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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 16, 2019 9:00am-10:00am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. our headlines today... prince andrew breaks his silence on thejeffrey epstein scandal — he says he let "the side down" by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender. that's the bit that, that, that, um, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis because it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family. a crunch meeting for labour as seniorfigures decide what to include in its manifesto .
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up to 200 firefighters have been tackling a huge blaze at a student accomodation block in bolton. # it must be love.# a star—studded line—up helps children in need raise nearly £48 million for good causes. great britain's rugby league lions are heading for another tour defeat. a spectacular try sets off a papua new guinea fightback, in their final game in the southern hemisphere. still some rain around for some of you this weekend but there is a window of drier weather coming in for the start of next week. the details right here on breakfast. it's saturday, 16th november. our top story... in an unprecedented interview, prince andrew has told the bbc that he let the royal family down by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. he spoke to emily maitlis
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at buckingham palace, addressing accusations that he'd had sex with a 17—year—old american girl. he said he couldn't remember meeting virginia roberts — the prince denies allegations of inappropriate conduct. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports. he is continuing with royal duties. last sunday, he was at the cenotaph, laying a wreath with his nephews. and yet, for month after month, he's been the focus of troubling questions. prince andrew, the queen's second son, one moment seen waving from the doorway of the new york home of a convicted child sex offender, jeffrey epstein, and photographed strolling through central park with him. buckingham palace has consistently denied any impropriety by prince andrew. now, he's decided to speak for himself to bbc newsnight‘s emily maitlis. but you were staying at the house of a convicted sex offender. yes. it was a convenient place to stay. i mean, i've gone through this
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in my mind so many times. at the end of the day, with the benefit of all the hindsight that one could have, it was definitely the wrong thing to do but at the time i felt it was the honourable and right thing to do. and i admit fully that myjudgement was probably coloured by my tendency to be too honourable but that's just the way it is. and then there's andrew's alleged friendship with the then 17—year—old virginia roberts, who was on epstein‘s payroll. she's alleged that andrew seduced her. one of epstein‘s accusers, virginia roberts, has made allegations against you. she says she met you in 2001. she says she dined with you, danced with you at tramp nightclub in london. she went on to have sex with you in a house
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in belgravia, belonging to ghislaine maxwell, your friend. your response? i have no recollection of ever meeting this lady. none whatsoever. you don't remember meeting her? no. it was in 2001, according to virginia roberts, that she had sex with andrew on three occasions, including one orgy. the palace has denied that. in 2008, epstein was convicted of procuring for prostitution a girl under the age of 18. he was sentenced to 18 months in prison. it was in 2010, after epstein had been released from prison, that andrew visited him in new york and stayed at his mansion. how does he explain that? the problem was the fact that once he had been convicted... you stayed with him. i stayed with him. and that's the bit that — that, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis,
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because it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family, and we try and uphold the highest standards and practices, and i let the side down. simple as that. but nothing about this story is simple. jeffrey epstein can't answer questions — he took his own life in august. as for andrew, the us authorities will undoubtedly very much like to hear his account of everything he witnessed. nicholas witchell, bbc news. well, virginia roberts' legal team has responded to that interview. they say they want prince andrew to speak under oath rather than giving statements to the media. and you can see the full interview in a bbc newsnight special on bbc 2, tonight at 9 o'clock. leading figures in labour and the trade union movement will meet this morning to decide which policies will be included in the party's election manifesto. despite some major announcements, it still has to decide whether to include some policies agreed at its party conference. 0ur political correspondent, john 0wen is in our london
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newsroom. big questions to be answered for labour today. the purpose of the meeting taking place today is for party bosses to translate policies passed by the labour party conference, or announced by shadow cabinet members come into a single, coherent document setting out what exactly the labour party would do if elected into office. in reality, much of what would make it into the ma nifesto much of what would make it into the manifesto would already be agreed behind—the—scenes between party officials. there are potentialflash points which could be up for discussion today. for example, freedom of movement. the labour party conference passed a resolution saying it would want to maintain and expand freedom of movement but it is unclear whether that pledge will make its way into the manifesto are what exact language will be used
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around that question. 0n brexit, we know the labour party position as they will seek to renegotiate a new deal with the eu before putting out deal with the eu before putting out deal to the electorate with a referendum and an option to remain for that there is pressure for the leadership to adopt a more overtly remain position, saying they would campaignfor remain remain position, saying they would campaign for remain in that referendum. finally, there should be some discussion around the question around the way in which pensions had been affected for women born in the 19505, who had the age at which they would receive their pension change, the so—called waspi women. interesting to see those details. the green agenda is at the forefront of the campaign for all of the parties. had had more from the conservatives and liberal democrats today. -- we have heard. the climate
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agenda is at the forefront of all the campaigns. we have had a commitment by the conservatives to plant 30 million trees and the liberal democrats have said they wa nt to liberal democrats have said they want to plant 60 million. something ofa want to plant 60 million. something of a bidding war. all the parties determined to make climate a real issue at this election. thank you. emergency crews have worked through the night, to tackle a fire at a student block of flats in greater manchester. the fire service said the flames spread across all six floors of the university accomodation building in bolton. two people were treated for their injuries at the scene. the bbc‘s children in need has raised almost £48 million this year. celebrities from the world of tv, music and sport all took part in the annual telethon. 0ur entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba has the highlights. three, two, one! cue the totaliser! the evening's huge total. the end of a fun—packed night...
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i wish for this year's children in need to be really, really big! ..that began with a performance from the cast of hit musical big. # do what i do, fake if you don't know how #. some of the uk's most famous faces were on hand to help with the fundraising efforts. a group of eastenders stars took to the strictly come dancing dance floor. jodie whittaker and the dr who team made a young fan's night with an unexpected appearance. what are you going to say to an actual time lord? laughter. um, you're amazing. applause. and some of england's top football players had a surprise for a group of children from the england amputee football association. great to meet you all. all the money from the night goes towards helping disadvantaged children and young people across the uk. children in need says the millions raised tonight should make a huge difference.
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lizo mzimba, bbc news. many thanks to anyone he gave money for children in need last night. every year it is fantastic, isn't it? prince andrew says he "let the side down" by continuing his friendship with the american billionaire, and convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. the prince has been speaking about the relationship for the first time, in an exclusive interview with bbc newsnight. he also addressed accusations that he'd had sex with an underage girl — allegations which he's always denied. let's have a look. the problem was the fact that once he had been convicted... you stayed. i stayed with him. and that's the bit, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis because it was not something that was becoming a member of the
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royal family. we try to uphold the highest standard in practices and i let the side down, simple as that. we're joined now by former bbc royal correspondent, michael cole. good morning. a real change from the royal family in terms of exposing themselves to interviews like this. why has he done it? good for the bbc and bad for buckingham palace. a major error. i do not know who is giving him pr advice but it is not very good. why has he done it? it is a mystery. if he is thinking, maybe perhaps he is trying to clear the air before the wedding of his elder daughter, beatrice, ido air before the wedding of his elder daughter, beatrice, i do not know. whichever way you look at it, it is a major mistake because it raises more questions than it answers. and
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the phraseology, saying it is unbecoming of a member of the royal family to stay with a paedophile in new york. it is unbecoming of any decent person to do so. i think, other people will say he cannot recollect, he doesn't remember. those of your view it he were a little bit older we remember president reagan with a round gate saying he could not remember, could not recollect that i could not recall. —— irangate. saying you cannot remember does not mean it did not happen. he has denied all allegations of impropriety. we were speaking to emily maitlis he did the interview earlier on. her understanding is the agreement to go ahead with the interview came directly from the top, and he will know what that means. the queen has sanctioned this interview. —— you will know. that was done in the
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south drawing room. of course it was given the stamp of approval by her majesty the queen. i would think there are some wise heads at buckingham palace shaking their heads. this is a very serious situation. it cannot be exaggerated or how serious it is. he is now deeply enmeshed in the american legal system. they take no prisoners. no matter how high you are, the law is above you. there is an fbi investigation. interviews are all very well but it is not sworn testimony. what he needs to do, and he can do it in london in the privacy of his own office with his own lawyers around him, he needs to make a deposition. he needs to be deposed by american lawyers, which is like you and me answering questions around a table on oath. 0nly questions around a table on oath. only by doing that though he scotched these rumours which will persist until something of that kind
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is done. -- he scotch. that will be a legal deposition. lawyers ask questions. they have validity in law. it is not going into the witness box and giving evidence. but do we want to see a prince of the royal blood being subpoenaed? that could be the next step. at the moment i would be extremely surprised if his royal highness, the prince andrew, a man who i liked when i covered him, i thought he was very pleasant, very approachable, unlike some members of the royal family. do we really want a situation where he cannot safely go into the united states? you are talking about what the family of virginia once. he will be thinking, ifido virginia once. he will be thinking, if i do this, i am honest, dispute these allegations, it might go away. i have dealt with it by coming clea n. i have dealt with it by coming clean. it was not an interview with
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a friend, it was an interview with a firm journalist. i do not cast any aspersions about the journalist or the interview. he had not seen it all, have you? it is not tested many, sworn testimony, it is not evidence. that will not do to deal with the matter. it will not go away. it will carry on until it is properly dealt with. i feel sorry for the man because i think he has many good qualities. in a way, people will be able to judge for themselves what they make of their determinations as to how he comes across. emily spoke about what it was like doing the interview. but you were staying at the house of a convicted sex offender. sighs. it was a convenient place to stay. i mean, i've gone through this in my mind so many times. at the end of the day, with the benefit of all hindsight that one could have, it was definitely the wrong thing to do.
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but at the time i felt it was the honourable and right thing to do. and i admit fully that myjudgement was probably coloured by my tendency to be too honourable but that's just the way it is. we did speak to emily earlier on. she was clear to say it was about what he said and the moment in time. walking into buckingham palace because she knew this was an interview she thought she would never be doing. from your experience, give people a sense of how unprecedented, that is that has been bandied about a lot, this is. in 1986i been bandied about a lot, this is. in 19861 did been bandied about a lot, this is. in1986| did an been bandied about a lot, this is. in 1986i did an interview with sarah ferguson and the prints on the day their engagement was announced. at their engagement was announced. at the at the time the newspaper said it was the most forthright, honest
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and candid interview ever done. you can look it up at the time. they we re very can look it up at the time. they were very forthright in what they said, very candid. forthat were very forthright in what they said, very candid. for that they should be admired. if you listen to the last clip, it is all about him, what he felt, how it occurred to him. what about this underage girl from a family that has been taken up by this man, epstein. by any doubts, he has an appalling record and has gone to jail. when he came out, they gave him a party in new york. all his friends gave him a welcome home party from jail. we have his friends gave him a welcome home party fromjail. we have not his friends gave him a welcome home party from jail. we have not heard the entirety of the interview so it could be that he talks with some empathy about the alleged victims. the palaces segmented as in 19, we have to be open to scrutiny and that is what they had done. it is an interesting tactic on their part. i am not sure it is a strategy that
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will work for them. if you think back the interview of prince charles with jonathan dimbleby was a disaster for with jonathan dimbleby was a disasterfor him with jonathan dimbleby was a disaster for him and took with jonathan dimbleby was a disasterfor him and took him with jonathan dimbleby was a disaster for him and took him years to recover. the interview with martin bashir was something she bitterly came to regret and affected the rest of her all too short and much missed life. good for you, good scoop, congratulations and all that, but if i was at buckingham palace in the press office, i would be pulling my hair out. once you have done this, there is no end to it. it is a pandora's box and the next question must be the next question. thank you very much for your time here this morning. and you can see the full interview in a bbc newsnight special tonight at nine on bbc 2. another cold week. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. some dry weather on the way. at the
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moment and all too familiar scene behind me captured by one of the weather watchers in ludlow. this is just one of a number of rivers in england and wales where there are close to 90 flood warnings in force at the moment. this shows where the bulk of them are in england, across the welsh borders into the midlands and yorkshire. these areas have seen the most amount of rainfall recently. understandable when you consider the likes of sheffield where we saw flooding a week ago. we have already seen close, just nine millimetres short, of the autumn rainfall. 0ne record which has already surpassed their autumn rainfall record is nottingham. still a couple of weeks left to go. more rain in the forecast was at this weekend, low pressure is close by. this will be the focus for patchy rain and light drizzle from northern england through to wales and the far
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south—west. ciao is edging towards the far west of scotland after a frosty but bright start. southwards and eastwards we are getting a respite from the rain already this weekend. some sunny spells in the south. the english channel coast and out towards the far west of wales, we will continue to see outbreaks of rain. in other areas, we will continue to see outbreaks of rain. in otherareas, the rain we will continue to see outbreaks of rain. in other areas, the rain will continue on and off. still heavy showers just along the coastal fringes of eastern scotland. the rest of scotland, away from the western isles and the eastern coast should be dry. a cold day for all with a chilly night to come. the showers across the west of scotland and northern ireland not as cold as last night. the crowd in the north of england through wales and the south—west. in southern and eastern scotland, it could start tomorrow morning with prost around. here's some of the brightest spots to start the day. —— frost. morning showers
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in scotland and northern ireland should largely fade away. some will continue in 0rkney and shetland but a brighter afternoon. temperatures like today sitting in single figures. i mention to window a drier weather. this is the high pressure system edging its way in. not particularly wide and not very well established one. monday and late into tuesday, the maps are just not much if any rain around. maybe one or two showers on the north sea coast. nina and charlie, at least some dry and sunny weather. broadcaster beverley turner is here to tell us what's caught her eye. 8 million britons living alone. there are now 600,000 people in five yea rs,
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there are now 600,000 people in five years, as fewer middle—aged men marry. this is what the headline is calling the reason for doing so three in ten households had only one person living in them. that is mainly taken up, according to the figures. middle—aged men who have divorced or never married. this can in itself a kind of raises the issue of loneliness. we are coming up to christmas. what it also raises is the fact we had to change our infrastructure, perhaps. this article is pointing out we need walkable streets with good lighting, good transport provision for people walking on their own. quite a sad state of affairs unless you really like living on your own. some people sitting at home i think i absolutely love living on their own. some days i wish i did. the problem will only get worse, if you consider it a problem. the proportion of couples with children who are married has
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also gone up slightly to 61% and married families tend to thrive best, it says. they tend to stay together. it talks about damage to mental health that loneliness can bring. that is a reality. 0ften mental health that loneliness can bring. that is a reality. often a lot in connection with older people. absolutely. housing pressure as well when there are more people living with them. a story from the guardian. this is more children being admitted to hospital with severe allergic reactions. we know allergic reactions are on the increase. we all anecdotally know it. if you are hosting a birthday party for kids at school, you have to be careful about peanuts. the incidents have risen by 72% in five yea rs. incidents have risen by 72% in five years. that is absolutely huge, 72% in five years. we don't know why so many children are having these extreme reactions. i can't imagine
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how terrifying it must be if you are a parent with a child at risk of anaphylactic shock from food. the one thing you cannot really protect them from, but one thing they will have access to every day. there will bea have access to every day. there will be a huge amount of research into this. there is a suggestion it could be to do with the immune fighting system which is seeded at there. if you are born by cesarean section you are five times more likely to have allergies because you are not going through the process that would cede your micro—biome, as it is called. in london, percentage—wise, it is higher than different parts of the country. perhaps it is pollution rated. environmentalfactors. country. perhaps it is pollution rated. environmental factors. a huge amount of questions about that. we like the idea of chancing upon something that ends up being worth a fortune. if you fancy splashing out
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ona fortune. if you fancy splashing out on a christmas present for a loved one, whether you have £6,000 at your disposal. this diary assigned by the beatles is going out for auction on november the 19th. this lady was at a concert in 1963. the band was not particularly famous at the time. she gate—crashed the dressing room and she forgot about it. she was moving house recently and found in the bottom of a filing cabinet. she thought, oh, i rememberthat. auctioneers reckon it will probably make £6,000. the value is notjust about the signatures, it is about the story attached to it. she was there when. the provenance is intact in these instances. it is basically one owner, one lady owner, that diary. ijust cannot believe she has forgotten about it. if i met the beatles, i would tell everyone i had
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met them. the filing cabinet. another story, a modern day morality tale. this man is all over the tabloids for years. he basically became an alcoholic and had a terrible life for ten years. he now says he has no money left, he is working a £10 an hourjob and is happier than ever. good to see you this morning. thank you for having me. this is breakfast. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when glynn purnell takes over in the saturday kitchen. glynn, what's on the menu for us? hello. how are you? all good, thank you. we are looking forward to what you. we are looking forward to what you have on the menu. we have sophie ellis—bextor. welcome back. what is your food heaven? i like seafood,
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like octopus and clams. and your food hell? mint chocolate chip ice cream. that is the reverse of what eve ryo ne cream. that is the reverse of what everyone else would want. two brilliant chefs cooking comfort food. the weather is a bit rough. we are going to be cooking home—made satay sauce with deep—fried pollock andl satay sauce with deep—fried pollock and i spelt that out. i am going to do with fried yardbirds with pumpkin. really nice. —— yard third. you are the man with the drinks trolley. i have two underrated grape varieties. really delicious. it feels like comfort food for this time of year. it is down to you to see what sophie eats at the end of the show. see you at ten o'clock.
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cani the show. see you at ten o'clock. can i vote for that? i look forward to that. always that time when it sta rts to that. always that time when it starts to make you hungry. a rumbling tummy. still to come this morning... from afghanistan to zambia — we'll meet the man who's ran a marathon in every country around the world — setting eight world records along the way. the headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and nina warhurst. a summary of this morning's main news. in an unprecedented interview, prince andrew has told the bbc that he let the royal family down by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. he spoke to emily maitlis at buckingham palace, addressing accusations that he'd had sex with a 17—year—old american girl. he said he couldn't remember meeting virginia roberts. the prince denies allegations of inappropriate conduct.
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the problem was the fact once he had been convicted. you stayed with him. i stayed with him. that's the bit that... as it were i kick myself for ona that... as it were i kick myself for on a daily basis, because it was not something becoming of the royal family andi something becoming of the royal family and i let the side down simple as that. earlier, emily maitlis described what it was like to be interviewing prince andrew at buckingham palace. it is hard to describe being in a state room in buckingham palace at the heart of royal family, facing the heart of royal family, facing the queen's son, the prince andrew, duke of york and asking him about his sexual history. it is not something i ever imagined i'd be doing, but equally, to have not asked those questions would have
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been something i couldn't imagine doing either. and you can see the full interview in a bbc newsnight special tonight at nine on bbc two. around 200 firefighters have worked through the night to bring a fire at a university block of flats under control. the flames spread across all six floors of the building in bolton in greater manchester. let's speak now to afnan gohar. describe what you saw last night. good morning. ijust... saw like the entire building engulfed in flames basically. when the alarm went off, because there are fire drills often in student halls, at what point did you realise it was real? no, actually not. because like the fire alarms go off almost every day. we thought it was just another false alarm. and somebody knocked on your
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door, what was going through your head at that point? at that point, i just thought somebody was pranking us. just thought somebody was pranking us. so i didn't think it was real. as far as we know there have been no serious injuries. amazing that everybody got out. was that because you all made sure it was evacuated properly. yes definitely. how much do you know about your belongings that were in the building? we see in the pictures now and the fire looks extremely dramatic, what do you know about your clothes and your possessions? we are not really sure yet. because we have not been updated. can you tell us a little more about the sequence of events, we have seen the images of the flames, that look like several floors up. can you give us a sense of the length of time it was from when you thought there was something
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wrong to the fire we can see in some of those images? i think it was less than ten minutes. so you're saying that from the first alert you had to when you left the building, just describe for us that sequence of events, what did you do and what did you see when you emerged? so i was just in my room at first with my friend and we heard the fire alarm go off and we didn't really like ta ke go off and we didn't really like take notice of it. until a girl came running and like she banged on the doors and screamed, telling us to get out. we didn't believe her at first. my friend went outside and checked and she confirmed that it was true. so all of us like ran
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away. as soon as was true. so all of us like ran away. as soon as we was true. so all of us like ran away. as soon as we could. it was only when you emerged from t building, what did you then see. we saw the building, the shared aapartments, that was the actual building on fire. i live in studios, but they're close to each other. while we were going down the stairs, we saw the entire shared apartments like going down in flames basically. 200 firefighters were sent to tackle the blaze, a0 fire engines, that gives you a sense of scale. thank you forjoining us and take care of yourself. those are the main stories this morning. now the sport. great britain have
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been destroyed in the rugby league by papua new guinea. the great britain lions will be heading home without a win on their southern hemisphere tour, after losing to papua new guinea in their final match in port moresby. it started well for great britain — they opened the scoring after 1a minutes — a swift move gave blake austin a clear run into the corner, for his first international try. they went 10—nil ahead but that was the end of their scoring and a spectacular try from edwin ipape set off the papua new guinea fightback. they won by 28 points to 10. england's women agonisingly lost the curtain—raiser this morning — a last—minute shirleyjoe try gave the papua new guinea 0rchids their first test win against england — they won by 20 points to 16 to level the series at 1—all. england captain emily rudge couldn't hide her disppointment. england batsmanjoe denly made 68 on his return from an ankle injury and he led
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a fightback on day two of theirfinal warm—up match before the first test starts next wednesday. the closed on 355—8 against new zealand a in whangarei — they closed on 355—8 against new zealand a in whangarei — a lead of 53 runs. denly feared his tour was over when he was injured in practice just over two weeks ago. when i first did my ankle it was touch and go really, whether i'd be fit for this game, and i'd been under a strict rehab programme and under great hands with the medical team here, so delighted to be back and able to spend some time out there today. with england already through to next summer's european championship, the other home nations continue their bids to join them today and it won't be easy. northern ireland are third in a really tough group, behind the netherlands and germany. they need to beat the dutch this afternoon and the germans on tuesday and hope other results go their way. wales also need some luck, as well as beating azerbaijan tonight and then hungary. scotland face cyprus and kazakhstan but they're facing a play—off next spring. for northern ireland,
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it's good to have a safety net. this is the start of an incredibly difficult double—header, which, whilst we have an outside chance of qualification, we'll do everything possible to try and take it to the final game and if the case is such that we don't qualify through that route, then we have hopefully a play—off to look forward to in march. to rugby union and gloucester scrum—half joe simpson scored two brilliant runaway tries, but he couldn't keep his side from defeat against toulouse in the opening game of the champions cup. simpson was making his european debut for gloucester after his summer move from wasps and his blistering speed gave them a 20—9 lead at half—time. but they didn't score in the second half, and toulouse went on to win by 25 points to 20. they're looking to lift the cup for a record fifth time. the men's number one — rafael nadal — is out of the season—ending
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world tour finals. that's because alexander zverev beat daniil medvedev to claim the last semi—final spot at the 02 arena in london, where he'll play dominic thiem. zverev is the defending champion and he certainly looked the part, winning in straight sets. nadal was awaiting that result, after beating stefanos tsitsipas earlier in the day. the young greek is through to the semis, though — he'll face roger federer, but although nadal is out, he was already assured of finishing the year on top of the world rankings. you know, after all the things i went through in my career in terms of injuries, i never thought that at the age of 33 and a half i would have this trophy on my hands again so it is... cheering and applause. without all my team and family that is here next to me, this would be impossible. i just can say thank you very much everyone for the support. thank you. ahead of this weekend's brazilian grand prix, world champion lewis hamilton says
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he wants reassurances about mercedes' future, before he commits to a new deal beyond next year. he was fifth fastest in yesterday's second practice session, which was marked by a heavy crash for williams driver robert kubica — thankfully he emerged unscathed. ferrari's sebastian vettel was quickest. and finally, have a look at this incredible bit of skill. this is england's number one table tennis player liam pitchford competing in the austrian 0pen. he beatsjun mizutani ofjapan to reach the last 16, with the help of these two outrageous behind—the—back shots. extraordinary reflexes there! look at that! he gets it on the table, no trouble. how unusual is that in table tennis. i think the backhands are unusual. that is more thana backhands are unusual. that is more than a backhand. that is a behind your backhand. and a bit of top spin. ever run a marathon. london in
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2016. it was horrific. i didn't train properly and i had a bad ankle. fancy another one? what about 196? nick butter has done exactly that, becoming the first person ever to finish a marathon in every single country around the world. nickjoins us now. we were talking about one marathon. how many have you done. we were talking about one marathon. how many have you donelj we were talking about one marathon. how many have you done. i have finished 196 in every country in the world. it has been three a week for 96 weeks. why? you're crazy! it is to try and raise money for prostate cancer uk, a friend of mine has cancer and we are trying to raise money and awareness. 0ver cancer and we are trying to raise money and awareness. over 11,000 cancer and we are trying to raise money and awareness. 0ver11,000 men die from it each year and it is killing more people than breast cancer. gavin was saying, it is
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gruelling, i heard along the way you we re gruelling, i heard along the way you were attacked by dogs and at shot at. where was the shooting? that was in guinea on the border. there has beena in guinea on the border. there has been a lot of... potential dangers, being attacked by dogs in tunisia. and i got mugged in nigeria and i had many occasions where i got nearly hit by cars and i did get hit bya carand nearly hit by cars and i did get hit by a car and broke my elbow. but we got there. kevin and i crossed the line after he outlived his life expectancy. i would say anyone who is watching, i would be grateful for any donations. we are still trying to reach our target. it isjust giving dot.com. 0r to reach our target. it isjust giving dot.com. or they can quick on the link. what does kevin think? i think he was nervous at the start.
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he was given two years to live and he is through his fifth year. it took two years to plan the journey. we weren't expecting him to be alive. but he is and we crossed the finish line together. that photograph is the most amazing feeling. i hope we will get the awareness and stuff. thisjourney feeling. i hope we will get the awareness and stuff. this journey is continuing for me i'm going to visit 200 schools to try and share the journey. i got through ten passports, got all my luggage tags. i want to educate kids about what i've done and show them that the world is a great place to go and explore. i was going to say, it is tricky filtering it down, what were your favourite experiences of countries you didn't know about. most of the time my perceptions of countries were wrong. i ran around a
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volcano and i ran with a thousand kids. i had a couple of days off to swim with some animal and did a marathon on a live runway, because there was no other space on the the island. you can see the photographs and the videos, i posted a diary entry each day and you can see everything. if you love running and people are probably getting back from a park run. get in touch. how did you get the motivation to go from one do another. we had everything booked and i couldn't missa everything booked and i couldn't miss a flight. going back to kevin and the people who are not fortunate enough to be in that situation. i'm big on promoting mottjust —— not wasting a day. you never know fit is your last. if i have to do three a week to do this trip and raise the money i will do it. if you're a person who is sitting at home
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thinking, that is extraordinary, i've never got close, i have never run 200 yards, a bit of sort of mind help there? yes, it is all to do with your mind. the body will follow if you believe it. first find somebody in the same position as you and wants to train. i have been able to train with brilliant friends and when i have on my own it has been the hardest. it is easier with somebody else. i imagine when you get to those countries that you knew nothing about were you surprised how engaged people were. yes i would say hello to everybody and it was the most remarkable experience and very forest gumpesque. how is the body?
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you still functioning. forest gumpesque. how is the body? you still functioninglj forest gumpesque. how is the body? you still functioning. i would say it is horrendous, but it is fine. you're tempting fate. i'm grateful to be finished. we had some dodgy moments in syria and libya and yemen and all the places i was scared of. i made it and i want people to donate. congratulations a remarkable achievement. all in one piece. and good morning to kevin. yeah he is watching. nina are you going to... inspired? i do the park run. step it up inspired? i do the park run. step it upa bit. inspired? i do the park run. step it up a bit. what about you matt?|j will be getting preparation for my early alarm call. you have the day you have you can go for a run. tell us you have you can go for a run. tell us the weather. it has not been a
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bad start for some. look at this shotin bad start for some. look at this shot in shetland. the reason i show you this is because while most of the uk has been facing rain this moment, some look at this from lerwick, only 15 millimetres of rain. that is around 10% of the what they normally get. so it is a dry spotin they normally get. so it is a dry spot ina they normally get. so it is a dry spot in a wet picture. that is thanks to low pressure pushing further south. and there is still one on the cards for this week. bringing some rain for some of you, but increasing amounts of dry and sunny weather later in the weekend and into the start of next week. here is that low pressure pressure system. the heaviest rain pushing in across south france and northern spain. this front will be the focus for cloud and rain throughout the day. northern england, wales and the far south west. hit and miss. some heavier bursts in the north—east.
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some showers in the western isles and northern ireland later. but some are intoa and northern ireland later. but some are into a drier window. the midlands, southern england, south wales, away from english channel coasts. still some showers here and in western and northern parts of wales. rain in northern england and the eastern coast of scotland and later in the far west of scotland. much of scotland and northern ireland dry. any sunshine hazy. another fine day in 0rkney and shetland. as you go into tonight, the showers in western scotland and northern ireland will stop temperatures dropping. some clear skies in central england. there could be a touch of frost on sunday morning. into sunday the same area with rain today, northern england and wales and the west will see showers. brightening up in scotland
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and northern ireland after a damp start. greater chance of showers in 0rkney tomorrow. central and southern england dry and bright. another chilly day. but as we go next week, monday and tuesday looking dry thanks to high pressure. thank you, no excuse not to get the trainers on this weekend. we all know sir rod stewart for his husky voice and big hits like sailing and maggie may, but did you know he also has a big passion for little trains? sir rod has spent the last 23 years building an epic model railway, which he unveiled for the first time this week. he's been telling david farrell, from bbc scotland's the nine programme how the project has helped him relax while recording a new album. action. action! sir rod stewart, it is a pleasure to chat to you. we're gonna talk about one of your passions, celtic and football, but if we talk about that now, we're gonna use use up the full ten minutes, i believe,
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but one of your other passions has come to light this week — the model railway. 23 years in the making. where did this start? i built a house in beverly hills at the turn of the century, in the early ‘905, and i dedicated — i knew i was going to build this model railway. so at the top of the house, i built a special, huge room, like a big attic. i have always been into trains, always, since i was a kid. does it help you switch off? it really does. it's the finest hobby, it's three—dimensional, it'is wonderful, you get to be a carpenter and everything. now, that's not the only tracks you are making — your new album is coming out in the next week. you have teamed up with the royal philharmonic orchestra for this. yeah, it's — i'm not the first one to do it. you'll remember elvis has done it, i think fleetwood mac have done it. it is all the classic standards that have made me, you know, famous over the years. and itjust brings out a new light. # you stole my soul but i love you anyway. you spoke out about
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your cancer diagnosis. yeah. what was it that made you want to talk about that after you had got the all—clear? um, simply to help people. i was doing a show with ronnie wood for prostate cancer, and i said to ronnie "this might be a good place to tell everybody, now that i have sort of got the all—clear". he said "yeah, go ahead and do it" and, you know, "i'll be right by your side." so i told everybody and everybody was aghast, you know, that i have been with it for 2.5 years and i had worked through all of that time — which was very helpful. did you, at that point, think "do you know what? i'm going to have to slow down and take it easy?" no, not at all! not at all. it's — i love what i do. i know it's gonna end one day, but i'm gonna make the most of it while i can. your other passions, of course — music, model railways and football. well, you'd better put my kids and my family in there or else, i will get into trouble! what comes first? football... ? no, the kids come first. yeah, absolutely, they really do.
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my two young — all my boys are celtic supporters, and i havejust started a junior celtic team under tens, for my little boy. they all come out in their hoops and their hoops tracksuits and it gives me so much pleasure! just before you go, we have got something for you, because i hear you like to wake up the kids back home in a different manner. you use bagpipes, i believe? oh, man! that is great! so we've got you your own set of bagpipes, so that you can wake the kids up — because you play them on cds, is that right? ido! when they are late for school in the morning, i put a cd on and turn it up! i do not know if you have played the bagpipes before but... no! i can make the noise! do you want to just have a try? show me how to put ‘em on. right. so you need to put it underyourarm. yeah. there we go. that's it. blow into it. and then... imean... we were on a budget when we were buying it, sir rod.
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bagpipes squeak. so we felt... and then this — that here, so if you put that, so into your mouth with the... just talk amongst yourselves, will you? we don't need to worry about that bit. put this over here. right, 0k. put it round here, like that? you could wear it as sort of a scarf almost. thanks, man! that's great! nice to meet you. thank you. have you tried the bagpipes. i tried it in edinburgh. it is very difficult to get right. unless it is played right it is hideous. sir rod did geta played right it is hideous. sir rod did get a note out of it. we are talking to robbie williams next week about his christmas album and there is a duet with rod stewart and there is a duet with rod stewart and robbie williams has met sir rod
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over the years. he has some fantastic stories about having dinner. 23 years he has been building that railway. he will have to find a new hobby. all morning we've been hearing about the staggering amount of money raised for this year's children in need appeal. the one show‘s matt baker spent nine days on the road with his rickshaw challenge team, made up of some extraordinary young people. they alone raised a massive £8.5 million. we'll chat with matt in a moment, first here's a look at team rickshaw's journey. right, team are we ready for this? yeah! start line, rickshaw challenge 2019. shall we do it? good work. we're there. i can feel your energy coming through. adrenaline. all right, all right, all right! team rickshaw! look at him powering up here!
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i'm so proud of you. 0h! it is an unbelievable achievement, you just keep going. you have done the steepest street in the world, so why not the highest village in the uk? i should have stayed in bed! 0h! you smashed it. thank you. matt bakerjoins us now. a00 miles, eightand a00 miles, eight and a £500,0005. congratulations. thank you. that takes a bit of sinking in really. this is the ninth year i've done the rickshaw challenge and you know every year itjust rickshaw challenge and you know every year it just always surprises me the amount of people that come
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out on to the streets to show their support, to show that you are love, to show their respect to the young people that are doing this. because all benefitted from children in need and know what a difference that money can make and this is their chance to celebrate where they have got to in their lives and inspire people to do nate and doe —— donate and it makes it all worth it. if i we re and it makes it all worth it. if i were to describe your body language this morning, i might be saying weary but proud. how close would by? absolutely. you would be dead on. there is no doubt about it, it takes it out of you. acycle with them every mile of the way and i feel thatis every mile of the way and i feel that is what i owe to them to help them through. the landscape that we have gone across, you talked to us la st have gone across, you talked to us last week as well, it is nothing in
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comparison to what they have been through in their lives and to give them a chance to do something that is different, another opportunity, for me this is very much their ta ke — off for me this is very much their ta ke—off now with for me this is very much their take—off now with everything they have done and how they have presented themselves. this isn't a landing. they're upset when it finishes. people think you must be exhausted, but they never want it to end. i'm sure each of them are going to go on to adulthood and smash it in the way that they have done with all of those miles. you mentioned a big part of this is the reception from the people along the way. pluck out a couple of moments that will stay with you. well, gosh... schools you know, they love it and they get to miss lessons! they come out and some of, hitchen yesterday, the whole town was out. everybody
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applauding and respect for the young people. so many messages we have been receiving. i have been filling in bits and pieces on instagram and i've an incredible missage from a lady who mum passed away, she followed the rickshaw challenge for nine years and all the funds that have been raised in her memory and you know at her funeral, giving to the rickshaw challenge and it is things like that, it is families, helping families and that is what is at the heart of children in need. often it is notjust that child that benefits, but the whole family network. it is nojust through the rickshaw challenge w the countryfile ramble which i have been part of creating and thank you to everybody who walked in that that raised 2.7 million. so it has been a really, really good year and i think with my children in need hat on, i want to thank you all for that outpouring of
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generosity that you have shown. it is very much appreciated and it is going to make a massive difference to the children in need and their family. so thank you from all of us. you're a modest fellow, how is your body shaping up? any aches and pains you need to report on?” body shaping up? any aches and pains you need to report on? i had a bath la st you need to report on? i had a bath last night and a bath first thing andl last night and a bath first thing and i have my wellies on feeding the sheep. i have chill blanes on my fingers and toes and a very sore backside. that is nothing in comparison to the achievements of this week and the difference the money will make. go and have your third bath in 2a hours. that is allowed today. amazing. 48 million
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last night. we are back tomorrow from six. bye—bye.
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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 10... prince andrew speaks publicly for the first time about his friendship with the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. in an exclusive interview with bbc newsnight, the duke says it was wrong to stay at epstein's house, and admits he let "the side down". i had to believe that myjudgment was probably coloured by my tendency to bleed to honourable but that's just the way it is. prince andrew also said he had "no recollection" of meeting virginia roberts, who claims she was forced to have

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