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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  October 21, 2019 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond 100 days. ten days to go until brexit and still mps haven't given their agreement to the deal negotiated by boris johnson last week. it means the first vote on the legislation won‘t be until tomorrow— as the government pledges to push ahead with getting all the laws through by the end of the week. the government wanted a simple ‘yes‘ or ‘no‘ vote on the deal today— but the speaker of the house refused, saying it had already been brought before mps on saturday. my ruling is that therefore the motion will not be debated today as it would be repetitive and disorderly to do so. the government promises to publish the withdrawal agreement bill this evening— our first look at how it intends to turn its agreement
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into domestic law. also on the programme: donald trump defends his decision to pull troops out of syria and insists the ceasefire is holding. president obama's national security advisor susan rice joins us to discuss the moves. prince william admits he's concerned for his brother and meghan after the couple ‘acknowledged they were struggling in a revealing interview broadcast last night. we will always be brothers. we are certainly on different parts at the moment but i will always be there for him as he will always be there for him as he will always be there for me. we don't see each other as much as we used to. and you may know him as mitt romney but thanks to a secret twitter account — pierre delecto has been defending the senator online. hello and welcome — i'm michelle fleury in washingto
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and christian fraser is at college green. the uk is due to leave the eu in 10 days‘ time, and although borisjohnson has negotiated a new deal setting out the terms, mps are yet to give the agreement their approval. the government had been hoping that mps would get a simple ‘yes‘ or ‘no' vote on the deal tonight, allowing the legal formailities to be worked though later. but commons speakerjohn bercow refused to allow the vote — saying that it was too similar to the question put to mps 48 hours ago on saturday. today's motion is in substance the same as saturday's motion and the house has decided the matter. today's circumstances are in substance the same as saturday's circumstances. my ruling is therefore the motion will not be debated today as it would be repetitive and disorderly to do so. mr bercow‘s decision was important because if mps had had that vote — and it had passed — the path for boris johnson
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to fulfill his ‘do—or—die‘ pledge to deliver brexit by the end of this month would have been clearer. but now there's no time limit for the legal too—ing and fro—ing, although the government says it's pushing ahead to get laws through by the end of the week. perhaps crucially, mps will be able to change the law as it goes through — possibly adding a second referendum or changing the nature of our future customs relationship with europe. i'm joined now by lucy frazer mp, minister of state forjustice in boris johnson's government. good evening. let's just good evening. let'sjust quickly look back on the day, a lot of mps very angry about the speaker's decision. what did you make of it? it is frustrating because it would have been an opportunity for the house to say it was happy with the deal and amend me —— house to say it was happy with the dealand amend me —— unamended and that would have been a great signal to start the legislation in the right place. but such a vote wouldn't have meant anything because oliver letwin‘s amendment withheld
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approval pending the legislation, it would have been a meaningless vote. it would have been an important signal but now we will press on with the legislation and hope we get that legislation through the house. jacob rees—mogg, leader of the house, set forward a fairly ambitious schedule this evening. the second reading of the bill will be tomorrow then a second reading, committee stage tomorrow night, committee stage on wednesday, third reading to bounce it onto the house of lords on thursday. you can't really be serious that a bill that fundamentally changes our way of life can be rushed through the house in three days. we are up against a deadline. but also we have been discussing this issue for over three years. we have been discussing all the bill for over three years and we need to get the legislation through. we have seen in the past you can get legislation through the house of commons in pretty short order, the benn act went through very quickly so
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benn act went through very quickly so it is possible to achieve. that was a i—page motion. in this bill it is going to change the way our courts relate to the european courts, that is fundamental to our way of justice in courts, that is fundamental to our way ofjustice in the uk. you happy with it going through in under three days? you're right to identify this isa very days? you're right to identify this is a very important piece of legislation. some of the provisions in that legislation were set out in the previous withdrawal agreement and that has been around for some time. many of the documentation of the northern ireland protocol, the political declaration, were produced at the end of last week so there has been some time to look at those. the key point is that people have been looking at this issue for three years. people who care about particular points in the legislation would have thought about any angle that can have been thought about. there have been papers, discussions, there has been conversations with numberten and others there has been conversations with number ten and others about all these issues. this is not coming the
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fore at the last minute. one of the things that labour mps like to amend is to put a customs union and the bill instead of the free trade agreement that boris johnson bill instead of the free trade agreement that borisjohnson once. they were to put that in the withdrawal agreement part of the bill, the legally binding part of withdrawal agreement, what does the prime minister do? will he have to pull it? there are a number of points in relation to that, we had some indicative votes. it didn't pass even at the indicative motion stage. we now have a bill and a deal that i think will command the majority of the house and i hope it is that bill that goes forward. ok, thank you very much for being with us. thank you very much for being with us. i should just say there is one other amendment that is likely to go out tomorrow and that was around the timetabling motion. the schedule for the week. they might try to amend that tomorrow. that would be the first battle royale. plenty to watch
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out for. the question is where that leaves us by the end of this week. in syria, angry residents in a kurdish—controlled city pelted departing us troops with potatoes as they hurled insults. the departing forces are headed to iraq to regroup as the president continues to face plenty of criticism for the way he ordered the withdrawal of troops from northern syria. overnight there was speculation that the white house was considering keeping a limited number of us troops in syria — to protect syrian oil fields and keep a foothold against isis. but a short while ago, in a cabinet meeting, donald trump suggested that wouldn't be necessary: when we went to turkey and when we went to the kurds, they agreed to do things that they never would have done before the shooting started. if they didn't go through two and half days of hell, i don't think they would have done it. i think we couldn't have made a deal. and people have been trying to make this deal for years.
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well, this weekend president trump attacked his critics including this tweet. we are pleased to say that ambassador rice joins us now to discuss the situation in syria and her new book tough love. ambassador, thank you forjoining us on the programme. we have to start with turkey and syria. you have this idea that troops are going to stay on the ground in syria or at least in neighbouring iraq. how much has this decision undermined american foreign policy? i think the consequences are almost incalculable when you add them up. in the first instance we have taken our foot off the neck of isis. we see prisoners
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escaping, sleeper cells reactivating, new attacks. in the next instance, we have undermined a very important relationship with our kurdish partner to have taken the fight to isis and sent the message not only to the codes that we are prepared to sell them out, see their ethnic homeland to the turks but to anybody who might be interested in partnering with us around the world that our word cannot be trusted. and we have ruled out the red carpet for vladimir putin and iran to take back territory but they were not being able to seize and given turkey a green light to ethnically cleanse the northern part of syria. set about abandoning an ally. there has been lots of debate or discussion is about what promises were made to the kurds when they agreed to partner with the us. the president said
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there were no promises made. you are there were no promises made. you are the national security adviser at the time under the obama administration, what promises were made? they were not formal promises. we said we would support them in the fight against isis and we would be there as they tried to sustain their national homeland. it wasn't a treaty but it was a moral obligation and everyone understood it to be so which is why there is bipartisan outrage here in washington over the president's decision to abandon them. it is where you hear reports of american forces who have spent years on of american forces who have spent years on the ground with a kurdish partner is feeling we betrayed our friends and allies. it is outrageous when you think about it. the kurds have been through so much in that whole region, whether in iraq or syria. the united states has traditionally come to their rescue, whether after the first gulf war or as president obama did. so for
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president tramp on a whim reasons that nobody understands, to absolutely counter to national security and through them under the bus, it not only makes no sense but it isa bus, it not only makes no sense but it is a shameful breach of our moral responsivity. i was watching an interview with the chair of our foreign affairs committee today and he was making the point that the relationship with the united states goes much deeper than this white house and its president, but he was asking what kind of alliance is it, what kind of special relationship is it when our interests come second to america first. that is exactly the question. historically our alliances and partnerships have been two way st and we have been there for each other, the special relationship with the united kingdom being the most important example of that in many respects but now all that is called into question is, when you have an american leader who is not pursuing even an american first foreign
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policy, whatever that means and however detrimental it may be, it is really in the first foreign policy. there is nothing about his decision to withdraw us forces unilaterally in us interests, it runs directly counter. it makes you wonder what he was given in that phone call with erdogan? what was the quid pro quo. i'm going to pick you up on the idea ofa i'm going to pick you up on the idea of a two—way street. you might know oui’ of a two—way street. you might know ourformer prime of a two—way street. you might know our former prime minister david cameron has a book out at the moment and when he was interviewed about it he talks about the first chemical attack in syria and he said he called the white house when president obama was there and he didn't get a call—back for four days. i don't recall that at all. i do recall them speaking repeatedly including about the chemical attack and prime minister cameron had committed tojoin and prime minister cameron had committed to join with united
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and prime minister cameron had committed tojoin with united states and france in responding militarily to that attack and unfortunately, took the vote to parliament and lost the in parliament. in part that influence president obama's decision to consider the necessity of congressional support to ensure we have a sustainable back in the united states to pursue what could be an extended military engagement and as you know, congress did not provide that but nonetheless a deal was reached to remove 1300 metric tonnes of chemical weapons from syria, which at the time we understood to be the bulk of their stockpile. in your book you write about many things, including how to accept failures in foreign policy. you also talked about political divisiveness that we see right now on both sides of the atlantic. catching your eye forward to 2020, how does political divisiveness open up how does political divisiveness open up the way for further foreign
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interference, especially as we saw in 2016, as we now know that the russians on social media? that is an important point and what i say in the conclusion of the book in the final chapter is in myjudgment our domestic political divisions our our greatest national security liability. not least because it gives an opening for adversaries like vladimir putin to pour salt in out like vladimir putin to pour salt in ourwins, to go like vladimir putin to pour salt in our wins, to go on social media and exacerbate distrust between americans whether it is on issues of race, americans whether it is on issues of race , gay americans whether it is on issues of race, gay rights or gun control, these are all hot button divisive issues in the united states. we see russia working to exhibit divisions are both sides. it is a problem united states has an opportunity to rectify. as we have overcome many
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divisions in a past from the civil war to vietnam but it takes focus and commitment and it means our leaders in particular are going to have to rise above the narrow political interests and put national unity and the strength of our democracy and global leadership first. if set at the un and the national security council, when you look at the situation in libya and the way that imploded anyway syria imploded, either any lessons over how the west does this, if you are removing someone how the west does this, if you are removing someone like gaddafi. how the west does this, if you are removing someone like gaddafim how the west does this, if you are removing someone like gaddafi. in my judgment, the decision by the united states, france, the uk, nato, to protect civilians in libya was the right choice. the intervention i think was the right decision but we
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all collectively failed to consolidate the piece. in libya gaddafi had run a one—man government, there were no institutions of state, the place was extremely fragile and we do not organise ourselves with the international community, the un and others swiftly enough and effectively enough to try and consolidate things and help the libyans form a national unity government. i don't know for sure, i don't think anybody can that had we been more ready and more active in that effort that we might have succeeded and that libya would be a unitary state now but what i do regret is our collective effort was insufficient to try to know if we could have made that difference. thank you so much for your time today. thank you very much. fascinating. the uk government has published the text of the withdrawal agreement bill —
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the piece of legislation that begins to put the government's new brexit deal into uk law. if the government is take the uk out of the eu by october 31st it is crucial that the legislation passes swiftly. on saturday mps refused to vote on the principal of the deal itself until the laws delivering it were in place. we are hearing that legislation will be published in the next hour. we are hearing that legislation will be published in the next hour. tomorrow's second reading of the bill will also be the first opportunity to see whether there might be a majority for the new deal in parliament. but even if that passes there are still multiple stages before it becomes law — including an opportunity for mps to vote on potentially significant amendments which the government may be unable to oppose, like a commitment to staying in the eu's customs union. let's speak now tojoe owen, programme director at the institute for government. we are in for an almighty bonfire this week over this legislation. particularly over the programming of
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it because tonight jacob particularly over the programming of it because tonightjacob rees—mogg sending out a 3d schedule, that is incredibly quick. the programming is likely to be the first big battle. three days is astonishingly quick, if you compared to legislation implemented in previous eu treaty changes, it is the shortest by some distance in terms of the amount of scrutiny they have. if the meaningful vote had taken place and happened and been successful today or even in the oliver letwin amendment had fallen on a saturday and the meaningful vote had passed, the programme motion would have been necessary. they could have said the benn act could have fallen away and they could have done it in three days or it is no deal on october the 3ist. days or it is no deal on october the 315t. now they cannot argue that so the debate about programming is likely to be couched about the debate between scrutiny in one hand and mp5 wanting more time and on the other hand, they need to hit the
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deadline are not have to ask for an extension. i want to remind our view is that when they considered this bill they have to consider what comes from europe. we have two parts of the withdrawal agreement. there is the legally binding part, the withdrawal agreement to and there is the political declaration which is non—binding. that is important when we consider the amendments because you could amend the political declaration but that is for the future. the other bit is far more complicated. mps won't be let loose oi'i complicated. mps won't be let loose on the text, if you like, of the withdrawal agreement and political declaration. this piece of legislation is about giving government the powers and putting in place new regulations that allows them to implement that agreement, that international agreement, in uk law. there will be bits that are very long in the international treaty. let me stop you there, are you saying if labour put forward an amendment on the customs union, where does that fit? because if you put down but amendment you are fundamentally changing the
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withdrawal agreement, that has to be renegotiated with the eu. what does it? there is an interesting question about how this amendment materialises. you could have an amendment that says this agreement cannot be ratified unless it contains a provision a uk customs union. that would require the government to go back to brussels and try to change it if they want to get this deal through or they could put through an amendment that serves as part of the future relationship negotiations that come next, a customs union should be a uk government negotiating objectives. that would require the government to do nothing now and actually they could overturn it once this legislation has been ratified. so, a lot depends on exactly where and how they try and put an amendment in around the customs union. it could end up being actually relatively meaningless with the need to ratify this deal in terms of what could
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change, but would be politically significant. that is an important point, thank you very much indeed. let's speak now to caroline flint, mp for don valley — and one of the six labour mps who rebelled on saturday by voting with the government on the new brexit deal. she joins us from central lobby. i don't know if you are able to hear joe but he was talking about amendments and where they may fit in the legislative programme that we are about to see of me next week. i can imaginea are about to see of me next week. i can imagine a scenario where, can you, where the government might be able to live with the customs union being in the political declaration bit of the bill because at the end of the day that is for a future government to legislate on.|j of the day that is for a future government to legislate on. i think thatis government to legislate on. i think that is an interesting point because i think part of the circumstances of the customs union coming up in the debate is whether parliament seeks to make it a condition of supporting the withdrawal agreement that has been decided with the eu 27 and uk government, whether it is something thatis government, whether it is something that is put forward as a suggestion, pa rt of that is put forward as a suggestion, part of what should go into the transition phase as part of those
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next round of agreements. i think it was made a condition, it would be seen was made a condition, it would be seen as a was made a condition, it would be seen as a wrecking amendment. whereas all along and it has been said by the eu, details have to happen in the transition stage or the implementation stage and there we will have more discussions, more mini deals and more meaningful votes. are you saying that potentially you could amend this bill and you could, maybe, the opposition alliance could amend it how they like to see it in the future and then we would head to the election where the prime minister would say it is an ideal as agreed with the eu or a very different piece of legislation that we now see? i think it all depends on what is the motivation behind amendments. whether they are there to wreck the withdrawal agreement that we have arrived at and therefore, stop brexit basically. whether it is actually something that we cannot unpick the withdrawal agreement at
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the moment because that is a done deal between the uk government and eu 27, but whether or not it would have something in it about the future. included in the withdrawal agreement bill are some concessions that myself and some colleagues have secured in terms of a parliamentary lock in the next stage so that on all these negotiations that will continue to happen in detail, parliament will have the opportunity to debate and have a vote at each stage. that is something that we actually secured earlier in the year under theresa may but actually we have managed to make sure that boris johnson has gone along with that as well. i welcome that that will be on the face of the bill, i understand, tomorrow. talking of motivation, shadow brexit secretary says that boris johnson's shadow brexit secretary says that borisjohnson's deal shadow brexit secretary says that boris johnson's deal is shadow brexit secretary says that borisjohnson's deal is a bad one. he says it is going to shatter britain's economic model and it goes against everything the labour and movement stands for. why go against your party and vote in favour of it?
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i think he said that about theresa may's deal and i think he would say it about any deal that comes forward. i disagree with it because i think if eu 27 are signing up to withdrawal agreement, i don't think they would sign up to something that is bad for business and standards and our relationship going forward. secondly, myself and other colleagues had secured, and people will see it on the face of the bill, not only a parliamentary lock to ensure parliament has a meaningful say on the next round of negotiations in stage two but also we have legislation on the face of this bill to protect workers' rights, to make sure we don't regress, but also as we go forward and for the european union, improves its workers' rights and we will have the chance to debate and vote them in the british parliament. i would say, that pretty much in every area when it comes to workers' rights british standards are far above the eu standard. so, i really think we have to have an honest debate about this, about what we gain from being
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in the european union and what things we do. don't forget, we have also spent the last year or so transposing into british law uk law so transposing into british law uk law so that actually many of the standards stay the same and for 15 months, if we get through this present situation, absolutely nothing will change. we will have a general election, i'll be campaigning for labour to win and if we win we can influence the future. i have more hope for that. did a view tojoin us i have more hope for that. did a view to join us this evening, thank you for that. —— good of you tojoin us you for that. —— good of you tojoin us this evening. a number of mps on the labour side who want to support this bill but there will be implications and pressure put on them from the shadow front bench. yeah. and one of the ones facing the election.
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coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — canadians vote in a general election believed to be one of the closest races the country has ever seen. hello there, quite a cool day for many of us today. we have seen a lot of cloud streaming in from off the north sea. it has been around this edge of area of high pressure, tending to topple southwards, thinning and breaking the cloud and pushing a that weather front which has been bringing some rain and drizzle, mainly across east anglia and the south—east. even across western areas, whilst it has been dry, there has not been a huge amount of sunshine but certainly a better day than it has been across norfolk for example where we have had this great low cloud, it has felt quite chilly as well. that cloud producing a little light rain, drizzle will tend to push away out of the way. we will see that there are cloud across and within wales.
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my are cloud across and within wales. my cloud coming to scotland and northern ireland as the breeze picks up northern ireland as the breeze picks up and some rain for northern scotland. much, much milderthan up and some rain for northern scotland. much, much milder than it was last night. quite chilly for my southern parts of england and wales. where we get some decent breaks, especially some rain like the west country, you may well find is a mist and fog around in the morning. that could lingerfor a good few hours before lifting and the sunshine coming through. i think we could see some more sunshine across england and wales. he bit my cloud as you had further north and we will find some stronger winds across scotland and northern ireland, tended to keep the rain in the far north of scotla nd the rain in the far north of scotland so generally it dry day elsewhere in this temperatures a little bit higher than today. a notable change for eastern parts of england. we have some rain waiting in the wings. that will start to arrive on wednesday there has been some very wet weather across france and spain. we are very much on the edge of that, that weak weather front bringing that slither of cloud and a couple of showers on wednesday. most of england and wales, and indeed is in scotland, should be dry and there will be
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sunshine at times but the weather front will bring to my persistent rain into northern ireland, into western scotland, quite a heavy rain over the hills here. those temperatures still sitting at 12-15d. temperatures still sitting at 12—15d. these weather fronts across the uk will tend to weaken and drift their way into england and wales but their way into england and wales but the main driving force that deep area of low pressure. that gets closer to the north—west. we are looking at some gales, may be severe gales around here, and blowing in a lot of showers as well. we will see a few showers pushing down on crossing wales. that week weather front arriving in the south—east corner, producing a little rain but not very much. those temperatures still 12—15dc.
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this is beyond 100 days. with me, michelle fleury in washington, christian fraser is in westminster. our top stories: my ruling is that the emotion will not be debated today... the uk parliament's speaker refuses a government request to hold a "yes" or "no" vote on its brexit deal. president trump says kurds in northeastern syria are withdrawing intelligently a day before a ceasefire in the turkish offensive is due to end. coming up in the next half hour: canadians go to the polls to decide whether to give justin trudeau's liberal party a second term. it's going to be a close call. and prince william says he's concerned for harry and meghan
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after the couple acknowledged they were struggling in a revealing tv interview. let's bring you some breaking news now. we have got the uk foreign minister dominic raab issuing some statements related to the death of harry dunn, who was killed by the wife of an american diplomat. he says the government was warned by the us that the crash suspect was going to leave the crash suspect was going to leave the country. he added that, we continue to urge the us authorities and the suspect to cooperate with the investigation. he says he also believes current arrangements for diplomatic immunity as seen at that
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base in norfolk are correct. it sounds like he would like some kind of change to that. just last week, harry dunn's parents went to the oval office where there was a meeting spring on them at the last minute when the president tried to get harry dunn's parents to come face—to—face with the woman who was believed to be behind the wheel when that accident occurred. mps are likely to have the chance, and possibly multiple chances, to vote on the prime minister boris johnson's brexit deal in the next few days. they'll be voting on the withdrawal agreement bill, nicknamed the wab, the document that puts the new deal into uk law. on saturday, mps voted not to ratify the deal itself until all of the necessary legislation had been written into the domestic statute books — a process the government hopes to wrap up by passing the wab by thursday, a week before the october 31st deadline. an ambitious time frame for a significant piece of legislation. let's speak now to our political correspondent jonathan blake,
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who's in the houses of parliament. we are waiting for that bail to appear, jonathan, and it will be the first time, we should say this, that mps have seen this legislation. first time, we should say this, that mps have seen this legislationm will be, and it will be the first chance for them to scrutinise in minute detail exactly how with the government has translated, if you like, the withdrawal agreement, that the deal struck by borisjohnson like, the withdrawal agreement, that the deal struck by boris johnson and the deal struck by boris johnson and the eu, into domestic legislation. it will explain all kinds of things. for example, how the government is going to administer the payments to the eu that it has agreed under the withdrawal agreement, key details about how the administrative border between great britain and northern ireland, the customs checks, will work, and plenty more besides. far from a rubber—stamping exercise, they will want to have a very good look at this bill when it is published, we expect in the next
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couple of hours this evening, and then debate and vote on it in the various stages that it will go through in the house of commons and ultimately the house of lords in a very, very tight timeframe. something like this would normally ta ke something like this would normally take several weeks but the government wants to get this wrapped up government wants to get this wrapped up in government wants to get this wrapped upina government wants to get this wrapped up in a matter of days. for viewers in the united states, and i'm sure in many parts of the world, what are we going to know by the end of this week? is britain likely to leave in an orderly fashion come october the sist? an orderly fashion come october the 31st? we will know, i think, whether there is broad support in the house of commons at least and parliament asa of commons at least and parliament as a whole for boris johnson's withdrawal agreement, because mps haven't had the chance to have a straight yes or no vote on the deal asa straight yes or no vote on the deal as a whole, if you like, in principle, so it is going to this next stage of the legislation going through. they will be amendments put
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forward from various quarters to try to bend and shape deal to mp5' liking. the big wins is an attempt to keep the uk in closer economic relationship with the eu by staying ina relationship with the eu by staying in a customs union and then an attempt to put the final deal to another public vote. the date of the 3ist another public vote. the date of the 315t of october still stands, that is what the government is working to, despite borisjohnson having been forced to ask for an extension, so we been forced to ask for an extension, so we could be in a place where parliament has approved boris johnson's deal, or they have approved a version of it that the government doesn't like and is not willing to take back to the eu. so several key steps in this process took over the next few days but uncertainty remains over where it will end up. yes, so some long nights. justin trudeau is facing the fight of his life. the canadian prime minister, once a darling of the left, has seen his popularity take a hit
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in recent years due to a string of scandals. those include ethics rules violations, the development of a controversial oil pipeline and the saga where he had to apologise after images of him wearing blackface as a young man surfaced. not exactly what you want on your scorecard in the run—up to an election. either way, it's going to be a close call as canadians head to cast their vote today withjustin trudeau's liberals and andrew scheer‘s conservatives neck and neck. let's cross live to montreal and speak to the bbc‘s chris buckler. what are going to be the key things to look for? is turnout going to be important, given how close this race is? if you take a look at turnout already in terms of the voting, it is already up by almost a third. it gives you a sense that the canadian electorate are interested in this vote and that is not a surprise because according tojustin turdeau, it has been notjust one of the
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closest elections in this country's history, but also one of the nastiest, but that is because his own political record and his own personal plast —— past have been on the record. we have had those images of him in black and brown face, which has really tarnished his reputation as one of the champions of multiculturalism in canada, and he has been accused of interfering ina he has been accused of interfering in a prosecution in a corporate corruption scandal. all that has taken away from neymar, —— justin turdeau, who four years ago was seen asa turdeau, who four years ago was seen as a new face for canada, with a fresh approach to politics. there are some questioning that and that is why this has become such a tight race between the conservatives and his liberal party. i was reading today that the biggest voting bloc in canada is the end of 35 is and they put so much faith in him back in 2015, this result will
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depend on whether they think he has delivered or whether he has let them down. and part of that is also to do with a lot of them are feeling very strongly about environmental issues. climate change is something that group feel particularly strongly about and by him pushing to try and expand an oil pipeline in the country, that is something that has caused a lot of problems as well. it seems some of those younger voters go to seems some of those younger voters gotoa seems some of those younger voters go to a third party, the new democrats, and they could end up as being the kingmakers in all of this, because they suggest —— the poll suggest the conservatives and the liberals are neck and neck but neither of them might reach a majority. that is something you know all about in westminster, the idea ofa all about in westminster, the idea of a hung parliament, all about in westminster, the idea ofa hung parliament, and it means justin turdeau might have to do some compromises to get the new democrats on board. thank you very much.
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today, president trump took another shot at the impeachment inquiry, calling it a phony investigation. but the pressure on many fronts is mounting and tomorrow bill taylor, america's top official in ukraine, will be called to testify. so what was the president's message to republicans who are now trying to defend the administration on multiple fronts? well, it was to just fight harder and here he was talking about the investigation. i watched a couple of people on television today talking about it. they were talking about what a phony deal it is, what a phony investigation it is, and the republicans have to get tougher and fight. we have some that are great fighters but we have to get tougher and fight because with the democrats trying to hurt the republican party before the election. joining us is the bbc‘s nick bryant. what did you make of that? donald trump basically saying the republicans need to be trevor —— tougher. you wonder what fighting
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tougher. you wonder what fighting tougher actually looks like. you had senator mitt romney last week, the former republican presidential candidate being very critical about donald trump. the president called him pompous on twitter. this does come at a time when there is a lot more restlessness within the republican party about donald trump and what many republicans would say is that we are trying to defend the president on so many friends right now, we simply cannot do that. impeachment is one, but party unity has held pretty tight. on other issues, of course, we have seen a lot more criticism from his own party at the president's actions. we have been talking a lot about syria but one of the curious ones was the announcement last week of where the g7 meeting would be held. that was a decision he talked about again. how
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did that play into what we have been discussing? syria, and absolute acid shower of criticism for the president from republican allies. even close loyalists like lindsey graham. the republican senator from south carolina, a golfing buddy —— buddy of the president, he has been so buddy of the president, he has been so critical of the president over syria and america's promises to every other ally in the world. who would forgive the americans for turning their backs on the kurds? and then donald trump saying he was going to host the g7 at his own resort in florida. again, another acid shower of criticism, not expressed so publicly but privately. one of the reasons donald trump reversed his decision. he said it was about the democrats making hay, but actually, his chief of staff was
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at camp david and he heard a lot of republicans are saying, we cannot defend you on the g7 being held at your resort, and that is what led to that reversal. i wasjust watching the cabinet praying while you were talking. i wonder whether they were praying for mick mulvaney after he's had such a shocker of a week. that prompts conference last week, remember what happened there. he not only admitted to a quid pro quo, with ukraine over military aid in return for continuing an investigation which could end up needing to do it on the biden family, he also announced a possible second potential impeachment of friends by saying that the g7 would be held in florida and that is potentially in violation of what is called a particular clause in the constitution which stops a president profiting from foreign governments. apparently he went into the west wing after that conference and said,
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how didl wing after that conference and said, how did i do? of course, they said then, he would have to do some clean—up pretty fast. that clean—up came from not just the acting clean—up pretty fast. that clean—up came from notjust the acting chief of staff but the president himself, reversing that highly controversial decision to host the g7 in florida. donald trump saying it would have been the greatest g7 ever. donald trump saying it would have been the greatest g7 evenfi donald trump saying it would have been the greatest g7 ever. it would have been perfect. apparently they are giving mick mulvaney a round of applause. anyway, thank you very much indeed. five people have died in chile after looters torched a clothing factory near the capital, santiago — bringing the death toll in violent protests there to at least seven. military and police used tear gas and water cannons against demonstrators. a state of emergency has been extended to 11 regions across the country, with 15 hundred people detained.
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the protests began over a rise in transport costs, but quickly spread. the scale of the unrest — since friday — is the worst chile has witnessed since it returned to being a democracy in 1990. the extradition hearing of wikileaks founder, julian assange, will go ahead next february after a judge declined a request by his lawyers to delay proceedings by three months. assange faces 18 charges in the us including conspiring to hack government computers. he has been in prison in britain since being forcibly removed from the ecuadorean embassy in april, where he'd spend 7 years while seeking asylum. thailand's king has stripped his 34—year—old consort of all her titles. (00v)the thai palace said in a statement that she'd breached a code of conduct for courtiers and was disloyal to the king. the consort has reportedly been removed from her military and royal positions for being "ambitious" and "attempting to elevate herself to the status of the queen." this is beyond 100 days. still to come, are electric cars as green as you think?
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more now on the news that abortion and same—sex marriage is set to be decriminalised in northern ireland from midnight tonight. opponents of the changes, following legislation at westminster, made a late attempt to block those changes, but failed. our northern ireland correspondent, emma vardy, reports. our bodies, our lives, our right to decide. their call has been heard. at midnight tonight a law passed by mps in westminster will take effect, overturning northern ireland's near total ban on abortion and legalising same—sex marriage. finally, our rights and our health care are being brought into the 21st century. this has been a long time coming.
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thousands of women in northern ireland have campaigned for this change. abortion has been illegal even in cases of rape. denise was unable to terminate her pregnancy after she was told her baby had a fatal condition and was likely to die in the womb. when you get that news it hits you like a bus, you just can't believe what you're hearing. i was too sick to travel, which left me with the experience of being trapped in northern ireland and in the vulnerable state of being pregnant with a child that was going to die. we pray for you to turn around and bring your presence. the change in the law is extremely contentious, vehemently opposed by a number of northern ireland's religious and anti—abortion groups. this is an imposition from westminster, it's not wanted in northern ireland. this is an historic day, it's the day when the people of northern ireland will have to face the reality that abortion has been forced on us against our will. ..to consider a private members bill on the defence of the unborn child.
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inside an attempt led by the democratic unionist party to thwart the change. sinn fein refused to take part, calling it a cynical political stunt. and less than an hour after they arrived, the dup walked out. i should just tell you that the withdrawal agreement bill has been published. a little bit earlier than was anticipated. so mps across the road will be getting their coffee, they will be pouring through it, seeing which bits they like and don't like. there it is. it puts into legislation that the other borisjohnson into legislation that the other boris johnson brought back from into legislation that the other borisjohnson brought back from the european union. it is about 100 pages long. it deals with all sorts
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of things. the divorce settlement, lots of things about the new northern ireland protocol, and there are things that won't get much attention. one of the things i am looking out for is the independent monitoring authority on citizens‘ rights. the home office did not want that in there but the eu wanted some sort of oversight of how the 3 million european union citizens will be treated here, and all the amendments we might see over the course of the week, whether any of those will stick. that is going to be the fun of the fair as we go forward to thursday. and the other thing that struck me was, we haven‘t seen thing that struck me was, we haven‘t seen much scoring of this deal that has been agreed. often economic forecasters like to have their say about what the implications of this agreement might be for the british economy. that has been something of
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a sore point. it has, and there has been some polling. we had to or three polling companies that put out some polling on how the deal was going down around the country. more people like it then don‘t like it but there is a really big caveat that three or four people out of ten don‘t know anything about it. they can‘t really form an opinion about it. that really goes to the crux of this issue. it is the same argument we had about the referendum, you tell people what it is about but do they understand it, can they make a decision based on what they have been told, and that argument will be used for a second referendum. are you going to send the withdrawal agreement bill to every household in the country? are they going to make an informed decision? the bbc has been told that prince william is worried for his brother harry and hopes he and his wife meghan are all right, after the couple acknowledged they were "struggling." it‘s rare to hear members of the royal family speak openly
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about their feelings. princess diana‘s famous interview to the bbc‘s panorama programme in 1995, in which she talked about the pain she‘d suffered in her marriage, was ground—breaking. and now her son harry has opened up about the struggles he faces to move on from his mother‘s death and commented on the reported rift with his brother william. his new wife meghan is disarmingly honest too, admitting she was naive about what life as a royal would be like. it‘s "existing not living", she says. speaking to itv presenter tom bradby during the royal pair‘s recent tour of africa, prince harry addressed his relationship with william, acknowledging that the pair had good days and bad days. there has been a lot of talk in the press about rifts with your brother. how much of that is true? um.... part of this role and part of this job and this family being under the pressure that it‘s under, inevitably, you know, stuff happens, but look, we‘re brothers, we‘ll always be brothers.
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we‘re certainly on different paths at the moment, but i will always be there for him, and i know he will always be there for me. we don‘t see each other as much as we used to because we‘re so busy, but, you know, i love him dearly and the majority of the stuff is probably... well, the majority of the stuff is created out of nothing. but, you know, as i said, as brothers, you have good days, you have bad days. a source at kensington palace, where william and catherine live, said prince william is "worried" about his brother, harry, and that he "certainly hopes the couple are alright". asked about a report that william was ‘furious‘ with his brother about the interview, the palace source said that was not the understanding and william was "certainly not furious this morning". as we mentioned, meghan also spoke in the documentary, when i first met my now husband, my friends were really happy because i
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was so friends were really happy because i was so happy but my british friends are said to me, i'm sure he's great, but you shouldn't do it because the british tabloids will destroy your life, and i very naively, i'm american, we don't have that they are, what are you talking about? that doesn't make any sense? i didn't get it. so, yeah, it has been complicated. we‘re joined now by royal historian and commentator sarah gristwood. they will be people that will look at this in one of two ways. either those who think it is commendable that they both talk about mental pressures and what they are going through. they will be other people who say they have got every luxury as members of the royal family, they have everything at their disposal, others go out there as a single mum, drop the kids off at the school and see what real pressure is like. drop the kids off at the school and see what real pressure is likelj know, see what real pressure is like.” know, and i think there is a bit of right on both sides. i think last
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night's documentary may have swung more people over to harry and meghan's side because what it made very clear wasjust the meghan's side because what it made very clear was just the depth of pain for the past and of fear for the future that he is feeling. and perhaps we hadn't quite taken that on board. the one thing that fascinates me is how the royal household will deal with this because it was always stiff upper lip, you have got to deal with it, you are in the public limelight, and look how it ended with princess diana. do you think they are more sensitive to it now? that is a good question. the first thing is that there are several different loyal households — — there are several different loyal households —— royal households, but the main core at buckingham palace, yes, probably, this isn't quite the way they are used to hearing royals talking. huge lessons were learned all those years ago from princess diana's death and i think everyone
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in royal circles is probably still very much a way that they have lessons to learn, that there are things still to take on board, but unfortunately... sorry to interrupt you. ijust unfortunately... sorry to interrupt you. i just wanted unfortunately... sorry to interrupt you. ijust wanted to pick up on what we heard meghan sayjust now, that she was naive, that she wasn‘t familiar with the world of tabloid journalism, but there are plenty of tabloids in america, whether it is us weekly, new york post, national enquirer, and as an actress she will have been exposed to that. there is a question they of how genuine it she is being, no? yes, i think that isa fair she is being, no? yes, i think that is a fair point. it is true that we all thought that meghan knew what she was getting into, she had been a celebrity in the past. it isjust possible that nothing quite prepares
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you for the level of attention given to the royals. but it is notjust about the tabloid media, it is a social media as well. that is why it is very hard to know quite how they or anyone else plans to try and change this. thank you very much for your thoughts on that. just before we go, let‘s focus on this week‘s story. in the murky world of politics, every tweet is scrutinised, sometimes by a person‘s attention you would wish not to attract. one of them, apparently, was republican senator mitt romney. he has revealed he uses a secret twitter account to post anonymously in the us. christian, i have been doing some digging of my own and i appear to have found what looks to
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bea appear to have found what looks to be a secret account of yours. can you confirm this is you? quite a cool day for many of us today. we‘ve seen a lot of cloud actually streaming in from off the north sea. it‘s been around this edge of area of high pressure, that‘s tending to topple its way southwards, thinning and breaking the cloud and pushing away that weather front, which has been bringing some rain and drizzle, mainly across east anglia and the south—east. but even across western areas, whilst it has been dry, there hasn‘t been a huge amount of sunshine but certainly a better day than it has been across norfolk, for example, where we have had this grey, quite low cloud, it has felt quite chilly as well. that cloud producing a little light rain, drizzle will tend to push away out of the way. we will see thinner cloud across england and wales. more cloud coming into scotland and northern ireland as the breeze picks up, and some rain for northern scotland.
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much, much milder than it was last night. but quite chilly, i think, for more southern parts of england and wales. where we get some decent breaks, particularly somewhere like the west country, we may well find some mist and fog around in the morning. that could linger for a good few hours before lifting and the sunshine coming through. i think we should see a bit more sunshine across most of england and wales. there‘s a bit cloud though as you head further north and we are also going to find some stronger winds across scotland and northern ireland, tending to keep the rain in the far north of scotland, so generally a dry day elsewhere and those temperatures a little bit higher than today. a noticeable change for some eastern parts of england. we do have some rain waiting in the wings. that will start to arrive on wednesday, and there has been some very wet weather across france and spain. we are very much on the edge of that, that weak weather front bringing this slither of cloud and a few showers on wednesday. most of england and wales, and indeed eastern scotland, should be dry and there will be sunshine at times, but the weather fronts will bring some more persistent rain into northern ireland, into western scotland, quite a heavy rain over the hills here.
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those temperatures still sitting at 12—15d. these weather fronts across the uk will tend to weaken and drift their way into england and wales, but the main driving force is that deep area of low pressure. that gets closer to the north—west of scotland. we are looking at some gales, maybe even severe gales around here, and blowing in a lot of showers as well. we will see a few showers pushing down across england and wales. that weak weather front arriving in the south—east corner, producing a little rain but not very much. those temperatures, still 12—15dc.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm: the speaker of the commons, john bercow, refuses a government request to hold a vote on its brexit deal, saying the question was already put to the house at the weekend. my ruling is therefore that the motion will not be debated today as it would be repetitive and disorderly to do so. and, in the last few minutes, the government‘s eu withdrawal agreement bill has been introduced in the commons ahead of its next phase of scrutiny. the foreign secretary ordered a review into diplomatic immunity arrangements following the death of harry dunn. we duly and immediately
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objected in clear and strong terms, and we

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