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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 20, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn face a sceptical audience in the first election debate — as they're pushed on brexit, the nhs, and honesty. does the truth matter in this election? i think it does and i think it is very important. i have been very clear about the deal that i have done. we will have a referendum, we will have negotiation and we will abide by that result. twitter says the conservatives misled the public by rebranding an official account to look like an independent fact—checking service during the debate. jose mourinho is the new spurs manager after the club sacked mouricio pochettino last night.
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more than 2 million adults in england are unable to see an nhs dentist, because appointments aren't available or it's too expensive, figures suggest. the foreign secretary summons the chinese ambassador after a former employee of the uk consulate in hong kong claims he was detained and tortured by chinese officials. i have been shackled, i have been handcuffed and i have been blindfolded, you know, so they make me hooded. and the mission to save thousands of animals from australia's bushfires. we'll have the latest on the desperate efforts. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn have traded verbal
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blows over brexit in the first tv debate of the general election campaign. the prime minister said the labour leader is unclear about whether his party supports leaving or remaining in the eu — and mr corbyn said the nhs isn't safe in conservative hands. the two leaders also locked horns over trust and leadership, the future of scotland — and the royal family. the public response suggests that neither man emerged as an obvious winner. iain watson has this report. this election has produced a first. never before has a sitting prime minister taken on the leader of the opposition head—to—head in a debate with no other parties present. but the topics they debated were less surprising. it all began with brexit. are you going to campaign for leave or remain? i want to bring people together... applause. ..therefore there will be a referendum in which that decision will be made by the british people and our government will abide by that decision. butjeremy corbyn moved swiftly to steer the debate onto his territory, claiming that a post—brexit us trade deal
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could harm the health service. "full market access for us products to our national health service." you are going to sell our national health service out to the united states. it is completely untrue. there are no circumstances whatever. .. boris johnson wanted to get back to brexit. although this has been consistently denied, he claimed labour would do a deal with the snp to deliver not one referendum, but two. of course jeremy corbyn and the labour party are going to do a deal, they probably already have done a deal, with nicola sturgeon and the snp to form a corbyn—sturgeon coalition and the price of that deal, the price of nicola sturgeon's support, she has made it absolutely clear, would be a second referendum on the union. i think i ought to be able to reply to this nonsense. the idea that there is going to be a coalition between labour
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and the snp, there is not going to be a coalition between labour and anybody else. there are no deals that have been done and there will be no deals done. both leaders tried to play to their strengths but found it difficult to deliver a knockout blow. but the questions moved from policy to the more personal. does the truth matter in this election? i think it does... laughter. anti—semitism is an absolute evil and scourge within our society. racism in any form is a scourge in our society. but it is going to take a lot more than one debate to convince the undecided who they should be backing on december the 12th. iain watson, bbc news, salford. the conservative party has been criticised after rebranding one of its twitter accounts to look like an independent fact—checking service during the debate. the conservative campaign headquarters press account changed its name to "fact check uk", with branding. twitter has accused the party
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of misleading the public. our technology correspondent has the latest from los angeles. they are not happy, to say the least. they put a statement about what the tory party has done with that account, saying that it was misleading and that it would not be tolerated in future. they said they would take decisive corrective action if the tory party, or indeed any other parties, try to pull a stunt like this in future. twitter is pretty clear about this kind of thing, it has a policy about pretending or implying that you are something that you are not on the platform. and i have to say, this is the company that has had to battle this type of technique of changing the identity of an account is something that foreign governments with data interfere in elections. so, to see this coming from a british politcal party has really angered twitter. at least, that is the sense i am getting from the company. a spokesperson
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for the electoral commission has said that "voters are entitled to transparency and integrity from campaigners in the lead up to an election". the commission said: "while we do not have a role in regulating election campaign content, we repeat our call to all campaigners to undertake their vital role responsibly and to support campaigning transparency." will moy is chief executive of full fact, the independent fact—checking charity. he told me that, while the responsibility for this lies with the conservative party, twitter could have taken more decisive action. wthey could have said to the conservatives this is unacceptable behaviour and you need to stop it straightaway. and it could have revoked their verification. at the moment, that account is marked out truly a conservative count. that is fine when it is identified as that, but when it is identified something else it should not have that special mark. james cleverly, the party chairman, says it is clear that the party
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was behind this account. was it clear, as far as you are concerned? it would not have been clear to typical twitter users. we are specialists with this information, we have been monitoring and researching it for years. we understand what people look at on twitter, we understand the impact of having rebranded that account in different colours from the conservative party with a different logo, with a check mark on it with the name fact check uk. people would not have noticed that. someone scrolling through casually might not have picked up that impression? that is very likely, yes. our political correspondent nick eardley is with borisjohnson who's visiting a factory in the north east. morning to you. we so you're on the campaign bus earlier, that was heading from that debate last night to argue art now. this story clearly around the rebranding of that account is dominating the news cycle this morning. do you think it is distracting from the message they conservatives are trying to get across today? possibly, it is about theissue across today? possibly, it is about the issue of trust, really, isn't it? he heard in that piece that
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laughter when boris johnson said that he thought trust was an important issue in this campaign. that is not something that will have been particularly comfortable for the prime minister. i suppose some will be asking this morning if there is enough trust in social media, with that rebranding of that site. i have a spigot if he tory candidates this morning and they are saying look, this is a bubble issue. it is not resonating with voters, we are not resonating with voters, we are actually departed. we are not commenced that anybody will actually remember it and if you weeks' time asi remember it and if you weeks' time as i said, that issue of whether or not we can believe everything that politicians and political parties are telling us in this campaign has been something that we have been asking repeatedly. on spending, be it on individual pledges, darius other things, as well. i mean, the argument coming the conservative party is its pretty clear if you look closely what was going on. we do not changes completely, if you looked at the actual pet twitter profile, you could tell it was from
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the parties but as she had a minute ago, sometimes these things are not all that clear. have a listen to the foreign secretary dominic raab explaining why he thinks it was ok. every day have been through the midlands, yesterday i was down in surrey, nobody gives a toss about the social media cut and thrust. what they care about is this absence of issues and of course there is a huge amount of scepticism about the politicians. what we are not days haveis politicians. what we are not days have is nonsense put around by labour. i think boris knocks that issue out of the park last night. so this is not a mistake in your view? frankly, when you're in the conservative's possession, we should be rebutting the nonsense that is put out about us. maybe unlikely that the tories but it is again, though, given some of the backlash. it is worth pointing out they are not the only party that have done things i do is in the past. the
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labour party run a backed checking twitter stream as well i have to say thatis twitter stream as well i have to say that is use a lot less we can play. but it is notjust the tories and i am sure many boaters at home will be thinking about some of the leaflets they get three the postbox in the morning, that look like newspapers and wonder at they may be count to look like sunday there are not, as well. good point. looking more broadly, then, is what the parties are doing today, take us through that. boris johnson is talking about justice again. it is been a big part of the tory campaign so far, he was talking about it yesterday, a bit more from him on that today because we may well be asked about thatjust issue a suspect this afternoon, when we hear from the issue a suspect this afternoon, when we hearfrom the prime minster, to the lib dems are launching their ma nifesto, the lib dems are launching their manifesto, a big moment their campaignfor manifesto, a big moment their campaign for will have a lot more detail of what their policies are going to look like, how they are costing them a bit more on their
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fiscal policy. the big plays they have come out with this morning is 20,000 more teachers in england. a lot of that will be paid for by staying in the european union basically, the lib dems main message is going to be stopped exits, have a lot more money to play with. jeremy corbyn is not out today, the labour party are talking about ending austerity stop again, big campaign pledge from them. scotland's first minister, the snp leader, nicola sturgeon is up in dundee, talking about independence today. saying it is only with independence, only by giving scotland a choice over independence will they be able to escape from as she says that some of the cuts that she things are inevitably committed public services, as a result of the economic hit she thinks the uk will ta ke economic hit she thinks the uk will take from brexit was up but at the heart of all of this and i suspect we will talk about it later today and probably later in this campaign
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for the next three weeks, as well, is trust. and whether all these things that politicians are saying can be silly straight up. and in some cases whether they are time to suggest they are something they are not. thank you very much, we will be with the liberal democrat campaign shortly. we will also be hearing more from the snp on this newsroom live today we're keen for you to get in touch this morning. at ii.30am today, brandon lewis from the conservatives will be here on the bbc news channel answering your questions. so, if you have something you want to know, please do get in touch on twitter — using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions — or you can email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. and do remember to leave your name and where you're from. if you haven't registered to vote already, or if you want to vote by post, there are only a few days left to apply. see our guide, at bbc dot co dot uk slash news or on the bbc news app
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former chelsea and manchester united manage jose mourinho has been appointed tottenham manager. he succeeds mauricio pochettino who was sacked on tuesday. mourinho — nicknames the chosen one — has signed a contract until the end of the 2022—23 season. mourinho has been out of work since being sacked as manchester united manager in december 2018. he takes over a spurs side that are 14th in the premier league and without a win in their last five games. our sports correspondentjoe wilson is at the tottenham hotspur stadium in north london. morning to you, joe. reversible, let us morning to you, joe. reversible, let us talk about pochettino. a lot of the fans feel that he should not have been sacked. i think that is very truth of the pledges talk about the tottenham hotspur stadium, as it is call behind me. we can say justifiably it is the most modern football stadium in the world, hold
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16,000 supporters. it is been built to allow spurs to compete and to rival the very best teams in europe. that is whyjose mourinho has been appointed of other things that pochettino achieved, he did not win hov. however, there is a real sense of wariness, i think, among the totte n ha m of wariness, i think, among the tottenham supporters. i have spoken to them here today, as one company to them here today, as one company to make, spurs now or in a position where they can dream. they can dream of being one of the best teams in europe. the only reason there in a position of dreaming is, as he told me, because of what pochettino has done here. in his eyes and i think in the minds of lots of supporters, to get rid of pochettino now in this way is fundamentally disrespectful to him. however, should add that at least one fan has omitted eight they are now predicting that spurs will be the league this season. i think thatis be the league this season. i think that is ambitious. but on that note, it does mean that marine you will be expected, there will be a weight of
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expectation that that he will deliver results fast. —— it does mean that was a more renewable be expected. if you look at who mourinho's record at chelsea and nestle, as we out the dredge and to a certain extent a second spell at chelsea, that does give credence and credibility to the idea he is the quy credibility to the idea he is the guy that contending the right immediately. but one vine has had me quite clearly today, look, that all happened a third time ago. jose mourinho is yesterday's manager, his style of the heat as a player tactically now in an area of pep guardiola seems backdated. he told me this is very pointed, that the most sought after manager right now is pochettino. so, i think we can anticipate an immediate effect, an immediate reaction from the players to jose immediate reaction from the players tojose mourinho immediate reaction from the players to jose mourinho in immediate reaction from the players tojose mourinho in the dressing. medium—term, long—term, jose
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mourinho's record of quitting any area other club, well, he does not tend to do that. just briefly, when i spoke one of the band grips earlier he said we want him up in the club about what happens next. earlier he said we want him up in the club about what happens nextm that going to happen? they have made their statement by clearly forced amino, their rationale is that they regret it, they are reluctant to get rid of pochettino, but they cannot allow the club to stand still. the bottom line is this, we will spend today, i am sure, debating the rights and wrongs of it, the ethics almost and morality of sacking managers he has done so much were five years postop expires when 3—0 at the weekend, the debate will have moved on. and all the fans will be interested in is the next set of results. that is the way that will is. let us either stop thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn face a sceptical audience in the first election debate as they're pushed on brexit, the nhs and honesty.
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twitter says the conservatives misled the public by rebranding an official account to look like an independent fact—checking service during the debate. a former employee of the uk consulate in hong kong says he was detained and tortured in china. now the foreign secretary has summoned the chinese ambassador. in sports, jose mourinho is the new totte n ha m in sports, jose mourinho is the new tottenham manager. he takes over from pochettino, who was sacked last night. jose mourinho has been out of work since he was dismissed by manchester united a year ago. a special night says wales boss ryan giggs as they reach next year's european championship with a 2—0 win over hungary and cardiff. and dom sibley will make his england debut in the first test against new zealand, which starts tonight — he'll open the batting alongside rory burns. i'll be back with more on those stories later.
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a man who used to work for the uk's consulate in hong kong has told the bbc that he was tortured in china and accused of inciting political unrest in the city. as a result of the claims made by simon cheng in the interview you're about to watch, the british foreign secretary dominic raab has summoned the chinese ambassador. the chinese foreign ministry has said they won't accept the uk's representations, and that interfering in china's affairs will "only harm the uk's own interests". let's see the interview that has prompted this response —— here's mr cheng speaking to our china correspondent, john sudworth: i've been shackled, i've been handcuffed and i've been blindfolded and also they made me hooded. they put a hood on your head? yes. for how many hours would that last? i don't know, because i cannot see anything.
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but a very, very long time. and then they handcuffed me like this. so, your hands are cuffed and they hang you on something? yes, exactly. and then they start to torture me. for example with my hands up, handcuffed and for several hours and it feels very painful. and then, for example, you need to do lots of extreme exercise, for example you need to do something like this for several hours as well. and you shuffle, you literally shuffle. you are not standing still. and if you tried to sit down or stop, what would happen? they would beat me and then even... did they beat you? yes, of course. of course they would ask whether the consulate instructed me to mingle with the protesters. they regarded me as the mastermind representing the uk. the consulate instructed and recruited volunteers from the staff to tap into and stay
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tuned to the status of the protesters and report back to the consulate. i actually cried and i said, "there is no need to torture me. "i will say anything you want to say, but i want to make it 100% clear that i didn't, the uk didn't assign any resources or materials in some way to the protest." one young girl came and then one of the interrogators told me she is also because because of the protesters. i've been brought to the detention centre. i realised not only me, a bunch of people also from hong kong got caught because of the protest. how many do you think? what i saw is about ten, but i'm not sure how many, but i would feel quite a lot. i heard someone speak in cantonese saying,
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"raise your hands up. "you raised lots of flags when you were in the protest, didn't you? raise your hands up." he was quite loud and i felt this was part of the torture because i remember i had raised my hands up as well. have you ever visited a prostitute? have you ever solicited prostitution? have you at any point in your life? i don't want to focus on the question of whether i solicited prostitution, because that is exactly what they want. i just want to state clearly here that i did nothing regrettable to those people i chose in life. i did nothing regrettable to that. meanwhile, the stand off between police and protestors at hong kong's polytechnic university enters its fourth day. the few pro—democracy protestors
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that are still inside face an increasingly desperate situation — supplies of water and food are running out. let's take you live to hong kong and our correspondent stephen mcdonell. some of these protesters, i understand, really young, may be as young as 15. so, what is going to happen next? how long can they hold out for? well, i think they probably cannot last much longer than 48 hours and even that would be stretching it. i mean, conditions are stretching it. i mean, conditions a re really stretching it. i mean, conditions are really top inside polytechnic university for those activity remain. the toilets and a very disgusting states, the food they have a starting to go off. so, it is only much of time to people start getting sick. they are surviving on biscuits and chocolates. as they come out, sort of, diet here in dribs and drabs, the police are grabbing them straightaway. there have been some pretty dramatic
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rescue attempts, people abseiling down off bridges to france waiting on motorbikes to drive. some tried to come through the sewers and police told us today that they have arrested accomplices who are waiting outside the universities, lifting up sewer covers as a way of trying to help them get three in that way. now, the police and in an official statement urged activists not to either abseil out or come to the sewers, because this is very dangerous. they are calling on the pa rents dangerous. they are calling on the parents and loved ones, friends of those who remain in situ come out peacefully. they say that anyone under the age of 18 will not be arrested, but they will take down their names and they could be arrested at some point in the future. but they will be a logical home. however, if you're over 18, then you will be arrested for rioting and here, you know, that is a crime which could lead to up to
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ten yea rs a crime which could lead to up to ten years in prison. this is why there is some reluctance from people to necessarily come out, because you can imagine, that is quite a serious punishment. so, that is where we are at the moment. we asked the police what i going to do if his activist do not come out? they said theyjust went to wait and that is because they have had some success with nuns, priests and professors from the university going in there and negotiating with the activists and bringing them out. as long as that process is yielding results, they are prepared to sort of see it through. and they will not, in other words, go and heavy—handed and dried the remaining activists out. but as isaid, you know, in the the remaining activists out. but as i said, you know, in the beginning, their supplies cannot last much longer. if it is going off, it is pretty terrible conditions in their andi pretty terrible conditions in their and i think most observers think it cannot last much longer than a couple more days at most ok, thank
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you very much for that update. more than 2 million adults in england are unable to see an nhs dentist, bbc analysis suggests. they include an estimated 1.45 million who have tried and failed to get an nhs appointment in two years with the rest on waiting lists or put off by cost. another 2 million assume they cannot get care where they live, suggesting nearly one in 10 miss out overall. dental leaders said the findings — based on official nhs data — showed access was a problem in every region. dominic hughes reports. desperately needed emergency dentistry. being carried out in a van outside dewsbury town hall. the dentaid charity normally works in developing countries, but today it is helping people like vasir. he has had to live with excruciating tooth pain for months. i was in too much pain, nobody could help me. nobody could help me. none of these nhs services, nobody would help me at all. he is far from alone.
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over the course of two days, staff saw 50 patients, extracting 20 teeth that were causing pain. any pain there? bbc analysis of data from nhs england shows that 4.3 million adults in england are going without dental care. of these, one 1.5 million people have tried and failed to get treatment on the nhs in the past two years. the rest are either stuck on waiting lists, put off by the costs or can't find a dentist. people like lindsay, in tooth ache and can't find someone to deal with. the 111 service is who they phone, they are usually kept on the phone for hours. and usually offered an appointment at couple of weeks down the line. if you're in acute pain, cannot sleep, need a tooth out, that is why we come. the british dental association says there are similar issues in wales, in northern ireland and in scotland, where checkups are free, it is less of problem. but for many in dewsbury, this kind of emergency treatment is
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always available. -- is all —— is all that is available. a charity filling the gaps left the nhs. you have an agenda server ten years now and you're back in nhs dentistry. looking at your contemporary graduated with, how many of them are doing that and how many of them are doing that and how many have gone into private work? are men, could not give ea an exact figure. in general terms. are men, could not give ea an exact figure. in generalterms. young dentists in general are the future of dentistry to stop currently the morale of young dentists is absolutely rock bottom. that is because of a contract which is target driven and which incentivise targets over actually providing the patient care, giving patients the time that they need. what you mean
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by target driven? nhs dentistry is divided into contracts across the country, so a particular practice that have a contract that they would need to deliver. so, there are instances with dentist across the country where they have to say no to patient sometimes, because they do not have any budget left in order to be able to deliver nhs services to them. one of your colleagues a sporty earlier talked about funding and whoever is next in government re—examining the contract for dentist. so, essentially, would you say there are not enough dentist coming through to work in the nhs to ca re coming through to work in the nhs to care for the patients who obviously require dental treatment? care for the patients who obviously require dental treatment7m care for the patients who obviously require dental treatment? it is not that there are not enough dentist in this country. what it is is that we need more dentistry want to reckon the nhs and because of the target culture in the nhs and the underfunding that the service actually receives, it becomes very difficult sometimes for some dentist to work within the nhs. it is
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putting them off. absolutely. looking at those figures, too many people assume they cannot get a. even if... those figures seem to suggest that they might have trouble getting that appointment. absolutely, actually that egger is probably closer to 4 million if the added together. about one in ten of the adult pub additionally cannot i do get an appointment with the nhs dentist, the charges are putting them of what they have some big if not trying. in a line, are you worried about future dental health because of this question mark absolutely, the current contract has not incentivise prevention, as well. the more we can deliver preventive advice as well as the treatment. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather. it is quite cloudy out there for
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many at the moment. there are a few bright and sunny spells developing across central and eastern areas of england and the north—east of scotland, as well as generally speaking, quite cloudy for many at the moment. we still have some rain affecting western areas of the uk. namely west and scotland, the east of northern ireland, though the isle of northern ireland, though the isle of man and western wales. that rain will come and go as the action goes onto will come and go as the action goes o nto sto p will come and go as the action goes onto stop elsewhere, it was a dry. asi onto stop elsewhere, it was a dry. as i mentioned, if you bright and sunny spells developing temperatures about nine... tonight we will continue with a bit of rain across the south—west. that will continue to come and go in cornwall. otherwise, if it were clad moving its buy in. again, should be a frost free nights. it could get close to freezing a the north—east of england and issued scotland into their status quite a bit of plaid around on their status of again, we will see some at both of rain in england and wales. bit of brightness breaking through in the east of scotland, tomorrow goodbye.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live with annita mcveigh. the headlines — boris johnson and jeremy corbyn face a sceptical audience in the first election debate as they're pushed on brexit, the nhs, and honesty. does the truth matter in this election? i think it does and i think it is very important. i have been very clear about the deal that i have done. we will have a referendum, we will have negotiation and we will abide by that result. twitter says the conservatives misled the public by rebranding an official account to look like an independent fact—checking service during the debate. jose mourinho is the new spurs manager after the club sacked mouricio pochettino last night. more than two million adults in england are unable to see an nhs
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dentist because appointments aren't available or it's too expensive, figures suggest. the liberal democrats have vowed to increase teachers' pay jose mourinho is the new tottenham manager, taking overfrom mauricio pochettino who was sacked last night. there's been a mixed reaction to the news. let's get more from our sports correspondentjoe wilson, who's at the spurs ground. joe, it seems this appointment was set up some time ago. yes. one thing you can say about this biz leadership is they move quickly, there is no void between managers as you sometimes get in these situations. we can also say we
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knowjose mourinho these situations. we can also say we know jose mourinho has these situations. we can also say we knowjose mourinho has been waiting foran knowjose mourinho has been waiting for an opportunity, specifically he's been waiting for this opportunity. i've been on the streets for an hour or two trying to gauge reaction from supporters here. one thingi gauge reaction from supporters here. one thing i haven't heard this morning is any direct criticism of mauricio pochettino. there is some optimism, also with a fair degree of wariness about jersey marine optimism, also with a fair degree of wariness aboutjersey marine you are coming in. let's hearfrom some of those supporters. jose marini.|j think he's going to bring the champions league to tottenham because he has the goal. to win the champions league? yes, that should be the main goal. i think the reason spurs are in the reason they are in is because of mauricio pochettino. to diminish that dream and completely disregard everything he has done over the last five and a
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half years is disrespectful. good choice. for a difference. half years is disrespectful. good choice. for a differencelj half years is disrespectful. good choice. for a difference. i do think is going to do great speakers you've seen what he is then manchester united. he is not the manager he was? i think they should give my servicio pochettino more time. —— mauricio pochettino. we have been talking a lot about how spurs may or may not need jose marini. how much does jose may not need jose marini. how much doesjose mourinho need tottenham hotspur. what other opportunities we re hotspur. what other opportunities were to get in the english football or european football now? right as one of those fans said, this is an 22,005. moreno is not the young, great hope in managerial terms. that is probably the realms of pep guardiola. we'll see how things turn out. it is always interesting with
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mourinho. the reason, is one of those fans are said, they've been able to dream of the elite is the way that mauricio pochettino turned those dreams almost into trophies. the other big news is that wales have reached next year's european championship, after beating hungary 2—0 in cardiff. both goals came from aaron ramsey, on his return from injury. manager ryan giggs said it was one of the greatest nights of his life and a bright new start for the wales side, after the disappointment of failing to make it to the last world cup. a special, special night. you know, after what happened in the summer, to come back and to qualify, the lads have shown great determination, quality, a never give up attitude. they deserve all the plaudits they are going to get because even though we had games to make up, there was no real room for error so concentration and, like i say, the quality that the lads have
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shown, they deserve it. northern ireland were thrashed 6—1 by germany and scotland beat kazakhstan 3—1 but both home nations already knew they couldn't qualify for the euros automatically. dom sibley will make his england debut in the first test against new zealand in tauranga, which starts tonight. he was the county championship's top scorer last season and he comes in to open the batting alongside rory burns. the bbc sport website has text and radio commentary on great britain's opening match at the new—look davis cup finals in madrid. andy murray is playing tallon griekspoor of the netherlands. murray lost the first set on a tie—break. i'll have more in the next hour. the liberal democrats have vowed to increase teachers' pay in england by at least 3—percent each year over the course of the next parliament.
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the party says the pledge, which will be announced at the party's manifesto launch later today, will come out of the fifty billion pounds the party says it will save by cancelling brexit. our correspondent tom symonds is on the campaign trail with the liberal democrat leader, jo swinson, who's visiting a school in cambridge. a real focus on education, a realfocus on education, there is the party feel is going to be able to differentiate itself from labour and the conservatives on this? on the day of the manifesto launch with jo swinson, on the day of the manifesto launch withjo swinson, as you can see here in mid visit with the children, that is the big question. this school is brand—new, built in 2017 and if all schools looked like this it would be good news for all parties. the liberal democrats is offering spending to try and win over the votes of pa rents, spending to try and win over the votes of parents, obviously, and the electorate in general. the announcement today for £10 billion for schools, and emergency cash
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injection next year and £7 billion to build new schools and improve classrooms. but, as you say, they are also looking to try and make sure teachers are attracted and kept in the teaching profession. this is the party's leila moran on that subject today. we know that teachers are leaving the profession in their d roves are leaving the profession in their droves and it is harder and harder to recruit as well. these pay rises that are promised a fully funded, a big difference to other conservatives are doing. we are asking for the pay rises to be taken out of the... we would value our teachers, we would end the punitive high—stakes testing regime we have in schools, we would replace ofsted with an inspector that has well— being at with an inspector that has well—being at the core of with an inspector that has well— being at the core of what it does. that is the liberal democrat leila moran talking earlier. the manifesto
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is due out this afternoon, we should get details of his from about one o'clock. i've been having a look, can't tell you what's in it, but many of those announcements the liberal democrats have been talking about during this early stage election campaign i'm going to be in there. spending, like all the parties, is very much on the agenda. the lib dems have had one set back in the last few days and that is not getting access to the big tv debate last night betweenjeremy corbyn and borisjohnson. jo swinson last night betweenjeremy corbyn and boris johnson. jo swinson is last night betweenjeremy corbyn and borisjohnson. jo swinson is hoping that when she does finally get into tv debates that are going to be happening over the next few weeks, she will start to make a big impact on this campaign. at the moment, the bbc‘s poll tracker issuing the liberal democrats have lost a little ground probably between 11% and 19%. there is still some way for them to go to make up that ground that currently is proving problematic for
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them. throughout the election campaign we will be putting your questions to all of the main parties. our guest this morning is the conservative security minister, brandon lewis. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news today. good for you to a nswer on bbc news today. good for you to answer questions from the public. we begin with a question from public. she asks, is it ok for a party to deliberately mislead the public to appearas deliberately mislead the public to appear as though it is an independent fact checking website? good morning. iwould independent fact checking website? good morning. i would disagree it is the main story, the main story should be some of the announcements we have seen today. in terms of
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answering the questions directly, the twitter handle is clear, it was a lwa ys the twitter handle is clear, it was always @, linked to the conservative website. we were just being very open about the fact, we were going to call out and fact check everything... that is partisan, isn't it? it can't be described as independence, it is partisan, coming from a party perspective. they were different colours, a take, it was to give the impression it is something it wasn't. we were open about it. on the twitter handle it said it was the twitter handle it said it was the conservative party. we were calling out similar things labour we re calling out similar things labour were saying that were inaccurate or false or lies. we saw that even in jeremy corbyn's opening statement. it is fairfor us to be
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jeremy corbyn's opening statement. it is fair for us to be calling out the forked and we have been open and clear. you are talking about facts yet, but twitter says, you misled the public. you are polluting the information space for people who are trying to get to the facts. dominic raab said he doesn't give a toss about it. jeremy corbyn said that he think the truth matters, he says, it does and people laugh. what does this say about the value of the conservative place on trust and untruth? the fact we were calling out the fact highlight the fact we do want to make sure the truth and the facts are out there. no one organisation, whether it is a given body on a person, has a monopoly about being clear on the facts. it is fairwe about being clear on the facts. it is fair we called out the facts as we see them. it was never anything other than the conservatives. the
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tag itself said that. are you going to do this again in the next debate, are you going to change the branding? the team have taken a decision about that yet. we cut through in we were telling the fa cts . through in we were telling the facts. it was a good thing we were being open, clear about when labour we re being open, clear about when labour were purporting lies about different issues. i think there is a lot of disagreement about either you were calling out the facts in that. let's move calling out the facts in that. let's m ove o nto calling out the facts in that. let's move onto the next question. angela from portsmouth asks, why if you refused to let the election see the report on russian interference in the last election before we vote on this one. there is a detailed process particularly when they are matters of national security. the average is four to six weeks for the to go through this process. one of
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the problems we have is because we are ina the problems we have is because we are in a general election, we are in the period of purdah, but after the general election the report will be published. but it should be published. but it should be published for democracy reasons. why on earth wouldn't you publish it? it appears as though there is something to hide. not at all. we are in purdah so we can publish something like that at the moment. after the general election it will be published. that usually does take for to six weeks. it is right we do this properly particularly when it isa this properly particularly when it is a matter of national security. charlotte next. what does boris johnson mean by get brexit done? how long that the conservatives envisage future talks with the eu to take? this is one of the clear dividing features of this general election. as about getting done. every single one of our candidates has signed up to support the deal that we have
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secured and borisjohnson has secured. if we are elected with a majority we can put that before parliament, get it done and we can pass the legislation before the end of january. we get it pass the legislation before the end ofjanuary. we get it done and we can move on to those domestic issues. in terms of a future trade deal, we have said we want to get that done before the end of 2020 so we can move out of the period and into that new opportunities for us around the world plus with our european colleagues. but getting it donejust means european colleagues. but getting it done just means the first part because there are tough negotiations ahead. getting brexit done mean we will have left the european union, past the withdrawal agreement bill, we will no longer be a member of the eu. we then got an implementation period to agree their future trade agreements and i am confident we will do that and then move on to our new future from the end of 2020. the
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next question from peter. given that half the uk's existing traders or the eu, how will we cope immediately after their exit? people are worried about that immediate post brexit period. that is a fair question. this is why we have got that implementation period, we've got 2020 where people have got that certainty, business has got the certainty, business has got the certainty and they will have a notice of what is in place from 2021 onwards. that is want to make sure we have that future trade deal. they deal with the eu is so good because we have the basics of that agreement. it'll be easy to do its radio than some people have outlined in terms of what europe is done in the past because we are not starting from scratch. we've got to withdrawal agreement which has the basics of a deal. we don't look at from scratch, we want to see what you take on board going forward. one
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of the things i have seen in myjob zonein of the things i have seen in myjob zone in travelling around the world, whether it is the usa, india, pakistan, there are massive opportunities for us as an independent nation with the ability to trade globally. we can do much bigger trade deals, more simply as a stand—alone country. there is huge opportunity for us to grow the rest of the world trade. do you think it isa of the world trade. do you think it is a danger in talking about simple deals, given how complex the clea ra nce deals, given how complex the clearance part of the process is? let's not forget at the beginning of this we were told brexit would be simple. one of the challenges, i suspect many of your viewers will have seen over the last year, has been a hung parliament meant we couldn't get things done, it has been difficult and complicated because parliament became frozen. some parties played games rather than delivering on the referendum. that is why we say a vote for the
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conservative party means we can get this bill through parliament because we are the only party that has got a deal that is ready to go and all about —— all our candidates have signed up to it. that deal in itself gives as the basis of the future trade deal. i want to get a few questions through. they conservatives want to implement an australian style points—based immigration system, how will this work with industries like the nhs and hospitality which need foreign workers? very good question. we won't have a points—based system. we can have a system where people come to this country based on what they bring to our economy and community rather than on theirjob. we will ta ke rather than on theirjob. we will take advice, we have always —— already commissioned an expert. they will consider and advise government. we have announced a special visa
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plan for the nhs. and go to squeezing one more question. if the conservatives don't get a majority and the brexit party has enough mps to get a majority, will you have a coalition? you will have to excuse me but there is only one way to absolutely guarantee we get brexit done and leave the eu and that is to have a conservative majority. when not doing deals with anybody, we need a conservative majority to deliver brexit. it's not that hypothetical vote. we have three weeks away from it. would you, if necessary , weeks away from it. would you, if necessary, work with another party to continue in government? we are saying we are not doing deals with anybody because we can only deliver... you did a deal with the dup. the dup have not supported the current deal we have got, we need to
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get this deal through. this is the deal that is ready to go. the only way to get that through parliament, put leaving the eu behind this is to have a conservative majority. that is what we mean by getting brexit done. ok, thank you very much for your time this morning. hello, an update of the business is used. amazon and ebay have failed to stop toys from being listed for sale which appear to have been declared unsafe by the eu, according to which?. the consumer group is asking the next government to make online marketplaces legally responsible for stopping dangerous products from being listed. more on this injust a moment.
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contractors and other flexible workers should enjoy a higher minimum wage than those with secure employment, that's according to the demos think tank. they also suggest that banks or trade unions could give benefits such as holiday pay. access to loans and mortgages should also be easier. the boss of emirates, the biggest long—haul airline in the world, says it took too long time for them to face up to the climate crisis. speaking at the dubai air show, sir tim clark says he's a climate change believer. so amazon and ebay have been accused of listing toys which are unsafe for sale. the consumer group which is asking the next government to make online marketplaces legally responsible for stopping dangerous products from being listed. they look at toys which had been registered as dangerous by the eu's safety gate system since 2017. earlier in the year, the british toy and hobby associaiton raised simlar concerns, warning that one in five toys it found sold on amamzon and ebar were dangerous for children.
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well, let's now talk to neena bhati who is head of campaigns for which? so what was dangerous about the toys you flagged on amazon and ebay? we found almost 20 toy listings across amazon and ebay that had identical or near identical altruistic to products that were banned. these are products such as toy slides which are common in playgrounds and classrooms which are toxic levels of chemicals in there. but also a transformers helmet which could damage a child's earrings. these were strongly suggested to be dangerous and amazon and ebay took them off their sites. but it took you to do that. both amazon and ebay say consumer safety is their priority is what is going wrong here? we would say we made the
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czechs amazon and ebay can easily make themselves and make sure these products should be there. these are packaging, branding that was identical to those databases and they should be making... their and safety checks are not working. they remove these listings down but there isa no on remove these listings down but there is a no on these marketplaces to ensure that unsafe products to make it onto their sites but also if they are found to be unsafe, to contact those people who have bought them to make sure they are unsafe and to remove them from their homes. and thatis remove them from their homes. and that is what you want to change, you wa nt that is what you want to change, you want the next government, whoever it may be, to make sure these online marketplaces are legally responsible for the safety of the items. this is the tip of the iceberg of the last three years we have contacted ebay and amazon multiple times and
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they've removed hundreds of listings of u nsafe they've removed hundreds of listings of unsafe products we have found on their sites. it shouldn't be up to organisations like which? to be flagging this to the online marketplaces. they have to make sure u nsafe marketplaces. they have to make sure unsafe products don't get on their websites in the first place. these are products that can easily make their way into children's stockings and it isn't acceptable given this isa and it isn't acceptable given this is a common way people are shopping online. whirring and interesting. good to talk to you. —— worrying. primak has hit back at environmental campaigners who attack its fast fashion culture. in an interview with the times, the boss of ab foods which owen primark, said that shopping on the high street is better for the planet than online buying. largely thanks to its efficient global supply chains which are less polluting than online delivery vans.
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a distracted safety operator in an uber self—driving car was primarily to blame for a fatal crash in 2018 — that's according to a us regulator. it also said an "inadequate safety culture" at uber was a major contributing factor. as too were poor, or somtimes non—existent, rules governing firms testing the technology. the findings follow a near two—year investigation. and aston martin has launched its first wales—made car, which it hopes will boost sales after posting losses of £13.5 million in the three months to september. the welsh government pledged public funds to attract the carmaker to the vale of glamorgan and the st athan plant is set to employ 750 people when fully operational. london's ftse 100 being led lower by home improvement retailer kingfisher‘s 6.3% tumble after it reported a worsening fall in underlying sales in the third quarter. sterling was slightly weaker against the dollar and largely flat versus the euro on wednesday, showing little immediate
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reaction to last night's johnson corbyn debate. that's all the business news. coming up, we have more on politics, this time a focus on the snp as they continue their campaign. that is coming up as well as all of the days of the main stories. right now, it is time for a look at the weather forecast. asa as a frost three starts for most of us as a frost three starts for most of us compared to yesterday. a much milder started the day that you have a lot of cloud around. that cloud is breaking up particularly across england at the north—east of scotland. this is the scene in nottinghamshire, some blue skies there. not the scene everywhere and towards western parts of the uk we her cloudy skies and a bit of rain.
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the east and northern ireland. that rain will continue on and off in the afternoon. there will be sent bright, sunny spells developing. chilly across the east, temperature 7-8, chilly across the east, temperature 7—8, further west we see highs of ten or 11 degrees. tonight, we will continue with a bit of rain across parts of cornel, pembrokeshire, but they will be cloud moving its way elsewhere. a frost free night. towards the east of scotland, england patches getting down to freezing. during thursday, lots of cloud around, some brighter skies developing especially towards the north—east but we've still got this rain moving its way to the far south—west, edging its way into the south—west, edging its way into the south—west of wales. temperatures tomorrow will be similar to today, 6-10 tomorrow will be similar to today,
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6—10 degrees. we've got this weather since moving north but it is linked into this area of low pressure. that could play a part in our weather for the weekend. fort freda, patchy rain at first and then more persistent rain will spread in across south—west england and across wales. perhaps the east midlands getting rain in the afternoon. sunny spells in the east of england. temperatures getting up a touch. and then the weekend. there are some uncertain things about the forecast for the weekend. it will stay cloudy, rainy at times but it will be milder. we've got this area of low pressure for us. we've got one weather front northwards and another weather system is going to move in from the south—west and i shall bring rain. asi south—west and i shall bring rain. as i mentioned, it will be milder, you can see the milder air coming in so for many of us, a south—westerly wind, temperatures in double figures. if you want the detail for
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the weekend, i suspect it may change a little bit, so stay in tune with the forecast. rain at times is expected.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's midday and these are the main stories this morning: a buckingham palace letter to a newspaper casts doubt on prince andrew's account of how long he knew the sex offenderjeffrey epstein. borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn face a sceptical audience in the first election debate — as they're pushed on brexit, the nhs and honesty. does the truth matter in this election? i think it does and i think it is very important. i have been very clear about the deal that i have done. we will have a referendum, we will have negotiation and we will abide by that result. twitter says the conservatives misled the public by rebranding an official account to look like an independent fact—checking service during the debate.
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jose mourinho is appointed the new spurs manager after the club sacked former boss mouricio pochettino last night. more than 2 million adults in england are unable to see an nhs dentist because appointments aren't available or it's too expensive, figures suggest. and the mission to save thousands of animals from australia's bushfires. we'll have the latest on the desperate efforts. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. a letter from buckingham palace has cast doubt on when prince andrew first met the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. the 2011 letter written to the times newspaper says that their relationship was much longer than the prince stated. it comes as bt has announced
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that it is reviewing its relationship with a training organisation as result of prince andrew patronage. let's speak now to our royal correspondentjonny dymond. so, prince andrew told newsnight that he met jeffrey so, prince andrew told newsnight that he metjeffrey epstein in 1999. what is now being said? pretty much the first thing he talked about was the first thing he talked about was the date when he metjeffrey epstein. now bbc news has dug out this letter to the times from his former private secretary, but is his very most senior assistant. in the letter, which is actually a defence of other issues, he mentions in passing jeffrey epstein and says that prince andrei had knownjeffrey epstein since the early 90s. so, that makes the relationship which we thought was around a decade long, almost twice as long. buckingham palace says prince understands by his words and by his recollection of
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events. but this is as part of a sort of ongoing not dramatic, but gentle unravelling of various aspects of what prince andrew said. the newspapers, of course, have been digging around finding various different examples, as well. this again casts doubt on if not prince andrew's word, then certainly his memory of this very controversial relationship. it is, as you say, a trip effect, isn't it? it underlines that whatever the decision—making process was to let him do this interview, for him to decide this interview, for him to decide this interview, the interview certainly has not shot the conversation was no, it is not such a down, i think there was a hope amongst people close to the prince that when the dust died down what would be left with the sort of core messages, the denial of a relationship and the
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acknowledgement that visiting epstein in 2010 after he had been convicted of child tax offences was the wrong thing today. albeit, in the wrong thing today. albeit, in the p's words for the right reasons. but instead, it really has not done that. because of perhaps the style of the interview, the tone itself, but also because of some of the things which he offered up as reasons for what might or might not have happened to his memories of what might have happened. they are being revealed is not quite as he put them, certainly, in a generous interpretation is that this goes on and on. of course this is vibrating the withdrawal of corporate support from organisations or a consideration of withdrawal of support from organisations that the princess peach in. i think this is important, because there is only talk after the interview and the newspapers and commentators and then there is the real world stuff. that is what the corporate support is and thatis is what the corporate support is and that is what the royal family does. it draws companies in two assessed
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with a kind of charitable work they do. they are a big draw, the royals. bt has pretty baldly said it is previewing its support for digital skills provider, because prince andrew is a page on. not that form of words, but by close it. this must be the most troubling aspect the of seeping away of the support from corporations, from companies and universities for prince andrew and the projects that he sponsors. universities for prince andrew and the projects that he sponsorslj give very much of that update. borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn have traded verbal blows over brexit in the first tv debate of the general election campaign. the prime minister said the labour leader is unclear about whether his party supports leaving or remaining in the eu — this and mr corbyn said the nhs isn't safe in conservative hands. the two leaders also locked horns over trust and leadership, the future of scotland — and the royal family. the public response suggests that neither man emerged
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as an obvious winner. iain watson has this report. this election has produced a first — never before has a sitting prime minister taken on the leader of the opposition head—to—head in debate with no other parties present. but the topics they debated were less surprising. it all began with brexit. with borisjohnson pushing his rival time and again to say how he would vote in the referendum labour is promising. are you going to campaign for leave or remain? i want to bring people together... applause ..therefore there will be a referendum in which that decision will be made by the british people, and our government will abide by that decision. butjeremy corbyn moved swiftly to steer the debate onto his territory, claiming that a post—brexit us trade deal could harm the health service. "..full market access for us products to our national health service." you're going to sell our national health service out to the united states! it is completely untrue. applause there are no circumstances whatever. boris johnson wanted to get back to brexit.
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although this has been consistently denied, he claimed that labour would do a deal with the snp that would deliver not one referendum, but two. of course, jeremy corbyn and the labour party are going to do a deal, and they probably already have done a deal, with nicola sturgeon and the snp to form a corbyn—sturgeon coalition, and the price of that deal, the price of nicola sturgeon's support, let's be in no doubt, she's made it absolutely clear, would be a second referendum on the union. may repel a wave must report as nicola sturgeon just about to start speaking in dundee. friends, it is always wonderful to be here in the beautiful, dynamic, vibrant city of dundee. or is this glaswegian accidentalp it, scotland's other yes city for ——
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likes to think of it. today feels a bit like the day after the night before. last night many people across our country will have watched the debate betweenjeremy corbyn and borisjohnson. a the debate betweenjeremy corbyn and boris johnson. a debate the debate betweenjeremy corbyn and borisjohnson. a debate in which the snp and scotland were talked about a lot, but not actually allowed to be in the room. and in a debate people have seen two men demonstrate, albeit in different ways, just how com pletely albeit in different ways, just how completely unfit they are to be prime minister. applause bought scotland, question that debate posed is this, why should we be content for either of these men
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to run our country and shape our future? we can do so much better than that. and that underlines the importance of this election. it is now just a little importance of this election. it is nowjust a little over three weeks until people across scotland and the uk but go to the polls. now, all elections are important, of course they are. but their selection really, really matters. because at sta ke really, really matters. because at stake is not just really, really matters. because at stake is notjust in five years, the future of scotland is on the line. now, i doubt there are many people in scotland, perhaps there is not anyone in scotland, who is not heartily sick of brexit and of the chaos we have seen played out at westminster night after night. but we should be clear about this, if brexit goes ahead all that will turn out to have just been the warm up
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act. trade talks for the future have even started yet and given the hard—line approach of bourse johnson, especially now with nigel farage pulling his strings, there is every chance that scotland will be forced out of the eu year with no trade deal out of living in that way will be an economic disaster. but any form of brexit will hitjobs, it will hit living standards and our public services. boris johnson, will hit living standards and our public services. borisjohnson, he wa nts a public services. borisjohnson, he wants a particularly hard brexit, with scotland outside, notjust the eu, but the single market and a customs union, the world's biggest trading bloc. his approach was subject is two years and years and yea rs of subject is two years and years and years of wrangling over issues like trade, fisheries, data, security and migration. and of course, jeremy corbyn, as result last night,
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incredibly, still will not even tell us incredibly, still will not even tell us whether he was the uk to leave the eu or to premiere and within it. the truth is westminster is going to be engulfed by brexit chaos for yea rs be engulfed by brexit chaos for years to come. with long—term damage to scotland guaranteed. that is why my message is clear, both for the snp in the selection is a vote to escape a mass of brexit. applause —— in this election. and it is a boat to put scotland's picture where it belongs, in scotland's cancer. not leave it in the hands of boris johnson. —— scotland's future. it is just an example, albeit an extreme example, of the high price scotland pays the westminster control. there
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isa pays the westminster control. there is a democratic cost, the tories have not won a general election in scotla nd have not won a general election in scotland for more than 60 years. but year after year scotla nd scotland for more than 60 years. but year after year scotland has been subjected to tory governments we do not vote for. that democratic cost comes with a severe particle cost to people's lives. tory austerity over just the last ten years has hit our public services hard. by the end of this decade, westminster will have cut scotland's budget by £1.5 billion in real terms. let us not forget this, that is a cut inflicted not just by the forget this, that is a cut inflicted notjust by the tories, but also in pa rt by notjust by the tories, but also in part by the liberal democrats, when they were in coalition with the tories. that is something voters in scotla nd tories. that is something voters in scotland should not and will not forget. by contrast, the snp in government in scotland, with very
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limited taxation powers, has prioritised investment in our nhs and other public services over tax cuts for the righteous. we have introduced a fairer tax system and we have pet record sums into our national health service was not in government the snp has abolish prescription charges, protected free personal care for older people are now extended to people of all ages. i think it is important to make this point, free prescriptions and free personal care, these are not giveaways. these are an important pa rt giveaways. these are an important part of the universal principle that underpins the nhs. the provision of care, free at the point of use, paid work collectively. it is an expression of our values and of our solidarity. and it is an example of the approach the snp has taken in government, a scottish model for public services. that means championing that universal
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principle. quality publicly owned public services that benefit all of us, paid for through a progressive tax system. as part of that, we are investing in a massive expansion of early learning and childcare for vulnerable to your old and all three and four jewels. vulnerable to your old and all three and fourjewels. this will be introduced in filton next year, saving families up to four and a half thousand pounds per child per year. half thousand pounds per child per yea r. let half thousand pounds per child per year. let me make this point, that saving is more, weigh more, than any tax cut, any party is offer working families. and it will deliver economic and social benefit. in our schools we are working to drive up standards and close the poverty —related attainment gap with extra targeted investment through our people equity fund. the students in our universities, we have abolish university tuition fees. last week i heard a tory turned lib dems, like some many of them, there are now i
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believe more tories and lib dems than there are lib dems. but i heard one of these lib dems that free tuition was and i could fantasy. perhaps he is not familiar with scotland, but let me say very clearly free tuition in scotland is very much a reality and is a reality the snp will always protect. applause and then to police and, since 2007 the snp first took office, we have been investing while westminster has in cutting. in england police numbers have been cut by more than 20,000. the tory pledge at the selection does not even fairly reverse that cut. by contrast, here in scotland the snp has increased the number of police officers by
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more than 1000. in fact, just to much as and restore england's share of police officers uk wide, the tories would need not the 20,000 extra officers they are promising, but 27,000. we have massively outstripped the rest of the uk in social and council house building, as well as a of any most recent four year period that we have figures for the snp delivered five times more social rented properties per head of our population than in england. we have also capped water in public hands and mean strategic interventions in important scottish industries. by the snp scottish government is responsible for social security systems, our system is power based on dignity, human rights despite. through it we have already increased support for carers and for low—income families. now, as we look to the future, we must keep in fasting and keep learning and reforming to benefit patients, our
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school pupils and communities across our country. and of course, as in any democracy, our government will come in for criticism and challenge, thatis come in for criticism and challenge, that is as it should be. any government will face difficult tests, that is, of course, true for the snp as it is for governments anywhere but the scottish model and have outlined, universal public services page for the progressive taxation, i believe has broad consensus support in scotland. one of the great advantages of countries of the great advantages of countries of our size, as we see in other comparable nations, is a sense of cohesion, solidarity and shared goals. so, although the labour party aggressively attacked the snp, it is, i think, aggressively attacked the snp, it is, ithink, very aggressively attacked the snp, it is, i think, very striking just how much of their policy platform at the selection bar was from at the snp has already done in government. from
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free prescriptions to abolishing university tuition fees, to free personal care, to public ownership of the water industry and opposition to fracking, labour has clearly been looking to scotland for inspiration. that might explain, at least in part, white people in scotland simply do not see the point in voting labour. —— why people in scotland. the snp are already delivering what they are only promising the fact is labour cannot win in scotland. in all of the 13 seats the conservatives hold here it is the snp who are the challenges. so, if people in scotland want to make sure that porusjohnson does not get a majority, if they want to see a progressive appliance form for scholars's and jesper and centre and the tories locked out of government, then only a vote for the snp can deliver that outcome.
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applause and of course fundamentally, when it comes to a choice for scotland between westminster control and becoming an independent country, labour always supports tory government over self—government. they wait inexplicably in my view, brother c scotland's feature in boris johnson's and, than brother c scotland's feature in borisjohnson's and, than in the hands of the people of scotland. although their policy on whether to give people the right to choose their own future in a new independence referendum seems chargeable, to change with the wind, there is no doubt where they stand on this substantial question. therefore, westminster control every time. no matter how tory governments forget and no matter how much damage the tories due to scotland. and make no mistake, it is now crystal—clear
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the continued westminster control means multiple threats to scotland, to our economy, living standards, to our nhs and other public services. that is right this election is so vital for it will determine what paschal intakes. will these threats become reality where will be decided differently by taking our future into our hands? rather than leaving it in the hands of borisjohnson and a broken westminster samson. let me outline three of those threats and how a virtually snp can head them off. first of all, there is a direct economic threat of brexit. leaving the eu permit lower economic growth and therefore a lower tax revenues to fund our public services. by the end of the next decades, a trade deal like the one favoured by boris johnson could wipe £9 billion from the scottish economy relative to eu membership. leaving with new trade
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deal, which is still a distinct possibility, could see that rise to £12.7 billion. the second threat is to the workforce. the end of freedom of movement will make it harder to child nhs social care staff. it will mean fewer people working in scotla nd mean fewer people working in scotland and therefore contributing tax revenue to public services. current immigration rates, our working age population is expected to remain stable over the next 25 yea rs. to remain stable over the next 25 years. whereas, with mejust migration from the eu, it is projected to decline by between 3% and 5%. the uk government's don't migration advisory committee concluded that eu migrants contribute more to the health service and social care then they use in services. they accepted that the care sector was fierce even more serious challenges of migration from the eu was restricted, yet that is precisely the scenario that the sector faces. in this election, the
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tories are deliberately and s ha m efu lly tories are deliberately and shamefully giving the impression that our fellow eu systems are a burden on our nhs and said of a vital support. that is a disgrace and it really has to stop. the third threat comes from the tony power grab on the scottish parliament, in apposite of their brexit vision. one nightmare to some of us. remember, the tories spot to kneel against devolution in the first place, do not ever forget that. —— tories bought tooth and neil. they have already used brexit to grab powers from the scottish parliament stop they have legislated for the first time ever on devolved matters without the consent of msps. they have even taken the scottish government to court, in an attempt to strike down an act of the scottish parliament. they‘ re
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to strike down an act of the scottish parliament. they're also threatening to take charge of funding in devolved areas currently controlled by the scottish government under the eu funds programme. you know, with the right—wing of tory party infill cry can anyone have any confidence that they will not be at by the power grab attention scotland's parliament? is uk wide they compromise on workers' rights and environmental standards. after all, the tories are desperate, desperate to dh radio donald trump. that could mean large rises in the course of nhs drugs, president trump has said everything including the nhs on the table. in government, the tories have made it clear, they are prepared to wrap up the devolution settle m e nt prepared to wrap up the devolution settlement if it gets a new way of brexit. we should be in no doubt that they would do the same if devolution got in the way of a trump trade deal. now, of course, snp mps will do everything they can to stop this from happening. the snp will
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introduce an nhs protection bill, to explicitly protect the health service in all four countries of the uk from being a bargaining chip in trade deals. scotland's future should not be dependent on the whims of westminster. so, a vote for the snp isa of westminster. so, a vote for the snp is a boat to deprive boris johnson of the majority that would enable him to do all of this. but more fundamentally a boat for the snp isa more fundamentally a boat for the snp is a vote to escape brexit and the threat it poses to our economy and public services. it is a vote to secure the right to choose our own future. if the future we then choose is as an independent member of the eu, we will be able to take full advantage of the single market currently around eight times the size of the uk alone. if we look at ireland, it is striking how the combination of independence and eu membership led to huge economic gains. as an independent country,
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scotla nd gains. as an independent country, scotland which be in a unique position to act as a bridge between the rest of the uk and the eu, making us a magnet for global investment, which in turn would best growth and tax revenue for public services. a vote for the snp is also a vote for migration policy to end the hostile environment, retain the freedom of movement. the snp government has made it clearjust how much we value those in the eu and elsewhere who contribute to our nhs public services. but control over scottish might patient policy, here in scotland who had the means to ensure that we remain unattractive destination for people who want to build a life and make a contribution to our country. —— remaina contribution to our country. —— remain a attractive destination. and the democratic average... to move on from the right—wing tories itching to get the hands—on devolution. of course, a vote the snp is a vote to
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protect college and being at the mercy of a donald trump trade deal. it is instead a chance to secure a future as part of the world's biggest trading bloc in which are members have to give their consent to trade deals. compare that to the way scotland has been ignored by westminster. in government in hollywood the snp is working hard to improve our health service, our schools and our police service. we are working with others across scotla nd are working with others across scotland to improve lives. we have introduced a progressive tax system and we are determined to keep public services and public lands. but all of that progress is at best if boris johnson gets a majority he is seeking. so, this election, there is no doubt that scotland is facing a crucial question, who should decide a refugee? should it be the people who live here or the likes of boyce johnson? with a vote for the snp, we can deprive the tories of the pre—hand that they so desperately
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want. we can protect the right of our hand people of scotland to decide their own future. we can escape the westminster chaos and an emboldened right wing tory government and begin when that right to choose the future we want for this and future generations. so, my message at this election is clear and at its heart it is simple. vote snp for and at its heart it is simple. vote snpfora and at its heart it is simple. vote snp for a better country and to put scotland's feature into scotland's hands. thank you very much. applause —— scotland's future into scotland's cancer. we will listen to her answers to some questions now. she called today the day after the night before,
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referring of course last night's television election the campaign. best minister, if you manage to stop brexit, not deny yourself the justification for an independence referendum next year? before i a nswer referendum next year? before i answer your question, can i take the opportunity to buy somebody in the audience. jenny moriarty. —— to embarrass somebody. he is celebrating his 23rd birthday today. hgppy celebrating his 23rd birthday today. happy birthday, jerry. my apologies, i will come to your question now. it is not your birthday, as well, is it? no is the short answer to that. the proposition i'm putting to the people of scotland in the selection is that brexit illustrates why we need to be in charge of our own future. as i said to my remark,
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brexit is the most extreme example of the broken nature of the westminster system for scotland. but it is only one example, one illustration. even if brexit is stopped and the uk remains, there is no guarantee that down the line we are not back there. people like nigel farage are not sebago to pack up nigel farage are not sebago to pack up and go away. there is no guarantee that we do not have other policies imposed on us by a tory government that we do not vote for. so brexit has brought into sharper latest fundamental question. if we wa nt scotla nd latest fundamental question. if we want scotland to be the country we can be, then had to be better secure that? to be better secure that by allowing people like borisjohnson, nigel farage, even jeremy allowing people like borisjohnson, nigel farage, evenjeremy corbyn, determines god's path and what kind of country b r, or do we take that feature into our own hands and decided things were ourselves?
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during last nights television debate, borisjohnson said he believed the snp had done a deal with jeremy corbyn believed the snp had done a deal withjeremy corbyn on a second independence referendum. jeremy corbyn said that was nonsense, and this morning we heard labour will agree to a referendum in 2020. can you clarify who is telling the truth? it is possible for all these things to be too. when borisjohnson is in the sentence, it is unlikely that what he is saying... it amuses me that given his racket as prime minister, anybody is still prepared to believe a single word that comes out of borisjohnson's mouth. there is no deal with jeremy out of borisjohnson's mouth. there is no deal withjeremy corbyn. the conversations i have had withjeremy corbyn in recent months, the most recent was just before the election was called, it is about a brexit,
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about how the opposition parties in westminster is trying to come together to stop brexit and to find a better way forward. the most recent discussion was about how we could get the issue taken to a general election, which we are now in. ido general election, which we are now in. i do believe if the parliamentary arithmetic enables this, thenjeremy corbyn is not going to turn his back on an opportunity for a uk labour governmentjust opportunity for a uk labour government just because opportunity for a uk labour governmentjust because he is determined to block the right of the scottish people to choose their own future. it will take a lot of explaining from him, if he was to say no, no, i'm going to walk away from this opportunity, why am i going to do that, because i want to veto scotland boss migrate to self determination. this is a man who favour self—determination for any other country on the face of the planet so it would be art...
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applause nicola sturgeon, the snp leader there in dundee. she began her speech by talking about last night's debate, she said scotla nd about last night's debate, she said scotland had been talked about a lot but not allowed to be in the room, referring to that legal challenge. she said, why should we be content to let either of these men shape our future? les talking out our scotland correspondent who is in dundee and has been listening to all of that. but first question from our own glen campbell at the bbc, asking if she stops brexit with you not remove your justification for independence referendum too. that was an interesting one. what was interesting about what
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nicola sturgeon said today was the goal posts seem to have shifted a little. she says that brexit, even if it was taken off the table, illustrates how scotland needs to be in charge of its own future. she put it in in charge of its own future. she put itina in charge of its own future. she put it in a wider historical context in his speech, she said brexit has come out of the it is an extreme high price in her opinion that scotland pays for westminster control. in effect, doing that speech, she came back to the two key messages that the snp have been campaigning on. but of brexit and that of independence and how the two are intertwined. of course, scotland is a country where the majority of those who voted to remain. she called the tory brexit vision the brexit nightmare. if you are sick of brexit, you haven't seen anything yet, she said, because these talks have yet to start. on the message of the independence, she said scotland
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was my advice is ignored, there is a democratic deficit and that is just going to continue. nicola sturgeon says what is at stake isn'tjust the next five years in the general election but the future of scotland itself. what else would you pick out from that speech. nicola sturgeon setting out why people should vote for the snp rather than labour or anyone else in scotland. clearly, a lot of seats in scotland are up for grabs. do you think they are going to make serious inroads into those held by the conservatives? what is interesting in scotland is a country of marginal seats. out of the 59 seats, dozens upon dozens are considered marginal. the snp are going to have a real go at many of those. they say they are the main challenger in the 13 seats. in the conservative seats. you know, it
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wasn't just the conservative conservative seats. you know, it wasn'tjust the conservative she was having a polecat in the speech here. she talked about the cuts in real terms to scotland's budget. she said, yes, that is down to the conservatives but in part it is down to the liberal democrats when they went into coalition with the conservatives. it is interesting that labour... she said they will be targeting those marginals, those conservative seats and she seemed to be asking to borrow the labour votes in those conservative seats as well. she said, if you vote for the snp, that was the way to get a progressive alliance in westminster. borrowing vote is an interesting thought. thank you very much. the conservative party has been criticised after rebranding one
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of its twitter accounts to look like an independent fact—checking service during the debate. the conservative campaign headquarters press account changed its name to "fact check uk", with branding. twitter has accused the party of misleading the public. our north america technology reporter dave lee explained how unhappy twitter were with the re—branding. they are not happy to say the least. they are not happy to say the least. they put out a statement about what the tory party has done with that account saying it was misleading, but it wouldn't be tolerated in future. they will take decisive corrective action if the tory party orany corrective action if the tory party or any other account tries to pull a stu nt or any other account tries to pull a stunt like this in future. twitter is pretty clear about this, it has a policy about pretending or implying you are something you are not on the platform. i have to say, this is a company that has had to battle this type of technique of changing the identity of an account as something
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foreign governments were due to interfere in elections. to see it coming from a british political party has angered twitter. that is the sense i'm getting. speaking on bbc breakfast this morning, the foreign secretary dominic raab defended the re—branding — insisting it was not a mistake. i knock on doors every day, i went through the midlands yesterday and i'm down in surry, nobody gives a toss about the social media cut and thrust. they don't. there is huge amount of scepticism about claims of all politicians but what we are not going to do is have this nonsense put around by labour. i think body knock that out of the park last night. so you think this is not a mistake. when you are in the conservatives position, we should be abetting the nonsense that is put out about us. however, a spokesperson for the electoral commission has said that "voters are entitled
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to transparency and integrity from campaigners in the lead up to an election". the commission said: "while we do not have a role in regulating election campaign content, we repeat our call to all campaigners to (ani)undertake their vital role responsibly and to support campaigning transparency." i'm sure we will touch on the fact checking aspect later. i'm joined by the former labour adviser tom hamilton, who used to help prepare leaders for prime minister's questions, and james johnson, former pollster to theresa may. welcome to you both. you are coming from those backgrounds. do you have a view on which leader you thought performed better last night? both leaders will have thought they had their high points low points. boris johnson started adequately and finished badly. jeremy corbyn started badly and finished reasonably well. they have both got
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moments they thought they were effective. they stumbled quite seriously only —— on a couple of occasions. jeremy corbyn could have a crisper answer to the question of which side he would be on in european referendum. it's not unreasonable for him to say in the referendum it doesn't matter what he thinks, it's what the public thinks. that is his message but it well. borisjohnson had that is his message but it well. boris johnson had a that is his message but it well. borisjohnson had a bit of a problem by agreeing so strongly that tooth was important at a time when that is one of his weakest points. and when he must have known this was happening with the twitter account. he probably didn't know. but that is another problem. james, your thoughts on the merits of the two leaders in that debate on how they performed? the first poll that came out said 51% saying boris johnson was the victor and jeremy corbyn and
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49%. that is almost a dead heat. both leaders will be happy, the conservatives will be equally happy they got a lot of airtime pretty much through the whole hour of boris johnson saying jeremy corbyn hasn't got an answeron johnson saying jeremy corbyn hasn't got an answer on which way he would campaign. jeremy corbyn had his say on austerity. both leaders will be happy, once you look past that this was a slightly better debate for jeremy corbynjust was a slightly better debate for jeremy corbyn just because was a slightly better debate for jeremy corbynjust because his ratings were so fine behind boris johnson quality that within 2% is an impressive performance. what is really interesting about the debate last night was the reaction of the audience, laughing at times as the two men responded to various questions. let's take a look at a couple of those clips. this is the truth matter in this election? i think it does.
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this is the truth matter in this election? ithink it does. it is important macro i have been cleared about the deal i have done. we will have a referendum and we will abide by that result. i'm not sure we have quite seen that reaction in an election television debates before. what does that say to you about the relationship between the voters and political leaders? having a studio audience in a debate is a bit of a risk because, depending on how the audience reacts, it can raise questions about partiality. the audience were reacting, they were laughing at both sides. they laughed at both. i'm not sure how helpful that is to be honest. i prefer these debates to happen without a studio audience at all. why do you think? is it helpful to have an audience and an audience
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reacting in that way?” to have an audience and an audience reacting in that way? i do think on your point about trust, the relationship between voters and politicians, it tells you something. i noticed when i first started in 2016 and ask about breaks is, voters will talk about it, they'd be quite in by the end people would laugh. that wasn't unfamiliar a review for me last night. a year after year, the division and the delay are not getting things done, that has undermined the relationship and trust. in america, that gets presented as anger. here, the british public seem to laugh. james, you think a real reflection of feeling as the broader public. the first topic that really seem to get the two men going and get that response from of laughter, forgetting the strong response from
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the audience, was the nhs. it seemed to me watching it last night the jeremy corbyn missed a trick when he was trying to push borisjohnson on the number, boris johnson's was trying to push borisjohnson on the number, borisjohnson's number of hospitals being built. he didn't pushit of hospitals being built. he didn't push it again. was that a mistake was mikei push it again. was that a mistake was mike i think the message did get across. he demonstrated that the nhs is an important part of his campaign. he made the point about his claim that borisjohnson was the sale of the nhs to donald trump. he had a point he wanted to make about the quality of the nhs and he preferred to that referred to a friend of hers who had died after treatment of the nhs. he was hammering that message home. he should be pleased with that. in terms of boris johnson,
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should be pleased with that. in terms of borisjohnson, entity, that is something people raise questions about. i think he got his point across, he spoke a lot. it worked in terms of connecting. in terms of, whenever there was a point that was building a new thought, boris is going to land a hit, they seem to back off. i wonder if that was nervousness all the time constraints? that'll be a lesson for both camps for the next debate. they should pin down or pin down their opponents. it'll be interesting to see how the dynamic will change with other party leaders involved. what about the conservative headquarters decision to rebrand that twitter account? i spoke to brandon lewis and said, are you going to do this ain? and said, are you going to do this again? it was in unequivocal no from him. perhaps they will do something like this again. would that be a mistake, james? they think it would
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go viral, grab attention and cause outrage. i expect they thought that was a mistake by now. it soon backfired. i used to be one of the people who run the labour press office twitter account and we will put out a factual rebuttals to tory claims and source way we thought they were wrong but we always did it with a labour branded accounts of people knew who we were saying it. what you should be trying to do in a situation is put out your view of the facts and evidence of the facts but it is important the audience understands that you are a party account. thank you both for your time today.
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if you haven't registered to vote you have only a few days to get that organised. but first the headlines on bbc news. a buckingham palace letter to a newspaper casts doubt on prince andrew's account of how long he knew the sex offenderjeffrey epstein. borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn face a sceptical audience in the first election debate as they're pushed on brexit, the nhs, and honesty. twitter says the conservatives misled the public by rebranding an official account to look like an independent fact—checking service during the debate. tottenham hotspurs have released the first photos of their new managerjose mourinho. the former chelsea and manchester united manager has been appointed after mauricio pochettino was sacked last night. mourinho — who has been out of work since he was sacked as manchester united manager last december — has signed a contract until the end of the 2022—23 season. he takes over a spurs side that are 14th in
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the premier league and without a win in their last five games. well, earlier i spoke to our sport correspondent and suggested that many fans thought pochettino shouldn't be sacked. that is too. let's talk about the totte n ha m that is too. let's talk about the tottenham hotspur stadium as it is still cold. we can say, justifiably, it is one of the most modern football stadiums in the world. it has been built to allow spurs to compete and to rival the very best teams in europe. that is why mourinho has been appointed. of all the things mauricio pochettino achieved, he didn't win a trophy. but that is a real sense of wariness amongst the tottenham supporters i have spoken to here today. one fan put it to me, spurs are in a position where they can dream, they can dream of being one of the best teams in europe. the only reason they are in that position is because
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of what mauricio pochettino has done. in the minds of lots of supporters, to get the —— a rate of mauricio pochettino is disrespectful to him. however, at least one fan told me today they are predicting spurs will win the league this season. that is ambitious to say the least. but on that note, it does mean that mourinho will be expected to, they will be a weight of expectation there that he will deliver results fast. yes, and spurs have said, we have appointed one of the best football managers in the world and if you look at mourinho's record at chelsea, inter milan, real madrid and toa chelsea, inter milan, real madrid and to a certain extent with his second spell at chelsea, it is give a credence that can —— he is a man who can turn things around. as one fan told me, that all happened a fairtime fan told me, that all happened a fair time ago. mourinho is yesterday's manager, his style, the
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way he deals with players, now in an era ofjuergen klopp and pat guardiola seems outdated. he told me the most sought after football manager in europe arrived now is mauricio pochettino, the guy that spurs have sacked. we can anticipate an immediate reaction from the players to mourinho in the dressing room. in the medium term, long term, mourinho's record of creating a new era at a club, well, he doesn't tend to do that. when i spoke to one of the fans groups earlier, he said they wanted more from the club are what is happening next? they have made the statement clearly, their rationale is they regretted their reluctance to get rid of mauricio pochettino but they can't allow the club to stand still. we will spend today, i am sure, debating the rights and wrongs of this. the ethics, the morality of
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sacking a manager who has done so much over five years. if spurs win 3-0 at much over five years. if spurs win 3—0 at the weekend, the debate will have moved on and the fans will be interested in the next set of results. that is the way football is. the tory candidate for leeds north east has been suspended over claims of anti—semitism and anti—semitic comments. our political reporterfor bbc radio anti—semitic comments. our political reporter for bbc radio leeds anti—semitic comments. our political reporterfor bbc radio leeds is tweeting that he has been suspended pending an investigation into alleged comments againstjewish people and has told him that he accepts the decision of the party. that is all the details we have at the moment. a man who used to work for the uk's consulate in hong kong has told the bbc that he was tortured in china and accused of inciting political unrest in the city.
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as a result of the claims made by simon cheng in the interview you're about to watch, the foreign secretary dominic raab has summoned the chinese ambassador. the chinese foreign ministry has said they won't accept the uk's representations, and that interfering in china's affairs will "only harm the uk's own interests". let's see the interview that has prompted this response , here's mr cheng speaking to our china correspondent, john sudworth. i've been shackled, i've been handcuffed and i've been blindfolded and also they made me hooded. they put a hood on your head? yes. for how many hours would that last? i don't know because i cannot see anything but a very, very long time. and then they handcuffed me like this. so your hands are cuffed and they hang you on something? yes, exactly. and then they start to torture me. for example with my hands up, handcuffed and for several hours and it feels very painful.
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and then for example you need to do lots of extreme exercise, for example you need to do something like this for several hours as well. and you shuffle, you literally shuffle. you are not standing still. and if you tried to sit down or stop, what would happen? they would beat me and then even... did they beat you? yes, of course. of course they would ask whether the consulate instructed me to mingle with the protesters. they regarded me as the mastermind representing the uk. the consulate instructed and recruited volunteers from the staff to tap into and stay tuned to the status of the protesters and report back to the consulate. i actually cried and i said, "there is no need to torture me. "i will say anything you want to say, but i want to make
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it 100% clear that i didn't, the uk didn't assign any resources or materials in some way to the protest." one young girl came and then one of the interrogators told me she is also because because of the protesters. i've been brought to the detention centre. i realised not only me, a bunch of people also from hong kong got caught because of the protest. how many do you think? what i saw is about ten, but i'm not sure how many, but i would feel quite a lot. i heard someone speak in cantonese saying, "raise your hands up. "you raised lots of flags when you were in the protest, didn't you? raise your hands up." he was quite loud and i felt this was part of the torture
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because i remember i had raised my hands up as well. have you ever visited a prostitute? have you ever solicited prostitution? have you at any point in your life? i don't want to focus on the question of whether i solicited prostitution because that is exactly what they want. i just want to state clearly here that i did nothing regrettable to those people i chose in life. i did nothing regrettable to that. the bushfires raging across australia's east coast have left hundreds of koalas feared dead. however, some people are doing their best to help the survivors. a rescue operation has been taking place to save injured koalas — with volunteers and even a dog helping out. andy moore's report contains some pictures you may find upsetting. it's been one of the worst
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seasons for bushfires in australia in many years. millions of hectares have burned, hundreds of homes have been destroyed and there's been a devastating toll on wildlife. other animals can run from the flames. the koala can't, and this slow—moving marsupial is trapped. he'll need rescuing, won't he? the woman behind that voice takes the shirt off her back and rescues the animal, taking care to avoid getting hurt herself. just careful of his claws. can you get water out of my car? and then she gives him a first aid, dousing him in water to try to treat his burns. do you want to put him in the blanket and bring him out of the hot stuff? yeah, i will. this animal was lucky. he was taken off to a local animal hospital for treatment. but it's believed that hundreds of koalas have died in the bushfires. this is a dog called bear.
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he's been specially trained to sniff out koalas and other small marsupials so they can be rescued from the flames. this is a young koala that's recovering well after being rescued. it was found curled up and badly dehydrated. but it's hoped it will eventually be able to go back to its home in the wild. andy moore, bbc news. the one o'clock news is next with jane hill. first it's time for a look at the weather. we have 18 flood warnings in force with the fans are struggling and also lowest stretches of the river severn which isn't expected to peak until we get this weekend. there is a lot of cloud around today, but we also have some areas of rain, particularly across the western side of the country where we are close to this slow—moving area of low pressure. the reason this area of
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low pressure is so slow moving is because we got this massive blocking area of high pressure covering a large swathe of russia. those areas of low pressure accounts move through, the app being blocked and become slow—moving. weather—wise, as i say, will see arena times across western areas, some could be heavy. the best of the sunshine in the west midlands and eastern parts of scotla nd midlands and eastern parts of scotland seeing brighter spells. otherwise, it is cloudy and overnight that cloud will stay with us as overnight that cloud will stay with us as well. for many of us, a dry night the temperatures around about 2-5 night the temperatures around about 2—5 celsius. if we get some clear breaks, temperatures were debt down toa breaks, temperatures were debt down to a touch of frost and that is likely across the north west of scotland. we are looking for another cloudy day on thursday. the south—easterly winds will be blowing strongly. we may well see some drizzle working into the east coast
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of scotland. the cooler air reaching northern ireland to reserve temperatures being into double figures like we will have to day, looking at high of seven celsius. rain in the forecast for southern wales and south—west england. we end the week on friday with low pressure close by, again bringing the chance of rain. this rain could become heavy across south—west england so thatis heavy across south—west england so that is an area of concern, perhaps spreading to southern parts of wales. otherwise, a lot of cloud around, the rain across northern parts of scotland and temperatures are rising. it will be less chilly. the weekend, low pressure in charge of putting a band of rain northwards, some of the rain could be quite heavy at times so that is cause for concern given the ground remains saturated after our incredibly wet autumn. we have seen rain at times over the weekend.
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the conservatives reject criticism of their decision to rebrand their twitter account a fact—checking service during last night's tv debate. the electoral commission has reminded all parties they must campaign responsibly. the liberal democrats promise they'll be able to invest billions of pounds in public services by stopping brexit as they set out their election manifesto. we'll analyse in more detail what the liberal democrats are promising. the other main stories this lunchtime: a letter written by buckingham palace in 2011 casts doubt on prince andrew's account of when he first met the billionaire sex offenderjeffrey epstein. tortured in china, a former employee of britain's consulate in hong kong speaks exclusively to the bbc,

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