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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  October 7, 2019 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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you're watching beyond 100 days... a disaster in the making critics say. president trump's decision to abandon the kurds in northern syria, is described in washington as the ultimate betrayal. but the president digs in. syria, he says, was a quagmire, and under him the "endless and ridiculous wars are ending". a second whistle—blower and more subpeonas are set to go out at the start of week three of the impeachment inquiry. also on the programme..... 19—year—old harry dunn died in a road accident involving the wife of a us diplomat, who has since left the country under diplomatic immunity. borisjohnson says he'll be be raising it with president trump if she fails to return. american businesswoman jennifer arcuri refuses to deny
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or confirm she had an affair with borisjohnson. their friendship, she says, had nothing to do with the grants she got while he was london mayor. hello and welcome — i'm christian fraser in london, michelle fleury is in washington. four years ago, the caliphate of the so—called islamic state stretched across a large swathe of syria and iraq. the group was busy murdering american and european hostages, its fighters had killed 138 people on the streets of paris. the americans turned to the kurds for help. and not only did they help to defeat the group, but today the kurds are guarding tens of thousands of defeated is fighters. but last night, president trump turned his back on his kurdish allies, announcing that he is withdrawing the us soldiers from syria — and will not be standing in the way of a planned turkish incursion into northeast syria. the decision has been slammed in washington. in recent weeks, the americans had
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persuaded the kurds to dismantle defensive positions, that were installed along the northern border to deter the turkish invasion. and now they are gone, donald trump has given president erdogan the green light to cross into kurdish territory as far as the red line on this map. —— as faras —— as far as the dotted line on this map, i should say. the president was stung into a response. writing on twitter, "if turkey does anything that i, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits," he wrote, "i will totally destroy and obliterate the economy of turkey." here's our world affairs correspondent paul adams. american forces on the move in northern syria, withdrawing from observation posts close to the turkish border. when turkish troops move in, the americans will not stand in their way. this moment has been coming for months. donald trump would like to get out of syria altogether. but even though this is a limited move, the thought of what happens next is causing alarm.
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turkish forces are getting ready to move in. they plan to drive syrian kurds away from the border. the white house has given them a green light. turkey will soon be moving forward, says the white house, with its long—planned operation. united states forces will not support or be involved in the operation. us forces, having defeated isis, will no longer be in the immediate area". local kurds have relied on american support for more than four years. now, they sense betrayal — watching in dismay as the americans left, sensing that they could soon be at war with turkey. no, says the poster, to the turkish occupation of our land. kurdish fighters, backed by the west, fought and defeated so—called islamic state. the last is stronghold — baghuz — fell in march. for donald trump,
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that spelled job done. "we will fight where it is to our benefit," he tweeted this morning. "and only fight to win. turkey, europe, syria, iran, iraq, russia and the kurds will now have to figure the situation out." how far does the turkish leader intend to go? he says he wants a safe zone in northern syria and he gave some indication at the un last month. this morning, he said the operation was about to begin. translation: there is always a phrase we say, "we can come any night without warning". and our determination remains because it is absolutely out of the question for us to further tolerate the threats from these terrorist groups. mr erdogan says he wants to settle as many as 2 million syrian refugees inside of the safe zone — a little over half the number currently sheltering in turkey. and there is the question of what happens to captured is fighters being held by the kurds.
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washington says turkey will now be responsible. paul adams, bbc news. there has been a furious cross—party response in congress today. the senator lindsey graham, normally one of the president's staunchest allies, called it a disaster in the making. "it is never wise to abandon an ally who has sacrificed on your behalf," he wrote. "it is never wise to repeat the mistakes of your predecessor. it is never wise to outsource american national security to turkey or any other nation". and from president trump's former envoy to the region brett mcgurck... "donald trump is not a commander—in—chief. he makes impulsive decisions with no knowledge or deliberation. he blusters and then leaves our allies exposed when adversaries call his bluff or he confronts a hard phone call." with me in the studio is michael singh, former senior director for middle east affairs at the national security council, now managing director at the washington institute.
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last month, the syria study group which he co—chaired, released their findings and recommendations about the future of us policy. when we spoke last, you said at the us is sure to stay engaged. when we spoke last, you said at the us is sure to stay engagedm when we spoke last, you said at the us is sure to stay engaged. it has an alarming decision because it could pave the way for a resurgence of isis as both democrats and republicans have earned here. frankly, it could trigger a cascade of events which would big bad for american interest and our allies. including the assad regime trying to ta ke including the assad regime trying to take northern syria. it could create a dispersal of these isis fighters and create a worsening of relations between turkey and the us. now we seem between turkey and the us. now we seem to be walking away from the progress that we've made. what is the message that the sense to the kurds who wear our allies? where
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does that leave them? they see this as an abandonment. of them. the united states is right to say that there was never a long—term guaranteed to the kurds, but at the same time we were trying to manage this sort of relations between the turks and the kurds and a way that benefited our interest. it also sends a confusing message to our other allies. we've been trying to recruit european or regional support for the military mission, humanitarian or stabilisation that is -- humanitarian or stabilisation that is —— missions in north—eastern syria and those will set those efforts back by calling in to question the us commitment. the big question the us commitment. the big question is what happens to these camps that are holding ijaz fighters and their families cosmic one has 70,000 people in it —— is fighters and their families? surely these people are then going to just walk
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out of the camps cosmic that has a concern. the persimmon from the white house said that these people are now the responsibility of the turks. —— the press statement from the white house. there are outside that that's on that the tax is to occupy. the kurds who currently card in that area it will leave nobody to go to that area. if you get this present bracket, it goes back to this idea of national security that you cannot wait for an attack on your own soil. you have to defend further afield. it shows you that everything and said he is inextricably linked. 0ur everything and said he is inextricably linked. our support for the kurds is notjust about the kurds, notjust the kurds is notjust about the kurds, not just about turkey, the kurds is notjust about the kurds, notjust about turkey, but it is about the security in north—eastern syria, preventing isis primary emerging —— preventing isis from re—emerging. it is important for policymakers to understand that this is not really about doing
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something for the kurds. this is about trying to expand moderate resources to safeguard our national security —— thank you for your input. and with us now is the conservative mp bob seely who sits on the foreign affairs committee. what nato consulted about what president trump was planning?” what nato consulted about what president trump was planning? i do not know but i assume that it may not know but i assume that it may not have been by the impulsiveness and impulsive nature of the decision it was made seemingly without reference to that many people, even within the us chain of command. i am unclear. which does speak about the instability of the decision making progress within the alliance? inconsistency is not good in policy, especially in policy in the middle east. i think the us tries to be consistent and there are many very impressive people who deal with us policy. i'm not sure that president trump is one of them and i think it is largely his impulsiveness which has pulled the us out of syria under thing which it pulled that out of
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the iranian nuclear deal as well. he is right in one sense that the eu has abdicated all response healthy for these prisoners. we do not want him back. and it has the american troops which are working alongside the kurds, with only a limited sort of involvement, with nato and us troops some of what president has a point. the un need to do more for the defence and combine nato objectives and policy objectives in the middle east. in the europeans do tend to cut when the americans try to go on and make policy. those fair comment, but i have to say this is a very rash and rash decision which is going to cost the lives of hundreds, if not thousands, people in the middle east and is probably going to bea middle east and is probably going to be a significant step back in terms of stability. what can europe do on this if the us is pulling out? as a
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just a question of spending money? no, nothing. it has taken years. the relationship with the kurdish forces in syria was developed —— started being developed four years ago. you cannotjust get being developed four years ago. you cannot just get in being developed four years ago. you cannotjust get in there and replace them. if there are british and french forces there, it draws into question what they can do. no one has the skill to do this apart from the us. the us pulling out —— no one has the skill to do this apart from the us. the us pulling out leaves alex exposed. — — the us. the us pulling out leaves alex exposed. —— are allies exposed. there will be significant casualties and a significant impact on this or is fighters. the isis idea is that they are guarding, if they are fighting a major nato power like
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turkey you will probably get a plate ofa turkey you will probably get a plate of a lot of those prisoners into iraq, which is now more unstable thanit iraq, which is now more unstable than it has been for months. and maybe into a side controlled syria as well. which i think is a very bad thing for western —— into the assad control syria. presumably the eu is talking to the kurds and trying to provide some support to ensure that there is something done with his presence? the trade-off, the relationship. as someone who served with kurds in the last four years myself, i find them impressive, with kurds in the last four years myself, ifind them impressive, i found them brave. i find them committed and they had a cohesion and an integrity to them. and i think, on a personal level, this is very, very disappointing that we treat allies in such a shoddy way and it is going to get as incredibly bad reputation in the west for not sticking by our allies. 0n bad reputation in the west for not sticking by our allies. on a personal level, that is my opinion to that. the relationship between
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the kurds in the us and nato is primarily that the ft has provided ground troops to defeat isis and also france provided air cover for them as well and once that us air cover goes “— them as well and once that us air cover goes —— the us and france provided that air cover. once that aircover provided that air cover. once that air cover goes there will be no replacement. the russians are happy because dues strategically they were have outmanoeuvred for whatever reasons. they have persuaded president trump to pull out of syria. it is a fantastic achievement for the russians have done this and bad for the rest of us. it is good in adverse side and for the tax. —— it is good news for the assad regime and for the tax. thank you forjoining us from westminster. a lot of cross
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criticism in washington today. here is a clip from fox news this morning. the thing i believe, if you make a commitment and somebody is fighting with you, america should keep their word. as long as it... because you want other people with you. it's just a bond of trust. call the president. call the president before it's too late. what was striking about that clip is that kevin mccarthy is the top democrat in the house. he is known as being a very big defender republican, republic and i should say. here you had him muted, nonetheless offering criticism of the president's policy and this was followed by another ally of the president's mitch mcconnell, saying that i owe to the president exercised to leadership. if you take these two statements together, the key thing here is that you are
quote quote
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starting to see these high—profile republican speak out against this action and now will be white house reverse themselves on this or will they press forward? if they reverse themselves, has the damage already been done. lindsey graham saying that that they are looking for a bipartisan response, meaning that they may be are trying to reverse they may be are trying to reverse the white house decision. we will look at that. as if the abrupt shift in its syria policy weren't enough to be dealing with, the white house continues to grapple with the growing threat of impeachment. over the weekend, a second whistle—blower stepped forward to describe the president's scheme to leverage dirt on his political rival, joe biden from the ukrainian leadership. and there are more depositions on the way. on tuesday, congress will hear testimony from gary sondland, the us ambassador to the european union who's become a key figure. three republicans, mitt romney, ben sasse and susan collins, have broken ranks with their party to criticise donald trump. the majority though have remained silent or supportive.
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one of those defending the president was republican senator ron johnson of wisconsin. in a heated interview on sunday, the chairman of the committee on homeland security stated that he had no trust in us intelligence agencies, such as the fbi and cia: ijust want the truth. the american people want the truth. so do you not trust the american...? do you not trust the fbi? you don't trust the cia? no — no, i don't. i'm just very confused here. absolutely not. you don't trust either of those agencies? after obstructing lisa page? 0k. joining us now from washington is former cia operative lindsey moran. good to have you with us. you had the chair of the homeland security committee, someone who is tasked with keeping america safe, does not trust the fbi or the cia, he fundamentally believes there is deep state working to get rid of the president. and really, that goes to the very heart of the divide in america at the moment, does it not? it sure does. it is a startling
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statement. it echoes things that the president himself has said before. he has said that he also does not trust the intelligence community and has denigrated the intelligence community, the cia and the fbi publicly. to have that echoed by republican senators at this time really plays exactly into the hands of ourenemies and really plays exactly into the hands of our enemies and into the hands of foreign intelligence services her watching washington, they are watching washington, they are watching the united states and this administration has really presented itself as a target rich opportunity for foreign spies. the watch of foreign spies do, they look for people whose motivations and vulnerabilities might cause them to betray our sell out their country and they are saying that in the white house. i want to pick up on the second whistle—blower stepping forward. from the little we know, they apparently have first hand knowledge of this phone call between
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the president and the ukrainian leader. how significant is that? how does that add or change our understanding of the dense cosmic well, i think what it does is it not only bolsters the claims of the first whistle—blower. only bolsters the claims of the first whistle-blower. it also debunks the republicans and those from the white house who have criticised the first whistle—blower for saying that the person had no first—hand for saying that the person had no first— hand knowledge. for saying that the person had no first—hand knowledge. now, we do have another whistle— blower with first—hand have another whistle— blower with first— hand knowledge. have another whistle— blower with first—hand knowledge. one thing i would like to point out is that nobodyjoins the cia with ambitions of becoming a whistle—blower. that is not a real career enhancing than ever. for two people to come forward and others, and i would suspect that there might be more in the future, it is not an easy thing to do. they whistle—blower act is it is not an easy thing to do. they whistle— blower act is actually rather weak in protecting people from the community and i think that by them doing this, they are doing what they swear they would do. when we're sworn into the cia, we're told
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that we pledge to uphold and protect the constitution of the united states. and i think that's what we're saying happening from within the the ranks of the intelligence community. going back to your first point, what you make of those who have responded by saying, these two whistle—blowers, are part of some broader conspiracy? it is really preposterous to think that the central intelligence agency is some kind of left—wing deep state. it is ha rd kind of left—wing deep state. it is hard not to laugh at that. as comical as that has come on a serious note, the cia really is a place where people pack their politics at the door. this is not a partisan issue. this is an issue of national security. the cia, the fbi, the entire intelligence apparatus that we may pay for, its specific mandate is to stop the kind of
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foreign interference that we're seeing the president elicit from, publicly, ukraine, russia and china. the death of a young man in a road traffic accident has become the latest test of the special relationship between the uk and the usa. anne sacoolas is the wife of a us diplomat living and working in the uk. she was wanted for questioning by british police over the death of 19—year—old harry dunn. he was riding his motorbike when he collided with a car near raf croughton in northamptonshire in august. ms sacoolas returned to the usa after reassuring police she had no intention of leaving the country. she's been granted diplomatic immunity by america, a decision which borisjohnson has questioned, saying that it "cannot be right to use the process of diplomatic immunity for this type of purpose". the foreign secretary dominic raab is to discuss the case with the us secretary of state mike pompeo.
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earlier, harry's parents spoke to victoria derbyshire. we know that she did not mean to kill our son. i can forgive her for that. but forgive her for a? we would have tried to get high a suspended sentence or that she could have continued to be a mum. so that she was now taken continued to be a mum. so that she was now ta ken away continued to be a mum. so that she was now taken away from her own children —— we would have tried to get hera children —— we would have tried to get her a suspended sentence. but forgetting her from leaving? i am nowhere near. — — forgetting her from leaving? i am nowhere near. —— forgetting her for leaving —— nowhere near. —— forgetting her for leaving — — for giving nowhere near. —— forgetting her for leaving —— for giving her for leaving. joining me now is ben emmerson qc, a prominent british lawyer specialising in international law. he's also the former un special rapporteur on counter—terrorism and human rights. what diplomatic immunities are given? diplomatic immunities are given? diplomatic immunities are given to those who are close to the
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core functions of a diplomatic embassy and it becomes much less clear when you travel further away from the centre of the central functions. the issue that has caused so functions. the issue that has caused so much controversy here is that too many people's mines, this does not seem many people's mines, this does not seem the sort of function or situation that diplomatic immunity is intended to protect the operations of a foreign mission. the defence from the megabytes, the us embassy, the actually issue the second statement after some of the criticism began. any questions regarding the waiver of the immunity, with regards to diplomats and their family, are immunity, with regards to diplomats and theirfamily, are considered carefully, given the global impact that such decisions carry, immunity is rarely waived. does that wash cosmic there have been cases that the united states cosmic embassy in london has waived immunity. they did this for a 60s commission claim for
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a secretary employed at the embassy. “ a square they pretty much unprecedented step of calling upon an ally. just on the issue of you saying that it was a serious charge. she was driving on the right—hand side of the road that that she drove out the side of the bay. we're talking about a possible charge of death by dangerous driving cosmic there has to be an effective independent police investigation to determine what potential liability there could be. there could be a straightforward liability of negligence for the road traffic accident, or if there was careless driving, it could be the fence of death by careless driving or the merciless offence if it was reckless driving of death by reckless driving. there are several liabilities that could be incurred, more important, i suppose for most
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people watching this is the inevitable real sympathy and empathy one feels for the family. in circumstances where a tragedy is compounded by what must be a completely bewildering and frustrating experience ——. completely bewildering and frustrating experience --. the pa rents say frustrating experience --. the parents say that they simply want accountability. should a road traffic accident, diplomatic immunity cosmic that has a very good question. one has to ask what the fundamental purpose of diplomatic immunity is. its object is to enable foreign diplomats to go about their business without the risk of being held up on trumped up charges on machines that don't expect the beloved. it is obviously a very difficult —— different set of circumstances we have a diplomat here or in the us it states. in circumstances like this in the past, you have seen one estate or the
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other way of diplomatic immunity is whatjustice can other way of diplomatic immunity is what justice can take other way of diplomatic immunity is whatjustice can take its other way of diplomatic immunity is what justice can take its course. that is excelling what the prime and the foreign secretary had suggested should happen here. very good to get your thoughts. northamptonshire police did meet the suspect and there was no immediate application for a waiver. there was a situation where they were going to investigate further and begin where they were going to investigate furtherand begin an where they were going to investigate further and begin an interview. and they say, unfortunately, we were laterally advised that the waiver had been declined, as in, the waiver of immunity had been declined and the suspect had left the uk. it came asa the suspect had left the uk. it came as a surprise, clearly, to northamptonshire police. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — the us businesswoman at the centre of a row over whether borisjohnson failed to declare his friendship with her as an interest favouritism".
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and the climate rebellion protests being planned for 60 cities across the world. we'll be hearing from two of our reporters out and about. hello sunnier skies on the way tomorrow when it has stayed cloudy today but there will be showers around. northern ireland and scotla nd around. northern ireland and scotland many of us here brightened up. there were showers here as well. a mixture of showers and rain brings rainbows. we're on a rainbow watch this week. there will be plenty of those as it stays wet at times with showers, but also some sunshine. the pressure is close by and it will be quite blustery as well, low pressure sitting close by the uk for much of the week. tightly packed isobars indicate the best queens. when these they will bring bands of showers and cloud and rain —— tightly packed isobars in the quite the high winds.
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it is turning blustery out there, now flossed or fog overnight. it is turning blustery out there, now flossed orfog overnight. she was peppered about western parts of the uk, frequently running into the western side of scotland, but some will travel east, right across the uk during the day. the proportion of the day, actually wet, might be quite small in some spots. you may see the odd shower to go through. either decided that, prolonged dry and sunny weather. the showers moved through a quicker. there could be showers with hill and thunder, —— could be showers with hail and thunder. it is not going to be a wash this week, but there will be quite a few heavy showers around, frequently moving into north—west scotla nd frequently moving into north—west scotland on wednesday. closest to that area of low pressure, but bands
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of showers and inquired through —— right through, even towards the south and east as well. other clients are meant that low pressure. wednesday, this is how we start, showers to the south and south—east. further showers moving on from the west. there is some sunshine around. anything on wednesday looks to be a little bit cooler. a selection of locations taking us into the weekend... you get the idea that existing unsettled. there may be some long spells of rain in parts of england and wales and into the weekend. many more locations available online.
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yond 100 days... with me michelle fleury in washington, christian fraser is in london. our top stories—— president trump says he will destroy the turkish economy if turkey goes "off limits" after his decision to pull us forces out of north—eastern syria. meanwhile, the white house continues to grapple with the threat of impeachment over the ukraine allegations as congress prepares to hear further testimonies. coming up in the next half hour... in the past hour, foreign secretary dominic raab has spoken to mike pompeo about the case of harry dunn. he reiterated his disappointment with the us's decision and urged them to reconsider. and american businesswoman, jennifer accuri, remains tight—lipped over her relationship with borisjohnson, saying he had nothing to do with furthering her career.
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make no mistake — president trump is fighting back against calls for impeachment with full force and any republicans who questions his policies have been put on notice. after mitt romney called the president's appeals to ukraine and china for help on investigations intojoe biden wrong and appalling — mr trump unleashed, saying: mitt romney never knew how to win. he is a pompous expletive who has been fighting me from the beginning, except when he begged me for my endorsement for his senate run — i gave it to him — and when he begged me to be secretary of state — i didn't give it to him. he is so bad for rs! he went on to call for romney to be impeached. and with donald trump's popularity amongst republicans running steady at 90% — his voice holds great
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sway in many states. but is this really the way to treat someone who might be part of the judge and jury in the senate? for more we are joined by ron christie — former advisor to george w bush. so, you have got mitt romney, if this goes to an impeachment trial, could be amongst the jury members, white ball that the strategy? what is the president trying to achieve? it is just another manic monday ntb abbe donald trump as my tweets. you would think that the has been on the verge of potentially impeaching the president of the united states, which are then moved to a jury trial, that she would not be antagonising thejury trial, that she would not be antagonising the jury pool in such a ma nifest of antagonising the jury pool in such a manifest of yet, this donald trump, this is how he is, he always has to end. ifi this is how he is, he always has to end. if i am senator romney, i am looking at that thinking you are doing yourself no favours, mr president, if i have to hold you in judgment. and yet it does appear to
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be working. you've only got two others, senator collins and ben sat speaking out. everybody else has been silent of depended donald trump. thus far, there are 67 senators that are required to remove a president from office. i would not start antagonising them on the verge ofa start antagonising them on the verge of a potential trial. still many steps we have to take, but it is not good politics. good to see you. you probably watch the sunday shows as the title. i was struck by how many republicans came on and did not defend the words of the conduct of the president. they were more interested in attacking the process. is that the right strategy from a republican point of view? good evening, question. i do not think that many of us, those who are here talking on tv or elected representatives like what the president has been using twitter for work what he has been using his platform today. there are so many issues about health care, about immigration that we could be talking
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about and instead we're talking about and instead we're talking about donald trump and his tweets. so, does not surprise one bit. that's the republicans are upset about the process, which i still think is a sham. we had not had a built in the house of representatives for an impeachment, but at the same time the president doesn't self no favours in the way that he acts towards others he perceives as being his political adversaries. that's a minimum of talking about it as if it was a joke. we have had senior senators on saying he was not really serious about getting china involved. then, you collect back, we had the same thing when he asked russia to go after hillary clinton's amy is, he was not really serious about it. that same day those e—mails were at. if you're calling on the chinese to get involved, to be releasing it as a joke? get involved, to be releasing it as ajoke? i do not think get involved, to be releasing it as a joke? i do not think anything the president of the united states as whether they are republican or democrat should be said lightly. i do not think that that offices is one that lends itself are people jogging one that lends itself are people jogging around on what they may
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remain update. you have to speak on a certain amount of conviction and determination by the president exceeds jogging, of course, determination by the president exceedsjogging, of course, our alleys and advertise around the world a re alleys and advertise around the world are trying to take measure of what mr chubb actually means and what mr chubb actually means and what he does not. i think that is a very dangerous precedent for us to be in. can we turn to serious things for a second. the baseball. the nationals are playing the dodgers in the player. when i said a few months ago that i wanted to get into baseball, i was assured that if i fell that the nationals it would be a life of celebration and silverware and now i learn, and watching the play—offs, following its from afar, i learned that the national social to baseball what the england football tea m to baseball what the england football team at a world cup finals. they implode. what is going on? hey, man! may have in one word game! we have not gone anywhere yet. you are jinxing us! what is it they say? it is not over enter the fat lady
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sings. i hear you is not over enter the fat lady sings. i hearyou are is not over enter the fat lady sings. i hear you are going tonight. iam going sings. i hear you are going tonight. i am going tonight. if we lose, question, i am coming after you. i am going tonight. if we lose, question, i am coming after youlj question, i am coming after you.” ama question, i am coming after you.” am a good luggage i'm, tally. so, tonight, is the best of five. —— i ama tonight, is the best of five. —— i am a lucky charm. look at those guys. i think i had am a lucky charm. look at those guys. i think! had about am a lucky charm. look at those guys. i think i had about five hotdogs that day. that is not popcorn, what is that? that is crackerjack, question. i do have a beerin crackerjack, question. i do have a beer in hand. enjoy tonight. back to
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the news. borisjohnson has called on the eu to enter detailed talks to "thrash out" its objections to his latest brexit proposals. under the uk prime minister's plans unveiled last week northern ireland unveiled last week, northern ireland would leave the eu's customs union with the rest of the uk, but would continue to abide by certain eu rules. despite there being less than a month left until the current brexit date, european leaders haven't exactlyjumped at the prime minister's latest offer. the french president says the eu will decide at the end of the week whether a new deal is possible. today the dutch foreign minister stef blok met with the uk's brexit secretary to discuss the proposals, tweeting afterwards that "important questions still remain on the proposals". well, earlier today i spoke to the dutch parliament's brexit rapporteur the mp pieter omtzigt, who's been in london today holding private talks with mps and dutch citizens.
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reportedly on saturday said the eu 27 would not accept an agreement that created a customs border in ireland. you say no checks of any sort? he is doing the negotiations, at least the commissioners in the negotiations. both sides have stated they do not want any border, because of the good friday agreement. but borisjohnson has also said that the uk is leading the european customs union in its entirety, that includes northern ireland. if that is the case, then they would have to be some kind of customs check on the island of ireland. that is why the uk, there was a deal between the eu and the uk, there was a deal negotiated, there was a deal which borisjohnson negotiated, there was a deal which boris johnson disapproved twice and proved once and the 30 vote. that is why they have come up with a new deal at the very last moment. there are less than ten days left before the european summit next week. i do not know the specific details. the
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eu council works better under the white hot pressure. but in this case, be honest, you can smell an extension coming? i'm not giving chances today about what is happening. of course we see the amendment which asks for one if there is no deal. but i would like to focus on what is the best way in which we can have a future relationship with the uk? the uk is a close partner to us, especially to as the netherlands and we do a lot of trade. a new deal will be highly disruptive for the netherlands and even more disruptive for the uk. at least the time being this act has taken the pressure off.” least the time being this act has taken the pressure off. i am not sure takes pressure off. i have to say, if you wanted to apply pressure, it would have been handy at the government has stuck to its own 30 day deadline in presenting a
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plan. you are meeting dutch expats today. i think you have already met some, some have been here four yea rs. some, some have been here four years. they pay taxes, mr obama is, is the settled status scheme working for them? —— raise is the settled status scheme working forthem? —— raise theirfamilies. they have worries that they have no physical document that they have settled status. it is still only a computer system and computer systems with governments have a tendency to breakdown every now and then. and they so have questions how the settled scheme will work in case of a new deal. in kissimmee deal, we have got everything fixed. but because of a new deal, this is part of the deal agreement and things could change. so, for instance, i was one of the mps did same in the uk and tabled a motion to be invented. but that has not happened yet. so there is no bilateral agreement at the moment? the netherlands are quite a lot of
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unilateral action. so, we for instance extended the validity of british driving licences. the problem being can you drive into belgium? i think this whole process has not been about the citizens and it causes a lot of anxiety there for millions of citizens. very interesting listening to that interview, because he was saying towards the end of the interview that in fact he thought it was going to be more serious for british ex pats to be more serious for british expats who were going into europe if there was no deal. he said under, of course, a withdrawal agreement or underan course, a withdrawal agreement or under an agreement, there was a freedom of moment all the way through to 2020. in the event of no deal, yes, it was public at those bilateral agreements, that would be fine for british pensioners in spain, there was been agreement between spain and britain, perhaps the same france it is for those people who are crossing borders, who
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work across several borders in central europe, this people are going to be the hardest hit. even by president trump's standards — many were left doing a double take today over his tweet... it comes after a chorus of criticism — from republicans and democrats alike — for his decision to withdrawal us soldiers from syria. well here to discuss the political fallout is our north america editorjon sopel i want to pick up kevin mccarthy, staunch allies of the president... those are people who would get an attack of the vapours at the thought of saying anything critical about donald trump. yet both of mount today and been sharply critical. mitch mcconnell signed a withdrawal of armed forces from syria would
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only benefit russia and the assad regime. i urge the president to exercise american leadership. by some of them can mccarthy. so, donald trump comes out last night and the white house make the statement, essentially saying look, if turkey got into northern syria, we will not be anywhere near. just giving the code, it says that having defeated the isis we won the rugby in the immediate area. in otherwise, the door is open to you. what we shouldn't, and social media donald trump talking about i migrate an unnatural wisdom. i think what follows it is more important. that is what signals that there is going to be some kind of clamp—down. i consider it to be off limits i will totally destroy and obliterate the economy of turkey. remember last night's statement was talking about we're not going to be there, do as you wish. i think donald trump has got the message. as upset earlier,
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the timing of this, when you need other venture can get, when you may be facing impeachment, very ought. on the side, we have just heard someone has said it is the instability of decision—making process. this idea that there is no consultation, they do not, probably do not know what was happening to people in congress. if people in the pentagon did not know, then surely the people in nato did not know either. you know, they say that history does not repeat itself, it rhymes. actually, in this case, history is repeating itself. a year ago donald trump tried a similar move at pelling american troops at assyria. that led to the resignation of the defence secretary and the resignation of his adviser of the region under result of which, donald trump quietly put to one side, the idea of pulling these american troops out of syria. something seems, similar seems to be happening
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this time around. he made this bold statement that no one saw coming, there is an enormous human cry, a large protest and suddenly the m essa 9 es we large protest and suddenly the messages we are getting from the defence department, from the white house, well, no, when we said we are giving a great light to the turks, watching meadows we do not support any move on their part. so, it has been a very confusing, head spinning, kind of, 24—hour. been a very confusing, head spinning, kind of, 24-hour. thank you for helping us work our way through it. the american businesswoman jennifer arcuri has refused to say whether she had an affair with boris johnson when he was london mayor and has denied he showed her preferential treatment. speaking on itv, in herfirst television interview about the allegations, she said the pair had bonded over their mutual love of shakespeare. the prime minister has denied breaking any code of conduct. here's our special correspondent lucy manning. i hope you're having a productive...
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ready to hang out! mrjohnson's been accused of a conflict of interest after she got public money and was allowed on trade trips he led. you like hanging out with us, right? i do, i'm always happy to hang out with innotech. today, she had her say, although six times she refused to say if they'd had an affair. the answer that i'm going to give is now going to be weaponised against this man. it's really categorically no one's business what private life we had, or didn't have. and categorically, more important, boris never, ever gave me favouritism. never once did i ask him for a favour. never once did he write a letter of recommendation for me. he didn't know about my asking to go to trips. mrjohnson has also refused to say if they did or did not have a relationship. it's notjust a personal question. the businesswoman got £26,000
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and went on free trade trips, and later her company was awarded £100,000 from the culture department. absolutely nothing to do with mrjohnson, she insisted. did you ever have any intimate relationship with boris johnson? yes or no. because the press have made me this objectified ex—model pole dancer i really am not going to answer that question. so, you won't deny it? i'm sorry. jennifer arcuri says boris johnson visited her at her flat here in east london five, ten, a handful of times. there are now four investigations to see whether mrjohnson helped her to receive any funds or access to trade trips. the london assembly has given him until tomorrow night to provide any e—mails or documents. if he doesn't, then they could summons him to appear. if he ignores that, then it could be a fine or even prison.
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the prime minister had little to add. did you break the gla code of conduct? no, and i think i've said everything i'm going to say on that matter. miss arcuri said they had a very close bond. labour says he should have declared this. he has a duty to declare his relationship with ms arcuri. he has a duty to make that declaration under the code of conduct which he needed to have abided by. jennifer arcuri has spoken. the prime minister still has questions. lucy manning, bbc news. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — waking up on the other side of the country, one man's expensive ride after a night out. members of the royal family are backing a new campaign aimed at helping people spot the early signs of mental illness.
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princes william and harry, and their wives, catherine and megan, have narrated a short film, which will be broadcast on tv tonight. katharine da costa reports. 27—year—old share struggles with depression and anxiety after suffering a miscarriage two years ago. she has and exercise helps to pursue made and now shares her worries for friends and family. but at the time, she said she felt utterly lost. i kind of opened up and for me that was a bake thing. because it is really hard to open up about mental health, but what you do open up new feel like a part of you is, like, relieved, basically. chefs is, like, relieved, basically. cher‘s not alone. a study shows... over a quarter of people waited at least six months before getting help. while three quarters of those
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wished they had done susan. everyone knows that feeling. when life gets on top of us. the czechs and duchesses of cambridge and sussex have joined a host of celebrities to launch every mind matters. an online toolkit providing simple steps to tackle anxiety, low mood and problem sleeping. but something more investment is needed to support those with severe mental illnesses. where only a third of patients receive the treatment they need. for some people, whatever you do, you're still going to suffer. more severe forms of mental in illness are not amenable to the sort of approaches. you need expert's help. the government recognises more work is needed to meet a raising demand on services. it is helped this campaign will help stop early symptoms from escalating and reduce pressure on the health service. we are in this
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together. thousands of climate activists have taken to the streets across the world for the first day in a two—week campaign of peaceful disobedience coordinated by the extinction rebellion protest group. the activists rose to prominence in april when they disrupted traffic in central london for 11 days. but this time they say to expect protests in 60 cities as they demand governments take immediate and drastic action to avert an ecological disaster. in the netherlands more than 100 people were arrested after erecting a tent camp in the centre of amsterdam. in australia, 30 people were arrested after protesters staged protests blockading roads in sydney and melbourne. and in london more than 140 people were arrested after blocking access on bridges and roads into the city centre and gluing themselves to the ground. -- 217 —— 217 people were arrested. the uk arm of the group is demanding
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the government declares an immediate climate emergency and reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2025. earlier we spoke to danjohnson who was at the london protest. so, ithink so, i think i can make out portcullis house behind you, which tells me you are on best mr bridge? yes, that's right. just outside the houses of parliament. this is best mr bridge right across the thames, which is then blocked by protesters for most of the day. that is the same for some key sites right across westminster, and around central london. places like chip albert square, the roads there have been blasphemous of the day. this is the strategy to target high—profile locations stop —— for most of the day. i am guessing that walking a bit of a tightrope between disruption to try and affect change and at the same time not so much that they start turning off members
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of the public who are sympathetic to their message? yes, it is a checker line. we have seen quite a few drivers who have been frustrated today, because the many roads have been blocked. there has been no prior notice, really, of which junctions were going to be blocked and so drivers have not been able to plan ahead to avoid the disruption. i guess that is part of the point of it, that is the strategy. they have raised $2.8 million through crowdfunding, big donations from household names like the band radiohead, as well as an american group called climate emergency fund. they have been spending some of this money on these events over the next two weeks. things i put the parties, paying some activist to take part. the goal is disruption and the real testis the goal is disruption and the real test is can they pull it off? they are talking about disrupting government agencies, disrupting
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roads, disrupting key infrastructure. the test of the support, we will find out next two weeks that that is there and how global this movement really is. i have been quite struck by the cross—section of people. i went out and about around london today and there are lots of older people there, as well. in fact, some quite interesting costumes. some of them look like the handmaids tale in these funny silver costumes. i also saw a priest who were sitting there, as well. so, it is not just it is notjust young people. we've all been there. at the end of a night out with friends, in the soothing lull of the taxi home, oh how nice it is to have a moment's kip. but spare a thought for one scottish clubber called joseph. yes, he'd got into his uberjust after 5am — and apparently had picked his destination — before falling asleep. but what should have been a brief drive
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this turned into a 3 hour long trip , finishing in kirkcudbright — more than 100 miles away from his home, at the cost of nearly eaoo. joseph went to find his way home on all guises of public transport, eventually making it back to edinburgh the following afternoon. a cautionary tale of when it really doesn't pay to get some rest. ijust remember one i just remember one instance ijust remember one instance when i was training as a kid, outranking and we had had quite a long night. i got on one of the slam door trains andi got on one of the slam door trains and i close my eyes, just take my shoes of and we went past my stop in wimbledon and i booked up in southampton. it was the last train home and some so and so had open the door and kicked my shoes off on the way. it was pouring down, i was in southampton with no shoes and it
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cost me £150 in a taxi back home. on a train, fell asleep and was let there on the train. that is all they have time for, goodbye. sunnier skies in the way tomorrow, but there will be showers abound. northern ireland and scotland, brightened up today to stop there we re brightened up today to stop there were showers, as well. that mixture of showers and rain brings rainbows. we are on rainbow watch the sea, plenty of those as it stays wet at times be showers but also some sunshine. low pressure close by it is going to be quite blustery, as well. low pressure are sitting close by the uk for much of the week. tightly packed as about indicating the best wins around low pressure, these were the fans of showers of shower to sunshine either side. we have seen cloud and rain for many of us today and some stage, the last of that as we go into tonight clearing
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away south—east england. showers continue across western areas, but for many there will be clear spells. temperatures not dropping down to far. no frost or indeed bulk overnight this week. we start tomorrow with a lot of sunshine around. the showers already peppered about western part of the uk. frequently running into the western side of scotland. some will travel east right across the uk during the day. the proportion of the date might be quite small in some spots. showers move through even quicker when you factor in the gusty wind. a shower could be heavy with pale and under. the showers can have quite an impact. temperatures around the mid—teens, sunspot 17 or 18 celsius. hopefully getting the flavour it will not be a wash out the sea, but quite a few heavy showers abound. frequently moving into north—west scotla nd frequently moving into north—west scotland on wednesday, closer to this area of low pressure. bands of
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showers moving through right the way across the uk. even towards the south and east, as well. this is how we start wednesday, could be some showers to the south and satisfy time. by the showers moving on from the west, again some sunshine around. wednesday looks to be in is around. wednesday looks to be in is a bit cooler. i will show a selection of locations taking us into the weekend. get the idea, it is staying unsettled. there may be some longer spells of rain in parts of england and wales in particular. just a few places, as you can see, many more locations available online.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. new figures show knife crime offences in england and wales have increased by two—thirds. we have a special report from a hospital on the front line what is going on out there? i hope it'sjust a blip. i hope there's a change in attitude towards knife injury. after the fatal car crash that killed 19 year old harry dunn, the prime minister urges the us to reconsider granting immunity to a suspect — who is the wife of a us diplomat. the businesswoman accused of taking favours from boris johnson when he was london mayor refuses to say whether they had an affair. kurdish fighters — key allies in defeating so—called islamic state —

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