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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 27, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's ham and these are the main stories this morning. nicola sturgeon will say boris johnson is unfit for office and his proposed brexit deal would be a ‘nightmare for scotland' as she launches the scottish national party's manifesto. we'll bring you her speech live from glasgow in the next few minutes. jeremy corbyn says he has documents showing the government has discussed offering the us access to the health service in trade talks. if you are worried about those egg whites, why not just if you are worried about those egg whites, why notjust make some? gary rhodes, the celebrity chef, has died aged 59. his family say he died yesterday
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"with his beloved wifejennie by his side". the bodies of 16 vietnamese people who were found dead in a lorry trailer in the uk have arrived back in vietnam. blue story director rapman questions ‘hidden reasons‘ for banning the film, saying it could help stop gang violence. if you are in a gang and you are living that life and you are running with a group of friends who are doing bad things, this film shows you the end result of that, if you wa nt to you the end result of that, if you want to keep a career as a gang member. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. in a few minutes, we‘ll be live in glasgow for the snp manifesto launch. but before that, labour leader jeremy corbyn says he has obtained hundreds of unredacted documents confirming the nhs would be on the table in trade talks with the us after brexit.
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borisjohnson has repeatedly denied this. mr corbyn, in a speech in london, accused mrjohnson of lying. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. he was at that event listening to mr corbin. he says, does he not, that us trade negotiators are seeking total market access to the nhs? he is calling on borisjohnson to explain. mrjohnson is going to have to do that, is he not? well, he is going to have to have some sort of answer becausejeremy corbyn is a saying that these documents, 545 pages, prove that the nhs is indeed on the table in any future us— uk trade negotiations and if it was not, he would not need 540 pages to explain why it was not. these are hugely detailed documents. they do not just these are hugely detailed documents. they do notjust cover the nhs, although a pc that is what mr corbin wa nts to although a pc that is what mr corbin
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wants to highlight. if you had to think of one issue on the campaign of whichjeremy think of one issue on the campaign of which jeremy corbyn has think of one issue on the campaign of whichjeremy corbyn has managed to get traction on, it is this idea of the health service being at risk. we all remember those chance at labour party events, not for sale, not for sale! that has been labour‘s key selling point. after a difficult three days, labour is desperate to get this election back onto the nhs and fears about the health service. these documents will have to go through quite a lot of detail the stop they clearly show what the us is asking for. less clear is whether the uk has agreed to any of the demands. one of the demands which mr corbin highlighted was the suggestion that the us is seeking longer patents for drugs. what that would mean, frankly, is more expensive drugs. we would not get to cheaper, non—patented drugs for a long time he cited the example of a drug used to treat crohn‘s disease and rheumatoid arthritis. in
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britain, the aim, nhs pays around £1200 per packet. in the us, it is £8,000. he said that was an example of the sort of costs the nhs would face if these trays, trade negotiations were pursued. 451 pa g es 451 pages of unredacted documents and information. all of it here. he... his government released this. we have since obtained this. this is a very different version of events. perhaps he would like to explain why these documents confirm the us is demanding the nhs is only table in the trade talks. these uncensored documents leave borisjohnson‘s
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denials in absolute tatters. it is clear, as i say, that labour wa nt to it is clear, as i say, that labour want to make this the issue of the election campaign. the game changer which sort of turns around their campaign. i have to say, looking at the documents, they actually go one offa the documents, they actually go one off a lot further than simply the nhs. they also talk about american demands, for example, to have changes in employment law for they also want changes to our food labelling. they would also prefer a no deal outcome. they encompass much more than simply the us demands on the nhs. joining me now is labour‘s shadow international trade secretary, and i suppose the missing link here is any evidence or proof that the british government is willing to say yes to these us demands. no, absolutely not. the fa ct demands. no, absolutely not. the fact that six meetings have taken place with officials, the fact that we now have evidence of what is
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being discussed, which was originally redacted, that shows that the negotiations about patents right, the negotiations about negative lists have all gone to a very high level. they are now ready, in some situations, to actually set out the detail of what a trade agreement would contain in wording. that is a great deal of negotiations that have already gone on. to say this is not at a high level is complete nonsense. it is sanctioned from the top, and we know that it has then gone to that level within the negotiations, which, at the moment, the uk cannot go beyond because we have not yet left the european union. you need to have left european union before officially your even allowed to negotiate, yet sex negotiating meetings taking into stage stopped at my yet
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six negotiating meetings have already happened. '5 is there anything in these documents saying that british officials would be prepared to consider these demands or is this an outline of what the americans want? of course there are. the way in which they have approached this is looking to get clarity on the extension of the patents, on the way in which they would adopt wording which is helpful to the uk government in shielding what is going on from the public, the way in which they have talked about negative list systems, the way in which they are using all the technicaljargon of trade to try to obfuscate the central fact here, which is that british doctors, british hospitals will not be able to have the protection of the national and of clinical excellence, in ensuring that the drugs that we
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put forward two people are cost—effective and making sure that actually the patents do not last so long that we cannot use generics which keeps those prices down for thatis which keeps those prices down for that is what is being discussed and we are at a high level of wording to put that into a trade agreement. thank you very much for your time indeed. so, there we have labour‘s claim. i suppose the big question is how far this changes the course of what has so far been quite a difficult election for labour. does this get them back onto their core narrative about the danger to the health service? thank you, norman. british celebrity chef gary rhodes has died in dubai at the age of 59. known for his distinctive spiked hairstyle and love for british cuisine, gary rhodes was best known for presenting programmes including masterchef. we will bring you much more on the sad news that gary rhodes has died throughout the programme. but first, we are going to go to glasgow where, as we have been telling you, the
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scottish national party is launching its manifesto today. the snp are about to launch their manifesto and set out what a minority labour government would need to do to get their support. the party‘s leader, nicola sturgeon, will demand an extra £4 billion for the nhs in scotland. that, it seems, would be one of those demands, part of the price to be paid for the smp‘s support. after the election next month. let us listen and do what she has to say. let us listen in to what she has to say. welcome to the launch of the snp ma nifesto for welcome to the launch of the snp manifesto for the 2019 general election. these events are becoming quite a regularfeature! which must be quite puzzling for people here in scotland. five years ago, during the independence referendum, the leaders
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of the no campaign, made up of course of the westminster parties, promised that if we voted no, we would get stability. since then, the westminster parties have delivered notice stability but constant chaos and three uk general elections. the promise that if we said no to independence scotland would stay in the eu has been broken and broken spectacularly. the promise that it was just a scare story to suggest that boris johnson was just a scare story to suggest that borisjohnson could be prime minister has been broken. the promise that scotland would be treated as an equal partner in the united kingdom has notjust been broken but completely shattered. the reality of westminster control over scotla nd reality of westminster control over scotland is this. the right—wing tory government scotland did not
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vote for, a prime minister in boris johnson who is dangerous and unfit for office. tory cuts to the scottish budget, a national health service under threat from a tory— trump trade deal, a paragraph on the scottish parliament, children forced into poverty and a disastrous brexit deal that will hitjobs, living standards and workers‘ rates. but there is worse to come. unless boris johnson is stopped, this willjust be the start. brexit is nowhere near being done. the tories have barely got going. they have not even started trade talks yet. because of boris johnson‘s started trade talks yet. because of borisjohnson‘s hardline started trade talks yet. because of boris johnson‘s hardline position, there is every chance, every chance, that the uk will leave the eu without a trade deal next year. that
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would be a catastrophe forjobs. evenif would be a catastrophe forjobs. even if he somehow avoids that, his dream deal would be a nightmare for scotland. it will take scotland out of the single market, which is eight times the size of the uk alone, and out of the customs union, the world‘s biggest trading bloc. compared with eu membership, that could cut scotland‘s national income by around £9 billion by the end of the next decade. that is equivalent to £1600 for every person in scotland. environmental standards and workers‘ rates will be at risk. and as night follows day, the tories will sell out scotland‘s fishing industry. the smp, scotland‘s remain party, backs a new uk wide referendum on eu membership. jeremy
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corbyn, incredibly, says that he is neutral on the issue of leave or remain. that means he is neutral on job losses, cuts to living standards and the erosion of our rights. of course, he would be happy to sit back and see scotland taken out of the eu, even if there is a majority for remain in scotland but not in the uk as a whole. the truth is that brexit will dominate westminster politics for years and years to come. scotland will pay a heavy price for the tories‘ brexit obsession and for labour‘s neutrality or, to give it its proper description, labour‘s woeful lack of leadership. so, this election really, really matters. the future of scotla nd really, really matters. the future of scotland is on the line. the opportunities for this and for future generations are at stake. we
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must not let brexit rob our children‘s future. that means the kind of country we want scotland to be is on the ballot paper. at the heart of it all, i ask people in scotla nd heart of it all, i ask people in scotland to consider this simple but fundamental question before you cast your vote. who should decide scotland‘s future? the people who left ear or boris johnson? scotland‘s future? the people who left ear or borisjohnson? a vote for the snp on december the 12th is a vote to escape brexit. it is a vote to bits:‘s future in scotland‘s hands. —— it is a vote to put scotland‘s future in scotland‘s hands. crucially, it is able to deprive borisjohnson‘s conservative party of majority for in the selection, the smp is the challenger to the tories in every single seat that they hold. the reality is this,
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in scotland, only a vote for the smp can defeat the tories. by voting snp, we can log the tories out of office. we can do that only by voting snp on assembly 12. after this election, there is every chance that the snp will hold the balance of power at westminster. unlike the liberal democrats, we will never, ever healthy tories into government. applause but we will be prepared to talk to other parties about forming a progressive alliance. now, those parties, of course, are already looking to the smp and to scotland for inspiration. many of the
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policies being promised in this election are already being delivered in scotland by the smp. the snp has already abolished university tuition fees. we have protected the nhs from creeping privatisation. the snp is not only detected free personal care for the elderly, we have now extended to all age groups in scotland. we have introduced free prescriptions, we set up a genuinely progressive tax system which helps low—paid and middle income earners. we are setting up a national investment bank. we have kept the water industry firmly in public hands. and while the tories have been cut in police numbers in england, we have increased the number of police officers by more than 1000. we have massively outstripped the rest of the uk in social and council house building. and we are helping with the cost of
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living. the snp right now is investing in a huge expansion of early learning and childcare for vulnerable to olds and all three—year—olds and four—year—olds. this will be introduced in next year, saving families up to £4500 per child per year. with limited powers, we have also established a social security system with dignity and fairness at its very heart. we are introducing a new £10 per week scottish child payment for low income households by the end of next year. that will left 30,000 children out of poverty when it is fully implemented. so, in government, the snp is not just implemented. so, in government, the snp is notjust talking about transforming our country for the better. we are doing it every single day. applause
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this manifesto builds on that and it sets out how the power, the experience and the values of the smp can put scotland‘s‘s interest front and centre in a progressive alliance to lock the tories out of government at westminster. it includes a clear demand for an end to austerity and a three—point proposal to increase scotland‘s budget. firstly, for a national health service. in government, we have shown our commitment in very difficult financial circumstances to the nhs. despite tory cuts since 2010, we have increased front line health funding by 13% in real terms, with more to come. in scotland, the snp
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is spending £136 more per head on front line health services than is the case in england. this amounts to over £740 million more spending in scotla nd over £740 million more spending in scotland compared to the uk. of course, given oui’ scotland compared to the uk. of course, given our rural population, there should always be higher per capita spend in scotland. however, if the next uk government raised health spending per head to the current scottish level, it would not only substantially increase health investment in england, it would mean that by 2024, 25, front line investment in nhs scotland would be £4 billion higher than it is today. second, there must be a real end to austerity. the tories, and let us never forget, they austerity. the tories, and let us neverforget, they did austerity. the tories, and let us never forget, they did this but the help of the liberal democrats, have left the scottish budget £1.5 billion lower in real terms than it was at the start of the decade. a
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potential uk government that once oui’ potential uk government that once our support must reverse that cut to oui’ our support must reverse that cut to our budget, and ensure real terms growth thereafter. thirdly, the uk must make right the cuts that scotla nd must make right the cuts that scotland has suffered. over a decade of austerity, the accumulative price imposed on scotland has been a massive £13.9 billion. that is how much investment in our communities and public services scotland has lost. of course, the cost in human terms has been worse. that must be made right. parties seeking our support must be prepared to set out how they will repair the damage of a decade of austerity, and put back money that has been lost. remember, when the tory government last needed a handful of votes from the dup, they bypassed the barnett formula to find money for northern ireland and,
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in the process, they denied scotland around £3 billion per year of investment. we say enough. it is time for scotland to be treated fairly. applause in any post—election talks, the smp will also demand that scotland‘s nhs be protected from trade deals. —— the snp. we will introduce an nhs protection bill which will guarantee that trade deals will not undermine the founding principles of the nhs, nor open it up to profit driven exploitation. as a double lock, it will stipulate that no trade deal can come into force without the consent of our scottish parliament. be in no doubt, no doubt whatsoever,
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a vote for the snp in this election isa a vote for the snp in this election is a vote to stop the tories are selling off scotland‘s national health service. applause snp mps will also demand an end to policies which are pushing people into poverty, debt and desperation. that means the two child cap on tax credits and the associated rate because must go. there must be... applause —— rape clause. there must be an end to the puny fit comic punitive benefits sanction regime. the benefits sanction regime. the benefit freeze and the misery of universal credit. we will also stand up universal credit. we will also stand upforfairer universal credit. we will also stand up for fairer pensions. universal credit. we will also stand up forfairer pensions. we universal credit. we will also stand up for fairer pensions. we will protect the triple lock and demand justice for was be women. applause
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we must never, everforget we must never, ever forget that the social security system is an expression of values and of solidarity. it helps those who are working hard but who struggled to make innes meet. the snp will not sit by and watch it torn apart. in government, with the powers we have already, the snp has been helping pa rents already, the snp has been helping parents and families with a special emphasis on those all important in early years. the baby boks, for example, provides practical help, but it is also a symbol of our values and of the kind of country we are seeking to build. it demonstrates that, as a society, we value each and every child in scotland. the current system of maternity leave feels that social justice test. it is unfair, and it
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works against those on the lowest incomes. it also means that parents, mainly mothers, often lose out on pension provision. we wanted to change that. emulating policies six fully introduced in nordic countries, and in particular iceland, we will propose legislation to increase paid maternity and paternity leave, and also increase shared parental leave by 12 weeks to 64 weeks. —— emulating policies already introduced. this will be for fathers to encourage an increase in paternal leave. that would support mothers returning to work and it has been shown also to help fathers spend more time with their children after paternity leave has ended. of course, with the powers of independence, we would have the ability to bring this into force. at westminster, we will use our influence to press for these measures to be introduced. this kind
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of policy is the hallmark of the snp's of policy is the hallmark of the snp‘s approach to government. practical action to improve people‘s lives, as we build the fairer society we know is possible. on the climate emergency, the biggest moral issue that we face today, scotland has the world‘s most ambitious emissions reduction targets already enshrined in law. we are already generating in scotland three quarters of our electricity from renewa bles quarters of our electricity from renewables using our influence, snp mps will demand that the uk matches scotland‘s ambition, meets its paris claimant responsibilities and sticks to future eu emissions standards for stopped —— paris claimant responsibilities we will propose a green energy deal, ensuring green energy schemes get the long—term certainty needed to support investment. the uk office for bbudget responsibility estimates
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that oil and gas revenues will be worth £8.5 billion over the five yea rs worth £8.5 billion over the five years to 24, 2024. that revenue, the vast bulk of it, of course from scotland, should be put to work in building that transition to a greener, sustainable future. we are proposing the ring—fencing of oil and gas receipts, creating a need fund to help pay for the energy transition through investment in areas such as renewable energies, electric vehicles and carbon capture utilisation and storage. applause and because those communities that currently host the oil and gas industry cannot be left behind in the necessary transition away from fossil fuels, we will demand that 1296 fossil fuels, we will demand that 12% of the fund, at least £1 billion over five years, will go to a need
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industrial strategy, to help diversify the economy is of oil hops, like aberdeen, falkirk and shetland. labour wants to impose an additional £11 billion windfall tax on scotland‘s nazi oil and gas industry. —— north sea oil and gas industry. that kind of shows that for the westminster government, nothing changes. the uk treasury has pocketed billions of pounds in revenues. while independent norway has set up an investment fund which is now worth $1 trillion, labour and tory westminster governments have left scotland with nothing. they claim that scotland is not good enough or rich enough to be independent, but when they need to balance the uk books, they always seem to find billions of pounds of
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scottish resources to do thatjob for them. applause well, let me suggest today a much better way. you know, it has been estimated that the renewal of the trident nuclear weapons system could cost more than £200 billion. that is a colossal waste of money. weapons of mass destruction are immoral. applause so, a key smp demand for our support will be the removal of trident from scotla nd will be the removal of trident from scotland and the saving of billions of pounds to be invested instead in our precious public services. —— snp.
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applause until such time as scotland is independent, we will also seek more powers for the scottish parliament stop in particular, we want to see devolution of drugs policy, to help tackle what is a public health emergency. we will press for the devolution of employment law so that the scottish coral, parliament can protect workers‘ rates —— the scottish parliament can protect workers‘ rights, increase living wage. so, let people be clear. if vote for the snp in this election is devoted to reverse austerity and to protect our nhs. it is a vote for action on climate change, for a fairer country and for more powers for our scottish parliament. but in
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this election, as has happened so often in the past, scotland is facing a democratic deficit. brexit is just the latest, albeit very extreme, example of that. the tories last won a general election in scotla nd last won a general election in scotland in 1955. in the last 60 yea rs, scotland in 1955. in the last 60 years, there have been 16 uk general elections the tories in scotland have not won a single one of these, not one. and yet, for 36 of those 60 yea rs, not one. and yet, for 36 of those 60 years, scotland has had to endure tory governments that we did not vote for. that is a democratic outrage and that must change. applause by
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by voting snp, we in scotland can do our bit to get the tories out of office, and we should. but as we have learned from bitter experience, as long as we are governed by westminster, our future can as long as we are governed by westminster, ourfuture can be imposed upon us. it is time to take scotland‘s future into scotland‘s hands. now, ithink scotland‘s future into scotland‘s hands. now, i think people are becoming increasingly sick of hearing jeremy corbyn and boris johnson talking about not allowing the scottish people to choose our own future. well, i‘ve got news for them. it‘s not up to you. applause and, you know what, it‘s not up to me, either. it is a
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decision for the people of scotland and for the scottish parliament. the democratically elected scottish parliament has agreed that the people of scotland should be given a choice over their future. an unelected tory westminster government has no right to overturn that decision. so an snp victory in this election would be a clear instruction for the people of scotla nd instruction for the people of scotland to respect scottish democracy. so, in this election, we can democracy. so, in this election, we ca n vote democracy. so, in this election, we can vote snp to send the strongest message to westminster, to boris johnson and to every westminster politician, there must be no westminster veto over the right of the people of scotland to decide their own future. applause
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and the snp‘s message to any westminster parties seeking our support is this. if you cannot support this most fundamental of democratic principles, then the snp cannot and will not support you. applause today, scotland does stand at a crossroads. we are facing two futures. in one future, we will be governed by boris johnson and taken out of the eu against our will. we will be at the mercy of an increasingly right—wing tory party. that will let nothing get in the way of their extreme brexit vision. the right—wingers who
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are running the show want to abandon eu standards, they want to cut scotland‘s share of uk government spending and they have shown that they will trample all over devolution, if it gets in the way of brexit. people in scotland have the right to consider an alternative future. one in which scotland‘s future. one in which scotland‘s future is in scotland‘s hands, not in borisjohnson‘s future is in scotland‘s hands, not in boris johnson‘s hands. future is in scotland‘s hands, not in borisjohnson‘s hands. a future with scotland as an equal partner with scotland as an equal partner with our closest friends and the rest of the uk and with the european union. in an independent scotland, we will always get the governments we will always get the governments we vote for. the nhs will always be protected from a tory— trump trade deal. decisions about taxation and social security will be made by the scottish parliament. we will have a
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migration policy tailored to scotland‘s needs. there could never bea scotland‘s needs. there could never be a rape clause or a bedroom tax forced on the people of scotland against their will. scotland is a country of extraordinary talent and resources . country of extraordinary talent and resources. we are already one of the wealthiest countries in the world. we are rich in renewable energy, we have a world—class food and drinks sector, raw tourism industry is booming, we are a world leader in the cutting—edge industries of the future. we have more top universities per head of our population than any other country in the world. our one. —— bar one. we can be confident that a better future for scotland as possible. we don‘t have to put up with the brexit mess and with what westminster chooses for us. we don‘t have to put up chooses for us. we don‘t have to put up with tory governments that we don‘t vote for. we have the power at this election to change all that.
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so, to people across scotland, wherever you are, whatever your background, wherever you have come from, and however you have voted in the past, let‘s join from, and however you have voted in the past, let‘sjoin together. let‘s stand up for the past, let‘sjoin together. let‘s stand upfor our the past, let‘sjoin together. let‘s stand up for our right to choose a better future. at this election, i am asking you to vote snp, to escape brexit. vote snp to lock boris johnson‘s tories out of office. vote snp to take power into your own hands, the hands of the people of scotland. vote snp so that together we can build a better country for this and for future generations. thank you very much indeed. applause so, nicola sturgeon very clearly sets out what the snp is
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asking for in terms of supporting any other party in government after the election. she said, if you cannot support the most fundamental of democratic principles, namely the right of the people of scotland to decide their own future in another referendum, then the snp cannot and will not support you. she said a vote for the snp wasa support you. she said a vote for the snp was a vote to escape brexit and deprive borisjohnson snp was a vote to escape brexit and deprive boris johnson of snp was a vote to escape brexit and deprive borisjohnson of a majority. she said the choice for the type of country scotland she said the choice for the type of cou ntry scotla nd wa nts she said the choice for the type of country scotland wants to be is on the ballot paper. nicola sturgeon will answer questions over the next few moments, which we will bring to you as well. the snp leader setting out her vision for scotland and
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repeatedly turning to jeremy corbyn and boris johnson for criticism. repeatedly turning to jeremy corbyn and boris johnson for criticismlj shall and boris johnson for criticism.” shall now take some questions from my friends in the media. firstly, brian taylor. as i recollect, you took some convincing to go down the route of a second brexit referendum. it is now quite a transition. brian, thank you for your question. it‘s not a transition. the snp has previously said that if we were faced with the prospect of a no—deal brexit, if that was the only alternative to a straight revocation of article 50, we would favour the relocation of article 50. joanna cherry was part of the court action that established that right. the snp
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laid an amendment at a previous stage of the brexit process in the house of commons arguing for that. we would prefer that there was a uk wide option for people to have their see again. but a no—deal brexit would be so catastrophically damaging for scotland that is not something we could countenance. this is where i accept i am in a different position perhaps to other leaders in this election. i am the leaders in this election. i am the leader of a party, the governing party ina leader of a party, the governing party in a country that did not vote for brexit. if we were in that position, we would be delivering and honouring the vote of the people of scotla nd honouring the vote of the people of scotland in the brexit referendum. applause you have said, first
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minister, that you would support jeremy corbyn as prime minister in exchange for an independence referendum. the chief rabbi has suggested that ifjeremy corbyn the chief rabbi has suggested that if jeremy corbyn became the chief rabbi has suggested that ifjeremy corbyn became prime minister the soul of our nation would be at stake. that decision may well come down to you. you could help jeremy corbyn well come down to you. you could helpjeremy corbyn into number ten, you could stopjeremy corbyn becoming prime minister. why would you go against the warning of the chief rabbi on behalf of the majority of britishjews, in exchange for another independence referendum? i deplore jeremy corbyn‘s lack of leadership on the issue of anti—semitism. i do not condone in any way, shape or form that failure on behalf of him and the labour party to eradicate that from their ranks. i have said before on more than one occasion that we don‘t choose, i don‘t get to choose
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the leaders of the uk party. we are ina the leaders of the uk party. we are in a westminster election. if there isa in a westminster election. if there is a hung parliament and the snp is in the position of holding the balance of power, we have to decide how best to exercise that influence on behalf of the people of scotland, but also as far as we can in the interest of the people across the uk. that is what we would seek to do responsibly. we would not be signing any blank cheque tojeremy corbyn or any blank cheque tojeremy corbyn or any leader of the labour party. you have mentioned the position on an independence referendum, i set out our position on another number of issues, in orderfor our our position on another number of issues, in order for our support to be relied upon. finally, i would say this to people who are worried, understandably worried about aspects including the one you have mentioned, ofjeremy corbyn‘s leadership. if we are in this position, it‘s becausejeremy corbyn in england has managed to get himself into a position of being
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able to potentially form a government. and the snp has a job to do in those circumstances, of making sure the right values, the right policies, the right priorities are to the fore. so, in addition to all of the other things i‘ve been speaking about, we would be very clear of her expectations to any party leader who wanted the support of the snp, to make clear a zero tolerance approach to anti—semitism, islamophobia, to any form of prejudice and racism. and i think to those worried about jeremy prejudice and racism. and i think to those worried aboutjeremy corbyn, it should give a degree of reassurance that snp mps, with the right values in the right approach on these issues, are able to apply that pressure. but my intolerance and my condemnation of anti—semitism and my condemnation of anti—semitism and racism in any form could not be
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any more emphatic or stronger. applause first minister, do you thinkjeremy corbyn is... look, on the answer to the first pa rt look, on the answer to the first part of your question, i don‘t know jeremy corbyn personally well enough to a nswer jeremy corbyn personally well enough to answer that question. but i say unequivocally and emphatically that he has failed to get to grips with this problem on this issue within his party. i deplore that and i condemn that unequivocally. as i say, part of the reason i am a supporter of scottish independence isi supporter of scottish independence is i would rather as the leader of the snp and as first minister of scotland, i would rather scotland was not in the position of having to
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choose between the devil and the deep blue sea for the prime minister of our country. and i... applause i make no bones about that. i could never support boris johnson as make no bones about that. i could never support borisjohnson as prime minister for a never support borisjohnson as prime ministerfor a whole never support borisjohnson as prime minister for a whole host of reasons, but on issues of racism and racist comments, he certainly has a chargesheet of his own to answer there. and i would expect any prime minister, any candidate for prime minister, any candidate for prime minister, to absolutely take on theseissues minister, to absolutely take on these issues centrally. and i say again, while i would far rather scotla nd again, while i would far rather scotland was independent, i would say not just to scotland was independent, i would say notjust to people in scotland but across the uk, i can‘t decide the outcome of the election in england. but ifjeremy corbyn and labour are england. but ifjeremy corbyn and labourare ina england. but ifjeremy corbyn and labour are in a position of being able to form a minority government, then better to have the influence of then better to have the influence of the decent snp mps in the air, who
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will ensure the right values are to the fore in the creation of any government. applause we have heard your views on jeremy corbyn, but you say boris johnson is unfit for office. could you firstly spell out for us by you think he is unfit? how long do you have? it is going a long way beyond just that you disagree with him? it could well be that you are going to have to deal with him to try to get an independence referendum. is it smart politics by calling him unfit? the question, can you spell out why he is unfit for office, i am happy to do that, but i‘m just conscious that we don‘t have a light on this venue for the day. —— we do not have
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this venue hired for the entirety of the day. so i might have to summarise, if you permit me. look, i have made reference already to some of the comments the borisjohnson has made about muslim women, about 93v has made about muslim women, about gay people, some of the way in which she casually insults and offends people for gratuitous reasons, the fa ct people for gratuitous reasons, the fact that since he took office i think it has become clear that we cannot trust a single word that comes out of his mouth, he stood at a platform in scotland yesterday launching the tory manifesto and told a direct lie about me. that is a minorthing in told a direct lie about me. that is a minor thing in the grand scheme of things, but it illustrates the fact that he cannot be trusted. he dodges scrutiny. i don‘t know whether that is going to change for the rest of that campaign, but of course he has absolutely set on taking scotland
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out of the european union against our will with the most damaging deal possible. so these are just some of the many reasons that i do believe borisjohnson is the many reasons that i do believe boris johnson is unfit the many reasons that i do believe borisjohnson is unfit to be prime minister of the united kingdom. applause and on the second part of your question, that i might have to deal with him after the election, i like to be a straight talker on these things whether he likes it or not. in scotland, we have the opportunity to vote in a way that deprives boris johnson of the majority he is seeking. and to play our part in ensuring that he is not in a position to be calling the shots over scotland‘s future after this election. in every single one of the
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13 seats in scotland that are held right now by conservatives, the snp is the main challenger. the message to people the length and breadth of scotla nd to people the length and breadth of scotland could not be clearer. if they want to stop borisjohnson, vote snp because that is the only way for scotland to do it. applause first minister, you have said the choice between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn is a choice between the devil and the deep blue sea. what is it about jeremy corbyn that you see as more palatable, in order for you to jeremy corbyn that you see as more palatable, in orderfor you to back him and put him into number ten? it's him and put him into number ten? it‘s not particularly anything about jeremy corbyn as an individual. i could not be clearer. if labour want to give me the chance to choose who should lead them, it would not be jeremy corbyn. i am not a fan. but
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if you‘re asking me, in terms of why labour and not the conservatives, it has a policy —based thing. i don‘t agree with all of labour‘s policies, farfrom it, buti agree with all of labour‘s policies, farfrom it, but i have more in common in terms of the social and economic outlook than i ever have done or ever will do with an increasingly right—wing conservative government. you only have to look at the uk manifesto of the labour party to see that they have borrowed quite a lot from previous snp manifestos. applause free prescriptions, free tuition, free personal care, opposition to fracking, opposition to car parking charges, keeping water in public hands, a national investment bank, i could go on and on and on and on. so it is snp policy that he is largely promoting at this election, so there you go.
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write... applause i apologise as my eyesight is failing me for some of the print journalists at the back... you say you are no fan ofjeremy corbyn. would you support any move within westminster to replace him as labour leader? look, i don't choose the leader? look, i don't choose the leader of the labour party. if i did,i leader of the labour party. if i did, i would leader of the labour party. if i did, iwould not leader of the labour party. if i did, i would not usejeremy corbyn. so that probably gives you the a nswer to so that probably gives you the answer to the question. if labour wa nted answer to the question. if labour wanted to change as leader, i would not have any great objections to that. i suppose i should caveat that by saying i should wait and see who they want to change it to. but i‘m not in charge of that decision, and that‘s the fact of the matter. we are part of a westminster system
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right now, scotland as part of a westminster system, if we want to make sure that scotland‘s interests are as protective as it is possible to have them in that westminster system, and it is a deeply flawed system, and it is a deeply flawed syste m fro m system, and it is a deeply flawed system from that perspective, then the snp has to be prepared to exercise its influence in that way. and i would far rather scotland wasn‘t having to just sit and hope we get the least worst option. that how it always seems to scotland in general elections. that‘s one of the many reasons i support independence, so we can get the government we choose, not the one that is foisted upon us. on that basis, we can co—operate with our friends in the uk, europe and in the world. it seems to me that is a far better future for scotland than continuing to be part of a broken westminster system. it might be helpful to me and you if the printjournalists
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could stand up if you wish to ask a question. not all at once!” could stand up if you wish to ask a question. not all at once! i wanted to ask, first minister, if your party was being misleading to voters when you put out leaflets in east dunbartonshire that a court ruled we re dunbartonshire that a court ruled were inaccurate and potentially defamatory? obviously, the lawyer who represented the campaign yesterday put forward the case. we respect thejudgment yesterday put forward the case. we respect the judgment of a court and will honour thatjudgment. respect the judgment of a court and will honour that judgment. beyond that, and in a more general sense, i would say this. jo swinson has a record she needs to be prepared to defend. and it‘s not a good record. on austerity, welfare, fracking, a host of other things. she seems a bit sensitive when it is raised. but it will continue to be raised because she cannot run away from it.
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applause the manifesto puts an independence referendum next year are front and centre when there is perhaps no polling evidence to show a majority of scots want an independence referendum next year. are you risking your alienating anyone other than die—hard independence supporters? no, there is increasing supporters? no, there is increasing support for independence, there is increasing support for an independence referendum on the timescale the snp has been proposing. i believe it is right to be straight with people and to say down one path that lies before us right now is a potentially catastrophic outcome for scotland.
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being taken out of the eu, being governed by borisjohnson with all that comes with that. i believe it is very important for scotland to get the opportunity to choose a different future to that and to choose what in my view is a better future. the point i would make to everybody in scotland, to those who support independence, to those who don‘t support independence and who we still seek to persuade and to some who i know will never support independence and for those who might be undecided, the point you‘re of unity i think is it should be for people in scotland to make that choice. so whatever scotland‘s future is going to be, it should be for the people of scotland to decide that. you should not be imposed upon us that. you should not be imposed upon us by boris johnson that. you should not be imposed upon us by borisjohnson of the westminster system. and if we don‘t ta ke westminster system. and if we don‘t take that future into our own hands, that‘s what‘s going to happen. we are going to have a future imposed upon us which is not one we want and is one which is going to damage this generation and those in the future.
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i think it is time to choose a better alternative to that. applause. first minister, your ma nifesto applause. first minister, your manifesto has tens of billions of pounds as the price to be paid for snp support to put labour into power. could you tell us what costings have been done to pay for this? we will give you figures on any of the policies you want figures for. let me be clear about our position here. other parties in this election, uk parties, are making commitments about increases in public spending. what we are doing asa public spending. what we are doing as a party that might hold the balance of power is setting up what we would expect some of the priorities for investment that we would seek to have. and we set that
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out in our manifesto. of course, we will scrutinise budget proposals that come forward and be guided by the principles that are absolutely the principles that are absolutely the core of this manifesto. income tax is already devolved to scotland, but the progressive approach we have taken to that would be the progressive approach we would expect to inform any tax changes the westminster parties were proposing. westminster parties were proposing. we would seek responsible but reasonable approach to borrowing and fiscal rules. we are proposing in here are much more rigorous approach to cracking down on tax evasion and tax avoidance, and of course we are putting forward proposals here that would lead to savings of substantial amounts of money. not renewing the trident nuclear system, for example, and instead ensuring that money could be spent on public services. so that is the position we are putting forward and i think that is
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a reasonable position. we saw the tories find money for the dup after the last election. i think by voting snp people in scotland can make sure that scotland gets treated fairly after this election. applause. i think i have time for a couple more. thank you. can you categorically rule out snp support forjeremy corbyn‘s oil and gas plans? rule out snp support forjeremy corbyn's oil and gas plans?” rule out snp support forjeremy corbyn's oil and gas plans? i am not attracted to that or in favour of it. the only caveat i would say is i have not seen any detail of it. it seems to me that that proposal would cost jobs seems to me that that proposal would costjobs in the north—east of
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scotla nd costjobs in the north—east of scotland in particular. i am absolutely committed to the transition away from fossil fuels. that transition is already under way in scotland. but we have got to ensure that is done fairly. i grew up ensure that is done fairly. i grew up in the west of scotland when i still saw the legacy of previous industrial transformations, when people were left behind and there was not a fair transition. we have got to make sure it is fair. i don‘t think from what i‘ve seen so far that this proposal does that and i believe what we are proposing in terms of the net zero fund and the net zero industrial strategy is a far better way to proceed. applause. on the timetable for independence, in 2014 you said the transition would take 18 months and it would all be wrapped up just would take 18 months and it would all be wrapped upjust in would take 18 months and it would all be wrapped up just in time for the next holyrood election. and that way, of course, you control the numbers in holyrood and could get
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your legislation through. if you have a referendum next year, you very quickly but up against the next holyrood election, perhaps only nine months away... we will continue watching this on the bbc news channel, but we say goodbye to our reviewers on bbc two. it gets quite tangled quite quickly. can you give me an exact timetable you would expect to get that done? in 2014, we had an 18 month transition in terms of the transfer of power to allow scotland to become independent. there were certain matters in the white paper we said would take longer than that to com plete would take longer than that to complete the transition. we will set that out fully. elections make life
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difficult. i am afraid they are a feature of our democracy and it is for politicians to ensure we respect that and we never shy away from people having a say on what it is we are putting forward for the future of our country. applause. your message on brexit is very clear. what do you say to the 1 million scots who voted leave?” have always said, i respect the vote of people who voted leave. i think the reasons that drove many people to vote leave and, obviously, some of them were directly related to the european union, some of them, and i am saying that based on many conversations i have had with leave voters, were due to frustration around austerity and the direction that westminster was taking our country. those issues have to be
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listened to and addressed but i would say two more things. as first minister, i cannot ignore the fact that a very clear majority of people in scotland voted to remain in the european union. i have a duty, i think, to reflect and represent that desire of people in scotland not to be taken out of the european union against our will. the second point i would make is that i have spoken to so many people who voted leave in the brexit referendum. i am not saying they have changed their mind on the basis in which they cast that vote, but they are as sick of the mess that brexit has become as those who voted to remain in the eu, because nobody who voted leave expected it to descend into the chaos that it has done. that was not inevitable and i have spoken to very many leave voters who, if they had the chance tomorrow, would probably vote differently to how they voted
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in 2016. but as first minister and leader of my party, i will always seek to listen to and respect how different people voted. the final point would be, whether people voted leave or remain in the brexit vote, nobody expected it to become the mess it has. and also, that fundamental point is that we should not, as a country, be having our future decided for us. whatever future decided for us. whatever future we have is a country should be one that we come together and decide ourselves. ok, i think, be one that we come together and decide ourselves. ok, ithink, with that, can i thank you all very much for your attendance? to the candidates, good luck on the campaign trail, i will see you all out there very soon. thank you very much. and that was the launch of the snp ma nifesto for and that was the launch of the snp manifesto for the general election. nicola sturgeon saying that the kind of country scotland wanted to be is
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on the ballot paper, and she said a vote for the snp was devoted to escape brexit and deprive boris johnson of his majority. she said the snp would never, ever put boris johnson into number ten, but she did talk about the snp‘s price, if you like, for backing another party, labour, in terms of forming a government in the event of a hung parliament. but the price for that, she said, would be the recognition that there could be no westminster veto over scotland determining its own future. she said to other political leaders, if you cannot support this most fundamental of democratic principles, then the snp cannot and will not support you. we hope to get some more reaction from glasgow, where that lunch was taking place, in the next few minutes. well, nicola sturgeon said a vote for the snp was a vote to escape
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brexit and put scotland‘s future in scotla nd brexit and put scotland‘s future in scotland was my hands. this election really, really matters. the future of scotland is only line. the opportunities for this and for future generations are at stake. we must not let brexit rob our children‘s future. that means the kind of country we want scotland to be is on the ballot paper. at the heart of it all, i ask people in scotla nd heart of it all, i ask people in scotland to consider this simple but fundamental question before you cast your vote. who should decide scotland‘s future? the people who live here or borisjohnson? if vote for the snp on december the 12th is a vote to escape brexit. it is a vote to put scotland‘s future in scotland‘s hands, and, crucially, it
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isa scotland‘s hands, and, crucially, it is a vote to deprive borisjohnson‘s conservative party of a majority. well, let‘s speak to steven from the snp. thank you very much forjoining us. i quoted something that nicola sturgeon said in that lunch, saying to other party leaders, if you cannot support the most fundamental of democratic principles, in other words the rate for scotland to determine its own future, then the snp cannot and will not support you. in any negotiations on a government being formed after the election, would the snp be demanding right upfront a pledge from that government, from, say, jeremy corbyn? because, obviously, the snp isn‘t going to work with boris johnson, that scotland could have a second independence referendum? well, absolutely. as you have seen from the manifesto today, we have rolled out a whole range of policies
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but, of course, we want to give people the right to decide their own future. the uk is at a crossroads. you have had people from all the political parties, and where we do agree as this is the most important general election that we have had for generations. we stand on the cost of a choice between scotland choosing a tone future and retaining that relationship with our european partners or going down the route of a dangerous and damaging boris johnson government. —— choosing its own future for the snp is best placed to the tories and was, has provided that opposition to the tories in the last parliament full stops, would it be an upfront guarantee of that referendum as opposed to talks one or two years into a new parliament about it? that is something that the snp would like to see. as we have said that, the snp believes that scotland should be an independent member state of the european union. we have never made any secret of that. we believe, as we have stayed in the
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ma nifesto believe, as we have stayed in the manifesto and before, scotland should have a choice on its future. that is so important right now, that we are able to choose. of course, thatis we are able to choose. of course, that is going to be at the heart of any discussion that we are having after the election. sorry, i amjust trying to get from you, if i may, sorry, would that be a red line for the party if a potential partner in government, the labour party, was not prepared to make that pledge right at the beginning of the parliament? first of all, i am not sure we have said we would go into government, but if you are in minority, and believe me there is no party more experienced in minority government in a parliament of minorities than the snp is, that will be upfront and something the snp want to deceive us along with things like scrapping trident, extending parental leave, ending austerity, fairness in pensions for the mostly women, of course it is going to be in there and a priority. —— fairness in pensions. i am sure your viewers will be shocked that
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the snp believes in independence for scotland. at this pivotal, pivotal moment, we should be given the choice and we are a bit tired of scotla nd choice and we are a bit tired of scotland saying we will let them do this or not that. the people of scotla nd this or not that. the people of scotland are speaking and saying they want a choice, they should be given that. one thing the snp has donein given that. one thing the snp has done in the past four and have your i have been in parliament is worked in the best interests of everyone in scotla nd in the best interests of everyone in scotland and we will campaign for an independence referendum but also on a range of issues for greater fairness. a fair pensions, scrapping trident and ending austerity and investing in our public services. would you want to go into government ina would you want to go into government in a coalition, or would that be at all is with your stated aim, your desire to have that second independence referendum?” desire to have that second independence referendum? i don't think... look, you do not lead, need to look at far away to see an example of a government that can govern in minority without following flat on its face and having to have snap elections all the time because it cannot pass any legislation. the
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scottish government, led by nicola sturgeon as first minister, has passed budgets, revenge of legislation because it has to deal with opposition parties. that means irresponsible government and irresponsible government and irresponsible opposition. as we have shown, i have passed legislation that i have co—signed with collea g u es that i have co—signed with colleagues in other political parties. other colleagues have campaigned on the rape close, showing that we can unilaterally revoke article 50. the snp has worked constructively with collea g u es worked constructively with colleagues from all parties and will continue to do that while we are at westminster. and are you sure, finally, that you have got it right with this focus on independence in the manifesto launch? that idea of a self—determined scotland ? the manifesto launch? that idea of a self—determined scotland? is that primarily what voters in scotland actually want? the snp wants to be straightforward. yes, we are for independence, we are for stopping brexit, we are for stopping austerity and bringing greater fairness, like to parental rights, something that many of us would have benefited from. we are going to campaignfor benefited from. we are going to campaign for those and seek to implement them. we are in favour of
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independence but also in favour of these progressive policies that we wa nted these progressive policies that we wanted to see implemented. it is interesting about how many of the westminster parties, labour and particular, are nicking ideas already implemented in scotland. we wa nt to already implemented in scotland. we want to see more fairness across the uk and will work with everybody who is interested in that and will work to block borisjohnson is interested in that and will work to block boris johnson from is interested in that and will work to block borisjohnson from number ten as well. 0k, ten as well. ok, stephen, thank you very much. but before that, labour leader jeremy corbyn says he has has obtained hundreds of unredacted documents confirming the nhs would be on the table in trade talks with the us after brexit. borisjohnson has repeatedly denied this. this morning, he described the fresh claim is total nonsense. our assistant political editor, norman smith, is in westminster. have you been able to see any of the detail on these documents yourself? here they are, i have been pouring
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through them but i will need a forklift truck to run around with these. there‘s an of detail. what they do tell us particularly is what they do tell us particularly is what the us side want. they are demands in any future trade talks. it is clear, yes, indeed, they do want access to to the nhs, the documents which are basically a summary of the outcome of six meetings over the past two years between us and uk trade officials reveal that on the us say they want total market access to the nhs stop the also want something called negative listing. what that means is that everything is upforgrabs, what that means is that everything is up for grabs, except those areas which are specifically ruled out. in other words, that gives a much greater access to nhs services and provision of drugs. they also want much longer patents for drugs, because, of course, the longer a drug is unrepentant, the more expensive it is, and they want looser price controls over nhs drugs. one example cited by mr corbyn was a drug for crohn‘s
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disease and rheumatoid arthritis. at the moment, it costs the nhs about £1400 per packet. if you paid for it the same price as they pay in the us, it would cost nearly £8,000 per packet. mr corbyn‘s charge was that these documents demonstrated that mr johnston‘s claimed that the nhs was not for sale was a life stopped —— that mrjohnson. 451 pages of unredacted documents and information. all of it here. he... his government released this. we have since obtained this, which is a very different version of events. perhaps he would like to explain why these documents confirm the us
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is demanding the nhs is on the table in the trade talks. these uncensored documents leave borisjohnson‘s denials in absolute tatters. now, what these documents do not show is whether uk officials have said yes, you can have access to the nhs! they detail what the americans are demanding, they do not prove that the british officials have given the thumbs up to any of this. you have to think of that, for any british prime minister to concede the sort of demands would be politically, i imagine, just about impossible. nevertheless, it is clear what the americans are demanding and, this morning, boris johnson, when pressed about it on a visit to cornwall, again denied that he was prepared to put the nhs on the table and any future trade talks. we are absolutely... there
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will be no sale of the nhs, no privatisation. the nhs is not on the table in anyway. not even patterns? in no aspect whatsoever. —— patents. this is continually brought up by the labour party as a diversionary tactic from the difficulties they are encountering, particularly over the problem about leadership on anti—semitism. the great vacuity about their policy on brexit. so, the denialfrom borisjohnson, the response from labour is to say that if the nhs is on the table and the answer is no to us negotiators, why do you need 540 pages to see no? our health editor, hugh pym, joins me now in the studio. we did know about some talks that had happened about the future of the
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nhs, trade talks, what is new in terms of the detail thatjeremy corbyn has been talking about today? labour invite has emphasised this issue before. it followed revelations by the channel 4 programme dispatches if you weeks ago that there had been six meetings between uk us officials, talking about the potential future trade deal that might follow and that drug pricing was involved in those talks. a source had told the programme that this implied the nhs. what labour have got hold of as the minutes of these meetings. they are very, very complex discussions, covering a whole range of issues right across the field of industry. intellectual property. but there are career do make clear references to the potential for discussions —— but there are clear references talk about total market access for us companies to uk service sectors, total market access employing health as well, and this idea of extending the patents so that a drug company
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could have exquisite access to its own drug for longer and charge more. the key issue at the heart of this is that american drug companies do not like, or most of them, do not like, on principle, the british system, where there are regulators, one in england, one in scotland, who could hold down the price of drugs and say this is all that we think is value for money for the prices these companies get is less in the uk than it is in the american health care system post they want that on the table. the implications in this document that that sort of thing is on the table but there is a firm denialfrom borisjohnson on the table but there is a firm denial from borisjohnson that they will be on the table. briefly, what happens next? do you think that boris johnson briefly, what happens next? do you think that borisjohnson is going to have to say more, give a much more detailed response than he hasjust now? these are talks about talks between officials, british officials reporting back to the actual trade talks, in earnest, will not begin until after brexit for that is the
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theory. so, then governments line up against each other and can set out their red lines. maybe the conservatives, though, need to be clearer about exactly what the status of these talks are compared with the actual real negotiations when they do begin. thank you very much. and you can find out what each party is promising to do on the issues that matter to you and, of course, a general election policy guide, which lets you easily compare each party and their policies. you can go online to check it out. or on the bbc news app. it is 12:17pm let‘s recap the headlines. nicola sturgeon has launched the snp manifesto, saying boris johnson has launched the snp manifesto, saying borisjohnson is unfit for office and that his proposed brexit deal would be a nightmare for scotland. the labour party say they have documents proving that the nhs is on the table in any future uk — us trade talks.
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and gary rhodes, the celebrity chef, has died aged 59. his family say he died yesterday with his beloved wife jenny by his side. sport now. afternoon! good afternoon. jose mourinho made it two wins out of two as a spurs manager when he watched his side qualify for the locate stage of the champions league stopped tottenham we re champions league stopped tottenham were 2— zyl del mag zero down before pulling one back. they then had to thank quick thinking ball boy. you consume at the bottom of the screen —— were 2—0 down. harry kane getting the final touch and the ball boy a huge thank you from jose mourinho! harry kane got his second and spurs‘ forth to seal that victory and becomes the quickest to reach 20 champions league goals.
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so, great night for spurs but forget harry kane, the real hero of the night had to be the ball boy. leakage is a very good ball boy. understands the game, reads the game. he is not therejust to look to the stands or to the scarves. does the kid. he is their living and playing the game very well. i wanted to invite him to the dressing room to invite him to the dressing room to celebrate i don‘t know where he is! but a very good ball boy, very good, really. meanwhile, manchester city but their place in the knockout stage for the seventh consecutive season, despite a disappointing 1—1 draw at home. they took the lead but their opponents hit back to earn themselves a point and at least give their 300 travelling fans memento for their 2000 milejourney back their 300 travelling fans memento for their 2000 mile journey back to ukraine. ben stokes has given his wholehearted support to joe root
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after the england captain‘s disappointing performance in the first test against new zealand. joe root made just 2—11 at the oval and has dropped out of the top ten of the test batting rankings for the first time since august 2014. several critics have suggested captaining the side has affected his batting. he has got the backing of everyone in the changing room that is most important thing to him as a captain and to us as players in general. the only thing that matters is the changing room vibe, relief is anything outside of that isjust noise. you know, he is england captain, he is england's bass player and he knows that and we have... he knows he has got the full support of others in the changing room a former australia player has upped his demands for compensation from rugby australia following his high—profile sacking last may. filao was sacked after making
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anti—gay remarks on social media. he argues that the termination of his contract is a case of religious discrimination. that is all your sport for life i will have more for you after 1:30pm. see you then‘s thank you very much. the celebrity chef gary rhodes has died in dubai at the age of 59. famous for his distinctive, spiked hairstyle and his love of british cuisine, gary rhodes was a regular on television, presenting programmes including masterchef. lets see a little bit of gary rhodes in action. if you are worried about those eight weights, why not just if you are worried about those eight weights, why notjust make some meringues? nothing wasted, really tasty. —— those eight weights. baked custard ta rt, let‘s tasty. —— those eight weights. baked custard tart, let‘s put him to one side, let‘s finish the dish. this is the moment i have been waiting for. we are going to take a lovely slice from this! now, of course, all we need is the extreme. here is another little tip, whenever you are putting a scream onto a flat plate and not
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able, just touch it with —— dusted with icing sugar, which is a nice garnish, but. you‘re a scream rolling all over the plate. there we are. “— rolling all over the plate. there we are. —— pure ice cream. well, in a statement, his family said they were "deeply saddened to announce the passing of a beloved husband, father and brother." there have been many people paying tribute to him.
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let‘s go live now to padstow in cornwall where we can speak to the chef paul ainsworth who trained under gary rhodes. paul, thank you very much for talking to us today for step you must be hugely shocked, as i think we all wear, when we saw this news this morning. absolutely. it is one of those things, you just cannot believe it. gary was a huge part of my life. that is where it all started for me, that was my first proper chef‘s job started for me, that was my first proper chef‘sjob in london, with gary. and what was he like to work with? tell us about what you learned from him. i was born in southampton. i trained at southampton college first my college lecturer was godfather to gary‘s children, and gary was opening a restaurant in london. i wasjust gary was opening a restaurant in london. i was just leaving gary was opening a restaurant in london. i wasjust leaving college but i had no money to kind of put a deposit down on a bedsit or anything
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in london, so gary put me up in the hotel where the restaurant was located for three months. he let me earn all of my wages until i had enough money to get my first kind of digs, if you like, in london. that just goes to show what kind of a man he was. and then when you worked for him, he was, for me, the first, you know, celebrity chef. when i first met him, i was actually quite overwhelmed by his hair! he was like the first famous person i ever met. when gary was filming, he was filming and you would not see him, but when he was in the kitchen, no matter what time i got there, if i was walking in at 6:30am, gary was there turning potatoes. he was first one and, last one out. what he taught me about cooking, leg, the tributes that have been paid, like what gordon ramsay said, he was the trip ryanair of what gordon ramsay said, he was the trip rya nair of british what gordon ramsay said, he was the trip ryanair of british gastronomy.
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where are we stand now on buying british, buying local, you know, ingredient— led cooking, nothing was ever on the plate that should not be there with gary. that is what i learned from him. he was the true master of simplicity. but behind—the—scenes comedy work that went into these dishes was phenomenal. and what seems so normal now, he was so far ahead of his time. and, as you say, the here! when i heard the news, i straightaway thought about the hair. i saw that image of the hair, the smile, and, in my mind, one of those first tv chefs, i think, in my mind, one of those first tv chefs, ithink, who in my mind, one of those first tv chefs, i think, who really made such a big impression on the wider public. lets talk more about his championing of british cuisine, because, at that point, perhaps that was not something that was particularly in fashion, was it? was not something that was particularly in fashion, was mm was not. we were very influenced, when i came into cooking, in this country, by french cuisine was when
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i worked for gary, he was about celebrating those dishes, like pies, fish and chips, treats like jaffa ca kes, fish and chips, treats like jaffa cakes, bourbon biscuits. he then made them his own for my fondest memory, still to this day, as a chef, there are certain things you taste as a chef that the levity forever, and i started working with gary and he had bred in putting on the menu traditionally, this is bread that is buttered, reasons and 999 bread that is buttered, reasons and egg mixture poured over and beat in the oven. gary treated it like a proper custard, so he made his own and very few chefs do that. lots of chef replicate and come up with dishes that they have been influenced by, but he was a real pioneer. he would invent things to stop this bread—and—butter pudding, had been there seven months and finally i got a taste of it and i had never tasted something that was... it wasjust... it blew had never tasted something that was... it was just... it blew my mind! and that is what i loved about him. it was the way that not only
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was he a pioneer in what he wanted to do for british cooking, it was the way that he came up with things, he invented things, he was my... the escoffier of my generation. the ultimate tribute to a chef from you they are, i think. paul, ultimate tribute to a chef from you they are, ithink. paul, thank ultimate tribute to a chef from you they are, i think. paul, thank you very much for your memories of gary rhodes. thank you. gary rhodes has died aged 59. the writer, director and broadcaster sirjonathan miller has died at the age of 85. a statement from his family says: "our father died this morning peacefully at home with his family around him following a long battle with alzheimer‘s." the statement goes on to say "his death is a great loss to our family and to his friends and will leave a huge hole in our lives." sirjonathan miller made his name as part of the cambridge footlights revue and the show beyond the fringe that launched the careers of peter cook, dudley moore and alan bennett. he went on to become a theatre and opera director,
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a writer and a presenter of a series of landmark bbc programmes. jonathan miller directing the opera, don pasquale, in florence. when you give him the soup, do it like... go, hello. he was one of the world's a great opera directors, and accomplished theatre director, television director, humorist, an artist, a sculptor, and all—round intellectual and elapsed medic. sorry to drag you away from the fun, old boy. war is not going very well, you know... his life changed in 1960 when the trainee doctor was directed tojoin the cast when the trainee doctor was directed to join the cast of beyond the fringe this topic ground satirical revue also starred alan bennett, peter cook and dudley murphy. we need a futile gesture at this
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stage... its success was immense. it transferred from edinburgh to london and then to new york. miller‘s medical career never recovered. goodbye, perkins, god, iwish i medical career never recovered. goodbye, perkins, god, i wish i was going to goodbye, sir... hold your tongue! i will not! was meant he moved into television, making films like the 60s ousted trip version of alice in wonderland. if you prick us, do we not bleed? soon, he was directing plays as well, including lawrence olivia less is a six year‘s shylock. —— mike laurence blood vessels, heart and in testing... he presented a medical series on
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television and said his training as a doctor helped his work with actors. i had been taught to look for the small details by means of which the doctor infers what might be wrong, little tiny details of how people carry themselves, how they talk. these negligible details which you are trained to keep your eye open for where absolutely all that the theatre was about. music. some of his operas stayed in the repertoire for decades. he claimed he was underappreciated in britain. i get asked much less to do things in britain now. some indeed thought him too clever by half. versatility made him a figure of fun. it did not stop him late in life learning how
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to make abstract sculptures out of metal. he was an egotist who could be devastatingly rude. really predictable. —— rarely. sirjonathan miller, who has died at the age of 85. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. another wet day, i am afraid. the weather will start to improve after the next 24 hours. rain for the north—west of scotland, some lengthy downpours working across southern wales and into southern counties of england. pretty wait for a time for london, with some heavy rain. temperatures, 10—13d. there is a
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risk of some further localised surface water flooding. the risk of some further localised surface waterflooding. the rain also becoming heavy and persistent over south—eastern parts of scotland, where we could see some problems overnight. still some summers for northern scotland, northern ireland, wales and south—west england. they will not be particularly problematic. tomorrow, still some rain around, thanks to this area of low pressure. we will get colder, drier and sunnier air working in over northern parts of the country. something we can all look forward to over the coming days. quite a lengthy dry spell on the horizon.
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hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: nicola sturgeon launches the scottish national party election manifesto, saying scotland‘s future is at stake,
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and borisjohnson is unfit for office. jeremy corbyn says he has documents showing the government has discussed offering the us access to the nhs in trade talks — a claim the prime minister denies. by by the way, if you are worried about those egg whites, why notjust make some meringues? gary rhodes, the spiky—haired celebrity chef, who champoined british cuisine, has died at the age of 59. the bodies of 16 vietnamese people who were found dead in a lorry trailer in the uk have arrived back in vietnam. blue story director rapman questions hidden reasons for banning the film, saying it could help stop gang violence. facebook could have a bigger impact on the way you vote in this general election, without you even realising it. there are a network of volunteer activists who use the site,
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with different views on the big issues and supporting different parties, but what they all have in common is that they are using their profiles and pages, often not using their real names, to influence how you think about politics and ultimately how you vote. some of these pages have millions of likes comments and shares. marianna spring is from bbc trending. she has been investigating who these unoffical facebook influencers are, and the sort of impact they are having. tell us about these unknown facebook influencers who are they? on your facebook feeds you might be seeing posts popping up from different official political party pages or pages run by campaign groups. you might also be a target for political ads. however, as well as that kind of content, you could be seeing posts from big facebook pages run by these facebook influencers — committed volunteer activists who are bypassing the mainstream media often because they think it
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doesn‘t represent people like them. working from their living rooms up and down the uk — lots based outside of london, they share election—related memes and news articles from their facebook pages and accumulative get millions of shares likes and comments. are these people officially linked to parties? they are not tied to any official parties or pages. we spoke to lots of these admins across the political spectrum. the people who run these pages don‘t like the mainstream media. they have often established their pages because they want to bypass it. they feel that they want to act as a news
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source that better represents those not being represented by the mainstream media. one woman in yorkshire says she believes she represents millions of leave voters outside of london whose voices are not heard. she posts means against labour. she tries to create a community. on the other side of the political spectrum, there is a big amount of anti brexit pages. one is almost a curator of news for those who follow her page. this is part of a bigger picture we are seeing about passive consumption of news. we like to log onto social media sites to get our news. people are more keen to give about more stories than hear about stories in depth. twitter
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screenshots are quick to read. people want someone to go through their twitter feed. the daily politic is a left—wing, pro—labour page. they did well back in 2017. you find it hard to maintain their strength since a recent algorithm change. we have a post here that shows stormzy encouraging people to vote. overall, we opt for us what people think, if you can take a slightly removed view of it. what do people think of these kinds of interventions, positive or negative? on one hand, social media has
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clearly empower these people to set up clearly empower these people to set up their own political news sites and to play a role in the election that they couldn‘t have done so ten yea rs that they couldn‘t have done so ten years ago. however, there are concerns that misleading or provocative content can be shared. there is a problem that people don‘t look at the other side of the argument or even know that it exists. thank you. the director of blue story, the new film about london gangs which has been banned by some cinemas after a mass brawl in birmingham, has said the violence in cinemas had nothing to do with the film. the vue chain has stopped showing blue story, because it says there have been incidents in 16 of their theatres. rapman, who also wrote the film, has questioned whether there are hidden reasons for the ban. vue insists its decision had nothing to do with race. our arts editor will gompertz has been speaking to the filmmaker. fictional trouble on the streets of
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london. real trouble on the streets of birmingham. the urban drama, blue story, has become a news story, after vue cinemas decided to pull it from all its screens for what they claimed was security reasons. a decision which has astonished the director. i was thinking, what is the reason? does the owner have an issue with the urban youth. is this a colour thing? you start going through all these things. it was an upsetting time. vue cinemas say the reason for pulling the movie was categorically not based on race. perhaps they are worried about gangs? the gangs this is about have
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been laughing together in the cinema, leaving connected, saying it was pointless but it is pretty good now. did you ever think, when you made the movie, it might be a lightning rod for trouble? not at all. i knew it would attract a lot of young people. the whole thing was to have the cinema filled up with 15—year—olds literally making the choice whether they should go down that route or the other route. i didn‘t think there would be people bringing out machetes for a film, of course not. as far as i am concerned, nobody pulled out a machete because of a film, anyway. vue cinemas said the 25 significant
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incidents all involve people attempting to watch blue story, so they pulled the film. how does it affect you, as a film—maker, that this film has been pulled?” affect you, as a film—maker, that this film has been pulled? i feel cheated. it is always an upwards hurdle, coming from my background. the last thing i thought was a cinema would ban us from every single site. what do you think the sort of decision says to the next rapman, trying to make the same journey you have made? it isjust telling them, it will be a hard journey, and when you get there, it will not get any easier. but we crack on. they take our legs, we crawl. we still come through at the box office. rapman talking to will gompertz. now with all the business
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news here is alice. in the business news... manchester city football club has broken the global record for a sports team vaulation. it comes as the parent company of premier league champions announced a £389 million investment from the us private equity firm silver lake. holding company city football group is worth £3.73 billion. the indian ride—sharing firm ola has begun signing up drivers in london ahead of plans to launch services in the capital "in the coming weeks". it comes days after rival uber was denied a new licence to operate in london after repeated safety failures. ola was granted a licence from transport for london earlier this year. victoria beckham‘s eponymous fashion business has posted another annual loss as demand for the former spice girl‘s high end clothes "plateaued". the label, which has not made a profit since it launched in 2008, reported a loss of £12.3 million for 2018. sales slipped 16% to £35 million,
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amid weaker wholesale demand. the office for national statistics has published its latest working and workless households in the uk report. it looks at the period ofjuly to september 2019 and the economic status of households in the uk and the people living in them, where at least one person is aged 16 to 64 years. laura gardiner, the research director at resolution foundationjoins us now. the headline i suppose is the number... the proportion of working horse —— households continues to rise every year. that's right. this is further confirmation of a long—term trend in the british labour market. fewer than one in seven working age households now has no one in work, whereas back in the
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19905, no one in work, whereas back in the 1990s, more than one in five working age households were workless. this has been a pretty steady downward trend, bar a little blip after the financial crisis. it‘s a welcome development and it‘s come from a mix of concerted policy action and the uk's of concerted policy action and the uk‘s remarkable jobs boom. of concerted policy action and the uk's remarkable jobs boom. do we know the proportion of households whereby one or more members of it are in full—time or part—time employment? we know lots of these working households, nearly a third, are mixed. we have one person and work, rather than two. are mixed. we have one person and work, ratherthan two. i are mixed. we have one person and work, rather than two. i think that‘s really important because the flip side of following household worklessness has unfortunately been rising in work poverty in britain. jewel learning, both members of a couple earning, is looking to be the
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surest way to avoid in work poverty. if yesterday‘s problem was tackling household worklessness, the problem now is tackling female employment and a lack of progression. how does the data carve up geographically? i haven‘t gotten into those weeds today. if we look at the really strong jobs boom of recent years, the fastest jobs growth strong jobs boom of recent years, the fastestjobs growth has been in the fastestjobs growth has been in the regions that started out with the regions that started out with the lowest employment rates. there are big gaps around the country. we
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have fewer unemployment blackspots, if you like, than we did 20 years ago. fewer gaps in terms of the numbers of jobs. ago. fewer gaps in terms of the numbers ofjobs. thank you for interpreting the data for us. november shop prices fell for the sixth consecutive month. according to the british retail consortium, the decline was driven, in part, by an easing of inflation for fresh food due to a strong crop yield for fresh fruits in the uk, and a fall in the global price of dairy. non—food prices also fell well below the 12—month average. kyle monk, is the head of retail insights and analytics at the brc. hejoins us now. i mention some factors. what else would you say feeds into this continuation of decline in shop prices. the overall headline figure is down. food price inflation has
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eased. non—food seems to be dragging on overall retail inflation. we have seen an particular clothing and fashion has had a long—term decline, which is contributing to that. it‘s important to note that black friday this year is following a week later, so that has not factored into the novemberfigures. black so that has not factored into the november figures. black friday is an important part of the golden quarter which retailers are counting on after a difficult year of trade, to get back in the black. we are yet to know the impact of black friday. consumers will welcome this drop in shop prices ahead of christmas. there are a number of factors which could push prices up in the near future. we need certainty from government. a cohesive trade deal will see food prices go up by as
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much as 30%, should a sufficient deal not be achieved. and this price reduction we have seen over the past six months, it refers to both food and non—food items in the shops? six months, it refers to both food and non-food items in the shops? so, food we have seen her sing consistent growth of the last 12 months. it is non—food where we have seen the more substantial decline. over the christmas period, retailers will be competing and we will see decreases in prices continue through the festival period. good to talk to you. that‘s all the business news. thank you. the british beauty council is calling for an independent body to be set up to investigate claims of bullying and unfair dismissal in the industry, which does not have a trade union. it comes after the bbc‘s victoria derbyshire programme uncovered cases of bullying
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across all levels of the industry. ellie costello reports. the beauty industry is big business. it contributed £14.2 billion to the uk economy last year, overtaking motor manufacturing and publishing. but the bbc has learnit allegations of abuse and bullying rife within the industry. i‘ve spoken with more than 20 people who work in the british beauty industry who claim to be victims of bullying. most of them say they are too afraid to go on record. they stem from director director level of companies to make up they stem from director level of companies to make up artist on the shop floors of department stores. i‘ve heard accusations of abuse, blackmail and psychological bullying. many of the people we spoke to were made to sign a nondisclosure agreement, often in exchange for a pay—out when they left theirjobs. it means it‘s difficult for victims to speak out about their experience.
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one of those people is nicole, but she says she wants her story to be told. she was an exec of a top beauty brand we would all be familiar with. nicole says after coming back from having a baby, she was told that she should leave. we‘ve changed her name and an actress is saying her words. i was in floods of tears and sick to my stomach and i really couldn‘t get out of bed. i was absent as a parent. i basically believed everything they told me. i believed i was a bad person. i was diagnosed with depression, stress and burn—out. i spent time in a facility. zak is a freelance make—up artist. he loves his job now but he hasn‘t always found it easy. being a guy in the make up
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industry kind of goes against what women think you can do, which is sad. there's a lot of times where it was, are you sure you want him to do your make—up? he's a guy, he won't know how to do your make up. you talk about fitting a mould and if you don‘t, you are out. yeah, my friend, we would work at this boutique and they asked her to not work on the front desk because they thought she was too ugly and too fat because she would stop people coming in. while it has no union, the british beauty council represents the voices, opinions and needs of the british beauty industry. we took our findings to them. it's heartbreaking actually, to think that an industry we are really trying to pull together is so at each other's throats. i think there needs to be some sort of ombudsman or industry body set up to make sure there's a place... safe place for people to go.
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the department of business said through the equalities act, employees are already protected against harassment in the workplace and they can always seekjustice at employment tribunals. ellie costello, bbc news. families who have lost children to gun and knife crime are using music to help cope with their loss. they‘ve been asked to come together as part of a new group called project ceasefire. graham satchell has been finding out more. it seems to be happening all the time. this doesn't have an age, this doesn't have a gender, and this doesn't have a location. it's happening to anyone and everyone. # we need a ceasefire...
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singer—songwriter cecil‘s track ceasefire has been written with the help of families who have lost loved ones to knife crime. the families have come together to form a group called project ceasefire. their aim is to speak with one voice and to help each other. and what i am trying to do is bring everybody together. it's so much better to be around people who have gone through the same thing. a recording studio in east london, cecil is meeting two of the group. ricky webb, whose brother wasjust 15 when he was killed in manchester, and pete chesney, whose daughter jodie was stabbed in the back in march this year. the impact of my daughter‘s death has been catastrophic. i will never be the same. my family will never be the same. it is impossible to understand the pain that something like that causes, unless you have experienced it, and that‘s why it‘s really good to talk to other parents that are going through the same thing. for me, it hit me very hard. i felt like i didn‘t know what to do with myself any more.
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it was just hard. my family, my mum, everyone was just broken. it was just... it was hard, it was really hard. thrown down from the sky like a lightning bolt... office for national statistics figures show knife crime in england and wales is an eight—year high. last week, a 19—year—old man was sentenced to 26 years in jail for the murder of pete‘s daughter. like the rest of the group, pete has been forced to think about the causes of knife crime, and the potential solutions. it‘s probable that the cuts to police officers on the street is not exactly helping, is it? if there are more police
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officers on the streets, then obviously this would be less... it would happen less, wouldn‘t it? i mean, that‘s an obvious thing. i think nowadays, for the young people, it's all about building yourself a name. like, you want to be the biggest person and the baddest person, but i don't get it. it doesn't really make sense. just — life is a gift. that's how i see it. life is a gift. you should just use it wisely. that's how i see things. next it‘s the bbc news at one witj jane hill. but first it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. more wet weather on the way. the most persistent rain is working into eastern england, some lengthy downpours for wales and southern
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counties of england. we have some rain across the far north—west of scotla nd rain across the far north—west of scotland today. not raining everywhere. we have some drier weather through the central belt of scotland. occasional bright spells coming through. temperatures for most of us this afternoon, 10—13d. going through the afternoon and into the night time, this area of rain will be very persistent over a good chunk of yorkshire, lincolnshire, into northumberland as well. we can see localised flooding. for the rest of us, there will be some and going. the area of low pressure bringing the rain begins to move away into the rain begins to move away into the continent on thursday, tomorrow. as it does so, we start to get these northerly winds brought in behind us weather front. for thursday,
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northerly winds brought in behind us weatherfront. forthursday, it is northerly winds brought in behind us weatherfront. for thursday, it is a cloudy start to the day. many of us will see further outbreaks of rain. heaviest and most persistent across northern england. moving into the midlands and east anglia in the afternoon. the south stays cloudy with some patches of rain around. further north, as the sunshine comes out, the temperatures go down. a chilly afternoon in edinburgh. highs of just chilly afternoon in edinburgh. highs ofjust 6 degrees. as the cleaner skies push in more widely, through thursday night, it will be a cold and frosty night. a frosty start to friday. for many of us, dry with plenty of sunshine. perhaps the odd patch of clouds and light rain for eastern england. for most of us, more sunny but cold. we are coming to the end of november, but this is the first big area of high pressure we have seen all month. it brings a big change in our weatherfortunes.
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finally, we are looking at several days of dry weather. that could be some rain for a time in the south on saturday.
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saying it‘s time to put scotland‘s future in scotland‘s hands and calling for a second independence referendum next year. nicola sturgeon warns that the uk may still leave europe without a deal — and that there‘s brexit—related chaos to come. who should decide scotland‘s future? the people who live here or boris johnson? a vote for the snp on december 12th is a vote to escape brexit. we‘re live in glasgow injust a moment. the other headlines this lunchtime... the labour leader produces documents which he claims shows the government has discussed offering the united states access
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to the nhs after brexit.

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