his african tour and the duchess will remain in cape town, where she later on in the day has an engagement with 12 female entrepreneurs. this is something thatis entrepreneurs. this is something that is particularly close to her heart. she is passionate about projects that are about uplifting young women and she wants to know what these young women are doing to try and navigate their way in a predominantly male society. lovely to speak to you, thank you for that. 8:13am. back to our main story this morning, the repercussions of the decision the supreme court. jeremy corbyn is leading calls for the prime minister to resign, after yesterday's supreme court ruling found mrjohnson's suspension of parliament was unlawful. but the labour party has faced criticism for its reluctance to back a general election and confusing brexit policy. labour's shadow attorney general, shami chakrabarti, joins us from brighton. where your conference was due to be going on but to now know so many mps
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are heading back to parliament. this has gone the way the labour party wanted. what are you going to do now that parliament is back? of course, we are working across the house of commons, including via conversations betweenjeremyjeremy as leader of the opposition and of smaller parties to ensure that the law is followed. the act which requires borisjohnson to get a deal from the european union or seek an extension. it's incredibly important to us that whilst we are itching for a general election, the nation comes first and there cannot be no deal crashed out during an election period. the priority is to try and lock that down, to secure compliance with that law and as soon as we feel confident at that, of course, we will trigger a general election. let's just pick you up on few things at michael gove this morning saying that if people feel the government
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is doing the wrong thing, then we should call a general election but i know i have spoken to you about this before, why not go for it now? well, we will go for it, as i said before, as soon as we are reasonably confident they country will not crash out of the european union union without a deal, with all the catastrophic consequences we have discussed if there is a no deal. that shouldn't happen by accident or default during a general election campaign. as you know, we worked across the house of commons to legislate to prevent that but we are dealing with a far right government that has displayed, proven only yesterday, complete contempt for the law. jeremy, as leader of the opposition, is working with other opposition parties to try and secure as best as we can compliance with that legislation. cani that legislation. can i also ask you as well, because i wanted your view and the labour
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pa rty‘s i wanted your view and the labour party's view... other parties are calling for a vote of no confidence. would your party support that? well, as i've been trying to say, we will support that, working with other parties. we have to work together because of the arithmetic in the house of commons, but before doing that, we are attempting to ensure that the country would not crash out of the european union without a deal, without some kind of relationship and agreement during an election campaign. it's about timing, it's about weeks and not months, potentially even sooner than that. that is what we're trying to do, trying to prioritise the national interest first and compliance with that legislation of the other week to ensure that we do not crash out of the european union by default. as soon as we are reasonably confident of that, then of course we will trigger a general election by means of a vote of no or another vote... if there was a vote
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of no confidence in you have been very clear you want to have this after the date, the 31st of october, if there voted no confidence before then, the labour party wouldn't back it? well, as i say, we are working across the house of commons, working with other parties and we will come to an agreement with the other parties, maybe even as soon as later today. but our priority, and i believe this is shared by other opposition parties as well, is to ensure that borisjohnson and his mates, who have not displayed much respect for the law so far in his short premiership, we want to make sure they abide by that legislation as best as we possibly can. when we have some confidence of that, it could be within days, but when we have some confidence of that, of course, we want to trigger a general election. you talk about confidence and you've talked about it a few times, if you are confident with the labour party
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not call an election now if you are not call an election now if you are not confident you could win it? just to try this one more time, i'm sorry if i am not being clear, we do not want the country to crash out of the european union without and arrangement because of the catastrophic effects that would bring the food supplies, the fuel supplies, the security arrangements. so what we need is for borisjohnson to present his deal to the house of commons, or to comply with the law, because there is now legislation on bass, and to request an extension of time of the european union. when we've got to that point, then, of course, we can trigger a general election and i would like it to be within days, not weeks, but we have to ensure that the catastrophic consequences of an accidental crash out are prevented. can you tell me whether the labour party is a remain party or leave
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party? there are labour voters, there are communities across this country that has been represented by the labour party for a very long time who voted to remain and who voted to leave. probably the majority of our members are, were remain voters and many, like myself, even campaigned to remain but labour has to represent, asjeremy remain but labour has to represent, as jeremy corbyn remain but labour has to represent, asjeremy corbyn said in his wonderful speech yesterday, we have to represent not the 52 or the 48% but the 99%. boris johnson to represent not the 52 or the 48% but the 99%. borisjohnson of course represents the 1% of the super wealthy in this country. that is what we have to try to do. it is very difficult because as you well know, you have been covering this story no doubt for the last three plus years, communities have been split, families have been fighting over this... what about the 17.4 million? try and bring people together... what about
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the 17.4 million? you talked about 196, the 17.4 million? you talked about 1%, what about the 17.4 million people voted to leave? very briefly? they need to be presented with a credible leave option that doesn't lead to food and fuel shortages and a lack of security cooperation for stuff that is what we want a guarantee for, that they can have a final say, with a credible leave option versus remain. shami chakrabarti, option versus remain. shami chakra barti, thank you option versus remain. shami chakrabarti, thank you for your time here this morning. jon is still at westminster and he will look at all the different repercussions shortly there might be from the supreme courtjudgment was there might be from the supreme court judgment was that there might be from the supreme courtjudgment was that it was raining this morning, how will it look, carol? still some rain to clear from the east. lincolnshire and the south—east. that should all go and the south—east. that should all 9° by and the south—east. that should all go by around lunchtime and then we will see some brighter skies with a few sharp showers. the wind will
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also ease as the rain clears. but we have seen some torrential rain in the last 24 hours. you can see yesterday's rain pushing northwards. this morning's rain coming in from the south—west and pushing steadily eastwards. if you are travelling, there will still be some huge puddles on the road and a lot of surface water and spray to content with so take it easy for some it's courtesy of this weather front which eventually pushes into the north sea. there will be a lull in proceedings and then the next array of weather fronts come in from the west bringing strengthening winds, thicker cloud and more rain. there goes the rain into the north sea and we are left with brighter skies behind. still some showers, especially as temperatures rise, if few of those could be heavy and possibly thundery. in between, we could see some sunny spells. thick enough clout in eastern scotland to produce some drizzle at times. we have some low cloud and mist and fog in northern ireland, it will brighten up with some showers for sub later, the rain comes in and
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cloud thickening in south—west wales and england, heralding the arrival of our next weather front. temperatures 13 in the north, 19 in the south. through this evening and overnight, our weather front coming in from the west introduce all this rain and they will be scooting from the west over towards the east. blustery winds around them as well. maybe some patchy fog for a time across south—east scotland but it will not be a cold night was not in fa ct, will not be a cold night was not in fact, quite and mild one with overnight lows remaining in double figures. we start off with the rain tomorrow, clearing eastern england festival, moving across north—east scotland and eventually clearing here through the course of the day. then we are into some drier conditions, some bright skies, some sunny intervals and also a few scattered showers. again, the potential here and there to be heavy and also thundery. temperatures 12—19 degrees. by friday, well, yet another weather system. this is an occlusion this
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time and will bring in some showers. the showers will merge to give some longer spells of rain to stop in between, some brighter skies, some sunny spells but it is going to be quite a windy day, particularly so across england and wales, especially along the coastline but even inland. note the temperatures sliding, 12—17 degrees. saturday is also going to bea degrees. saturday is also going to be a fairly showery day. in between showers, bright spells. areas of cloud at times. still quite blustery but note the change in wind direction, more northerly blow coming across scotland. temperatures here 12—15, in england, wales and northern ireland or 17. thank you, carol. it is biting up slightly in westminster after another deluge this morning. westminster, it's almost like someone has pressed play after it
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being on pause. it was suspended, prorogued by five weeks. but yesterday the supreme court said boris johnson's yesterday the supreme court said borisjohnson's decision to prorogue was unlawful and mp should return. 11:30am this morning they will be backin 11:30am this morning they will be back in the chamber taking their seats. mps over the country are descending on parliament right now. but what are they going to do? observers say it's difficult to overestimate the constitutional and political significance of yesterday's ruling but where do we go from here question but how does this change everything? our reporter graham satchell has been taking a look at the historical significance of the judgement. this is an extraordinary moment, a huge moment in british constitutional history. historians in the future are going to look back and discuss this ad infinitum, because it lays down very clearly that parliament is sovereign. because every time we have had a debate between who is sovereign —
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is it the monarch, is it the prime minister, is it parliament — parliament always wins. parliament is sovereign, suspending it was illegal and borisjohnson gave unlawful advice to the queen — the verdict of the supreme court was clear and devastating. some also believe it will have a dramatic impact on the future relationship between prime minister and monarch. traditionally, the queen relied on the prime minister's advice and we now know for the future, for the queen, for the monarchs that follow, that if it comes down to a choice between what parliament wants and what the prime minister wants, it has to be parliament and therefore, at some stage, the queen, or any other monarch, is now empowered to ignore the advice of the prime minister if he or she feels it is not commensurate with what parliament want. throughout history, suspending parliament for long periods has never really worked. we go right from the magna carta, right up to what is seen as the most celebrated moment of prorogation, which is when charles i prorogued
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parliament because he didn't get what he wanted out of the mps and wanted higher taxes, prorogued parliament and caused such a great controversy that pitched britain, essentially, into a civil war. they dropped his head off. yes, and charles i was, of course, executed, finally, for proroguing parliament. that, of course, won't happen to the current prime minister, but outside the supreme court, the anger on both sides is clear and there are now those metaphorically calling for mrjohnson's head. if the prime minister had any principles or integrity, he would resign, but i don't expect that to happen, frankly. the elephant in the room here is brexit. officially, the referendum was advisory, but the question for some is this — in practice, did parliament give away its sovereignty to the people when it called the referendum? the people spoke and they made theirjudgment, but we have a political class, we have a ruling class, in which i include thejudges here, that have decided they're going to thwart that result at every turn. the issues at stake could not be more fundamental —
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the sovereignty of parliament, the will of the people, the rule of law. graham satchell, bbc news, westminster. looking back there through the history books and looking at what happened yesterday, we are asking what happens today, what do mps do right now, what is their plan going forward ? right now, what is their plan going forward? but first, let's go to the brea kfast tea ms forward? but first, let's go to the breakfast teams around the uk to find out what's happening where you are. it is fairto it is fair to say many of us had an awful day yesterday. a months worth of rain fell yesterday in wiltshire.
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that is due to the remnants of a hurricane. for many of us, we are in between weather systems, so it should be drier than it was yesterday. it is not completely dry. heavy showers in the south and east. those were mostly clear away into the afternoon. still showers in the north and east of england, into scotla nd north and east of england, into scotland later on. through much of wales and southern and central areas of england it will be brighter later on with temperatures between 17 and 19 degrees. the next batch of rain will move into ireland and then spread into wales and england. overnight temperatures down to about 11 to 15. we have this next weather system moving east with low pressure
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driving the weather fronts and also giving us a fairly blustery day. some fairly strong winds expected during thursday. behind it we are looking at a mix of sunny spells and blustery showers during thursday afternoon. maximum temperatures, very similar to the last few days, around average for the time of year, the mid to high teens. for the rest of the week keep your umbrella handy because there is more rain in the forecast on friday. more shari during saturday, more persistent rain, particularly in the south on sunday. that is all for me. goodbye. —— showery.
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this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and sally bundock. mps in the uk get back to work — after the suspension of parliament was ruled unlawful on tuesday. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 25th september. with british lawmakers getting back to it, businesses are still urging for clarity over the looming brexit deadline. we'll take you through the timeline. also in the programme... the boss of wework steps down for the good of the company after investor worries over his leadership style at the office rental firm.

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