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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 10, 2019 2:00pm-4:59pm BST

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you were ever a fan of the west wing. there is a crunch meeting, alan aldo goes into the white house to slug it out with martin sheen. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. —— alda. they have no chance of today at two: turkey steps up heavy artillery and air attacks on the kurds in syria — as the us stands accused reaching an agreement, they sit and of abandoning its allies in the fight against so—called islamic state. have a chat. and then they wait this is the scene live this afternoon — until it is time to go and meet the on the turkey / syria border. press. you look at the gulf between the two sides. it still seems pretty brexit talks under way unbridgeable. it is basically that between borisjohnson and his irish counterpart leo varadkar — but, so far, little we brits have put on a package which cause for optimism. the eu have said no to. we are harry dunn who died in a car crash in august — a us suspect won't return to the uk, waiting for the eu to put a counter say briefing notes held by president trump. of pakistan, coming up on afternoon live all the sport — ben croucher. —— a counter pakistan, which the eu a major typhoon means that england against france on saturday in the have said they are not going to do. rugby world cup is off. at 2:30pm, i for lack of fresh thinking and new
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will tell you about scotland waiting proposals, you can't see how this is for the weather for a chance to play going to work. albeit i think genuinely both men would desperately for the weather for a chance to play for a place in the quarterfinals. like to avoid no deal because of the here is the monster storm, a violent typhoon at the moment, no wonder it has caused disruption to the rugby matches. it will bring torrential i didn't see that episode. was rain, damaging wind to southern japan as we head today we can. more that alan alda or martin sheen? detailsjust half japan as we head today we can. more i didn't see that episode. was that alan alda or martin sheen7m details just half past. was in poor american accent. also coming up — something to chew that alan alda or martin sheen7m was in poor american accentm on from england's outgoing that alan alda or martin sheen7m was in poor american accent. it is nice to laugh. there is not much to chief medical officer: a proposal laugh about. we have spoken about to prevent childhood obesity — by banning snacking the ticking clock but the end of the on trains and buses. road is there. i think it is, the ticking clock but the end of the road is there. ithink it is, i suspect it has been there for some time now. i was struck at the tory party conference just the other week, just talking to senior tories hello, everyone — this i felt they had mentally already is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. there have been reports of fierce moved into the post—breakdown of clashes in northeast syria as turkey continues its major offensive against kurdish fighters, talks world, gaming out what happens
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whom they regard as terrorists. next. i think we are beginning to get a pretty clear idea of how this the turks say they've hit more than 180 targets in air could shake out now. it looks likely and artillery strikes there will have to be a further since the attack began yesterday. one report said eight brexit extension, borisjohnson says civilians had been killed, he will comply with the wall. and tens—of—thousands are said to have fled the assault. the us secretary of state mike although he still intimates he has pompeo has been defending president trump's surprise decision some mechanism for getting ranted, to pull us troops out of the area, and has denied that it gave turkey not —— getting around it, not a green light for its attack. our correspondent martin patience sent this report from the turkey/syria border. entirely clear how. jeremy corbyn has given a thumbs up to a general this is the latest salvo of the syrian war. turkey this morning election saying one is no deal is of shelling positions in the north of the country. the table he would be prepared for labour to back a general election last night, its forces pushed when he has previously said he would into key towns along the border. kurdish fighters vowing to stop not do that. given that, it would seem not do that. given that, it would seem in the aftermath of the talks the turkish advance fired back. breaking down we would i think be moving fairly quickly towards a the men who led the fight against the islamic state group winter general election. thank you, norman smith. are battle hardened. but, without american support, they‘ re completely outgunned by the turkish military. our correspondent adam fleming civilians are also caught in the crossfire.
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translation: after the turkish in is brussels for us. shelling on the border what we varadkar says is absolutely crucial to where we go from here. what we varadkar says is absolutely crucial to where we go from herelj just texted the entire british press areas, so far, we have backin just texted the entire british press back in brussels to find out what received ten patients. film or television reference they two of them are critical would use. lost in translation, and are having surgery. translation: after the turkish shelling on the border groundhog day, the thick of it, only areas, so far, we have received ten patients. two of them are critical foes and horses. the rest don't make and are having surgery. the number of injured any sense. a joint statement from is on the rise every hour, but we, the medical staff, are ready. america has been accused of stabbing leo varadkar and boris johnson the kurds in the back. any sense. a joint statement from leo varadkar and borisjohnson after their meeting. leo varadkar tweeted but donald trump is doubling down, showing no regret. it. the taoiseach and prime the kurds are fighting for their land, just minister, it says, have had a so you understand, they are fighting for their land. detailed and constructive and, as somebody wrote in a very, discussion. both continue to believe very powerful article today, ideal is in everyone's interest. they didn't help us in the second world war, with normandy, as an example. they believe they can see a pathway toa they believe they can see a pathway to a possible deal. based on they mentioned names of different battles. but they are there to help challenges of custom and consent, us with their land. and the potential to strengthen president erdogan this morning, making his first comments since the operation began. bilateral relations including northern ireland. they agreed to meet for their own discussions and
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officials would engage intensively translation: hey, european union, get a hold of yourself! on them. further discussions,... look, i'm telling you again. if you describe our operation as an invasion again, we will take the easy road. if you listen to what norman was we'll open the doors and send saying a couple of minutes ago, that was a way more positive outcome of that meeting venue might have you 3.6 million refugees. expected from what people had been saying beforehand. you are not in a country where half the population have already been joking because, hang on, that forced from their homes, sentence there, they agreed they there are fears of a fresh humanitarian crisis. the humanitarian situation could see a pathway to a possible is untended and getting worse. the military situation threatens deal. that was unthinkable 24 hours to be overrun notjust ago! there are only two pathways to with a turkish—kurdish conflict ago! there are only two pathways to a possible deal i can see, one, the but with the threat of isis, and the diplomacy is, frankly, in crisis. irish say we, the irish, are we are seeing in this microcosm prepared to have a withdrawal here a global situation agreement that has a less specific, where the traditional diplomatic less legally operational backstop on it. the one that is in the actors have been horrifically weak. withdrawal agreement is 100% failure means syrians are once again certainty at the moment. does this mean the irish government would be running for their lives. prepared to accept something that martin patience, bbc news, was 90 or 80% certain? how you judge on the turkish—syrian border. the level of certainty, i'm not
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sure. the other pathway to a deal is our international correspondent the uk accepting that either orla guerin sent this update from the turkish side of the border. northern ireland or the whole uk would potentially add some point in the future have to remain in the within the last few minutes here, there have been three very eu's customs territory for a loud blasts close to us. temporary period. those are the only two options, island relaxing what it we could hear them, we could feel wa nts two options, island relaxing what it wants from the deal or borisjohnson them and instantly there were scenes of panic in the streets of people relaxing his position on whether running for their lives. northern ireland could be in the customs union for a period after others rushing towards the scene, trying to find out if brexit. this meeting tomorrow is there were casualties. we know that there was at least one person injured. we saw them being taken away going to be interesting because leo from this building across the road. varadkar rather does going to be interesting because leo va radkar rather does hold going to be interesting because leo varadkar rather does hold the key that is the office here. there is going to be a couple of the local governor. of interactions from that statement, and we could see on the ground it sounds like. leo varadkar will the evidence of an artillery strike. so this was incoming fire from the other side of the border. there was a second strike further down the street. speak to head of the task force we could see the smoke rising. the authorities have pushed us back now. they are afraid of barnier. the more incoming fire. but for the first time, this offensive that turkey is carrying out across the border andy brexit secretary will meet him as well. sounds like they are
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in syria, that has now working on it, engage intensively started to feel very real and there will be some sort of process around trying to get a deal. on the side of the border. the issue could be the irish and by extension the eu have always said they don't want to be the ones responsible for a no—deal brexit. president erdogan has said this they would be prepared to keep on morning that in his words 109 talking with the uk until one terrorists have been eliminated. seconds to midnight on the last day, turkey says that the offensive is going according to plan. that more than 180 targets were hit by last night. evenif seconds to midnight on the last day, even if it was futile so they could and we know turkish forces across the border today are pushing not be playing for a no—deal brexit. deeper into north—eastern syria, taking territory. is this a case of the eu doing what the cost of the offensive is now being felt here it has done over the last few in turkish territory. dr drew mikhael is a research fellow months, keeping the door open to be from queen's university belfast, hejoins me now... polite, diplomatic and the good guys in this process? even though they know the door is being kept open to something they can never actually 24 2a hours on, what is your assessment agree with. lots to think about. of where this is leading?” when they say it concentrates on 2a hours on, what is your assessment of where this is leading? i don't think it is possible to give an accurate assessment about where it customs, that is a huge issue. will ultimately lead. in the short, explain what it meant spike in the sense here. it is worth picking medium and long term we can say this isa apart some of the details, maybe i medium and long term we can say this is a diplomatic, military and most
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should have done it. consent, the importantly humanitarian catastrophe. as we have seen, reports of tens of thousands of idea that one of the big objections people fleeing their homes. for the uk to the backdrop and withdrawal agreement as it stands at certainly from the humanitarian the moment is it not does —— but point, from the diplomatic point the kurdish are being squeezed between doesn't give a strong enough... turkey and incoming syrian national boris said on his first day the military forces. you don't have to look far to see what happens when backstop is anti—democratic and you have refugees of that level wrote to donald tusk saying in within your country. lebanon. -- august the backstop if it came into force would contravene the spirit of matt leaving your country. president the good friday belfast peace erdogan has said he has shown his agreement because unionists in northern ireland would be upset about it. nothing is meant to happen intentions, threatening europe with in northern ireland any more unless flooding them with a 3.7 million it has the consent of both the unionist and nationalist registered refugees inside the country. this shows turkey's communities. that then evolved into the proposal put forward by boris intentions of setting up a safe sun, johnson to the eu after the conservative party conference last most likely going to lead to further week. would have the stormont consent motion which would mean the humanitarian issues regarding refugees. especially if they are northern ireland assembly would have to give its consent in advance to forced to be refiled into syria. you we re the replacement backstop ever coming forced to be refiled into syria. you were careful with your language just
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then, what did you mean to say? the into force. in other words, probably injune or into force. in other words, probably in june orjuly next into force. in other words, probably injune orjuly next summer they would either have to give a thumbs international principle of pushing up would either have to give a thumbs up orthumbs refugees, forcing them to go back to would either have to give a thumbs up or thumbs down to this replacement arrangement ever coming the country they have fled, into fort. then, every four years, a president erdogan has said he is likely going to set up a safe sun vote in the northern ireland inside northern syria in which the assembly about whether to continue this arrangement or to come out of syrian refugees currently housed in turkey can return. looking at the it. the eu was not opposed to the idea of a stronger role for the role of the united states here, it northern irish political is difficult to see this as anything institutions. but they did not like other than the united states this consent mechanism that was proposed by the uk. first of all throwing an ally to one side and not because it could have prevented the caring about the consequences. arrangements coming in, would have absolutely, i think that is more given the stormont assembly and in than fair. last december, 2018, particular the dup, in the eu's view, the power to veto this coming donald trump threatened to remove troops, in which case the kurdish in. you would effectively have no deal happening in northern ireland at the end of the transition period forces on the ground warned that next year effectively and there this was the likely outcome of said would be nothing in its place to removal. moreover, looking to the protect the irish border if that longer and medium term, the us is happen. the other thing they are not setting itself up as a reliable opposed to was the four year rolling
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deadline which they think would ally. this administration has said it wishes to continue employing create massive uncertainty every local proxies to carry out work that four years. just think about it if they require. and whenever those we we re four years. just think about it if we were in that situation were about a year before people would start worrying about, is the replacement local proxies,, the ypg, has backstop going to survive the stormont vote? the eu thought that destroyed the isis caliphate, it was a blatant veto for the dup to sets up them as someone not to be pull... that has been one of the dealt with. in european capitals, most productive areas in the talks some of those being held in syria because the eu is not opposed to it in principle. they think, yes, let's are going to have to go.|j strengthen the role of the northern some of those being held in syria are going to have to go. i would classify that as a medium term ireland institution. ithink strengthen the role of the northern ireland institution. i think there will be something both sides can problem. isis has actually claimed approve but not the mechanism boris several suicide bombing attacks johnson has proposed. he would have inside of syria and iraq at last to step back to that for something that was acceptable to brussels and night. the innocent people within the rest of the eu. that phrase that the north—east parts of syria are they can see a pathway to a possible already suffering the fallout from deal, i mean, they are notjust this decision. —— inside of syria saying that, that suggests reason
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and rakka last night. for optimism. yes, again, though, i borisjohnson is meeting his irish counterpart leo varadkar for brexit think those two options as i laid talks this lunchtime — just days after european leaders out as the potential paths to a expressed pessimism about reaching a deal by the end of the month. brexit deal to me seem so massive, the two leaders are having what's and if you go back again to what been described as a private meeting norman was saying before i came on, to "allow detailed discussions". the labour leaderjeremy corbyn said the idea in the current political this morning that labour was ready climate that borisjohnson is now for a general election once going to sign up to northern ireland it was clear that a no—deal being in the eu's customs union after everything he has said about brexit was off the table. our political correspondent being a poster that idea seems to be jessica parker reports. quite extraordinary. equally, the can he break out of this deadlock? borisjohnson leaving downing street idea that the irish government would back down from having a backstop earlier to see this man — that gives them 100% certainty and leo varadkar, also on the move. by extension the eu would back down the two leaders arriving from a backstop with 100% protection for their meeting near liverpool. but can an agreement be reached? for the single market, that seems ministers insist they've not run just as extraordinary at the moment, out of road just yet. the reason the prime minister's meeting leo varadkar isn't simply too. fascinating, adam, thanks. just to have a social conversation. let's go back to norman smith. well, they're seriously focused on trying does that change things? i don't to resolve this issue and trying to get a deal. think so, actually. ifeel a bit the issue being this — how to keep the irish border free and flowing,
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and how close trade ties need to be in order to make that happen. like trying to make sense of this. now, in just one week from today, there's that crunch eu summit, where borisjohnson has said he hopes to finalise a deal with brussels. they agreed they could see a pathway three weeks from today, the uk toa they agreed they could see a pathway to a possible deal. wes fiona's, is due to leave the european union. but, as things stand, pathway could be here or way over the two sides still seem far apart, while the deadline is closing in. there. what it is and is a landing strip, which is what borisjohnson said they had to find, this landing this former chancellor the latest to offer up some ideas strip where they could get some of his own about how to get an agreement. broad agreement. there is nothing but is a brexit delay now inevitable, after mps passed specific to suggest they found any a law designed to prevent mechanism to get round these two a no—deal departure? twin hurdles of customs and consent. yes. i think the government will comply with the benn act on the 19th of october, instead, the backstop, to coin a and i think the european union phrase, seems to be to go away and will grant an extension. reflect. i take it now, one week away from the crunch eu summit, the challenge now for us is to demonstrate that the well of ideas has not run dry. u nless away from the crunch eu summit, unless they have something tangible just because the proposal to grasp now, this does not give on the table is not going to fly does not mean that we shouldn't look them sufficient great to get an at other versions of a deal. but he has got different ideas on what to prioritise if an extension is secured — agreement —— grit to get an
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a message to borisjohnson that labour is eager for a snap election. agreement. instead, sketches out a distant footpath. that's fine and take no—deal off the table, and then, let's have the election. dandy but you need something down in we're ready, we're ready. black—and—white when you are days away. however cordial and there is only one reason it constructive the conversation may hasn't happened yet — we can't trust you. be, however much their desire may be to get a deal, it is not here, there is not the nuts and bolts of an but hang on, here is one agreement that i can see in the ofjeremy corbyn's top team statement, which is perhaps no surprise. because the mass of on whether a further referendum should come first. obstacles around customs and my concern might be that we would, if we had a general election, it consent, it is so hard to see how would be a kind of quasi—referendum, that it would be all your bridge that because, basically, about in or out, what kind of deal. we believe that we have to have and, so to a certain extent, customs control because we want our i can see the sense in trying own customs regime. the irish are to have a referendum first. saying no way, we don't want any next saturday's showdown session customs checks. i don't see how you in parliament following the eu bridge that. you could perhaps find summit will be a must—watch, as mps decide what to do next. a way around the issue of consent, a serene atmosphere doesn't always hang over westminster, say the dup can have a vote every but big decisions do. jessica parker, bbc news. six years, rather than four years. also say you have to have the our assistant political editor approval of the nationalist community as well. there are ways
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norman smith is in westminster. you can get around consent. customs i think has become a deal breaker. we are awaiting some sort of news and i don't see anything in this conference, a statement from leo text that suggest they found a way varadkar at the john lennon conference, a statement from leo varadkar at thejohn lennon airport, around it. at the risk of being he is about to fly. boris johnson's start work to your walled off, we plan isn't? downing street are built shielding him from press conference 01’ shielding him from press conference or media statements. i guess that it up —— at the risk of us being will change when leo varadkar has had his say. i think number ten's statler and waldorf, we built it up view was that if the whole meeting and take it away again. could be out with the media spotlight and there was a grated the outgoing chief medical officer chance of the two men —— my greater for england has called for a ban on eating and drinking on public transport, to help tackle the rise chance of the two men —— my greater chance of the two men focusing on the hard yards of trying to get this in childhood obesity. in herfinal report, professor dame sally davies says deal over the line, albeit i think the government needs to take radical action, including tighter rules on eve ryo ne deal over the line, albeit i think everyone accepts the odds of a food advertising and on takeaways. breakthrough are pretty close to here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. running a mile every zilch. we have been around this so morning before lessons — just one way this school in south many times, time is now almost up. london is trying to tackle childhood obesity. only days to go until the eu summit. too little exercise and too much fatty food has proved disastrous. now england's former
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there doesn't really seem to be any chief medical officer has said radical action is needed, including banning eating fresh thinking on either side. the on public transport, and tax breaks for healthy food. british proposals as put forward by borisjohnson british proposals as put forward by government needs to be bold boris johnson have and it can make a difference, british proposals as put forward by borisjohnson have been put to one side by the eu and there has not and the public are asking for this. they believe, the public do, been any counteroffer it seems from the eu. it means it is hard to see that government should protect their children. what the basis is for any sort of today's report lays out the challenge posed agreement. i rather suspect by the by childhood obesity. close of play we may reach a on average, in the final year of primary school, situation were either mrjohnson or six out of 30 children will be obese, twice the number compared to 30 years ago. leo varadkar concedes it is game in england alone, 1.2 million children are clinically obese. this is feeding into diseases overfor leo varadkar concedes it is game like type two diabetes, over for negotiation. you are normally upbeat but we are running once very rare in children. out of road, aren't we? we are. we there are now 100 have three or four days now until the eu summit. they have always said they would need probably a week to new cases each year. have a deal signed off in advance so orange, grapes, apples, strawberries... they could put it round the 27 some of three—year—old marisa's favourite foods. her parents made a radical change to her diet recently, different eu countries, all be on the same page when they get to the after being warned that she was summit next week. it is not a case overweight and needed to be slimmer. of borisjohnson summit next week. it is not a case i was feeling so bad of boris johnson lines summit next week. it is not a case of borisjohnson lines next week summit next week. it is not a case of boris johnson lines next week and because i am the mum and i am they all sit down and debate what
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they all sit down and debate what responsible for her health, they are going to do and come to an and i was feeling terrified about herfuture and how to help her. agreement last minute. it does not work like that really. they have the deal worked out in advance. that the result of the healthier diet means today is kind of the last is that marisa has lost two kilos chance to get that agreement which presumably they could still get and the rest of the family are slimmer as well. through the eu. if you look at all and there have been other successes. the language we fat in the last sort the levy on sugary soft drinks has seen a sharp drop in the amount of 2a or 48 hours or so, you get the of sugar being eaten, sense we have moved into the blame but today's report wants a tax game. there has been a souring in on sweet, milky drinks and the phasing out of advertising of all unhealthy food. the atmosphere. mentally, i thought this back at the tory party it says only bold measures will stop children from drowning in a flood conference, mentally in team boris of unhealthy food options. johnson they have already moved on sophie hutchinson, bbc news. to the next phase which in their mind is, i think, i'm joined now by food scientist to the next phase which in their mind is, ithink, a general election. which also coincidentally 110w election. which also coincidentally nowjeremy corbyn's mindset, with and historian dr sue bailey. his announcement today that once a delay has been assured, he will good afternoon to you. this would be a change in modern culture, wouldn't press the triggerfor a delay has been assured, he will press the trigger for a general election having previously rebuffed it? for a lot of people, this is how it. it means the likely course of they eat! it is interesting, in events following saturday sitting of terms of the national food survey,
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parliament is we will pretty quickly we only just started move into a winter general election. terms of the national food survey, we onlyjust started recording snacking and eating outside of the underlining just how important this home around 25 years ago so it is a particular meeting between boris johnson and leo varadkar is. fairly recent change. a lot of particular meeting between boris johnson and leo varadkar ism particular meeting between boris johnson and leo varadkar is. it is, because the view in downing street people are doing it. time is more is that basically dublin is the key pressured. we have more demands. here. if the taoiseach could give people just pressured. we have more demands. peoplejust think pressured. we have more demands. people just think now it is an the thumbs up or even a hence that a cce pta ble people just think now it is an acceptable thing to do. a lot of people say, we remembered decades ago you would sit down every day for he was mildly sympathetic to something the british government was ago you would sit down every day for afamily ago you would sit down every day for proposing, that would provide the a family meal, cooked food, and momentum for brussels to come on that's what's gone wrong. we don't board. but if dublin holds out, then do that any more. again, it is only there is no way, it is argued, that since the sort of light 1970s, early there is no way, it is argued, that the rest of the eu is going to trample all over dublin and say you 19805, since the sort of light 1970s, early 1980s, records of eating outside of just have to sign up. what we have the home, eating separately. all of learned over the past three years is these changes that have taken place that the eu has stuck resolutely by because we are slightly more fractured in the way we have to have dublin, almost as sort of an act of faith in the eu to say, we know you a food consumption patterns now. say their span were brought into action area faith in the eu to say, we know you are a smaller, weaker member of the eu, you risk getting pushed around tomorrow, would we notice any
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by the big, bruising neighbour in significant difference, do you the shape of the uk, we will stand think? people would have to control by you. they have never to be budged themselves. interestingly, in the washington metro system there is a from that. unless the taoiseach is ban on eating and drinking on the going to see some sort of deal that he thinks is acceptable today, i think it will be game over for the metro there. obviously, there is a negotiations. thank you, norman. method of enforcing it. quite how one does it, does labelling on our brussels correspondent adam fleming in is in brussels for us... norman said zilch when he spoke about hope of a breakthrough, i bosses are saying you shouldn't be don't know what the french german eating and drinking. how do people get this in force? by nature, if you is. people just don't know what the french german is. peoplejust say don't know what the french german is. people just say zero here. are grabbing food on the go, you are people have been saying that for a going to grab the wrong sort of couple of days now, the chance of a food. that unfortunately is true. it revised deal to be signed off by is really up to the individual to leaders at the summit is zero. so actually be more controlled. if they much would need to happen that i are going to snack, look at the just can't see it happening. we will healthy types of snacks such as fruits and possibly not which they listen very intently to what leo could be consuming, rather than high varadkar has to say. is there any kind of movement on ireland and by fat, salt, sugar foods could be consuming, rather than high fat, salt, sugarfoods which could be consuming, rather than high fat, salt, sugar foods which tend to be more prevalent. thank you, doctor extension the eu's red lines? could
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sue bailey. they see a scenario whereby maybe they see a scenario whereby maybe they reduce the amount of certainty time for a look at the weather... which would make the sort of here's ben rich. proposals borisjohnson has put forward a little bit more palatable? is there room for manoeuvre on that idea of a consent mechanism with the all ice on tokyo? and that part of political institution set up by the peace process so japan more generally. this is political institution set up by the peace process so the northern ireland executive, assembly at typhoon hagibis, itsjourney over the last four or five days, moving stormont and the ministerial council over the warm waters of the where the british and irish specific, growing, you can see in governments cooperate to do with the centre the eye, that shows it issues for the whole island of means business. a violence iphone. ireland. there was a sticking point it has been downgraded, just if there is to be more negotiations semantics, really. it is now known after this stage, if there is an as very strong. wind speed has extension to the brexit process and dropped by five miles per hour, more talks, that will be the area we still sustained wind in the middle are looking for. the other thing to of 115 mph, gusts of 160 mph. the look for with leo varadkar, what does he say about an extension? here track takes it towards tokyo and the in brussels, the conversations are just beginning. both in terms of the
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south east, 1a on saturday evening, duration, how long it is, any we expect. still as a very strong conditions that would be attached, typhoon. part of the problem is that conditions that would be attached, conditions the uk would be expected just last month the same parts of to live up to as part of the japan had another typhoon, eye. extension. the conversation has only just started here in the background, not formally among the 27. not one there is japan, you can see eye —— side, but how sick, interesting to see michelle barnier. no emotion, very straight. not seem to do you can see faxia. typhoon hagibis‘ anything that rocks about —— michel. track takes it in a similar direction. for areas still cleaning the eu negotiators don't want to make the situation any worse. that up direction. for areas still cleaning up after the last— last month, this is why you saw in barnier‘s speech, will not be welcome. scotland's game lavishing praise on the uk on sunday, technically this thing negotiating team, saying they were might have passed but they could very competent and professional. still be clearing up? this is looking at opportunities to try to saturday's where the first of all. be nice, but to british ears that we expect the storm to arrive, would say, thanks, that is not making landfall in the evening, nearly enough. there is always a bit weather going downhill as it approaches. 200—300 millimetres of
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of tension, i suppose, when it leo rain. in the centre, right under, varadkarand of tension, i suppose, when it leo varadkar and the british prime minister speak because we varadkar 500 millimetres. damaging and tens that they things that are very dangerous wind, big waves crashing unpalatable —— might unpalatable to onto the shoreline. 6—9 metres high exit years. do you remember the crashing into the shoreline. huge coastal flooding problems. sunday, briefing from uk official on monday the storm moves quite quickly night, the spectator, they raised the prospect ireland have possibly north—eastwards across japan, by sunday itself we are looking at a sent the boris johnson the prospect ireland have possibly sent the borisjohnson of the prospect ireland have possibly sent the boris johnson of the summer, if you move on one bit of the backstop, we will move on the largely sorry, if rather breezy day, rest, which did not go down well the forecast not too bad itself. as with the irish. the german first you say, clearing up to do depending zilch is apparently zilch, says a onjust how bad tweet. —— matt the german for zilch. you say, clearing up to do depending on just how bad this term is when it makes 1a. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. turkey continues its offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria — the japanese meteorological society there are reports of heavy fighting in the central border region, of the world authority on storms. and seven civilian deaths. boris johnson is meeting the irish prime minister today — to try to find a solution other forecasting centres around the to the brexit deadlock. world, we are getting the latest president trump says officials will speak to the american woman information from them. let's talk who claimed diplomatic immunity closer to home. nothing as dramatic after a crash resulted in the death of teenager harry dunn. as that. we could have some problems
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with our own in the form of quite a lot of rain. things clouding over england's rugby world cup match across the rest of the uk, that was against france on saturday is called cou nty across the rest of the uk, that was county down earlier on. quite a off. scotland have called for gloomy picture there because this contingency plans if the typhoon stripe of cloud has been working its affects the match on sunday against way in. it is out in the atlantic. japan. james madison has pulled out of the england squad. and heather this is a very lengthy weather front and it has some little bumps on it. watson has her biggest winner on that. it's sliding through quickly. instead it will hold it back, tour since 2017. bringing pulses of heavy rain to the outgoing chief medical officer some areas. as we head towards the for england has called for a ban on eating and drinking on public end of the afternoon, the wet transport, to help tackle the rise weather developing, particularly wet in childhood obesity. in herfinal report, professor dame sally davies says the government needs to take radical in the western side of scotland. action, including tighter rules on 20-30, in the western side of scotland. 20—30, may be 50 millimetres of food advertising and on takeaways. rain. there will be some clear here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. spells. most especially through northern ireland, southern and running a mile every eastern scotland, that is where we morning before lessons — will have the lowest temperatures. elsewhere, a pretty mild night. just one way this school in south tomorrow gets off to a blustery
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london is trying to tackle childhood obesity. start. here is one bump pushing into too little exercise and too much fatty food has proved disastrous. now england's former parts of wales and northern england, chief medical officer has said enhancing the rainfall. there are met office yellow warning in force. radical action is needed, including banning eating on public transport, the ground is so wet at the moment, and tax breaks for healthy food. government needs to be bold a further 50 — 70 millimetres of and it can make a difference, and the public are asking for this. rain will cause further problems. these bands of rain continuing to they believe, the public do, sing south eastwards. strong winds as well, gusts of a0 — 50 mph. the that government should protect their children. today's report lays out western side of scotland and here, the challenge posed by childhood obesity. hefty showers. a lot of rain but on average, in the final year of primary school, there will be some sunshine as well. six out of 30 children will be temperatures generally between 13 obese, twice the number and 17 degrees. but that front not compared to 30 years ago. done with us as we head into friday in england alone, 1.2 million children are clinically obese. and saturday. this bump in the this is feeding into diseases weather front works in and that will like type two diabetes, once very rare in children. hold the rain back across southern there are now 100 and south—western parts of the uk. new cases each year. we are likely to see heavy rain orange, grapes, apples, strawberries... returning to the south—west of some of three—year—old england, perhaps getting into wales. marisa's favourite foods. further north, there will be some
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her parents made a radical change sunshine but some hefty showers in to her diet recently, after being warned that she was the far north—west, 13, 1a, 15 overweight and needed to be slimmer. i was feeling so bad degrees. saturday night and sunday, because i am the mum and i am this dollop of rain pushing north responsible for her health, eastwards. it may dry up later in and i was feeling terrified about the day, some uncertainty about that. plenty of showers into her future and want to help her. northern ireland and western the result of the healthier diet scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland and temperatures of 11—16d. is that marisa has lost two kilos for some of us, quite a lot of rain and the rest of the family over the next few days. there are are slimmer as well. and there have been other successes. warnings and you can check those by logging on to the bbc weather the levy on sugary soft drinks has seen a sharp drop in the amount website. of sugar being eaten, but today's report wants a tax on sweet, milky drinks and the phasing out of advertising of all unhealthy food. it says only bold measures will stop children from drowning in a flood of unhealthy food options. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. as you can imagine, there's been plenty of reaction to all of this on social media. this is bbc news — jess brammer, executive editor of huffpost uk said... our latest headlines: "obesity is a massive issue, turkey continues a military offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria — but shift workers eating breakfast there's widespread international
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concern the attacks could lead to a resurgence of the islamic state group. borisjohnson and the irish prime minister have released a joint a psychologist and eating disorders specialist, statement saying they are trying going by the twitter name to find a "pathway to a possible ceylan, said... brexit deal" after a meeting today. briefing notes given to president trump reveal that a woman with diplomatic immunity, who's a suspect in the fatal crash of teenager harry dunn, will not return to the uk. but the proposal is supported by a twitter user known england's outgoing chief as grumpy brummie. medical officer says eating and drinking on local public transport should be banned to help tackle childhood obesity. and coming up — we'll tell you why sonia pombo is the campaign lead the design of the new £20 note for action on salt — was revealed in the seaside a specialist research group which is based at queen mary town of margate. university of london. shejoins me now... sport now on afternoon live i'm guessing that you support any with ben croucher. move like this? totally? and every rugby expert is now a we are facing a situation with many weather expert. children being obese and having long term effect from that, type two
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diabetes, cardiovascular disease, we from a pure sporting side — all need to address this, there is scotland need to beat japan by eight no magic bullet, no single answer, a points on sunday to qualify for the quarterfinals whole raft of measures need to be at the rugby world cup. however — as you might taken into account, which the chief have just heard from ben in the weather — that typhoon could medical officer in her report has scupper those ambitions. highlighted. the idea of banning whilst the worst of the weather may snacking on public transport, it is have passed by sunday, what it leaves behind could be the real problem. big brother, everything people feel is going wrong in many places. now for knockout games, world rugby has reserve days, but not for pool games. surely the argument has always been so if it's called off. that's it. a nil—nil draw and it'll the argument is about education and knock scotland out — assuming that ireland beat samoa responsibility. it is a novel approach. not something i have seen as they're expected to do. they're left in limbo suggested before. iagree, i'm not sure how it would be policed or until sunday morning. prevented. it is just highlighting england already know that some of the things we can all do they're not playing. they were due to play france collectively to address this in tokyo but on saturday problem. it is not, i don't think, fairto problem. it is not, i don't think, fair to say it is down to individual when the typhoon is expected to be at its strongest. responsibility of the parents to make sure their children are doing they've now left to head south to a training camp more exercise 01’ for a few days in myazaki. make sure their children are doing more exercise or eating healthily, because there are so many cues out that cancellation means england
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there influencing behaviours. the will top the group and likely play australia in the last eight. environment is different socially to italy against new zealand has also been called off. italy had an outside chance before. the sweeter things, easily to qualifying for the knockouts — but needed a win and a bonus point grabbed, asa against the all blacks. something they've never managed. before. the sweeter things, easily grabbed, as a nation we don't sit one of their players, leonardo ghiraldini, down as a family and eat properly, broke down in tears when he heard down as a family and eat properly, do we? it is part of the problem. i the news given that it was meant to be his final match and he'd spent guessing 20, 30, a0 years ago, we the last six months battling to be fit after a knee injury. probably were not snacking as much as we are now. part of the fast paced life we live and down to all lets move on to cricket because of the marketing out there england announced their new boss on encouraging our children on their way into school to eat a high fat, monday and we have heard from him for the first time today. salt, sugary products on the way he's been talking up the quality of his side and why not into school or back home. it is really, when they're the world champions and arguably the most something we need to tackle. it is formidible side in the white down to the food industry, really, ball shorter formats. as for test matches, well, to really earn up to their responsibility and the government to it's been a while since england were a real force — make them do so. no child, exemplified by australia retaining the ashes this summer, even if the series was drawn. generalisation, few children want to silverwood replaces trevor bayliss be obese. want to have that label. as head coach and he and joe root
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will be wanting to get england back if they new ways of avoiding it, wouldn't they take them? it is easy to the top of the world rankings to say that, i think. like i said, and he's been speaking it is the social cues. people don't to jonathan agnew about what he's focusing on. wa nt it is the social cues. people don't wantan it is the social cues. people don't want an unhealthy it is the social cues. people don't wa nt a n u nhealthy lifestyle it is the social cues. people don't want an unhealthy lifestyle or environment, but that is what the i think it isjust i think it is just giving test food industry are giving us. all the cricket the emphasis it deserves. we mass marketing, not so much on talk about putting more structure around that his team and helping joe london transport, but on social with that as well. making sure that media, magazines, constantly encouraging them to buy unhealthy the batting line—up is exactly how products. the amount ofjunk food we wa nt the batting line—up is exactly how we want it moving forward and that marketing money is massive. wouldn't everything we do now puts us in the process in two yea rs' make difference if that was scrapped everything we do now puts us in the process in two years' time when we can makea process in two years' time when we can make a huge impact on the australia world series. james maddison has withdrawn from the england squad altogether? i think we should give for the euro 2020 qualifiers against czech republic and bulgaria ita altogether? i think we should give it a go. all the evidence, because of illness. gareth southgate has chosen not to replace him so england consultation to restrict advertising will have a 23—man squad instead. they play the czechs in prague tomorrow — and marketing, the evidence that has and will qualify for been provided to government is very the european championship if they win. strong. it is down to them now to and two—time grand slam winner naomi osaka has chosenjapanese over stop sitting on their hands and take action. thank you, sonia. american nationality with an eye
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on the tokyo 2020 olympics. osaka plays under a japanese flag a climate change activist has been but had dual nationality. arrested on board a flight which was about to take off japanese law stipulates from london city airport. several other campaigners have been arrested during protests an individual must choose one by extinction rebellion at the airport. before their 22nd birthday our correspondent richard galpin sent this. there have been a whole series which is next week. osaka has started the administrative of protests here since the morning. process to make sure she can compete it started off with a sit in protest at her home games next year. just inside the terminal entrance. about 20 or 30 people singing and chanting. police eventually moved on and carried a number of them away. fingers crossed they weather is a but the most significant so far has been, as you are saying, little bit better than it is right a climate change protester managed now. more for you in the next hour. to get on board a flight bound to dublin. now, when you're abroad, the european health insurance card, known as ehic, allows you to get medical care forfree, or at reduced cost, in 31 countries. but if the uk leaves the european union without a deal we understood a number only 3 countries say of them had tried they will offer anything similar. to buy tickets to do this. the government advice is to take out travel insurance. this man got on board the flight but the insurance industry is warning about price rises, and apparently march up and down especially for people with medical problems. the aisle having a talk catherine burns reports. about climate change to passengers, until police moved onto the plane and they took him away. michaela sheehan loves since then, there have been a number yoga, as a way to look of other protests and people gluing
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after her mind and body. themselves to the pavements. basically at the entrance again it tends to relax my muscles to the terminal building. and also, a couple of people if i've had a seizure. climbed onto the roof it's not always easy though. of the terminal building. i have to say, apart she has epilepsy and is struggling from that one flight, to get it under control. the amount of disruption has her first seizure happened been pretty minimal. when she was a teenager in paris. a bit of inconvenience i was in disneyland for passengers, but nothing on a school trip. i was queueing for a ride significant and the other flights and i had a seizure. have been going on as normal. i was taken to hospital by ambulance but the climate change protesters and they did blood tests say what they are doing, they believe, is important. and observations every 15 minutes, they say they do not want expansion and i was in hospital the rest of the day, of this airport to go and it was all completely free ahead because of course, that means yet more because of my ehic card. carbon dioxide emissions. michaela always takes her ehic card on holiday, if she can. it means she can get medical care time for a look at the weather... for free or at the same reduced cost locals would pay. even with the card though, she has more expensive travel insurance because of her health. the focus is the world cup rugby, this is me and my boyfriend. so, for this holiday, ben. that looks huge. enormous i paid £60 for the week for travel insurance, whereas he paid £23 for the year. storm. this is the typhoon. look at british people travelling abroad get about £150 million worth of treatment a year
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using the ehic scheme. if we leave the eu with a deal, that would continue, the eye, that is the hallmark of a at least temporarily. these 31 countries strong storm. in the centre of the all accept ehic cards. essentially, it's the eu, storm, sustained winds 120 plus switzerland, norway, iceland and liechtenstein. strong storm. in the centre of the storm, sustained winds120 mph, the government has asked them gusting at 170 mph. categorised by to continue taking ehic until the end of next year, the japanese meteorological agency asa the japanese meteorological agency as a violent typhoon. it is taken no matter what happens with brexit. so far, only one, spain, towards the south and east of japan has agreed to do so. over the next few days. the blue ireland and portugal have different coherent doesn't show necessarily plans but, essentially, the extent of the storm, it shows they will continue to treat british the extent of the storm, it shows the uncertainty about where it might tourists, even if there is no deal. make landfall. there is something to there is nothing in place yet for play for but in the tokyo area people travelling to the other 28. looking like some dangerous weather. the government says it's still trying to sort more no wonder those fixtures... one has health care deals though. it adds that it always tells people to make sure they have travel been cancelled, scotland game in the insurance when they go on holiday, air. when will they know? i will and that is still the official advice, but there is a warning show you more in a moment. white! from the uk's largest travel insurance provider.
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if nothing changed between now and the 31st of october and there was no deal, then i am expecting prices to go up, but we don't know by how much. —— set. it is the second typhoon in she accepts that, for people like michaela who have long—term japan over the last couple of health problems, any price months. last month, one tracked rises would be higher. i feel like it's definitely putting a label on us now saying, you have to pay more for this across the south east of japan. because of your epilepsy. there are areas still recovering michaela says, when she's booking her next holiday, which could have another dose of her only real choice will be those torrential rain and strong wind. countries have agreed to carry likely to add to the problems. storm on treating british tourists as they do now with ehic. hagibis is enormous, 850 miles across, affecting a bigger area. as and catherine burns is here now. for your question about the different rugby matches, as we go a lot of people know ehic. it stands into saturday, torrential rain, may be up to 500 millimetres in places. for the european health insurance strong wind, strong typhoon as it card. there is something like 27 makes land for, why across the coast million out in the uk, so a lot of
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6-9 makes land for, why across the coast 6—9 metres high. that is a huge us do have them. what it means is you can have state health care at concern. you can the same way local scan. if it is 6—9 metres high. that is a huge concern. you can see 6—9 metres high. that is a huge concern. you can see why they have cancelled the match on saturday. on free there, you get it for free, if sunday, moving quickly it is cheaper, you get it cheaper. north—eastwards. the weather itself will improve markedly on sunday. in fa ct, will improve markedly on sunday. in fact, quite a nice but breezy day. of course, the question is, how much if we leave with a deal, there will damage and disruption has a cause? be some kind of transition period that is what they will be watching and that will meet you will still be with regards to that storm. what is able to use your ehic probably till happening over here? some problems the end of next year. if we leave of our own but nothing on that with no deal, it expires, apart from scale. quite a lot of rain in the in three countries which have done some sort of agreement. so spain has forecast, things chording over across western parts of the uk, outbreaks of rain already, you can said, yes, ireland and portugal slightly different arrangements but see on the satellite picture of the area of cloud working its way in. as for uk tour is getting help, it means the same thing, you can get we spend, the stripe of cloud that state—run care. means the same thing, you can get that state-run care. other countries extends across the atlantic, rightly that state-run care. other countries that have not signed a deal, what way back, a long front developing are we talking about in terms of what we will be spending? 20 extra wiggles along it. it will notjust countries, people have a choice, if
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move through quickly, it will hang they have a medical bill, they have back at times and give some pulses to pay it in for themselves or they of really heavy rainfall. for some need to take out really good travel of really heavy rainfall. for some insurance which is always the of us. the rain wrapping up this government advice. but in terms of evening in western areas, parts of western scotland could see 20—50 cost, travel insurance, the average millimetres of rain. travel policy is about £38 so for most people... i think it is for a year, problems, localised flooding. our bouts are fine erratically across parts of england and wales, in between perhaps and clear sky, so people... i think it is for a year, so not too bad but the insurance industry is saying, we will have to northern ireland, east of scotland, the lowest temperatures. for most, a increase it. we don't know by how mild and blustery night. into much it will increase. there are so tomorrow, the weather front with its many unknowns here. but if you have little wriggles on it, affecting some kind of long—term health problem, they would expect it to go parts of england and wales particularly met office weather warnings in for high ground of wales up problem, they would expect it to go up more. michaela there, she pays into the north midlands, northern three times more than her boyfriend england, 50—70 millimetres of rain, and she is saying she will pay more. could cause some flooding and travel what is the deal at the moment if problems. the wet weather slides its you have a long—term, chronic illness? are you covered at the way quite slowly south—eastwards across england and wales through moment? ehic does cover you for tomorrow. notice lots of showers, longer spells of rain still pre—existing conditions. dialysis, affecting parts of western scotland,
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this is something that travel northern ireland. strong and gusty winds here, strong and gusty winds insurance doesn't cover so people in association with the frontal that need dialysis, they needed on system further south, some sunshine average three times a week and it is in between. temperatures about where expensive. it costs between 750 and they have been for the last few about 1000 euros a week, so with a days, 13—17d. friday into the start of the weekend, the weather front is ehic card, they can get the still in play. another wriggle developing. it may work initially treatment at the local level. that will not exist afterwards because like the front has cleared away from travel insurance will not cover the south, edging its way back in dialysis because it is not an again. more wet weather, particularly across the south—west emergency, it is routine care. these of england, getting into wales. are all things that we will find out one way or another... suck it and further north, sunny spells, hefty showers into the far north—west, temperatures 13—15. sunday, more see. thank you very much. rain to move across england and wales, brighter skies with showers the new £20 note featuring one of britain's across northern ireland and most famous artists, scotland. sunday temperatures jmw turner, has been unveiled. similar, looking at highs of 11—16d. the bank of england governor mark carney travelled to margate in kent this morning — the town where turner spent much of his time. the polymer note will be in circulation from the beginning of next year. our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz. in the clear light and under the big skies of margate which the painter turner loved so much, and in the gallery which bears his
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name, the new turner 20 on show, ready for its launch in february. the 20 is our most used and most forged banknote, so getting it right is important. we have to get this note right. it is the most secure note we've ever produced. by using polymer, we've been able to add additional security features. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: there's multiple foils, turkey continues a military offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria. there's multiple windows. there's widespread international there's lots of ways that you can concern the attacks could lead to a resurgence determine that this is a real 20. the new £20 note. of the islamic state group. what jumps out immediately, brexit talks under way looking at the big one, is turner between borisjohnson and his irish himself, his self—portrait. counterpart leo varadkar — as they try to find a solution to the brexit impasse. and behind, the fighting temeraire — the navy vessel which stood behind briefing notes given hms victory at the battle of to president trump reveal that trafalgar. a woman with diplomatic immunity, and importantly, these who's a suspect in the fatal crash security features. of teenager harry dunn, two clear, see—through windows. will not return to the uk. that's new and hard to forge. england's outgoing chief medical and where there's foil, it's now officer says eating and drinking on local public transport in two colours, gold and blue. should be banned to help tackle childhood obesity. so, what do the people of margate think of the new 20? and coming up, we'll tell you why do you recognise this guy? er, yep, turner.
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the design of the new £20 note was revealed in the seaside yep, obviously, and the margate lighthouse. town of margate. and the turner centre in the background. you like it? yeah, ido. plastic. yeah, plastic. that's ok, is it? well, they sometimes can flick out of your pocket a little bit easy. the only thing i find with these, donald trump has tweeted in the last in our till, they roll. few minutes. he has been saying they roll up and they stick together. the turner 20 replaces turkey has been planning to attack the adam smith version we have now. the kurds for a long time. we have will it be as popular? no soldiers or military anywhere that depends how much we pay near the attack area. i am trying to by cards or mobile phone instead. end the endless wars. someone asked simon gompertz, bbc news, margate. to send tens of thousands of in a moment, the latest soldiers to the area and start a new business news. first a look at the headlines waragain. on afternoon live. soldiers to the area and start a new war again. turkey is a member of nato. borisjohnson and the irish prime minister say they are trying to find a "pathway to a possible brexit deal" after meeting today. turkey continues its offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria — there are reports of heavy fighting in the central border region, any more developments, we will bring and seven civilian deaths. president trump says officials will speak to the american them to you. we're also keeping an woman who claimed diplomatic
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eye on leo varadkar who are to give immunity after a crash resulted in the death of teenager harry dunn. some briefings. sport now on afternoon live with ben croucher. england have topped their group here's your business at the rugby world cup today headlines on afternoon live. without even playing. nissan's european operations, which include plants in britain and spain, will not be sustainable if britain's departure from the eu leads to 10% tariffs on vehicles. you have just heard about that that's according to the carmaker‘s european chairman. typhoon. the economy appears to have avoided recession, it's with output growing by 0.3% been an unprecidented day injapan with two games on saturday in the three months to august. cancelled due to the threat of an incoming typhoon. according to the ons, typhoon hagibis is expected to hit who produced these figures, the country on saturday with devastrating effect. world rugby have taken a rise in film and tv production the extraordinary decision to call helped boost activity off the games between england and france and italy in the services sector, and new zealand. offsetting a disappointing england head coach eddiejones performance form manufacturing. backed the decision. well, he would because it means the owner of the wrightbus factory england top the pool and get a has said he has not been two—week rest between their last able to reach a deal to sell it pool match and their quarterfinal — to a new owner. italy had an outside chance the firm, which was behind of qualifying although they needed a bonus point win over new zealand — the so—called boris bus and is the last uk—based maker a team they've never beaten. of buses collapsed into bad news for fans who travelled administration last month. all that way and italy unions however say they are veteran leonardo ghiraldini. hopeful that a new deal
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can still be reached. he's barely played all year due to a terrible knee injury. fought his way back to fitness and was expected to win his 10ath the uk economy shrank cap in a swansong appearance in aurgust but still looks against the all blacks. he apparently broke down in tears like it escaped recession — earlier when he found out the game had been called off. how does that work? august wasn't the greatest of months. car production slowed down a lot of concern in scotland. they in august. some of the car makers need to win their last game and stopped production in the spring because they were worried about that serious concerns over whether it will be played. being the brexit date. some saying scotland play japan on sunday in yokohama, they would do the same in november. which is only about 20 miles south of tokyo and expected there was the expectation they would to take the brunt of keep production ticking over, note the typhoon this weekend. predictions are that the weather they went for the usual summer shutdown is so what we saw was the will have passed by sunday, but it's more how severe its impact will be. economy faltering a bit in august scotland have to beat japan but it did really well injuly, by eight points to qualify for the last eight — better than expected. the economy if ireland beat samoa anyway, which they're expected to do. if it's called off — it goes down as a nil—nil draw, rose by 0.3%. the governor of the which isn't enough for scotland. coach gregor townsend says he's bank of england saying this may be a putting faith in world rugby to ensure a game goes ahead. £20 note but the economy and scottish rugby want some contingency underlining terms is not doing that
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great. he said growth was pretty measures put in place. slow and that is what you have to a decision isn't expected until sunday morning in japan. remember. this time last year, it earlier we spoke to the former scotland international andy nicol who's in tokyo. isn't doing nearly as well, growth isn't doing nearly as well, growth isa isn't doing nearly as well, growth is a lot slower and as a result, they have just got to prepare now as some are now saying is a lot slower and as a result, some are now saying the next move is that interest rates could be down if the game has taken place at 7a5 rather than up, deal or no deal.|j on sunday night. the weather will a lwa ys rather than up, deal or no deal.|j always look at the bright side of come in on saturday and we will only life on this side of the service sector is doing all right. film and know on sunday what the collateral damage is and whether this game is television is doing great, that is going ahead. it will be very one of the reasons we have seen output doing so well. the crowd was difficult. no one in the squad will filming over the summer. a sign of ever experience something like this, like you are waking up on a game day how well we are doing in certain not knowing if in fact it will be areas and that has outpaced the game day because you don't know if economy. it is really interesting the game is happening. i don't think anyone has a president is here to say, this is how you cope with it. the way that the american business they had to make sure they are models are changing. the likes of playing on sunday night and prepare netflix and amazon becoming big accordingly. producers of content in their own james maddison has withdrawn right but still they are turning to from the england squad for the euro 2020 qualifiers against czech republic the uk increasingly because of and bulgaria because of illness. the leicester city midfielder, regulations and they can't get
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who is yet to make his senior debut, enough of us really. that james won't be replaced in the squad. england will qualify for next year's regulations and they can't get enough of us really. thatjames bond european championship if they beat contract you keep talking about will the czechs in prague tomorrow night. probably be in the pipeline. let's tennis and british number two heather watson talk about world mental health day is through to the quarterfinals of the tianjin open in china, with her biggest win today. businesses are marking that in more than two years. she dropped three games how? is it just in beating the world number22 wang qiang, who's ranked over 100 today. businesses are marking that how? is itjust talk today. businesses are marking that how? is it just talk or today. businesses are marking that how? is itjust talk or our places above her. today. businesses are marking that how? is it just talk or our business is taking action because this is a it's only watson's second win serious problem. hundreds of on the main wta tour this year. millions thought to suffer from she'll play poland's magda linette depression around the world. the in the last eight. world health organization saying this has got a real cost attached to and two—time grand slam winner it. they are saying that it could naomi osaka has chosenjapanese over american nationality with an eye cost the economy $1 trillion in on the tokyo 2020 olympics. productivity. how do we go about changing the culture around the osaka plays under a japanese flag world ? changing the culture around the but had dual nationality world? let's talk to a ceo at the with a japanese mother and haitian father. bran agency media,. good afternoon. japanese law stipulates an individual must choose one nationality before you come from this very personal point of view and that is why you their 22nd birthday. think it is important. point of view and that is why you think it is importantlj point of view and that is why you think it is important. i have that's all the sport for now. suffered in the past from stress and
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anxiety that manifests itself with briefing notes given bouts of insomnia, and i consider to president trump reveal that a woman with diplomatic immunity, who's a suspect in the case of a crash in northamptonshire myself having relatively good mental in which a teenager died, will not return to the uk. health but it definitely focused my police want anne sacoolas, mind on if i was suffering that way, who's married to a us diplomat, to return to the uk in connection probably mind on if i was suffering that way, pro ba bly lots mind on if i was suffering that way, probably lots of other people who i with the collision in august work with were as well. i was very in which harry dunn died. duncan kennedy reports. keen to create a healthy culture when harry dunn died in august, around mental health and more his family could never imagine that their arc of grief specifically to de—stigmatise it would take their son into the white house. within media. that stigma is a real issue. people are so concerned in but last night, president trump made this very competitive world we have a promise to talk to the woman who is the main suspect of getting ahead, staying ahead, how in harry's death. do you convince employees to admit there might be something?m we are going to speak to her very shortly and see if we can do you convince employees to admit there might be something? it is important to role model that it is do something with... 0k to important to role model that it is ok to not be ok and that we work in it was an accident, it was an acc... it was a terrible accident. an environment where we can speak but just look at this. openly to each other and share how it's the briefing note the president was holding saying that the woman we are feeling and that we as a he is talking about will not return company will support our employees to the united kingdom. andindeed company will support our employees and indeed we will give them tools that note was met this to help support themselves and give
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morning by outrage from harry dunn's family spokesman. them resilience. we have a very open it didn't sit with his spoken words. culture, we are very inclusive and proud of that and we have introduced clearly, as he tends to do, all sorts of initiatives to just speaks off the cuff and says encourage people to talk openly and whatever he thinks makes him look best in the moment. to bring their true selves to work. you know, so we were angry when we left london yesterday, we know that workplace stress can be and that has tipped us over the edge, i have to say. a major source of mental health this is anne sacoolas, the wife of an american issues, so how do you go about intelligence official, who was driving the car tackling that and what tips can you that collided with give other businesses? we have done harry dunn's motorbike. several things. one thing we have northamptonshire police say they want to speak to anne sacoolas done, i talked about after she pulled out of this de—stigmatising, i think probably american air base, and about the most powerful thing we have done the accidentjust up the road, is introduce an initiative where an accident that has involved people share their own stories everyone from harry dunn's whether it is through e—mail, a family, to the president of the united states. podcast or speaking about it openly in front of the company. when we did harry dunn's family met the foreign secretary yesterday that come overnight that broke down barriers and created a culture where to try to get mrs sacoolas returned people thought they could be open to the united kingdom, and without being judged for it. it but they came out disappointed. is important to educate as well, so i felt extremely let down by the government today, we have established a mental health or by the foreign and commonwealth office. analyse programme where people are and i am deeply, deeply disappointed there to have open and honest
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conversations with their peers. they that they think it's ok to kill have been trained by professionals to do so. we have trained over 160 a young lad on his bike and they can people in the agency on mental just walk away. the family say they plan to go to washington to add more pressure health and the differences between for mrs sacoolas's return. psychosis, neurosis orjust a bad day at work. so that we are arming all that, and grieving people with a genuine understanding for harry at the same time. duncan kennedy, bbc news. of mental health. also it is really the new £20 note featuring important to have from the top a consistent and constructive culture one of britain's most famous artists, jmw turner, has been unveiled. around mental health and around how the bank of england governor mark you talk about mental health. we carney travelled to margate can't be a box ticking exercise in kent this morning — the town where turner where this year we are supporting spent much of his time. mental health, next year it is the polymer note will be in circulation from something else. the leaders of the beginning of next year. organisations if they want to take our personal finance it seriously they had to take it correspondent simon gompertz. seriously and be consistent in the clear light and under throughout on this area. really the big skies of margate, which the painter turner loved valuable advice there. let's hope so much, and in the gallery other business leaders are which bears his name, listening. thank you. a quick look the new turner 20 on show, at the markets. look at that. they ready for its launch in february. the 20 is our most used are perking up a bit. doing a bit and most forged banknote, blacker, concern about trade talks so getting it right is important.
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between china and the us. —— doing a we have to get this note right, bit better. it is the most secure note we have ever used. by using polymer, we have been able to add additional security features, briefing notes given to president trump reveal that there are multiple foils and windows a woman with diplomatic immunity, who's a suspect in the case and there's lots of ways you can of a crash in northamptonshire determine this is a real 20. in which a teenager died, will not return to the uk. the new £20 note, whatjumps out police want anne sacoolas, who's married to a us diplomat, immediately looking at the big to return to the uk in connection one is turner himself, with the collision in august his self—portrait, and behind, in which harry dunn died. duncan kennedy reports. the fighting temeraire, the navy vessel which stood behind hms victory at the battle of trafalgar. and importantly, these when harry dunn died, his family security features. two clear see—through windows, couldn't imagine that their grief, that's new and hard to forge. ta ke couldn't imagine that their grief, take their son into the white house but last night president trump made and where there's foil, it is now a promise to talk to the woman who in two colours, gold and blue. the main suspect in harry's death. so what do the people of margate we will speak to her very shortly think of the new 20? you recognise this guy? and see if we can do something... it yes, turner. the margate lighthouse and was an accident. it was a terrible the turner centre in the back end. you like it? accident. but just look yes, i do. was an accident. it was a terrible accident. butjust look at plastic, that is ok, is it? was an accident. it was a terrible accident. but just look at this. was an accident. it was a terrible accident. butjust look at this. it is the briefing note saying the well, they sometimes flick out
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woman he is talking about will not of your pocket easily. return to the uk. that night was met the only thing i find with these, they roll up in our till this morning by outrage from harry and they stick together. the turner 20 replaces dunn's family spokesman. it didn't the adam smith version we have now. sit with his spoken words, it will it be as popular? that depends how much we pay clearly as he tends to do, speaks of by cards or mobile phone instead. the cup, makes him look best in the simon gompertz, bbc news, margate. moment. we were angry when we left yesterday, that has tipped us over in a moment, the latest the edge. this is anne sacoolas, the business news. wife of an american intelligence official who was driving the car that collided with harry dunn's nice note? very nice. i am sure motorbike. police say they want to speak to anne sacoolas after she turner would have approved. pulled out of this american air base first a look and about the accidentjust up the at the headlines on afternoon live. turkey continues its offensive road. an accident that has involved against kurdish forces in northern syria — there are reports of heavy fighting eve ryo ne road. an accident that has involved everyone from harry dunn's family to in the central border region, and seven civilian deaths. boris johnson is meeting the president of the united states. the irish prime minister today — to try to find a solution harry dunn's family met the foreign secretary yesterday to try to get to the brexit deadlock anne sacoolas return to the uk. but president trump says officials they came out disappointed.” will speak to the american anne sacoolas return to the uk. but they came out disappointed. i felt woman who claimed diplomatic extremely let down by the government
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immunity after a crash resulted in the death of teenager harry dunn. today or by the foreign & commonwealth office and i deeply and disappointed that they think it is 0k to kill disappointed that they think it is ok to killa disappointed that they think it is ok to kill a young lad on his bike here's your business headlines on afternoon live. and they can just walk away. the nissan's european operations, which include plants family say they plan to go to in britain and spain, washington to add more pressure for will not be sustainable if britain's departure from the eu leads to 10% anne sacoolas's return. all that and tariffs on vehicles. grieving for harry at the same time. thats according to the car—makers european chairman the economy appears to have avoided recession, we will be back with the latest with output growing by 0.3% in the three months to august. according to the ons, headlines but let's catch up with the weather. who produced these figures, a rise in film and tv production helped boost activity some parts of the uk can expect yet in the services sector, offsetting a disappointing performance form manufacturing. more very some parts of the uk can expect yet more very wet weather over the next couple of days. we have seen things the owner of the wrightbus factory clouding over with outbreaks of rain has said he has not been able to reach a deal to sell it in many northern and western areas. to a new owner. this approaching area of cloud, a the firm, which was behind frontal system sliding its way in the so—called boris bus and is the last uk—based maker unnoticed we can follow this stripe of buses, collapsed into of cloud right the way out into the administration last month. unions however say they are atlantic. quite a long weather front
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hopeful that a new deal can still be reached. which will wriggle around and feed us pulses of heavy rain over the next couple of days. back to the here and now. the rain starting to the uk economy shrank in august but still looks like it escaped recession — p9p up here and now. the rain starting to pep up this evening across how does that work? north—western part of the uk, some particularly wet weather across high you are looking even more devious ground of western scotland, could than you wear when i discuss the new see 20—30 millimetres, maybe 50 £20 note. our economy, surprise millimetres of rain. in between, surprise, has been rather up and perhaps a zone of clearer skies, thatis down but there has been some perhaps a zone of clearer skies, that is where we will have the concerns that we were going to see lowest of the temperatures. a mild night for many of us and quite a two quarters going into reverse, a blustery one as well. tomorrow, here recession. what we saw over the summer was recession. what we saw over the summer was july was quite recession. what we saw over the summer wasjuly was quite strong and one of the reasons that were strong is one wriggle from the weather was to do with the strength of the front and that will pep up the service sector which is the biggest rainfall for a time. over the high ground of wales, we could see 50—70 pa rt service sector which is the biggest part of our economy, 80%, and in millimetres of rain, that could particular, film and tv production. cause some travel problems, perhaps i don't know if you have a part in the latest series of the crown but flooding. that wet weather will stagger its way slowly south that has been filming... james bond. eastwards a cross stagger its way slowly south eastwards across england and england and wales and saw plenty of those heavy showers pushing in towards the
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your fee keeps that has been filming... james bond. yourfee keeps going up and that has been filming... james bond. north—west. there will be to make your fee keeps going up and that shows up in gdp! single—handedly sounds of strong winds, one across the southern half of england and saving the economy! that has wales in association with that weather front, also very windy compensated for other bits that have across the north coast of northern not been doing so well, for example ireland and western scotland. manufacturing. in march we saw quite temperatures 13—17d. friday night and into saturday, noticed the way a lot of activity there, companies area bit in which that weather front doesn't a lot of activity there, companies are a bit more relaxed at this time around but overall we are looking at play through. it wriggles its way around but overall we are looking at a picture where growth is pretty, backin play through. it wriggles its way back in our direction so we are likely to see another pulse of rain well, it is shuffling ahead. what pushing up from the south—west, some does that mean? we had the governor of that could be on the heavy side. of the bank of england saying that further north some sunny spells for the pace of growth was pretty slow. northern england, northern ireland and northern scotland. hefty showers across the north west of scotland. what does that mean? it means our policymakers when they talk about temperatures of 13—15d. sunday, some interest rates are starting to think uncertainty about the timing but about cutting interest rates rather that lump of wet weather likely to than raising them, regardless of slide away to leave a mix of sunny whether or not we get a brexit deal. spells and showers although some of those showers could turn heavy in the west later on and top number of american issues with what temperatures of 12—16d. is happening in hong kong. some have
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been seen to back the protests and that has gone down very badly. do you remember we were talking about the nba? it had put out this treat which some had said, this is pro— protesters which some had said, this is pro—protesters and it caused tensions. chinese state broadcasters took some of their programmes are airand we had took some of their programmes are air and we had tiffany's pulling an ad which was seen to be pro— protesters ad which was seen to be pro—protesters and seem to be offending some chinese customers. there is one big company, household name that is going the other way and i will tell you more about that now. so mira, tell us about how apple has got involved in all of this. apple hello, you're watching has an app available on its door and afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at a: what is being said is that was being could there be a "pathway" to a possible brexit deal? used by protesters to track where borisjohnson and the irish prime minister say they can see one the police officers are. apple came after meeting today. under some pretty heavy criticism
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from the chinese government and they turkey steps up heavy artillery and air attacks on the kurds in syria, eventually pulled that app. of as the us stands accused of abandoning its allies in the fight against so—called islamic state. course the app developers and others are criticising apple for buying into those chinese demands. the app harry dunn, who died developers say this is not true but in a car crash in august — a us suspect won't return to the uk, apple says this app was actually say briefing notes held by president trump. endangering the lives of some of coming up on afternoon those security officials and police live, all the sport. officials, and it was being used by good afternoon, simon. these protesters to victimise scotland call on world rugby residents. there is a big tussle to have a contingency plan in place there about he said, she said what in case their must win match againstjapan at the rugby world cup is called off on sunday — does that app do but fundamentally like england's has been on saturday. when it comes to a company like it's all down to violent apple, in the last three months it typhoon hagibis. made over $9 billion of sales. that yes, and looking at that will be ben is in china, so it is clearly a who has our weather forecast this afternoon. rain for most of us over very, very much financial decision the next few days and in some for apple. interesting timing as places, quite a lot of rain, which those trade talks resume between the could cause some problems. all the way the details later in the two countries. you have had a busy programme. week because of general motors, ben, thank you. workers have been striking and that
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also coming up — a new rural ramble for mobility scooter users. is having all sorts of we'll find out about a scheme ramifications. absolutely. i was launched in gloucestershire to allow people who use them to explore the cotswolds countryside. just in michigan and i was speaking that's in news nationwide in just over half an hour. toa just in michigan and i was speaking to a lot of these workers who said, we made a lot of sacrifices during the financial crisis when gm had to be bailed out by the us government. now we want our fair share. there is still a big gap between the union and the autoworke rs still a big gap between the union and the autoworkers and gm, so the hello everyone, this is afternoon workers have been on strike now for live. i'm simon mccoy. four weeks, but there in the last hour borisjohnson workers have been on strike now for fourweeks, but there is workers have been on strike now for four weeks, but there is a bigger and his irish counterpart leo varadkar have released a joint issue there, that we see the statement saying they have held manufacturing sector in the united detailed and constructive discussions and that they both see states is already starting to a pathway to a possible deal. their statement said contract. gm is the biggest employer in the state of michigan and that is that they discussed the challenges a big manufacturing state, so what the worry is that if the strike goes of customs and consent. on for much longer, it can really following their discussions the taoiseach will consult pull the us into a more a—door with the taskforce 50 and the brexit secretary stephen barclay will meet michel barnier tomorrow morning. recession. the are some concerns and the prime minister and the irish taoiseach have been meeting just if you look at it from a financial days after european leaders
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expressed pessimism about reaching standpoint for gm, they have lost $1 a deal by the end of the month. billion as a result of the strike. jessica parker reports. great to talk to you. thank you. doing a deal isn't always easy. shall we talk about some markets. these two men know that and it wall street just opening. hasn't been all smiles recently, but shall we talk about some markets. wall streetjust opening. they are concerned about what is going on following today's talks in the north with general motors. also those west of england, the pair agreed that they could see a pathway to a trade talks resuming between america and china over that particular possible deal. the reason the prime dispute. things there, holding minister's meeting leo varadkar is things down. the markets very not simply to have a social worried about those tensions and conversation. they are seriously those gdp numbers not do much to focused on trying to resolve this lift spirits on either side of the issue and getting a deal. the issue atlantic. being this— how to keep the irish let's return to one border free flowing, how close trade of our main stories. boris johnson is meeting his irish counterpart ties need to be in order to make leo varadkar for brexit talks, that happen. in just one week from just days after european leaders expressed pessimism about reaching today, there is that crunch eu a deal by the end of the month. summit where boris johnson the two leaders are having what's today, there is that crunch eu summit where borisjohnson has said he hopes to finalise a deal with been described as a private meeting to "allow detailed discussions". brussels. three weeks from today, the uk is due to leave the european chris shirling—rooke is the chief executive of mersey maritime — union. and as things stand the two an organisation representing the interests of the ports sides seem far apart while the and maritime sector on merseyside. deadline is closing in. this former
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chancellor, the latest to offer up good to talk to you. you will watch some ideas of his own about how to the results of these talks just as getan some ideas of his own about how to get an agreement. but izzard brexit closely as we are. absolutely. our delayed now inevitable, after mps passed a law designed to prevent a members want certainty so just to nodal departure. yes, i think the put the maritime sector in some kind government will comply with the benn of context, in the city region it is act on october 19 that the eu will worth a.2 billion a year and employs grantan act on october 19 that the eu will grant an extension. the challenge some 52,000 people, so it's a big now for us is to demonstrate the industry. when we think about well of ideas has not run dry, just maritime it is notjust about ships because the proposal on the table is and ports but it is the not going to fly doesn't mean we shouldn't look at other versions of universities, engineering companies, a deal. cheering offshore wind, it's the lawyers, so it's a very big industry with a very but he has got different ideas of what to prioritise if an extension is secured, and message to boris big supply chain. what our members are telling us is we want certainty, we wa nt johnson that labour is keen for a are telling us is we want certainty, we want a deal, that is absolutely snap election. take no deal off the what we want. however i think it is table and then let's have the worth remembering that if there isn't a deal and it is also worth election. we are ready, we are ready. there is only one reason it having a bit of faith in the maritime industry because we have hasn't happened yet. we can't trust
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been trading globally for years and you. but hang on, he is one of we have committed right the way jeremy corbyn's top team on whether through this process to keep the lights on, to keep food on the a further referendum should come first. my concern might be that if table, to keep medicine coming through our ports. there does seem we had a general election it would bea we had a general election it would be a kind of acquires a referendum, to be very talk about brexit and that it would be all about in or ports, everybody seems to think out, what kind of deal, and so to a about dover and the facts suggest it is the north of england that is certain extent, i can see the sense in trying to have a referendum really the backbone of when talking about trade by sea. when you say and first. next saturday's showdown session in parliament following the eu summit will be a must watch as it is interesting to hear you mps decide what to do next. a serene suggest that when we are talking atmosphere doesn't always hang over about a new deal, you are saying there is still cause for optimism stop you that i think we have to be westminster, but big decisions do. optimistic. we are talking about an jessica parker, bbc news. damian industry which is literally a millennia old. we have been doing grammaticus is in brussels but this generations. of course it will jonathan blake is in westminster. with all the pessimism around, is that one be bumpy and we absolutely do not sentence, they believe they could see the pathway to a possible deal. wa nt be bumpy and we absolutely do not want a no deal, but should we face the challenges of that, then i have that is optimism, isn't it? that is what everyone is jumping no doubt that our industry will that is optimism, isn't it? that is what everyone isjumping on because the language in this statement, as deliver. it will not be easy but you suggest, vertically that line is
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that both leaders agreed they could evenin see a pathway towards a possible deliver. it will not be easy but even in the last 100 years, i suspect we have had more difficult deal is optimistic, is positive. periods, so perhaps it isjust time to have a little bit of faith in our compared, certainly, to what we have industry and the maritime sector heard in recent days. but what does specifically. i am sure you have it suggest at this point in the looked at this closer than anyone here, but if there is a border in brexit process? i'm not sure it the middle of the sea, how does that suggests anything of a breakthrough. work in practice? it is if an i will what this statement does, which has been put out by both downing street not be drawn on potential scenarios and dublin after some four hours or so or deals or no deal what i can say and dublin after some four hours or so of talks between borisjohnson and leo varadkar this afternoon is keep the process going. because as is we want a deal and i was the statement also points out, there listening earlier that we had are challenges, as they are somehow managed to avoid a described, which is something of an understatement may be, of customs recession. the fact that industry is and consent and that is what the two moving on and doing the best it can leaders were talking about this afternoon. while they may be able to in these very turbulent times, i think there is cause for optimism. see a pathway to a deal there are still those challenges in the way. and a lot ofjobs in the region, namely, the customs arrangements for 52,000 jobs related to your industry the uk after brexit, particularly at specifically. yes. again with the uk after brexit, particularly at the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, as you
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are hearing in that report a moment liverpool, generally we are very ago, and then the issue of consent. strong transatlantic port, one of they say the people of northern the most advanced ports in the uk, ireland would have for it to closely it is constantly under investment and there is more investment in more aligned to the eu for some regulatory rules. so it is one thing cranes which was announced last being able to see a pathway to a week. we had more people to terminal deal, it's another thing to go hand in hand and walk along that path. so there is optimism because we are jonathan, thank you. damian facing not towards the eu but grammaticus, it is that issue, the towards the rest of the world. very quickly, because i am out of time, challenges of customs and consent. having been built up with a bit of november the 1st, you just want to optimism in the sentence before, know where we are, you don't want to bringing back to earth with a bump? see an extension, you just want to yes, and at the minute i would have know where we go from there. the not to say it is very unclear to be able to say it is very unclear to be able to see what exactly this pathway is knowing is the biggest problem because how can you prepare, how can you invest, how can you prepare your they might have found and if it business when you don't know what amounts to anything more than a you are preparing for? that is the gentlemanly way of saying they had a decent discussion and want to keep big challenge. we just need a deal. the whole thing rolling. they don't wa nt the whole thing rolling. they don't want a big bust up at this stage whether they genuinely have really good to talk to you. thank identified the sad thing. there is you very much forjoining us. let's little sense here they have done
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that yet because, as you are saying, have a look at the weather. rain in those two issues essentially are the forecast over the next couple of daysin these huge, substantive points which the forecast over the next couple of days in fact for some of us, quite a are at the heart of the difficulty lot of rain to come, enough to cause here. to reach an agreement, as we some problems. it has been clouding heard yesterday from michel barnier in his briefing is that he was over from the west, quite a moody giving to the european parliament, shot from one of our weather there are enormous problems to watchers. you can see this big rope overcome. on that customs issue, of cloud extending right back into yes, and also the consent issue, the the atlantic. quite a long weather participation of people in northern front here and instead of moving ireland in any sort of decision through quickly, it will wriggle around, you can see on this front, essentially, that two pathways that have been available have been the eu these bulbs, that will hold it back from time to time across the british saying, northern ireland should stay isles, bringing pulses of heavy under the whole eu customs rules. that would sort the problem is out. rain. one of those pulses already pushing in across the north—west of the uk has been saying no to that. scotland. here is we go through that is one possible route that you tonight into tomorrow, you could see could see through this. the other 20-50 possibility, the uk said except our tonight into tomorrow, you could see 20—50 millimetres of rain. all such deal which we put on the table which outbreaks of rain moving quite erratically across england and removes the need for customs rules. wales. some clear spells in northern the eu says we can't do that because you are asking us to waive the rules ireland, southern and eastern scotland, generally with the cloud without anything definitive or
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workable to put in place. how will and strengthening breeze as well, it they get around that and have the will be a pretty mad night. leaders found something? i don't tomorrow, here is one of those bombs know. it's very hard to say they i mentioned on that weather front. could have done because of the that will hold it back and pep the pressures hemming them in. it's not rain up across parts of wales, just for these two to find northern england. on high ground we something, the uk side, this would could see up to 50—70 millimetres of have to pass through parliament, support on both sides from the rain. certainly a conservative party and the could see up to 50—70 millimetres of rain. certainlya big puddles, surface water on the roads. these democratic unionists. on the eu bands of rain will move slowly and side, it is notjust ireland, it is steadily across england and wales as the rest of the 27 and the we go through tomorrow. we see more commission here. ireland might want down force pushing in across western to agree to something but remember, scotland, the north coast of the commission and the eu have a northern ireland. the windiest very clear viewpoint, which is the areas, the far north—west and down towards the south and those defence of the single market and how that external frontier woodwork. the temperatures through the afternoon, next meeting is michel barnier, the 14, temperatures through the afternoon, 1a, 15, 16 degrees, again some spells of sunshine. out of friday brexit secretary, and other meetings as well but tomorrow will be into the weekend, this front still crucial? yes, and even more than with its wriggles on it, still that, we will hear very soon i affecting our weather so not clearing away but bringing more rain think, from the irish prime minister back into the south and particularly leo varadkar. they might be able to throw some more light on this. but southwest. some heavy bursts showing
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tomorrow, yes, here the brexit up southwest. some heavy bursts showing up here also spreading into wales. the further north you are, some secretary stephen barclay meeting with michel barnier. that will be a spells of sunshine, still some hefty pretty key moment, to see whether showers into the far north—west, they are able to indicate that there temperatures of 1a, 15, may be 16 is any way forward or whether this degrees. sunday's weather, we will is any way forward or whether this is more of the sort of official see rain pushing back across england dance, each side trying to get and wales, the rest of that should clear out into the north sea. a day through this without having the blame landing on themselves for a of sunshine and showers for scotland failure of the talks. damian and northern ireland and temperatures between 12 and 16 grammaticus in brussels and jonathan degrees. goodbye for now. blake in westminster, thank you. we are waiting to hear from leo varadkar and we will bring that to you live when we do. there have been reports of fierce clashes in northeast syria as turkey continues its major offensive against kurdish fighters, whom they regard as terrorists. hospital and security sources say three people including a child have been reportedly killed in mortar fire from syria into a turkish the turks say they've hit more than 180 targets in air and artillery strikes since the attack began yesterday. tens of thousands are said to have fled the assault.
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the us secretary of state mike pompeo has been defending president trump's surprise decision to pull us troops out of the area, and has denied that it gave turkey a green light for its attack. our correspondent martin patience sent this report from the turkey/syria border. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. this is the latest salvo today at three: of the syrian war. turkey steps up heavy artillery and air attacks turkey this morning, shelling positions in on the kurds in syria — the north of the country. as the us stands accused of abandoning its allies in the fight against so—called islamic state. last night, its forces pushed into key towns along the border. this is the scene live this afternoon — kurdish fighters vowing to stop on the turkey—syria border. the turkish advance fired back. brexit talks under way the men who led the fight between borisjohnson and his irish against the islamic state group counterpart, leo varadkar — but, so far, little are battle—hardened. cause for optimism. harry dunn who died in a car crash in august — a us suspect won't return to the uk, but, without american support, say briefing notes held they‘ re completely outgunned by the turkish military. by president trump. coming up on afternoon civilians are also live all the sport. caught in the crossfire. england against france is called off translation: after the turkish at the rugby world cup with a shelling on the border
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typhoon set to hit japan areas, so far, we have received ten patients. at the rugby world cup with a typhoon set to hitjapan on saturday, scotland are nervously two of them are critical waiting to see if the weather will and are having surgery. even give them a chance to play for the number of injured is on the rise every hour, but we, a place in the quarterfinals. more the medical staff, are ready. details at 3:30pm. typhoon hagibis? america has been accused of stabbing the kurds in the back. this is a big and powerful storm. but donald trump is doubling down, showing no regret. drifting its ways northwards to japan, still a very strong typhoon. the kurds are fighting for their land, just so you understand, they are fighting for their land. we will talk about saturday's wet and, as somebody wrote in a very, very powerful article today, and windy forecast but also look they didn't help us in the second world war, forward to sunday for the scotland with normandy, as an example. game. they mentioned names also coming up — something to chew on from england's outgoing of different battles. but they are there to help chief medical officer: a proposal to prevent childhood obesity — us with their land. by banning snacking president erdogan this morning, making his first comments since the operation began. on trains and buses. translation: hey, european union, get a hold of yourself! look, i'm telling you again. if you describe our operation as an invasion again, we will take the easy road. we'll open the doors and send
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hello, everyone — this you 3.6 million refugees. is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. there have been reports in a country where half of fierce clashes in northeast syria the population have already been as turkey continues its major forced from their homes, offensive against kurdish fighters, whom they regard as terrorists. there are fears of a fresh hospital and security sources say humanitarian crisis. three people including a child have been reportedly killed in mortar fire from syria into a turkish the humanitarian situation border town. is untended and getting worse. the turks say they've hit more than 180 targets the military situation threatens in air and artillery strikes to be overrun notjust since the attack began yesterday. tens—of—thousands are said to have fled the assault. with a turkish—kurdish conflict the us secretary of state mike but with the threat of isis, pompeo has been defending and the diplomacy is, president trump's surprise decision frankly, in crisis. to pull us troops out of the area, we are seeing in this microcosm and has denied that it gave turkey here a global situation a green light for its attack. where the traditional diplomatic our correspondent martin patience sent this report from actors have been horrifically weak. the turkey—syria border. failure means syrians are once again running for their lives. martin patience, bbc news, this is the latest salvo of the syrian war. on the turkish—syrian border. turkey this morning shelling positions in the north of the country. last night, its forces pushed into key towns along the border. let's speak now kurdish fighters vowing to stop to sanj srikanthan who is executive director the turkish advance fired back. of the international rescue committee uk. the question is, with so many people
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fleeing their homes is where are the men who led the fight they going? i think that is the most against the islamic state group are battle hardened. frightening aspect of this crisis, is they are fleeing from one crisis to another crisis affected area. but, without american support, most of the 6a,000 we know are they‘ re completely outgunned displaced in the last couple of days by the turkish military. are going to places like rack. as you know from pictures, it is in civilians are also caught in the crossfire. ruins and there is lack of clean translation: after the turkish water, electricity and the people shelling on the border areas, so far, we have there have already suffered so much. received ten patients. two of them are critical so it is really a crisis on top of and are having surgery. another crisis that we are seeing. the number of injured you are replacing one group of is on the rise every hour, but we, the medical staff, are ready. displaced people with another? that is correct. we are talking about an area that has people that have been america has been accused of stabbing displaced many times and we are the kurds in the back. talking about people then being but donald trump is doubling displaced yet again. and new people down, showing no regret. from other parts of the middle east the kurds are fighting who have been made refugees try to for their land, just so you understand, they are fighting come into that space. so we are for their land. removing one problem and creating and, as somebody wrote in a very, another. and how do you deal with very powerful article today,
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that problem? they didn't help us another. and how do you deal with that problem ? what another. and how do you deal with that problem? what are the problem in the second world war, is that people in that sort of with normandy, as an example. situation face, what do they have, they mentioned names of different battles. if anything? people on the ground but they are there to help us with their land. president erdogan this morning, literally just have the making his first comments if anything? people on the ground literallyjust have the clothes on their back. they don't have a means since the operation began. to support themselves. they have already suffered from so many years of this brutal civil conflict and translation: hey, european union, get a hold of yourself! look, i'm telling you again. now, on top of this, these if you describe our operation operations are going to mean they will have to move yet again. our as an invasion again, concerns are that the most vulnerable, and that as are usually women and girls, will have next to nothing and will be subject to exploitation in these situations, which we have seen so many times we will take the easy road. we'll open the doors and send you 3.6 million refugees. over the years in syria. how easy is in a country where half access to them? it is becoming very the population have already been forced from their homes, there are fears of a fresh humanitarian crisis. the humanitarian situation difficult for us. we have over 2000 is untended and getting worse. the military situation threatens to be overrun notjust staff inside syria, the irc. people with a turkish—kurdish conflict but with the threat of isis, and the diplomacy is, frankly, in crisis. we are seeing in this microcosm here a global situation go away from population centres where the traditional diplomatic where we can reach them when bombing actors have been horrifically weak. failure means syrians are once again sta rts where we can reach them when bombing
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running for their lives. starts and they become harder to martin patience, bbc news, find. obviously for their safety but it also means it is harder to get on the turkish—syrian border. humanitarian aid to them. we have real concerns the most vulnerable won't be found in time and that could really compound casualties in this crisis. we are talking about an area of the middle east which through history, and certainly in the last few our international correspondent orla guerin sent this update decades, has seen migration on a from the turkish side of the border. scale none of us can imagine. from within the last few minutes here, various peoples fleeing struggles on there have been three very their part of the world and then loud blasts close to us. we could hear them, we could feel creating issues in other countries. there is no sign of an end to this? them and instantly there were scenes of panic in the streets of people running for their lives. we always have to be hopeful that others rushing towards the scene, trying to find out if there is an end to these things. you there were casualties. are right to flag that a lack of the peace process is the real problem, because this isn't going to go away, evenif because this isn't going to go away, even if this fighting right now we know that there was at least stops. the wider conflict is still one person injured. we saw them being taken away boiling on and without a peace from this building across the road. that is the office of the local governor. process that is internationally and we could see on the ground supported and internationally recognised, we are going to see displacement for many years to come.
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the evidence of an artillery strike. humanitarians will always be on the ground. irc will always be there to so this was incoming fire deliver as long as we are allowed to from the other side of the border. but the bigger issue is that there was a second strike humanitarian agencies are not being further down the street. the access they should. we call on we could see the smoke rising. the authorities have pushed us back now. all sides to respect international they are afraid of more incoming fire. but for the first time, humanitarian law and give this offensive that turkey humanitarians the access, even if the fighting cannot be stopped. is carrying out across the border in syria, that has now really good of you to join us, thank started to feel very real you for your time this afternoon. on the side of the border. president erdogan has said this morning that in his words 109 you're watching afternoon live. terrorists have been eliminated. turkey says that the offensive these are our headlines: is going according to plan. that more than 180 targets were hit by last night. and we know turkish forces across the border today are pushing deeper into north—eastern could there be a "pathway" to a possible brexit deal? syria, taking territory. borisjohnson and the irish prime minister say they can see the cost of the offensive is now being felt here after meeting today. in turkish territory. turkey steps up heavy artillery and air attacks on the kurds in syria — as the us stands accused of abandoning its allies in the fight against so—called so—called islamic state. briefing notes given borisjohnson is meeting his irish to president trump reveal that a woman with diplomatic immunity, who's a suspect in the fatal crash counterpart leo varadkar for brexit of teenager harry dunn, will not return to the uk. talks today — just days scotla nd
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after european leaders will not return to the uk. head coach says he has expressed pessimism about reaching faith scotland head coach says he has faith in world rugby to do all they a deal by the end of the month. can to get their rugby world cup the two leaders are having what's been described as a private meeting match with japan played. it could be to "allow detailed discussions". the labour leaderjeremy corbyn said cancelled if typhoon hagibis hit this morning that labour was ready for a general election once hard. on course to win a 27 medal. it was clear that a no—deal brexit was off the table. our political correspondent the most successful ever female in jessica parker reports. the competition is on course for all round gold in the final. and the new doing a deal isn't always easy, these two leaders know that. it has england cricket coach says he is not been all smiles recently after going to put extra support around the eu rebuffed the brexit the test match squad as he sets out his plan for the team in the coming proposals. minister syed boris yea rs. his plan for the team in the coming years. i will have a full round—up johnson still has his eye on getting injust over 15 minutes. a deal. the reason the prime minister is meeting leo varadkar briefing notes given isn't simply to have a social to president trump reveal that a woman with diplomatic immunity, conversation, they are seriously who's a suspect in the case focused on trying to resolve the issue and get a deal. the issue of a crash in northamptonshire in which a teenager died, will not return to the uk. being this, how to keep the irish police want anne sacoolas, border free being this, how to keep the irish borderfree and being this, how to keep the irish border free and flowing, how close who's married to a us diplomat, to return to the uk in connection trade ties need to be in order to with the collision in august in which harry dunn died. make that happen. in just one week duncan kennedy reports. from today, there is that crunch eu summit where boris johnson from today, there is that crunch eu summit where borisjohnson has said he hopes to finalise a deal with when harry dunn died in august,
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his family could never imagine brussels. three weeks from today, the uk is due to leave the european that their arc of grief would take their son into the white house. union. as things stand, the two but last night, president trump made sides still seem far apart, while a promise to talk to the woman who is the main suspect the deadline is closing in. this in harry's death. form a chance that the writers to we are going to speak to her very offer up some ideas of his own about shortly and see if we can how to get an agreement. but is a do something with... brexit delay now inevitable after it was an accident, it was an acc... mps passed a law designed to prevent it was a terrible accident. but just look at this. a new deal departure? yes, i think the government will comply with the it's the briefing note the president was holding saying that the woman he is talking about will not return to the united kingdom. benn act on october 19 and the eu that note was met this will grant morning by outrage from benn act on october 19 and the eu willgrant an benn act on october 19 and the eu will grant an extension. the challenge now for us is to harry dunn's family spokesman. demonstrate the well of ideas has it didn't sit with his spoken words. not run dry just demonstrate the well of ideas has not run dryjust because the proposal on the table is not going clearly, as he tends to do, to five does not mean that that we just speaks off the cuff and says should not look at other versions of whatever he thinks makes him look a deal. but he has got different best in the moment. you know, so we were angry ideas on what to prioritise if an when we left london yesterday, and that has tipped us over extension is secured. a message to the edge, i have to say. this is anne sacoolas, borisjohnson the wife of an american extension is secured. a message to boris johnson that extension is secured. a message to borisjohnson that labour is eager for a snap election. take no deal intelligence official, who was driving the car
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off the table and then let's have that collided with harry dunn's motorbike. northamptonshire police say the election. we are ready, we are 01:09:07,795 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 ready, there is they want to speak to anne sacoolas after she pulled out of this american air base, and about the accidentjust up the road — an accident that has involved everyone from harry dunn's family, to the president of the united states. harry dunn's family met the foreign secretary yesterday to try to get mrs sacoolas returned to the united kingdom, but they came out disappointed. i felt extremely let down by the government today, or by the foreign and commonwealth office. and i am deeply, deeply disappointed that they think it's ok to kill a young lad on his bike and they can just walk away. the family say they plan to go to washington to add more pressure for mrs sacoolas's return. all that, and grieving for harry at the same time. duncan kennedy, bbc news.
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the outgoing chief medical officer for england has called for a ban on eating and drinking on public transport, to help tackle the rise in childhood obesity. in herfinal report, professor dame sally davies says the government needs to take radical action, including tighter rules on food advertising and on takeaways. here's our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson. running a mile every morning before lessons — just one way this school in south london is trying to tackle childhood obesity. too little exercise and too much fatty food has proved disastrous. now, england's former chief medical officer has said radical action is needed, including banning eating on public transport, and tax breaks for healthy food. government needs to be bold and it can make a difference, and the public are asking for this. they believe, the public do, that government should protect their children. today's report lays out the challenge posed by childhood obesity.
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on average, in the final year of primary school, six out of 30 children will be obese, twice the number compared to 30 years ago. in england alone, 1.2 million children are clinically obese. this is feeding into diseases like type two diabetes, once very rare in children. there are now 100 new cases each year. orange, grapes, apples, strawberries... some of three—year—old marisa's favourite foods. her parents made a radical change to her diet recently, after being warned that she was overweight and needed to be slimmer. i was feeling so bad because i am the mum and i am responsible for her health, and i was feeling terrified about her future and want to help her. the result of the healthier diet is that marisa has lost two kilos and the rest of the family are slimmer as well. and there have been other successes. the levy on sugary soft drinks has seen a sharp drop in the amount
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of sugar being eaten, but today's report wants a tax on sweet, milky drinks and the phasing out of advertising of all unhealthy food. it says only bold measures will stop children from drowning in a flood of unhealthy food options. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. a climate change activist has been arrested on board a flight which was about to take off from london city airport. several other campaigners have been arrested during protests by extinction rebellion at the airport. our correspondent, richard galpin, is at the airport. it has been a whole series of protests throughout the day, including people gluing themselves to the pavement, people climbing up onto the roof of the terminal building. buti onto the roof of the terminal building. but i think probably the most significant protest we have seen most significant protest we have seen have been one person boarding a flight, seen have been one person boarding a flight, a climate change activist, and then essentially talking to
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passengers on board about climate change and eventually being taken away by the police. but of course, that delayed that flight to dublin significantly. perhaps more extraordinarily, we have had a former paralympian extraordinarily, we have had a former pa ralympian cyclist, extraordinarily, we have had a former paralympian cyclist, a man called james brown, who as far as i understand it is partially sighted, climbing onto the top of the fuselage of a ba plane which was bound for amsterdam. he was eventually brought down by the police. but certainly, overall, in terms of the level of disruption, it's not been great at all. the vast majority of flights have managed to 90, majority of flights have managed to go, it is only a couple of flights, as far as we know so far, that have been delayed. so from that point of view, it's not been a huge success for extinction rebellion, but they are trying to highlight the issue, because here in particular, london city airport, because there is a
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major expansion programme under way and they say that is wrong because it will lead to yet more carbon emissions from aviation fuel and they are saying that is exactly the opposite from what they say you should actually happen, which is to be cutting emissions as quickly as possible. richard galpin reporting. now, when you're abroad, the european health insurance card, known as ehic, allows you to get medical care forfree, or at reduced cost, in 31 countries. but if the uk leaves the european union without a deal, only three countries say they will offer anything similar. the government advice is to take out travel insurance. but the insurance industry is warning about price rises, especially for people with medical problems. catherine burns reports. michaela sheehan loves yoga, as a way to look after her mind and body. it tends to relax my muscles if i've had a seizure. it's not always easy, though. she has epilepsy and is struggling to get it under control. her first seizure happened when she was a teenager in paris. i was in disneyland
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on a school trip. i was queueing for a ride and i had a seizure. i was taken to hospital by ambulance and they did blood tests and observations every 15 minutes, and i was in hospital the rest of the day, and it was all completely free because of my ehic card. michaela always takes her ehic card on holiday, if she can. it means she can get medical care for free or at the same reduced cost locals would pay. even with the card, though, she has more expensive travel insurance because of her health. this is me and my boyfriend. so, for this holiday, i paid £60 for the week for travel insurance, whereas he paid £23 for the year. british people travelling abroad get about £150 million worth of treatment a year using the ehic scheme. if we leave the eu with a deal, that would continue, at least temporarily. these 31 countries all accept ehic cards. essentially, it's the eu, plus switzerland, norway, iceland and liechtenstein.
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the government has asked them to continue taking ehic until the end of next year, no matter what happens with brexit. so far, only one, spain, has agreed to do so. ireland and portugal have different plans but, essentially, they will continue to treat british tourists, even if there is no deal. there's nothing in place yet for people travelling to the other 28. the government says it's still trying to sort more health care deals though. it adds that it always tells people to make sure they have travel insurance when they go on holiday, and that is still the official advice, but there is a warning from the uk's largest travel insurance provider. if nothing changed between now and the 31st of october and there was no deal, then i am expecting prices to go up, but we don't know by how much. she accepts that for people like michaela who have long—term health problems, any price rises would be higher.
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i feel like it's definitely putting a label on us now saying, you have to pay more for this because of your epilepsy. michaela says, when she's booking her next holiday, her only real choice will be those countries who have agreed to carry on treating british tourists as they do now with ehic. just to bring you some breaking news. the derby north mp, labour mp chris williamson, has lost his high court bid to be reinstated to the labour party after he was suspended in february over allegations of anti—semitism. he was filmed saying labour had given too much ground and was being deem it —— demonised. he said these complaints he deeply regretted. the initial suspension was lifted injune but was reimposed two days later after backlash from jewish groups. mr williamson said he
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hoped to overturn what he called an unconstitutional decision to suspend him from the party loves. the decision of the high court means he is still out of the labour party after that bid to be reinstated failed. that is the derby north mp chris williamson losing that high court bid. we will more from our correspondence a little later on. you're watching afternoon live. let's catch up with ben rich and the weather. good afternoon, a lot of rain in the forecast for some of us over the next couple of days. the radar picture from earlier on shows these outbreaks of rain starting to develop across the north—west of the uk and that rain is going to pep up as we head through the rest of the afternoon and into the evening. some particular heavy bursts of rain in the western side of scotland, could see 20—50 millimetres in places and some outbreaks of rain pushing across parts of england and wales as well. there will be some slots, perhaps northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland, some clear spells here. that is where we will
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have the lowest of the temperatures but elsewhere are mild and blustery night. we keep the blustery winds tomorrow. outbreaks of rain and gusty winds pushing south—eastwards across england and wales. plenty more showers into the western side of scotland, some into northern ireland. it will be windy here as well stop there will be some sunny spells to be had in between those various rain bands and top temperatures of 1a—17 degrees. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines: could there be a "pathway" to a possible brexit deal? borisjohnson and the irish prime minister say they can see one after meeting today. turkey continues a military offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria — there's widespread international concern the attacks could lead to a resurgence of the islamic state group. briefing notes given to president trump reveal that a woman with diplomatic immunity, who's a suspect in the fatal crash of teenager harry dunn, will not return to the uk. england's outgoing chief medical officer says eating and drinking on local public transport should be banned to help tackle childhood obesity. also coming up — we'll find out about a scheme launched for mobility scooter users in gloucestershire to allow them to explore the cotswolds, that's in news nationwide shortly. sport now on afternoon live.
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we are more interested in the weather than in the rugby. we knew before the tournament started that typhoons could be a problem at the rugby world cup. as such, world rugby put reserve days in place for the knockout matches. they didn't do so for the group games though and that decision could be scotland's undoing. they need to beat japan on sunday by eight points, assuming ireland beat samoa anyway, in order to qualify for the quarterfinals. that typhoon could scupper those plans. the decision will be made
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he's been talking up the quality of his side and why not really when they're the world champions and arguably the most formidible side in the white ball shorter formats. as for test matches — well, it's been a while since england were a realforce, exemplified by australia retaining the ashes this summer, even if the series was drawn. silverwood replaces trevor bayliss as head coach and he and joe root will be wanting to get england back to the top of the world rankings and he's been speaking to jonathan agnew about what he's focusing on. i think it isjust i think it is just giving cricket the emphasis it deserves. you're talking about putting more structure around the test team and helping with that as well. we are making sure that the batting line—up is exactly how we want it, moving forward. and everything we do now puts the process in place so we can
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make a huge impact.” puts the process in place so we can make a huge impact. i thing it is truly important we find a method of play in test cricket, a dna, if you like, we have heard that term. what does that make up look like and we have obviously tried different things this summer. not all of them would have had success but along that path, we have found a couple of guys we know can stand the test and the pressures of test cricket. simone biles is on course to win her 22nd medal at the world gymnastics. the most successful ever female in the championships is on course for gold in the all—around final. biles is on course to become the world's most decorated gymnast by the end of the competitive action in germany this week. coverage continues right now over on bbc two. james maddison has withdrawn from the england squad for the euro 2020 qualifiers against czech republic and bulgaria because of illness. gareth southgate has chosen not to replace him so england will have a 23—man squad instead. they play the czechs in prague tomorrow and will qualify
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for the european championship if they win. and two time grand slam winner naomi osaka has chosenjapanese over american nationality with an eye on the tokyo 2020 olympics. osaka plays under a japanese flag but had dual nationality. japanese law stipulates an individual must choose one before their 22nd birthday which is next week. osaka has started the administrative process to make sure she can compete at her home games next year. that's all the sport for now. more heartbreaking story about chris williamson. he says the high court has today judged williamson. he says the high court has todayjudged that the labour party acted unlawfully in recent
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spending on the 28th ofjune and that there was no proper reason for doing so. he says, and glad the suspension has been quashed, however, he says, i am currently suspended. just clear at exactly what has happened this afternoon. suspended. just clear at exactly what has happened this afternoonm was a very what has happened this afternoonm was a very brief hearing, as you can imagine, it literally took a few moments. thejudgment imagine, it literally took a few moments. the judgment was imagine, it literally took a few moments. thejudgment was handed out andi moments. thejudgment was handed out and i have it in front of me now. essentially what has happened is they have ruled in chris williamson's favour. he was originally suspended in february, following allegations he had made anti—semitic remarks at a momentum meeting. initially, he was reinstated and told he would face a written warning but there was an outcry by different labour mps, amongst other people, that led him to being suspended again. today the
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judge said the decision to suspend him a second time after that disciplinary hearing should not have happened, it was unlawful. there has been a second separate disciplinary proceedings started against him at the beginning of september, in which he is alleged to have sent a e—mail toa he is alleged to have sent a e—mail to a member of the public who complained about his criticisms of margaret hodge mp, that referred her toa margaret hodge mp, that referred her to a video on youtube, the video said she trivialised the memory of the holocaust and requested she get the holocaust and requested she get the hell out of the labour party. there are other allegations as well as part of those disciplinary proceedings which began in september and are continuing. chris williamson had tried to get those thrown out and declared unlawful. he failed in that and remains suspended from the labour party and the judge decided that the proceeding should continue. the disciplinary proceedings from labour would continue until they reach a conclusion based on those
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fresh allegations made against him. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide, and see what's happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to amanda parr in bristol for us this afternoon and can tell us more about a new initiative to help people with mobility issues enjoy the beautiful cotswolds. yes, that is right. we sent our director, jonathan, out to test a brand—new eight mile accessible route in an all—terrain mobility scooter. we got him to make a film forest. his talents reach further than even we, his colleagues, realised. he is laughing in my earpiece as we speak now. i think he feels rather more at home sitting at
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the controls in the gallery. it is up the controls in the gallery. it is up to me, i think, to embarrass him with some pictures of him in action and tell you what he has been up to. he has been exploring the area around sudeley castle. very beautiful terrain and he has been trying out the new eight mile disabled access route which has been developed and constructed by the cotswold volunteer wardens. they have been working with the disabled ramblers group. it is suitable for all—terrain mobility scooters. the wardens have been working on accessible pass alongside —— along the cotswolds for many years now. this is a little different. it marks the introduction of more challenging routes. it has taken the volunteers hundreds of hours to install some gates, improve services and liaise with the landowners and the council
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about rights—of—way issues. the whole idea has been a massive hit. did he enjoy it? in fact in his film, he said something really lovely, he said it was as if the countryside had been unlocked for him. they had been really careful so as not to sanitise the experience for people. the landscape is natural, uneven and can get muddy. he speaks to lots of other people who have some lovely things to say about the experience they had. one man was overjoyed and said it meant he could nowjoin his wife on walks which they had always liked doing the past and they couldn't do now and another woman said it brought back countryside experiences that she thought were in her past and having them with her grandchildren now was unexpected and really rather special. the only issue is the sort of vehicle you have to use. these abilities cuddles are not cheap. ——
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mobility scooters. the wardens say now they have opened up the road, they will focus efforts on finding a vehicle they can offer out to hire. they very much see this and sipping to build on. if you build it, they will come, and as the popularity grows, they hope the growing interest will bring more opportunities to fundraising so that multiple can try the for themselves. i know your colleague alex lovell is watching, she has been tweeting, and we are wondering whatjonathan is saying in your ear right now. he says i have done very well! that was going to happen one day! it is good to talk to you. lovely to see you. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access
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them via the bbc iplayer. a reminder that we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at a:30pm on afternoon live. she is really not happy! the new 20 pound note featuring one of britain's most famous artists, jmw turner, has been unveiled. the bank of england governor mark carney travelled to margate in kent this morning, the town where turner spent much of his time. the polymer note will be in circulation from the beginning of next year. our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz, reports. in the clear light and under the big skies of margate which the painter turner loved so much, and in the gallery which bears his name, the new turner 20 on show, ready for its launch in february. the 20 is our most used and most forged banknote, so getting it right is important. we have to get this note right. it is the most secure note we've ever produced. by using polymer, we've been able to add additional security features. there's multiple foils, there's multiple windows. there's lots of ways that you can
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determine that this is a real 20. the new £20 note. what jumps out immediately, looking at the big one, is turner himself, his self—portrait. and behind, the fighting temeraire — the navy vessel which stood behind hms victory at the battle of trafalgar. and importantly, these security features. two clear, see—through windows. that's new and hard to forge. and where there's foil, it's now in two colours, gold and blue. so, what do the people of margate think of the new 20? do you recognise this guy? er, yep, turner. yep, obviously, and the margate lighthouse. and the turner centre in the background. you like it? yeah, ido. plastic. yeah, plastic. that's ok, is it? well, they sometimes can flick out of your pocket a little bit easy. the only thing i find with these, in our till, they roll. they roll up and they stick together. the turner 20 replaces the adam smith version we have now. will it be as popular? that depends how much we pay
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by cards or mobile phone instead. simon gompertz, bbc news, margate. in a moment, we'll have the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: she discovered someone using that accounted leaked stories about her to the sun newspaper. she revealed her detective work in an explosive tweet that went viral yesterday. rebecca vardy denies the allegation. anita mcveigh spoke to caroline frost about this. it has caught the imagination. i think the nation at the moment is desperate for any story other than political chaos and the more serious things we are
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seeing happening. on the surface this looks like a glorious mud fight between two alpha females, the likes we have not seen for decades. there are more serious underlying themes we could talk about and one is that clearly the advent of the wag is unprecedented, they have taken centre stage in a way that i guess this story has really shown for us for the first time. they are just wives and girlfriends of sports stars, football players, but they do have a currency, they have huge followings on social media, they matter to an enormous number of people and already we are seeing people and already we are seeing people divided into teams. underneath, you have the questions of if she has been hacked, then what does that mean? we are going down that road of how do you hack into a social media account and at what point can you say your social media accou nts point can you say your social media accounts are your own? i do not know who she has had on her team using her social media for her. at what point do you claim responsibility for that. i also it lifts a veil
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into a world where we normally see glamour and friendship eventually thatis glamour and friendship eventually that is not always the case. people like coleen rooney, you alluded to it, they will have people who help them manage their social media presence. i them manage their social media presence. i guess them manage their social media presence. i guess the next logical step is as we mentioned in the introduction, is to call in these forensic it experts to see who else could have been using her account or gaining access to her account? yes, and it must be a mortifying week for rebecca vardy either way because we know she is a sort of new kid on the block. coleen rooney is almost the queen of the wags because of her longevity and that status and also because of her connection with wayne rooney, one of the leading lights of the england football team also many years. but rebecca vardy is always in the papers and people say she is not afraid of publicity. however this is not the kind of publicity she would want. there is that old adage of no publicity is bad there is city, but you would not argue that in this case? no, as she
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said in her reply, they are really putting their washing on the line for everyone to inspect, she is saying, not being funny, i don't need the money, but i don't need the money. this is about if someone was to sell stories, this apparently happened simply to go circle as well, which were macro where stories are leaked to newspapers, shock, horror. but it is about developing relationships with the press and getting the magazines on side and one side to —— one way to do that is to share, but it is a bad look being caught out. she will be mortified if she has been doing it and if it is someone she has been doing it and if it is someone else doing it in her name. she blocked out the account and then worked out it was not anybody else. and she is saying, is uac, you think it is me?
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in a moment, we'll have the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: could there be a "pathway" to a possible brexit deal? borisjohnson and the irish prime minister say they can see one after meeting today turkey continues a military offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria — there's widespread international concern the attacks could lead to a resurgence of the islamic state group. briefing notes given to president trump reveal that a woman with diplomatic immunity, who's a suspect in the fatal crash of teenager harry dunn, will not return to the uk. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. nissan's european operations, which include plants in britain and spain, will not be sustainable if britain's departure from the eu leads to 10% tariffs on vehicles. that's according to the carmaker‘s european chairman. dyson, best known for its vacuum cleaners, has cancelled its programme to make electric cars. founderjames dyson told staff that the automotive team has developed a fantastic electric car, but that, unfortunately,
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it is not commercially viable. the economy appears to have avoided recession, with output growing by 0.3% in the three months to august. according to the ons, who produced these figures, a rise in film and tv production helped boost activity in the services sector, offsetting a disappointing performance form manufacturing. nissan's future in sunderland is in doubt? we have heard this before. yes, you will recall that nissan has this plant in sunderland, employing 600 people directly, on top of that, over 20,000 people relying on the operation in the supply chain because as we all know, from the conversations we have been having, there is a very long and complex supply chain. and now the chairman has been admitting that if under
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what is called wales —— world trade organisation rules, what we might have to face if we leave it out a deal, we could see tariffs on vehicles of 10%, which of course causes all sorts of concerns for car—makers and indeed for consumers as well. but what does that mean to the future of that particular industry in an area that relies on it for skilled jobs? the firm chairman made these comments when he was visiting the plant in sunderland. this is what he had to say. you will have to sustain 10% export duties on the vehicles we will be exporting to the eu, knowing those vehicles represent saudi percent of total production, the overall business model will not be sustainable —— 70%. richard dunbar, senior investment strategist, aberdeen standard investments joins us now from edinburgh. strong words from the european chair of nissan. the clock is ticking, as
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we all know, under the 31st of october deadline. do you think this isa october deadline. do you think this is a common thought that is occurring to those international businesses which have a uk arm? occurring to those international businesses which have a uk arm7m should not be a big surprise what the chairman of nissan is saying, making cars in the uk for sailing to europe is a pretty low margin business. they do not make a lot of money on that, if you put a 10% tariff, it makes that price uncompetitive all the europeans will have to pay more for it. his comments are obvious, that 10% tariff or make an awful lot of bit —— difference. it could be mitigated. we could see a weakness in sterling which could make the ca rs in sterling which could make the cars cheaper in that perspective. but it shows you the complexity of the problem that is facing him and nothing he said today should be a surprise. we are also seeing some impacts of the uncertainty surrounding brexit in other figures we have had today, the gdp ones. they have been slightly complex. august was pretty weak but the rest
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of the summer was not too bad. the figures were a little better than had been expected. not .3% growth, and the mix was interesting as well as usual, led by services rather than manufacturing but within manufacturing and construction in particular, they were bright spots, a lot more houses built. and some social housing built. that was a bright spot. the backdrop generally is not good. we are seeing a similar downturn in europe and a similar impact in trade talks, impacting manufacturing across the globe. a dell backdrop at a little better than had been expected. how do your clients feel about this? do they feel the uk is a risk or opportunity? i think a bit of both. sterling is the best barometer for investors, in terms of risks and rewards. despite the gyrations of
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the past few weeks, in terms of the brexit debate, you... we are seeing interest from investors in the stock market in the uk and even with the hong kong bid for lse falling away, there is demand for uk assets and uk interests. it is a bit of a mix and sterling as the barometer in between the two arguments at the moment. i know the markets are not quite as exciting as coleen rooney and rebecca vardy. full but you can see they are in positive territory and you might think, we are looking at these numbers and what has been going on in the uk, all eyes are looking at what is going on between the us and china. they have another round of trade talks, trying to avoid that
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all—out trade war with tariffs being imposed on everything in time for christmas. that's all the business news. as we heard earlier in the programme, borisjohnson is meeting his irish couterpart leo varadkar this afternoon, to try to revive the stalled brexit negotiations. as things stand, the chances of a deal look bleak. so what would a no deal brexit mean for everyday products that the uk imports, like fresh flowers? our correspondent, jim connolly ,has been to europe's largest flower auction in the netherlands to follow a shipment on its journey to the uk. if there's a no—deal, we've got to work in a different way. chris is a flower importer. she supplies florists across kent, for weddings and other special occasions. she's worried that a no—deal brexit could mean more paperwork and delays in the main port of dover. do we know a week before the 1st of november that, actually, it's a no—deal? and that information's key for you? it is, because then you've got a week to sort yourself out. like most wholesalers in the uk,
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she buys them from the netherlands. just look how busy this place is. it is absolutely unbelievable. it's been described to me as being a bit like an ant city, and you can see why. the uk buys around £700 million worth of flowers from here every year, so the chances are if you've brought some back home recently, they came through here. this is europe's biggest flower auction. from the auction, the flowers travel on conveyor belts to chris's supplier. he, too, has concerns. we're worried, er, about delays at border control. extra paperwork we have to do, er, which will, in effect, affect the transport time. some of these on order... back in the uk, and newsbeat‘s been speaking to traders at the uk's largest wholesale flower market, and this is a common message. so, everyone's still in the dark. we don't know what's happening three weeks away from the dates. we still don't know if we're leaving then or not, which is a bit stupid really.
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however, some people we've spoken to see brexit as an opportunity for british flower growers to pick up some of the slack. in exeter, we've met one small business arranging flowers for wedding and corporate events. i think we need to open our eyes a little bit in britain and just see what is being produced locally, you know, around britain. the flowers that i've got in today, they're all grown in cornwall. and these ones, actually, are grown in the scilly isles. some veterans of the industry say that may be so, but it could take years to establish. the british government says it's committed to getting a deal with the european union and the eu now needs to engage at pace with the uk's proposals. however, many in the industry say a lack of clarity around brexit makes their future uncertain. jim connolly, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich.
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as we heard earlier, chris williams has lost his high court bid to be reinstated to the party. a judge ruled that the labour party acted unlawfully and speaking outside the court, he criticised the campaign against him. every step of the way, the party bureaucracy has briefed against me in the media and did not honour their own requirement of confidentiality. resulting in me being viciously smeared and abused. with increasingly wild accusations, all the while i was prevented from defending myself. the labour party hasissued defending myself. the labour party has issued a brief statement and says the court has upheld chris williamson's suspension from the party and his disciplinary case must run its course. plenty more with all those stories at five o'clock but now we go to the weather. good afternoon. some parts of the uk can
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expect yet more very wet weather over the next couple of days. we have certainly seen things clouding over without breaks of raining northern and western areas today. this approaching area of cloud sliding its way in and we can follow this cloud right the way out into the atlantic. we have quite a long weather front which is just going to wriggle around and feed as pulses of heavy rain over the next couple of days but back to the year and now, what is left of this afternoon and into this evening, the rain starting to pack up, i think, across north—western parts of the uk. wet weather across high ground in scotland. may be up to 50 millimetres of rain in places. in some outbreaks of rain further south you will notice pushing on across england and wales. it is a mild mitral many of us. quite a blustery one as well. into tomorrow, i mentioned the wriggle is on that weather front and this is one and
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that will at the rainfall across parts of wales and northern england. we could see 50 to 70 millimetres of rain. that could cause travel problems, perhaps localised flooding. that wet weather will stagger its way south—eastward is across england and where and plenty of heavy showers pushing on towards the north—west. there will be two different —— zones of strong winds, one across the southern half of england and wales. also very windy across the northern coast of northern ireland and scotland. there will be some sunshine for some of us. if we had through friday night and into saturday, the weather front does not clear through and we are likely to see another pulse of rain pushing up from the south—west. some of that could be on the heavy side. further north, sunny spells were northern england, northern ireland and scotland. ft showers across the north—west of scotland. temperatures
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not quite as windy. the wet weather likely to slide away. sunny spells and showers. some of those showers could turn really heavy in the west later on. top temperatures of 12 to 16 degrees. today at 5. borisjohnson, and the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, say they can "see a pathway", to a possible brexit deal. following more than two hours of talks, the leaders said they believed a deal was "in everybody‘s interests". we'll have the latest
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on the brexit negotiations. the other main stories, on bbc news at 5. turkey steps up heavy artillery and air attacks on the kurds, in syria. thousands of civilians are reported to have fled. we have seen turkish shelling throughout the morning on the syrian town and village, behind me. you can probably see the columns of smoke, rising on the horizon. after the crash which killed teenager harry dunn, the suspect — claiming diplomatic immunity — will not return to the uk, say
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