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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 12, 2019 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: polls open in an hourfor the uk's third general election in less than five years, and the first in decemberfor almost a century. the convicted killer who tried to fight off the london bridge attacker with a fire extinguisher speaks for the first time about what happened. there has been a big increase in the number of people getting their milk delivered. i have joined number of people getting their milk delivered. i havejoined around in manchester to deliver a couple of clients and find out why. jose mourinho says tottenahm will be a team to be feared in the knockout
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stages of the champions league. that is despite losing to bayern munich in theirfinal group game. good morning. we've got cloud and rain spilling in from the south—west. it's moving north and eastward through the course of the day, possibly leaving some snow on the hills. it's going to be a blustery day, but the wind will strengthen from the south—west later. i will have more in 15. # silent night... christmas comes early for terrence, the age uk volunteer who won't be home alone for the first time in 20 years. it is thursday 12 december. our top story: after six weeks of campaigning, polls are about to open across the country for voting in the general election. it is the third ballot in less than five years, and the first to be held in december in nearly a century. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster for us this morning. jonathan, talk us through the day ahead.
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good morning, yes, decision day has arrived. the time for politicians to do the talking is over and it is time now for voters to deliver their verdict. injust time now for voters to deliver their verdict. in just under an time now for voters to deliver their verdict. injust under an hour, as you say, at 7am this morning, voting will begin in 650 constituencies across the uk. so, as you head out this morning, you will see those familiar black—and—white signs indicating polling stations at schools, community centres and many other buildings besides. people will have until 10am tonight to cast their vote, putting a cross next to their vote, putting a cross next to the name of their candidate and the party representing them at westminster. many people will have already voted by post and if your postal ballot is still sitting by the front door in that envelope you can hand it in at your local polling station at any time before the polls closed tonight. if you are staying up closed tonight. if you are staying up to watch the drama unfold, the first results should be in before midnight, and then many more as the
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night goes on, and by this time tomorrow, we should have a relatively clear idea of what sort of result this unusual election has delivered. jonathan, thank you very much. results coverage starts as polls close tonight. huw edwards and the team will be here on bbc one and the bbc news channel from 9:55pm tonight. there will be special coverage on bbc radio 4 and 5 live, and of course, there is full coverage online at bbc.co.uk/news and on the bbc news app. the convicted killer who fought the london bridge attacker with a fire extinguisher, john crilly, has told the bbc that he was prepared to die to protect others. mr crilly, a friend ofjack merritt, one of the two cambridge graduates killed in the attack, has been speaking exclusively to our legal correspondent clive coleman. nearly two weeks ago, ex— offender john crilly found himself at the centre of mayhem and butchery at a prison education event at fishmonger
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‘s hall where his good friend jack merritt was murdered. just like a very high—pitched wail, like a scream. john saw a woman sprawled on the stairs, bleeding, then usman khan, two knives out, wearing what looked like a suicide belt. he joined him with a fire extinguisher, shouting at usman khan not to blow his belt. he said to wait for the police. i was prepared to probably lose my life, yes. i was. with others using makeshift weapons, john pursued khan onto the street, spraying him with the extinguisher. within minutes, police arrived. john shouting at them to shoot khan because of the belt. they did. john's thoughts then turned to his friend, jack merritt, the cambridge graduate who saved his life and who
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along with saskia jones had been murdered by khan. can you tell me what he meant to you? john just basically hope. do you think of yourself as a hero? a hero? no. jack gave up his life. he is... he would be my hero. john crilly talking to our legal correspondence clive coleman. —— correspondent. police in new zealand say they are finalising plans to recover the bodies of those killed by a volcanic eruption on white island on monday. at least eight people are known to have died and another nine are missing, presumed dead. the salvage operation has been hampered by ongoing volcanic activity on the island.
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lawyers for the hollywood producer harvey weinstein say he has reached a $25 million settlement with dozens of women who have accused him of sexual misconduct. the money will be shared among more than 30 former employees and actors. he still faces criminal charges and is set to stand trial in january. he has pleaded not guilty and denies any wrongdoing. tributes have been paid to the naturalist and broadcaster david bellamy, who has died at the age of 86. he presented a series of nature programmes in the ‘70s and ‘80s, and was a campaigner for conservation. our arts correspondent david sillito looks back at his career. there's nothing like a good drying day to put spring back into your polyester. david bellamy — for more than 30 years, he was the enthusiastic face of botany on television. he had failed his exams at school, but a job in a lab fostered a love of science, and a few years later he was a lecturer at durham university, specialising in marine biology. it was that which lead to the interview when the torrey oil
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tanker ran aground ini967, releasing thousands of tons of oil into the sea. all of a sudden, a very large stretch of coast was going to be changed. the whiskers, his voice and his easy—to—understand style led to his celebrity. i think ithinki i think i was interviewed byjohn craven in the very early days on a sewer pipe in redcar, and i think that made me. ino the late 19905 he was linked to hundreds of conservation and wildlife organisations. but when he declared climate change to be "poppycock", invitations began to dry up. but the conservation foundation he set up in 1982 has issued a statement describing him as a friend, a teacher, and a larger—than—life character, who inspired people with his knowledge and enthusiasm. and that's where all the action is. a painting worth around £50 million may have been found inside the wall of the gallery from where it disappeared. portrait of a lady by the austrian artist gustav klimt went missing from a gallery in northern italy in 1997. now, tests are being carried out on a painting which was found in a secret compartment
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inside the gallery wall, discovered by a gardener as he cut back ivy. may be someone decided to stash it away rather than it going missing. good morning, sally. sorry, com pletely good morning, sally. sorry, completely confused by that last story. is that the art gallery equivalent of just shoving story. is that the art gallery equivalent ofjust shoving something in your loft? it is like one of those secret notes, you know at school when there is a little brick missing in the building and you all stash notes in there? people do that with wallpaper, as well. you put something behind the wallpaper, a message for the next person. it is a similar kind of thing. message for the next person. it is a similar kind of thinglj message for the next person. it is a similar kind of thing. i hope it is a nice message. i would put help, i've been kidnapped.
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a nice message. i would put help, i've been kidnappedlj a nice message. i would put help, i've been kidnapped. i will give you a nice message, a positive message from jose mourinho this morning, never under confident. jose mourinho has been pretty bold about tottenham's chances of going deep in the champions league this season. he says spurs will be a team to be feared in the last 16. that is depsite losing 3—1 to bayern munich in theirfinal group game last night. they had already qualified for the knockout stages, butjose reckons they will be much better when he has had more time to work with them. manchester city rounded off their group games with a thumping 4—1 win over dinamo zagreb. gabrieljesus got himself a hat—trick. they will now be one of the seeded teams in the knockout stages. it looks like steven gerrard is going to extend his stay as rangers manager. he has been a huge success in scotland since joining them in may last year, and says it will be a pretty simple decision to sign the new deal that he has been offered. and it was yet another strange evening in the life of ronnie 0'sullivan. here he is refusing to shake the hand of his opponent and the referee at the scottish 0pen, choosing to fist—pump instaead. he said it is because he is
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a bit 0cd with germs. i understand that. has that not arisen before? not that i am aware, but more bizarrely, in the end he did actually shake james cahill‘s hand. but the refereejust did actually shake james cahill‘s hand. but the referee just got a fist bump. doesn't the referee where a glove? —— where a —— wear a glove. i understand that. it is all about the hygiene. but you couldjust i understand that. it is all about the hygiene. but you could just have some antibacterial gel. every time i have said hello to you, sally! we're almost halfway through december, which means the christmas party season and hangover season is in full swing. 0ne firm has come up with a solution — hangover days for employees who have over—indulged,
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giving them the chance to work from home. we went out to ask what workers thought of the idea. the idea of a hangover is a good idea, because people already take days off for hangovers anyway. they just don't tell their employer. some countries, companies have dvds, which i actually think that's a idea, because it means that people who don't drink, as well, can benefit from looking over their own well— being —— duvet benefit from looking over their own well—being —— duvet days. benefit from looking over their own well-being -- duvet days. why would you need a hangover day? just take a normal holiday if you think you are going to go out and get leathered, a little bit of maturity about the whole thing, and just back to that ina half whole thing, and just back to that in a half day. i would love a hangover day, but i think you can just soldier through it, really.
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'tis the season, christmas.” just soldier through it, really. 'tis the season, christmas. i do think it's useful for students to go out drinking, or work, think it's useful for students to go out drinking, orwork, or uni, but i am still not productive, so sometimes it's better for us to stay home. however that go down, charlie? you could ring up tomorrow morning, sorry, hung over. can i have today at home? the floor in the whole thing in this working environment, it is just not going to work any practical sense —— flaw. we would like to hear your views on this. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and you can tweet about today's stories using the hashtag #bbcbreakfast. but if you are hung over, you won't be up, it is 6:12am. never at work with a hangover, i promise you, good morning, carol. it is a cold start to the day for some of us. it is
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also a frosty one. you may find you have to scrape your car windscreen before you head out. we have rain coming in from the west moving eastwards as we go through the course of the day, so temperatures in the west are not quite as low. 0vernight we have had this transient ridge of high pressure across us, clear skies, hence the drop in temperatures. some of us will start off with some sunshine. but an array off with some sunshine. but an array of fronts coming in from the west bringing in rain and a fairfew showers across parts of scotland through the course of the night, so the met office has a nice warning out, which is valid until 10am, and of course it is ice on untreated surfaces, so take it steady if you arejust heading out surfaces, so take it steady if you are just heading out on the roads on the pavements. you can see the showers we have had in scotland, some of them falling as snow in the hills in the rain coming across northern ireland, england and also wales. today is going to be a blustery day. later on the winds will strengthen in the south—west. but to start with, frosty, bright, the cloud builds coming in from the west ahead of this system, which will bring in some rain and some hills no. we've got hill snow overnight across for example the
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hills in wales, we could see some in northern england. but if we see some heavy bus coming out of this rain, well, we could see even some snow at lower levels in the north of england. we don't expect it to settle, and it will be transient. temperature—wise, still on the nippy side if you are heading out in any central and eastern areas, where is out towards the west we are looking at eight, nine, ten or 11. out towards the west we are looking at eight, nine, ten or11. now, as we head onto the evening and overnight, the wind will strengthen across southern parts of wales, the south—western approaches, the english channel, and also the channel islands, potentially touching gale force. 0vernight, also, we lose the rain from england. but it starts to sweep back in towards the east of scotland and we also have a fair few showers coming oui’ also have a fair few showers coming our way as well. so tomorrow we start off again on a windy note. the strongest winds virtually where they we re strongest winds virtually where they were overnight, south wales, the south—west, the english channel and the channel islands. again the risk of gales. a lot of dry weather around tomorrow, still some rain getting across the north—east of scotland, still a fair few showers
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and still feeling on the nippy side. but then, you expected. it is december after all. temperatures of five to about seven in the south—west, a little bit higher, possible seven to 11. low pressure very much the driving force to the north—east on saturday but we have this system scooting across southern areas with its fronts. 0ne this system scooting across southern areas with its fronts. one look at the isobars will tell you it will be windy through this weekend stop so windy, we have some showers in the north, showers and northern ireland, showers moving across parts of england and wales, with some hill snow as well. and then it looks like we could see something else coming away later on saturday into the south—west of england. still a little bit of uncertainty to just how far north that is going to get, but what i can tell you this weekend is it is going to stay chilly. there will be some sunshine around, with some showers as well, but it will often be windy, especially so in the south. let's take a look at today's papers.
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we'll stay away from the front pages and go straight inside. what have you got? of course we do, i forgot! back page of the times, var, don't know how you think about it, video assistant referee, it's been hugely controversial. i'm a big fan of it. not everybody is. in principle, it's a great idea, but the times has a great line saying the fa will step in to sort out var armpit offside chaos, situations, and it has happened, where a player's armpit has been declared offside, ahead of the last defender, and a goal has not been given. it has happened in controversial circumstances this season. roberto firmino's goal was the most controversial against aston villa. i don't know if the camera can pick this up, his armpit was adjudged ahead of the last defender. that's fair enough, isn't it? yellow it is so marginal. that's why you
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haveitin it is so marginal. that's why you have it in the first place? they have it in the first place? they have said they will use it for the clear and obvious decisions, instead of the tiny marginal decisions that ta ke of the tiny marginal decisions that take a while, they will use it for the big decisions. i'm with you, it should come down to common sense. the idea of var is there is a human being who looks at it and says, yes, that either you aren't, aren't you? you can't be a little bit offside or not really enough. it has to be black or white, where do you go? an armpit... an ankle? that's what they're doing, and for fans armpit... an ankle? that's what they're doing, and forfans in the ground, it's becoming really frustrating. in some sports, though, it becomes a moment of drama. thing of tennis, it is a moment where eve ryo ne of tennis, it is a moment where everyone gets drawn in and the picture comes down —— think of. everyone gets drawn in and the picture comes down -- think of. you are all part of it in tennis, they do it well. in football, the fans seemed detached and one step away
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from what is happening and even the referee has the power taken away from him at times and that feels wrong. a real can of worms and they have to try to sort it out. people's birthdays, i have picked up on this, bill nighy‘s, he is 70 years old. and lionel blair, who of course famously is a song and dance man, is 91 today! wow! i never thought he was that... a great age... john barrowman is in later, he ploughs a similar path as an entertainer, a showman. he's not 91! nowhere near 91! did you ever used to do that thing where you tapped a can to stop it from being too busy? no. when you had a can of coca—cola or something like that or a beer, you tap it to stop it being busy. —— fizzy.
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like that or a beer, you tap it to stop it being busy. -- fizzy. did it work? white apparently, for everyone that drinks stuff out of a can, there was this theory that if you flicked it it dislodged the bubbles stuck to it. it doesn't work. scientists have tried it on more than 1000 cans and those tapped lost about the same amount as those that did not get tapped. in california scientists have been looking at the strength of hair, and they are dealing with an issue on the face of it... you would think thick hair is strong with an thin hair, right? go to the university of california, they have a machine that has been busy pulling hair to find out whether thick hair is stronger than thin hairand low whether thick hair is stronger than thin hair and low and behold it turns out professor robert ritchie gives us an explanation frankly i don't understand, but what they determined was that wasn't true. it says, "this is actually a statistical thing which is a bigger piece will have a greater possibility of having a defect".
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bigger things have more possibility of defects. a weakness. can i put the theory you have for your hair? go on! we haven't heard about charlie's hair enough. it is magnificent, amazing everyday! you have a theory that you could pull a truck with your hair. he does! you have put it out there now... the truth is... a lego truck! the truth isi truth is... a lego truck! the truth is i have long thought that would be something that could quite easily happen! i have long thought that! have you not heard this theory before? it hasn't been tested scientifically, but it is just a thing that i think is possible!” think they should have got you in that experiment. if we canjust... if someone can think of the device that we could use to attach to charlie's head, butjust the hair, thinks it is strong enough to pull a
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truck! we don't have to deal with that immediately! maybe something for the forthcoming future! maybe next week! thanks, sally, that was the sport and we will have the weather later. the time is 6:20am. surgeons in new zealand have been working around the clock to help those injured in the volcano eruption on white island earlier this week. in the first 2a hours, specialists dealt with a workload they would normally deal with in a year. we'rejoined now by william pike, who survived a volcanic eruption in new zealand in 2007. william, thank you very much your time this morning. first of all, can you tell us a little bit about your experience. what happens to you? sure, i went mountaineering with my good friend back into thousand seven and we climbed up a very popular mountain and ski field and we overnighted in a small shelter near the top of the mountain, which was very close to the crater lake.
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there was no signs of eruption or anything like that and we were cleared to be up there and in the middle of the evening, unexpectedly the mountain erupted and it spewed 1.5 million cubic metres of mud, rock and water and it threw us up into the airand rock and water and it threw us up into the air and it crashed onto our building. i heard commotion outside, i suppose you could say, and went to the door and looked outside and i could see the debris raining down. it burst into the hut, crushed my legs and i could feel my bones breaking and crunching. it was absolutely horrific. william, you we re absolutely horrific. william, you were severely injured. what's been the long—term injuries you suffered? as the rocks and mud and water came bursting into the hut, my right leg, and my left leg in particular, was badly crushed and broken and as a result i later had my leg amputated below the knee. i also suffered from kidney failure due to the crush injuries and i had a body
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temperature of 25 due to hypothermia. it was a really intense situation. we are hearing from the medics involved in treating those affected about some very, very severe burns of those people who did survive. is that something you experienced as well alongside the damage to your legs and those problems? i would say very minor sulphur burns from the sulphur coming out of the volcano. there was no steam coming out of the mountain, so that was the key difference between the eruption i was in and the survivors on white island. big difference there. i'm thinking when you saw this story, possibly you must have been taken back to the moments that you lived through? absolutely. my heart really did sing and of course my first thoughts went straight to the victims and their families and my deepest sympathies
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to them. it's incredibly traumatic, not only for the patient but for the friends and family close by. where you are where where you were at that time of the risks? clearly being near a volcano in that situation, there is a risk involved. there is, absolutely. what people don't understand, especially outside new zealand, is new zealand is a very volca nically zealand, is new zealand is a very volcanically active island. we have the national park with the world—famous the national park with the world —famous crossing, the the national park with the world—famous crossing, the alpine crossing, and you get thousands of people walking through that everyday and right next door to that is a mountain with thousands of people, and there is rotorua, that is active, and it is rare volcanoes erupt and normally it is called a blue sky eruption, no—one can predict it, and that's what happened in my case and on white island. you talked about the physical
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injuries and the burns of the people that have been burned so badly in this incident. i'm sure there are also psychological scars? absolutely. the physical injuries are equivalent to the mental injuries i suppose. when i did wake up injuries i suppose. when i did wake up in hospital after being upset and frustrated, i realised i had come to a fork frustrated, i realised i had come to afork in frustrated, i realised i had come to a fork in the road and one road was the easy option, and that was to go home and sit on the couch, and a ha rd home and sit on the couch, and a hard option was to chase the life adventure i wanted so much. i really chose that life of adventure that i'm so passionate about, and it's been a really long road to get back... to get my life back on track. i was really lucky to have my friends and family as a support mechanism, and if! friends and family as a support mechanism, and if i could offer one bit of advice to those victims involved, really put your hand up and asked for help when you need it, and asked for help when you need it, and for the friends and family to
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really rally round and give as much support as possible because that support as possible because that support was essential to my road to recovery. william, thank you for taking us through your story. william pike, who was caught up in a volcanic eruption into thousand seven. we will speak to a consultant in plastic surgery and burns later to talk about how people will be recovering. you heard william's story there. you're watching breakfast. thanks forjoining us this morning. we are going to bring you something delightful. that is notjohn maguire, a little hedgehog withjohn maguire, a little hedgehog withjohn maguire in gloucestershire this morning and he's looking at technology. also citizen science to tackle falling hedgehog populations. i take it you're not holding the hedgehog, or are you? good morning, naga. it's not me, partly because this one only came in last night. two came in last night and it is a bumper year at the wild hogs rescue
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centre in gloucestershire partly because it has been such a mild winter that the hedgehogs haven't hibernated, and also they have had their young late in the season and sometimes a second letter. this one came in last night, joe, how much did he weigh? 356 g. to give you an idea, a small one, a hoggart, will be about 200 g, maybe the same as an apple and when they are ready to be released, something like 750— 800 g, almost a bag of sugar, a rockmelon, and we will show you some later that are larger. this boy or girl, we're not sure yet? no, we're not. they will need to double in weight before they are released into the wild. if it is mild in a couple of months, or maybe wait until the spring. we will show you around the amazing hospital, smallest hospital i have ever been in, but the patients are
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tiny, later on in the programme. this is the icu, where the hobbits come in when they are small and vulnerable and then they go next door where they are kept warm, said an fattened up ready to be released. that's after the news, travel and whether where you are watching this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. polling stations will open across the capital within the next half an hour. it means some schools will be closed with pupils having an extra day off. for some parents that's meant having to find childcare at short notice. some christmas events, like concerts and nativities, have had to be rearranged. my my mum and dad were supposed to come for the evening performance, but as it got changed at the last minute, they couldn't work anything out so they couldn't work anything out so they couldn't work anything out so they couldn't come. it's a little bit annoying that my kids have to be offjust sprung on
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me,| kids have to be offjust sprung on me, i had quite a lot of plans. the body which represents doctors is warning homeless people are in desperate need of better support. new research found hospitals seen a three—fold increase in the number of patients with no fixed abode over the past eight years. figures fromt the bma revealed there were more than 36,000 a&e visits in england by homeless people last year, with almost a third of those in the capital. for decades it was rumoured parakeets were introduced to london byjimi hendrix or during a humphrey bogart film, but those urban myths may have been disproved by experts. scientists have now mapped sightings of the birds over the last 50 years and found no evidence to support the theories. it's thought an outbreak of fatal parrot fever may have encouraged owners to release them in the 1920s and '505. let's take a look at the travel situation now. lots of problems on the tube this morning. the circle line has severe delays. similar problems on the hammersmith and city line eastbound following a signal failure at hammersmith. there are minor delays on the northern line
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between camden town and edgware due to overrunning engineering work. in to overrunning engineering work. fact, the delays ( line in fact, the delays on the northern line have cleared up. great western railway are running replacement buses between bourne end and marlow following a signalling problem. 0n the roads, traffic is building on the a13 from dagenham into barking. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. its a chilly start to the day and there's a touch of frost out there for most spots too with temperatures hovering around freezing. not the greatest day of weather, it's set to turn wet and windy for match of the day but they will be a bit of early brightness out towards eastern areas first thing and then the cloud will start to thicken from the west. a band of rain pushing from the west as we head into the afternoon, some of it possibly quite heavy at times and it will be raining for much of the day and also strong gusts of wind around. temperatures not up to
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much, peaking between seven and nine through the afternoon. still raining for much of the first part of the evening rush—hour with the band of rain clearing east followed by showers through the evening and overnight. it's staying windy overnight. it's staying windy overnight and into tomorrow morning but it will feel a touch milder tomorrow with temperatures tween 3—5 celsius to start the day. lots of dry weather around tomorrow, quite a bit of. staying rather windy, remaining blustery over the weekend but again, mostly dry. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now it's back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. it's 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. our top story: after six weeks of campaigning,
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polls are about to open across the uk for voting in the general election. it is the third ballot in less than five years, and the first to be held in december in nearly a century. police in new zealand say they are finalising plans to recover the bodies of those killed by a volcanic eruption on white island on monday. at least eight people are known to have died and another nine are missing, presumed dead. the salvage operation has been hampered by ongoing volcanic activity on the island. lawyers for the hollywood producer harvey weinstein say he has reached a $25 million settlement with dozens of women who have accused him of sexual misconduct. the money will be shared among more than 30 former employees and actors. he still faces criminal charges and is set to stand trial in january. he has pleaded not guilty and denies any wrongdoing. tributes have been paid to the naturalist and broadcaster david bellamy, who has died at the age of 86. he presented a series of nature programmes in the '70s and '80s and was a campaigner for conservation. he has been described as a larger—than—life character who inspired a whole generation.
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a painting worth around £50 million may have been found inside the wall of the gallery from where it disappeared. portrait of a lady by the austrian artist gustav klimt went missing from a gallery in northern italy in 1997. now, tests are being carried out on a painting which was found in a secret compartment inside the gallery wall, discovered by a gardener as he cut back ivy. it sounds as though they are not yet certain whether it is the real thing. it could have been a copy of it or something that someone had stashed away. but if it is, £50 million is a lot of money to find inside a while. i will bring you confidence and positivity this morning from jose mourinho. who else? what i love this. i do really enjoy the way he speaks about his team. after a defeat last night he said this. he saw them lose in the champions league and said spurs will
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be the team to be feared in the last 16. manchester city put aside some of their premier league struggles, for the time being at least, rounding off their champions league group stage unbeaten. it was mainly thanks to a gabrieljesus hat—trick as they beat dinamo zagreb 4—1. tottenham were also through, but were hoping to avenge their humiliating defeat to bayern munich in what was the final round of group matches. joe wilson reports. manchester city one in a stadium where everything mattered. the crowd waved croatian blue. denim is a grab began like a team aiming to qualify —— dinamo zagreb. danny 0lmo came through barcelona's academy. the technique would not have been lost on the manager. well, guardiola needed a response. the equaliser came with a couple of zagreb players lying on the ground, one in the penalty area. the referee said play on, so said he did. zagreb protested, nothing was changing. with this challenge, no punishment was the refereeing decision. well, this game became a chance for city to regain their swagger. jesus threw
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for his second goal, and the heart was gone from the home team. with this cross, jesus completed his hat—trick, again his best form away from home. now, how about ending the game with a goal. job done, zagreb gone. they finished bottom of the group. eric dyer captained tottenham in germany. qualification insured, spurs rotated their players, but all recalled the 7—to defeat to bayern munich in october. it was 1—0 here in the 14th minute. future is what counts. this player isjust 19, in the 14th minute. future is what counts. this player isjust19, and he was his chance in the tottenham team. boy, he hit it. but bayern we re team. boy, he hit it. but bayern were relentless and tottenham could not keep them out for long. before halftime, thomas muller. while coutinho's astonishing shot could barely have been closer to the goal, just look at the replay. ball, cross
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bar, line? do you want to see a perfect finish from coutinho? here we go. he isjust that perfect finish from coutinho? here we go. he is just that bayern on loa n we go. he is just that bayern on loan from barcelona. without harry kane, spurs, in truth, offered little in attack. 3—1 defeat could easily have been worse. he has had a great start to life in scotland, and it looks like steven gerrard is going to be rewarded with a new contract at rangers. he joined them in may last year and has them right on celtic‘s tails at the top of the premiership this year. he is in talks over a new deal and says he is happy at ibrox. they play the swiss side young boys in the europa league tonight. arsenal also play tonight. theyjust need to avoid a heavy defeat away at standard liege to qualify from their group. it is freddie ljungberg's first european match in charge, and he says he is not getting involved in speculation about his own future. that's not a conversation i've had with the bosses. myjob is to go from day—to—day, game day, game to game, and try to help this fantastic club. and that's what i try to do.
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then all those decisions are up to the top dogs to do. and it was yet another strange evening in the life of ronnie 0'sullivan. here he is refusing to shake the hand of his opponent and the referee at the scottish 0pen, choosing to fist—pump instaead. he said it's because he is a bit 0cd with germs. he did shake james cahill‘s hand at the end of the match, but the ref still got a fist—pump. he also says he can't open door handles without tissues. ido i do that with every toilet i go into, covering my arm. honestly, so you know we met out to a loo that is just outside the studio, i will do my business, wash my hands, dry my hands, and! my business, wash my hands, dry my hands, and i always use the towel to open, to unlock the door. and then i threw the towel in the bin and i
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walk out without touching the bin. but ronnie 0'sullivan must have spent a career shaking hands with people, all the time. and now clearly he has just changed the way he feels about it. and he is one of those players who has certain routines and systems and ways to keep himself calm in life in general. that is just one of his things. the weather with carol coming later as well. the reformed killer who fought the london bridge attacker with a fire extinguisher, john crilly, has told the bbc that he was prepared to die to protect others. mr crilly, a friend ofjack merritt, one of the two cambridge graduates killed in the attack, has been speaking exclusively to our legal correspondent clive coleman. nearly two weeks ago, ex—offenderjohn crilly found himself at the centre of mayhem and butchery at a prison education event at fishmongers' hall, where his good friend jack merritt was murdered.
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and what was the first thing that sort of made you think, hang on, something is going on here? just a very high—pitched girl's. .. something is going on here? just a very high—pitched girl's... not to be sexist, and that, but a very high—pitched girl's scream. so i thought was that girls messing about? was it screaming or laughter? girls laughing or screaming, i wasn't sure. and for a second it just got proper a lot louder, a lot more intense. it was obvious something was taking off. you came down the stairs, around the corner of the stairs, presumably. as soon asi of the stairs, presumably. as soon as i came out of there, i could clearly see usman is at the bottom of the stairs, in the corridor. he is just stood there with his two knives. john screamed at khan, what are you doing? his reply was chilling. something like kill
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everyone, or kill youse, or something about killing people. and then... yeah, like that. john attacks khan with anything he could find, first a wooden lecture and, then a fire extinguisher, all the time aware that khan was wearing what looked like a suicide help. i'm just basically screaming at him to blow it. you asking him to blow it 7 blow it. you asking him to blow it lling blow it. you asking him to blow it up? calling his bluff, sort of thing. saying you haven't got the balls to blow it. he said i am waiting for the police. he said he was waiting for the police? before he blew it, yes. i was prepared to probably lose my life, yes. i was. john and others with makeshift weapons pursued him onto the street. he couldn't see what he was doing with it, so i was spraying him,
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hoping someone else was going to be able to take him from the side or from behind or whatever and that's exactly what ended up happening. the spray distracted him, and the guy gave him a prod. within minutes, police arrived. it seemed like ages before they shot him. and they weren't all gung ho and trigger—happy. they took their time, to the point where i did scream as well to shoot him. you screamed shoot him? yes. why? i thought something would happen. afterwards, his thoughts turned to jack merritt, the cambridge graduate who saved his life, and who died along with saskia jones. made you feel important, sort of thing, like, listened and you
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could tell he was really genuinely interested. can you tell me what he meant to you? jackjust basically meant to you? jackjust basically meant hope. do you think of yourself asa meant hope. do you think of yourself as a hero? a hero? no. jack gave up his life. he is... yeah, he would be my hero. that isjohn crilly that is john crilly speaking that isjohn crilly speaking to clive coleman. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. and it seems as if it has got a bit more chilli just over the last couple of days. is thatjust me? good morning. we have had days where it has been chilly and days where it has been milder, but today is another day when it is going to be
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chilly. in fact, across central and eastern parts of the uk this morning there is a touch of frost. so you may find you have to scrape your car windscreen before you head out. we also have rain spreading in from the east. another thing to watch out for this morning is nice. the met office have a yellow wanting out for that across scotland. as you can see, there has been a lot of showers falling over night and through the course of the night we have had the rain coming across northern ireland, wales and south—west england. and thatis wales and south—west england. and that is going to be pushing steadily eastwards through the day. a blustery day the wind will start to strengthen once again in the south—west and the english channel. so first thing this morning there will be some lovely sunrises. we've got some sunshine, a frosty start, but the rain moving from the west towards the east. the brightest skies today are going to be across the north—east of scotland. for the rest of scotland, fairly cloudy with some showers. showers and fairly cloudy across northern ireland, and through the afternoon the rain gets across to eastern england, depositing some hills no stop in some of the heavier verse we might see a little bit of that at lower
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levels, but pulled away from that and we're back into some brightest skies and also some showers. blustery winds, as i mentioned. temperatures a little bit higher in the south—west. but still, as naga alluded to there, it is a chilly day ahead. through the evening and overnight the winds will strengthen across south wales, the south—western approaches, the english channel and the channel islands, intentionally touching gale force. meanwhile, although our rain clears england, it swells around and comes back in across eastern scotland. and there will still be some showers around, so we could still see some hill snow falling out of them. temperatures overnight falling between three and about five degrees. then as we go through the course of tomorrow, we will still have this rain coming across eastern parts of scotland. but a lot of dry weather. yes, there will be some showers, but it will be quite blustery across south wales, the english channel in the channel islands, where there is still the risk of gas to gale force. here, a little bit milder at 11 degrees.
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still cold everywhere else. 0n saturday, it is a right mixture we have got. there will be some dry weather. there will also be some showers, some of the showers falling as snow on the tops of the hills and then the south it will be quite windy. later in the day we will see this next system coming in from the south—west. now, there is still a little bit of uncertainty how far north this will travel during the course of saturday or saturday night. but we think by the time we get to sunday it will be coming in from the south—west, heading northwards, still windy and southern areas. but as you can see in the chart, many of us will have a dry day and many of us will also see some sunshine. but not particularly warm, particularly so in the northern half of the country, where we are looking at between three and six, seven, eight or nine as we move further south. thank you very much, speak to you later. there's been a 7% increase in the number of consumers getting their milk delivered on the doorstep. so why is the traditional milkman making a comeback? dani hewson is out
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on the milk round for us. right and early, in the little milk fan, milk float. good morning! —— milk than. good morning. yes, i'm doing a spot of moonlighting this morning, i'm on a milk round in greater manchester. i remember back in the '80s when it seemed absolutely everybody used to get their milk delivered but then of course there was a great big tail off as we went to the supermarkets and we got our milk in those plastic containers, but really over the last year we've seen a real shift. there's been a 7% increase in the number of people getting their milk delivered. now, a lot of that has been down to environmental concerns, people wanting to do more to keep the planet safe. now, i'm here with andy, who's been delivering milk, can you believe it, for how long? 0ver can you believe it, for how long? over 35 years now. that surprises me because i'm surprised people still
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wa nted because i'm surprised people still wanted their milk delivered in that time? it's always been existing, people have dropped off in the last few years, but people have become aware of the environment and glass and glass has upturned over the last few years. you said every time something like blue planet is green you see an increase in deliveries? blue planet is one and anything on the tv that involves environmental issues, certainly there is an uptake we notice. you've got quite a round to do this morning. let's have a quick look at some of the stuff you deliver because some of the colours on these bottle lids are frankly... i don't understand what we've got here because it isn'tjust milk, is it? you're right, semiskimmed is the most common new have these days and then you have plain milk, organic milk and in more recent times, we have fruitjuice, milk and in more recent times, we have fruit juice, apple juice, pineapple juice, cranberry juice, and then we have a fresh, flavoured
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milk, which is a fresh milk. also we've got these great boxes and in here, nothing to do with milk at all? as part of the ongoing thing, fruit and vegetables delivered to your door. we have a convenience store, so a bit of diversity but it is helping it run through and work and the core thing is the milk and its sustainability and ability to re cycle. its sustainability and ability to recycle. despite the fact you've got this traditional milk round, a lot of these orders are done online? it's the modern way, you can get your phone or tablet and you can order it by 9pm and the following day it is on your doorstep, milk, vegetables, whatever, they're in the morning for you. cheers, andy, you have a lot to do. let's have a chat about why these changes have happened. rachel is here. what exactly have you been seeing? milk from the milkman accounts for 5% of
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all of the milk we buy and in the la st all of the milk we buy and in the last year alone, we seen a 7% increase in how many of us are buying from the milkman. even though milk is in decline overall and less people are buying less milk in terms of the amount they are buying, we are actually seeing more shoppers engage with the milkman. that's really interesting, because we've seen a big rise in different sorts of things like plant—based milks but you've seen a fall in milk consumption totally? yes, and one of the reasons we think is driving that isa the reasons we think is driving that is a real shift in our consumption habits. so we are moving away from traditional food and like the classic tea, the splash of milk, and towards fruit and herbal tea, that doesn't require milk so as our consumption habits change, so do our shopping habits, be it from the supermarket or the milkman. is this sustainable, this growth in delivery? the fact we are seeing more shoppers buying from the milkman is due to a couple of
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factors, one of those is it has environmentally friendly credentials. we know shoppers are increasingly concerned about single—use plastic and the fact we have glass bottles really appeals to a lot of these ethical shoppers. another reason could be the convenience that this literally delivers to shoppers, meeting their top up shopping needs and as we can increasingly order online, which we are doing overall, meet a number of needs for shoppers today. thank you, rachel. we will talk more about those environmental changes that people are making and we will speak to the boss of the dairy. right now i'm going to earn my keep and help out with some of these deliveries. let's see if she actually is, she's going to walk the other side... dani, are you actually going to do it? there we go, off she goes! let's go and find a gate that's open! she's going to get the wrong one! she's going to get the wrong one! she's going to tap on someone's
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door! is there something reassuring about the milkman coming around? it is happening, you are asleep, it arrives. the lovely nostalgia feeling, remembering to put out the note, roll it up and put it in the thing, the cream from the top of the milk. we are going to go on the warm feeling sentimental right now. this christmas day, the chances are you'll be with friends or family, but that's not the reality for thousands of older people. when discussing the issue of loneliness on the programme yesterday, we met terrence, who for first time in 20 years won't be spending christmas alone. terrence told us he didn't have christmas tree, but soon after the programme, a local college offered to get him one. dan went along last night to see it decorated. if you're watching breakfast on a wednesday morning, we met an amazing man called terence. he struggle with
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loneliness over the years and he told us he doesn't have a christmas tree. we promised we'd sort him out stop he's in here. oh, hello! what are you doing here? nice to you ain! are you doing here? nice to you again! we made you a promise, can we come in? of course you can. do you know what we've had, terence, an incredible reaction to you coming on. the thing that struck home was when you mention how many times you've been on your own on christmas day. yes, like i said, what used to happen is i used to go round to my mother's on christmas day because i a lwa ys mother's on christmas day because i always cooked a meal for her and mother's on christmas day because i always cooked a mealfor her and i a lwa ys always cooked a mealfor her and i always took the right thing round to her and always took the right thing round to herandi always took the right thing round to her and i used to buy her little bits all the time, like cigarettes and all this sort of stuff, and i used to parcel them all up at christmas and put them in a pillowcase and take them round to her. one day, i'll neverforget pillowcase and take them round to her. one day, i'll never forget her
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saying to me, she said," do you know, without you bringing me my presence at christmas, i wouldn't have any presence, would i?” presence at christmas, i wouldn't have any presence, would i? " and i have any presence, would i? " and i have two think about that now. people on their own now don't get any presence from people. and the good news, this year you have got christmas dinner taken good news, this year you have got christmas dinner ta ken care good news, this year you have got christmas dinner taken care of because of your work with. .. christmas dinner taken care of because of your work with...” christmas dinner taken care of because of your work with... i have indeed, yes, i have indeed. who are you going to go for christmas dinner with this year? i'm going to go with our nancy. she's the good friend you've been talking to? she's 19 and she's got dementia —— 90. but having said that, because i've already dealt with a lot of people with dementia, there's a way to do it. do you think the fact you've struggled with loneliness in the past few more aware of how to deal with this? i'm a lwa ys aware of how to deal with this? i'm always aware, with anything, unless you've actually been there, i didn't know what it was like. i didn't know what it was like to have depression until i got it.
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what it was like to have depression untili got it. you had what it was like to have depression until i got it. you had such an impact on our viewers, we'd love to do something for you, you said on—air you didn't have a christmas tree, which we promised we'd sort out for you. am i allowed to go and open yourfront door? out for you. am i allowed to go and open your front door? yes. you stay there, terence. we got some people waiting outside. terence, can i welcome these lovely people who have come to meet you from alden college. there got an early christmas present for you, terrorists. nice to see you, guys. —— terence. hello, sir. good evening. how are you, sir, today? ru-ok day, terence? it's ok. you got a tissue at the ready? —— are you 0k, terence? while terence is sorting
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himself out. ru—0k day? do you need a seat? no, i'm ok, thanks. tell us what you wanted to help out and get involved? we have been no come here to bring you a christmas tree. to brighten up your christmas! thank you! oh, terence! we've had a lot of people who said they would love to do something for you, but we thought alden college, their only round the corner from you, they were so keen to help and come and do something. that's so nice. now, terence, we've got one more surprise for you, because i heard you like a carol. yes, i do. do you have a favourite? yes, silent night. do you want to come with me?
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we've got a few more friends from alden college. come out here, terence. this is the 0ldham college choirjust for you. # silent night, holy night. # all is calm, all is bright. # round yon virgin, mother, mother and child. # holy infant so tenderand mild. # sleep in mother and child. # holy infant so tender and mild. # sleep in heavenly peace. # sleep in heavenly peace. #
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you need an illustration of the impact ofjust a moment in time of someone getting a bit of attention like that, it shows. lovely. details of organisations offering information and support with loneliness are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000 564 756. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. polling stations will open across the capital within the next half an hour. it means some schools will be closed with pupils having an extra day off. for their parents that's meant having to find childcare
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at short notice. and some christmas events, like concerts and nativities, have had to be rearranged. my mum and dad were supposed to come for the evening performance, but as it got changed at the last minute, they couldn't work anything out so they couldn't come. it's a little bit annoying that my kids have to be offjust sprung on me, i had quite a lot of plans. the body which represents doctors is warning homeless people are in desperate need of better support. figures from the bma have revealed there were more than 36,000 a&e visits in england by homeless people last year, with almost a third of those in the capital. for decades it was rumoured parakeets were introduced to london byjimi hendrix or during a humphrey bogart film, ut those urban myths may have been disproved by experts. scientists have now mapped sightings of the birds over the last 50 years and found no evidence
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to support the theories. it's thought an outbreak of fatal parrot fever may have encouraged owners to release them in the 1920s and '505. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the circle line and the eastbound hammersmith and city line have severe delays following a signal failure at hammersmith. there's a part suspension on the district line. great western railway are running replacement buses between bourne end and marlow following a signalling problem. 0n the roads, westbound tailbacks on the highway heading towards tower hill. as you can see there from the camera. in mayfair, brook street is closed for works with no access to brook gate from park lane. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a chilly start to the day, and there's a touch of frost out there for most spots too, with temperatures hovering around freezing.
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not the greatest day of weather — it's set to turn wet and windy for much of the day, but they will be a bit of early brightness out towards eastern areas first thing and then the cloud will start to thicken from the west. a band of rain pushing in from the west as we head through the late morning into the afternoon, some of it possibly quite heavy at times and it will be raining for much of the day and also strong gusts of wind around. temperatures not up to much — peaking between seven and nine through the afternoon. still raining for much of the first part of the evening rush—hour with the band of rain clearing east followed by showers through the evening period and overnight as well. it's staying windy overnight and into tomorrow morning but it will feel a touch milder tomorrow with temperatures tween 3—5 celsius to start the day. lots of dry weather around tomorrow, quite a bit of. staying rather windy, remaining blustery over the weekend but again, mostly dry. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and naga.
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bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: the polls have opened for the uk's third general election in less than five years, and the first in decemberfor almost a century. the reformed killer who tried to fight off the london bridge attacker with a fire extinguisher speaks for the first time, about what happened. do you think of yourself as a hero? a hero? no. jack gave up his life. he's... yeah, he would be my hero. good morning. there has been a big increase in the number of people getting their milk delivered to their doorsteps. i am out on a milk
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round and —— in manchester. jose mourinho says tottenahm will be a team to be feared in the knockout stages of the champions league. that is despite losing to bayern munich in theirfinal group game. good morning. it is a cold and frosty start for some central and eastern parts of the country. you will start with some sunshine. rain already in the west will move across most areas through the course of the day, and once again it is going to be blustery. i will have more details in 15 minutes. # silent night... christmas comes early for terrence, the age uk volunteer who won't be home alone for the first time in 20 years. it is thursday 12 december. our top story: after six weeks of campaigning, polls are about to open across the uk for voting in the general election. it is the third ballot in less than five years, and the first to be held in december in nearly a century.
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0ur political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster for us this morning. jonathan, talk us through the day ahead. yes, the time for politicians to persuade us with their policies is over, and the time has come for voters to deliver their verdict. as of now, polling stations, tens of thousands of them, are open in the 650 constituencies that make up the electoral map of the uk. so for today, primary schools, community centres, libraries, turned into polling stations where people will be able to go and cast their votes until 10pm tonight, putting across in the box next to the name of the party and the candidate that they would like to represent them here at westminster. many people will have already voted, of course, by post, and if your postal vote is still sitting sealed on the kitchen table by the front door, don't worry, you can drop that off at your polling station at any time before 10pm
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tonight. come 10pm, we will get an exit poll which should give us an idea of the outcome. the first results will come in before midnight, and by this time tomorrow, we will have an idea of the outcome and the result that this unusual election has delivered. thank you. results coverage starts as polls close tonight. huw edwards and the team will be here on bbc one and the bbc news channel from 9:55pm tonight. there will be special coverage on bbc radio 4 and 5 live, and of course, there is full coverage online at bbc.co.uk/news and on the bbc news app. the reformed killer who fought the london bridge attacker with a fire extinguisher, john crilly, has told the bbc that he was prepared to die to protect others. mr crilly, a friend ofjack merritt, one of the two cambridge graduates killed in the attack, has been speaking exclusively to our legal correspondent clive coleman. nearly two weeks ago, ex—offenderjohn crilly found himself at the centre of mayhem and butchery at a prison education
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event at fishmongers' hall, where his good friend jack merritt was murdered. it was just like a very high—pitched wail, like, yeah, a scream. john saw a woman sprawled on the stairs, bleeding, then usman khan, two knives out, wearing what looked like a suicide belt. john attacked him first with a wooden lectern, then with a fire extinguisher, shouting at usman khan to blow his belt. he said to wait for the police. i was prepared to probably lose my life — yeah. yeah, i was. with others using makeshift weapons, john pursued khan onto the street, spraying him with the extinguisher. within minutes, police arrived, john shouting at them to shoot khan because of the belt. they did. john's thoughts then turned to his friend,
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jack merritt, the cambridge graduate who had changed john's life, and who along with saskia jones had been murdered by khan. can you tell me what he meant to you? jackjust basically meant hope. do you think of yourself as a hero? a hero? no. jack gave up his life. he's... yeah, he would be my hero. police in new zealand say they are finalising plans to recover the bodies of those killed by a volcanic eruption on white island on monday. at least eight people are known to have died and another nine are missing, presumed dead. the salvage operation has been hampered by ongoing volcanic activity on the island. lawyers for the hollywood producer harvey weinstein say he has reached a $25 million settlement with dozens of women who have accused him of sexual misconduct. the money will be shared among more
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than 30 former employees and actors. he still faces criminal charges and is set to stand trial in january. he has pleaded not guilty and denies any wrongdoing. tributes have been paid to the naturalist and broadcaster david bellamy, who has died at the age of 86. he presented a series of nature programmes in the '70s and '80s and was a campaigner for conservation. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito looks back at his career. there's nothing like a good drying day to put spring back into your polyester... david bellamy — for more than 30 years, he was the enthusiastic face of botany on television. he had failed his exams at school, but a job in a lab fostered a love of science, and a few years later he was a lecturer at durham university, specialising in marine biology. and it was that that led to the interview when the torrey canyon oil tanker ran aground in 1967, releasing thousands of tons of oil
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into the sea. all of a sudden, a very large stretch of coast was going to be changed. the whiskers, his voice, his down—to—earth, easy—to—understand style led to his celebrity. i think i was interviewed byjohn craven in the very early days on a sewer pipe in redcar, and i think that made me. where you are, i can see you through the leaves. ino the late 19905 he was linked to hundreds of conservation and wildlife organisations. but when he declared climate change to be "poppycock", the invitations began to dry up. however, his commitment to the environment was undimmed. the conservation foundation he set up in 1982 has issued a statement describing him as a friend, a teacher, and a larger—than—life character, who inspired people with his knowledge and enthusiasm. and that's where all the action is. let's go back to one of the major stories of this week. surgeons in burns units in new zealand have been working
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around the clock to help those injured in the volcano eruption on white island earlier this week. in the first 2a hours, specialists dealt with a workload they would normally deal with in a year. joining us now from our london newsroom isjorge leon—villapalos, a consultant in burns and and reconstructive surgery at chelsea and westminster hospital. thank you very much for talking to us thank you very much for talking to us this morning. can you kind of ta ke us this morning. can you kind of take us through what kind of injuries the medical staff will be dealing with there? well, they will be dealing with devastating injuries of different extents and different depths. so when burns like this present to our colleagues in new zealand, they will present with not only the visible skin burns, but related injuries like the potential for inhalation or injury from toxic gases. that means they will have to deal with life—saving priorities like stabilising these patients to allow them to breathe and to return
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the skin to what it was before, with a number of very, very complex techniques that require very lengthy surgeries and a phenomenal amount of effort from the multidisciplinary teams in the burns unit in new zealand, not only the burns surgeons, but the nurses, the ns the tests, and everyone involved in the ca re of tests, and everyone involved in the care of these very complex injuries in large numbers. -- the anaesthetists. we're hearing that some have suffered up to 90% burns. talk to me about what the recovery process is like for that, and if there is a chance of returning to a normal life. well, 90% burns are very severe injuries that undoubtedly are life—threatening, but ina undoubtedly are life—threatening, but in a specialised burns centre, and with expert care like the one they will be able to provide in new zealand, there is no doubt that there is the possibility of a successful outcome. but we need to think of these injuries like a big
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marathon of treatment, along many, many years and sometimes for life. what this means is that 1's surgery will not do, will not complete recovery. they will need many surgeries with many visits to the operating theatre, and the input of many professionals, to warrant recovery. essentially, these people may stay in hospital for many, many months and they will need a lengthy period of rehabilitation. indeed, in the rehabilitation is notjust physical, is it? i mean, the psychological impact of this, talk to me about how medical teams help patients actually just confront that challenge in itself. well, there is no doubt that the burn injuries may not be the only injuries these patients may suffer, but in burns unit, we do not treat only the visible injuries. we treat a patient, with burns injuries, and that includes not only the physical manifestations of the burns that you can see, but also their
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psychological state. let's all think of these patients as people who have had their lives turned completely upside down, and we need to try to return them to normal society as functional members. but it is a very, very lengthy process that involves not only treating the visible burns, but also psychologically, the patient and families. am looking at a quote from you when we had a chat before, one of our team had a chat with you, and you have said that burns units are the antidote to pessimism. tell me about that. well, there is no doubt that when somebody comes around with very extensive injuries, with very extensive scars, with the possibility of not surviving, with the possibility of having functional and body image issues for the rest of their lives, sometimes you actually... 0r of their lives, sometimes you actually... or some people may think that treatment is futile or that it is not worth attempting. i think
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that in the burns unit, we need to be that type of antidote to pessimism, and try to deal with the management of these patients to the best of the ability of the multidisciplinary team, until there is no possibility of further improvement. if we treat these patients to the best of our ability, and ensure that our teams in the burns unit in new zealand will do so, we will be able to return them as functional members to society. but we need to think of these patients as... of the possibility of recovery for these patients all the time, notjust the possibility of the scars or body image altered, and thatis the scars or body image altered, and that is what i mean when i say we need to be an antidote against pessimism, and antidote against giving up. we always need to continue until, for whatever reasons, the treatment is futile or not possible. it is also about, i suppose, the patients never giving up suppose, the patients never giving
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up on themselves, as well, encouraging that. absolutely, so there is obviously the possibility of treatment not being possible anymore because the patient‘s injuries are so severe that it cannot be possible to recover from them. but until that happens, until for whichever reason, you know, the reserves of the patients are not sufficient to warrant treatment, the multidisciplinary burns centre will a lwa ys multidisciplinary burns centre will always be there to try things. thank you for your insides and just explaining what all of these people in the medical teams are going to be going through. thank you for your time this morning. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good . not too bad, thank you, charlie. the weather is a bit nippy in central and eastern parts, so for some, a bit of frost around but it won't last too long because we got cloud building in from the west and
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in the west already we do have some rain. the other thing to watch out for in scotland is ice, a yellow weather warning from the met office and the showers are falling on frozen surfaces so take it easy. the rain has been moving in across northern ireland, wales and west in england, travelling eastwards, blustery winds and behind it, look at isobars, the winds will strengthen in the south—west and english channel. first thing this morning, there is some early brightness and the best sunshine will be in north—east scotland, rain moving from the west to the east and it will carry on with some showers across scotland, rain getting in here later on and rain getting in across parts of northern ireland but across parts of northern ireland but afair bit across parts of northern ireland but a fair bit of with showers behind. the rain pushes into eastern england with some hill snow and some of the heavier bursts, that might cause lower level areas to be affected but it won't settle or last. behind that, some showers but also milder conditions, tens or 11s that, some showers but also milder
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conditions, tens or 115 compared to 4-7 conditions, tens or 115 compared to 4—7 further east. through the latter pa rt 4—7 further east. through the latter part of the day, you will find the wind will strengthen. south—west wales, southern wales generally, south—west england, the english channel and the channel islands, we could have just up to gale force and as the rain clears to the north sea, watch this curl comeback into parts of eastern scotland. elsewhere, some clear spells but also some showers and it's going to be another cold night. windy tomorrow once again in the same areas we've got the gusts to gale force overnight and we'll have that during tomorrow as well, but for a lot of us, there will be a lot of dry weather wound. still the risk of rain clipping the north—east of scotla nd risk of rain clipping the north—east of scotland and showery outbreaks of rain coming in across northern ireland, getting in across northern england and north wales stop the another chilly day, apart from the south—west, where looking at 11 and in st helier, ten. by saturday, we still have the wind arrows on, still blustery across england and wales. a northerly wind coming in across
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northern scotland but a lot of dry weather and sunshine on saturday, but there will still be some showers and still some falling as snow on the hills. now, later on in the day it looks like we're going to a little system come in across south—west england and how far north it gets is still open to question as it gets is still open to question as it travels north overnight. it may get as far as northern england, it may not. what we think is this, by sunday it will move steadily north, still with some hill snow and there will be showers in the south and rain across the north of scotland. still with hill snow here, but wherever you are, it's going to feel chilly and it's going to be windy, especially in the south. so naga and charlie, loads going on in the weather. pick your element and more or less it's in the forecast! is it too early to ask about weather on christmas day? yes. but what is the weather going to be like on christmas day? it is too early, charlie! you know what carol always
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says, the only time you can ask about weather you will have a white christmas is boxing day stop fair enough, and then we won't get it wrong! makes a change! the trend is towards the end of next week, it will turn that bit milder. gradually we are getting you there. 0nly will turn that bit milder. gradually we are getting you there. only a week out. does that mean it is too warm for snow? you will have to wait until next week, naga! as soon as we have an idea we will let you know. isn't it always guaranteed in the highlands? you often get it. you know what, you are more likely to have a white easter if easter falls early than a white christmas because winter is set in and the colder air is ensconced, it's already in place. so you won't predict christmas but you will predict easter! four months ahead! you two are awful! you think we have forgotten that you have predicted a white easter and when it
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happens i will remind you! the goodness' sake! she doesn't mean that! she is turning away... " just let me out of here!" iam i am looking at the monitors stop this is what we can see. —— i am looking at the monitors stop this is what we can see. —— i am looking at the safe at this time of year, hedgehogs are usually fast asleep, hibernating for the winter, but not this year. there are fears that mild autumn weather meant hundreds of baby hoglets were born too late to hibernate. john is at a rescue centre in gloucester to find out what's being done to help. good morning, charlie. this little character has been here at the wild hogs hedgehog rescue in frampton in gloucestershire for around three weeks. he's waking up, he's getting
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a bit sprightly, probably bored of me holding him. he weighs about 220 9 me holding him. he weighs about 220 gand me holding him. he weighs about 220 g and when he came in, he was much lighter. probably only 150 g or something. he really needs to fatten up something. he really needs to fatten up before he is released back into the wild, he needs to be 750 or 800 g, something like that, so much larger than he is now. they are experiencing here a record year with a number of hedgehogs being brought in because, as you say, of that mild winter, it's creating quite an issue and it is something that they are working hard to deal with at this rescue centre and another rescue... and at other rescue centres right across the uk. here we go... there he comes. he's had a strimmer injury, this fellow? it is an ancient species that's struggling to cope with modern life. he's healing nicely.
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the hedgehog population has declined by around a quarter over the last decade, but evidence can be difficult to obtain so the wild hogs hedgehog rescue centre in gloucestershire is building 15 of these hog boxes to gather information. so this is the feeding station, emily. take the lid off and you can talk us through what's inside. how does it work? so, this is where the hedgehogs will come in. we put in a tunnel to keep the cats out, because they come through, and a lot are microchipped as pets. they come in here and there's a microchip scanner through this doorway and they come through this area, where we have food for them. we have a camera here so we can pick up and see what they're doing and we have a microphone to hear them. sometimes it's quite useful to hear them if they're coughing, it's quite useful to hear them if they‘ re coughing, that it's quite useful to hear them if they're coughing, that can be a sign of illness. underneath we have weighing scales, so we can keep track of their weight. all of the electronics is kept away from the hedgehogs nice and safe. despite the
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overall population decline, they've seen almost double the number of hedgehogs here this year. the mild winter has meant hoglets have been born too late in the season and sometimes there have been second letters. the young will struggle to put on enough weight to carry them through hibernation and the winter. we've had a lot of hoglets in this year. last year, we had 186 admissions throughout the entire year, but this year, the next hedgehog that comes in will be our 310th admission. so that's a increase on the ear before. and when we've looked at data from last year, the ones coming in now are quite considerably smaller. it's just getting milder and wetter. they're not hibernating for so long, so they're waking not hibernating for so long, so they‘ re waking up, not hibernating for so long, so they're waking up, maturing earlier and actually breeding earlier. everything slows down when they hibernate, even their growth. just all a bit out of sync, isn't it? yellow yes, it is. 0nce
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all a bit out of sync, isn't it? yellow yes, it is. once they gain enough weight and can fend for themselves, they are microchipped and released. when the hog boxes come online in january, and released. when the hog boxes come online injanuary, it will then give staff a far clearer idea of how the hedgehogs are coping and what we can do to protect them. john maguire, bbc news, gloucestershire. when they are first brought in, this is where they come, the intensive ca re is where they come, the intensive care unit, if you like. these numbers, 19 is the year, 280, that is the 280th hedgehog to come in this year and we had two coming in last night. it takes us to 311 this year, and they only had 180 also or something like that last year. we will just take you something like that last year. we willjust take you through to another part of the centre here. we are going to introduce you to emily once again. this was our little friend that we were talking to... talking with a second ago. emily, he is about 220 g. 0ver
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talking with a second ago. emily, he is about 220 g. over here, little and large, this lump, how much does he way? he is 890 g, so he's ready for release if the weather is suitable for release. we talked in the piece... i said it's an ancient species that's struggling with the modern world. what can people do to help watching this morning, to help a population that's really been under threat? the best thing people can do is help make their gardens wild. if they've got hedgehogs around, feed them. cat food and water is excellent for hedgehogs. and if they can connect their gardens to their neighbours', if safe to do for the hedgehogs, then it is brilliant because they can walk through one garden to the next and make their way through. they travel almost a mile a night most nights, so they need a big area to roa m nights, so they need a big area to roam around in. it's see the difference in size, their eyesight
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isn't very good but they have great sensitive hearing. how do people know if they and should be brought toa know if they and should be brought to a rescue centre? if they out in the day then they are definitely vulnerable or possibly ill and would need to come in. at the moment, if they are not under 500 g, we would ask people to contact a rescue because they are too small to hibernate. we were comparing them to fruit earlier and we said he weighs the same as an apple and this larger one is something like a rockmelon, something in between those two. something in between would be where you're looking for... the smaller one needs to be rescued, the larger one needs to be rescued, the larger one is fine. they are very cute, aren't they? as we were saying, they've had a pretty hard time over recent yea rs, they've had a pretty hard time over recent years, hedgehogs, and this year because it was such a mild winter, proving problematic but volu nteers winter, proving problematic but volunteers such as these, charities, rescue organisations, rspca et cetera et cetera are doing what they
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can to help. so from little and large, back to you guys in the studio. it does look like a story, they are just about to go off and have an adventure! very cute! i envy hedgehogs being able to roll up i envy hedgehogs being able to roll up inside themselves and be that cosy. that is nice as a position. very calming. we could have hedgehog cam, couldn't we? we are talking about the way people are employed and a hangover day, the idea... you have five allocated days where you can call in and say upfront that you can call in and say upfront that you can't make it in, you are going to work from home instead. we could never do that. it would never work. you might try to do it tomorrow! lots of people talking about it today and lots of people say it is millennials, using the word snowflake, it is dividing a lot of people. richard has said, "personally i'm not one to overindulge, hangover day, if you
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are, book it off instead, it is your choice and don't get rewarded". you work from home, though, you call up and you say you're working from home with a hangover. graham has said, he is more sympathetic, is that not condoning unhealthy levels of drinking? like goes even further. "hangover day sounds in tantalising. rewarding people for letting down their colleagues is never going to go down well stop e—mail has taken it further. how about some self—control? —— going to go down well. mel has taken it further. jean has said, is it really impossible to celebrate a special occasion without getting lost? gillian says, "thinking about the hangover day conversation, people would possibly just be returning home after a big
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night out and whenever i come into work and i see people returning from a big night out, i'm alwaysjealous. millennials need to toughen up". i'm with you, go out and get you're fun on but suck it up the next day and deal with it. on but suck it up the next day and dealwith it. this on but suck it up the next day and deal with it. this means you call in on the day and say you're not going to make it in and you can't do it. but if you're feeling that unwell that you can't get to work, the chances of working from home were pretty slim too. yes! deal with it! life! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. polls have opened across the capital until 10pm this evening. it means some schools used as polling stations will be closed with pupils having an extra day off. for their parents that's meant having to find childcare at short notice.
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and some christmas events, like concerts and nativities, have had to be rearranged. my mum and dad were supposed to come for the evening performance, but as it got changed at the last minute, they couldn't work anything out so they couldn't come. it's a little bit annoying that my kids have to be offjust sprung on me, i had quite a lot of plans. the body which represents doctors is warning homeless people are in desperate need of better support. new research found hospitals seen a three—fold increase in the number of patients with no fixed abode over the past eight years. figures from the bma have revealed there were more than 36,000 a&e visits in england by homeless people last year, with almost a third of those in the capital. for decades it was rumoured parakeets were introduced to london byjimi hendrix, or during a humphrey bogart film, but those urban myths may have been disproved by experts. scientists have now mapped sightings of the birds over the last 50 years and found no evidence to support the theories.
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it's thought an outbreak of fatal parrot fever may have encouraged owners to release them in the 1920s and '505. let's take a look at the travel situation now. things have improved a bit. the circle line and the eastbound hammersmith and city line have minor delays following a signal failure at hammersmith. there's still a part suspension on the district line. 0n the trains, there's no strike action today on south western railway but an amended timetable is still in place. 0n the roads, works at east smithfield are causing westbound tailbacks on the highway heading towards tower hill. in mayfair, brook st is closed for works with no access to brook gate from park lane. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a chilly start to the day, and there's a touch of frost out there for most spots too, with temperatures hovering around freezing. not the greatest day of weather — it's set to turn wet and windy for much of the day, but they will be a bit of early brightness out towards eastern areas first thing and then the cloud will start
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to thicken from the west. a band of rain pushing in from the west as we head through the late morning into the afternoon, some of it possibly quite heavy at times and it will be raining for much of the day and also strong gusts of wind around. temperatures not up to much — peaking between seven and nine degrees celsius through the afternoon. still raining for much of the first part of the evening rush—hour with the band of rain clearing east followed by showers through the evening period and overnight as well. it's staying windy overnight and into tomorrow morning but it will feel a touch milder tomorrow with temperatures between 3—5 celsius to start the day. lots of dry weather around tomorrow, quite a bit of cloud. it will be staying rather windy, remaining blustery over the weekend but again, mostly dry. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: after weeks of campaigning, polls have opened across the uk for voting in the general election. it is the third ballot in less than five years, and the first to be held in december in nearly a century. 650 seats are being contested across england, wales, scotland and northern ireland, with the first results expected before midnight tonight. the reformed killer who fought the london bridge attacker with a fire extinguisher, john crilly, has told the bbc that he was prepared to die to protect others. mr crilly, a friend ofjack merritt, one of the two cambridge graduates killed in the attack, has been speaking for the first time about the moment he came face to face with usman khan wearing a fake suicide vest. i'm just basically screaming at him to blow it.
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you're asking him to blow it up? i was screaming, calling his bluff, sort of thing, saying you haven't got the balls to blow it. he said, i'm waiting for the police. he said he was waiting for the police? before he blew it, yeah. i was prepared to probably lose my life, yeah. yeah, i was. police in new zealand say they are finalising plans to recover the bodies of those killed by a volcanic eruption on white island on monday. at least eight people are known to have died and another nine are missing, presumed dead. the salvage operation has been hampered by ongoing volcanic activity on the island. lawyers for the hollywood producer harvey weinstein say he has reached a $25 million settlement with dozens of women who have accused him of sexual misconduct. the money will be shared among more than 30 former employees and actors. he still faces criminal charges and is set to stand trial in january. he has pleaded not guilty and denies any wrongdoing. tributes have been paid to the naturalist and broadcaster david bellamy, who has died at the age of 86.
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he presented a series of nature programmes in the '70s and '80s, and was a campaigner for conservation. he has been described as a larger—than—life character who inspired a whole generation. a painting worth around £50 million may have been found inside the wall of the gallery from where it disappeared. portrait of a lady by the austrian artist gustav klimt went missing from a gallery in northern italy in 1997. now, tests are being carried out on a painting which was found in a secret compartment inside the gallery wall, discovered by a gardener as he cut back ivy. worth £50 million! either way, it is quite curious. i am going to call
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him the dutiful 0ne, but i am not sure i am going to say that. the special one —— beautiful one.” don't need to say it, because he will say about himself. whatever you want, but he is not the winning one. but he is definitely the confident one. tottenham lost their final group game in the champions league last night, but that didn't stop jose mouinho confidently declaring that spurs will be a team to be feared in the last 16. elsewhere, manchester city rounded off their group games with a thumping 4—1 win over dinamo zagreb, asjoe wilson reports. manchester city were in in a stadium where everything mattered. the crowd waved croatian blue. dinamo zagreb began like a team aiming to qualify. dani 0lmo came through barcelona's academy.
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the technique would not have been lost on the former barcelona manager. well, guardiola needed a response. the equaliser came with a couple of zagreb players lying on the ground, one in the penalty area. but the referee said play on, so city did. zagreb protested, nothing was changing. when rhodri was challenged like this, no punishment was the refereeing decision. well, this game became a chance for city to regain their swagger. jesus through for his second goal, and the heart was gone from the home team. with this cross, jesus completed his hat—trick, again his best form away from home. now, how about ending the game with a goal for phil foden? job done, zagreb gone. they finished bottom of the group. eric dier captained tottenham in germany. qualification ensured, spurs rotated their players, but all recalled the 7—2 defeat to bayern munich in october.
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it was 1—0 here in the 14th minute with kingsley coman. the future is what counts. ryan sessegnon is just 19, and here was his chance in the tottenham team. boy, he hit it. but bayern were relentless, and tottenham could not keep them out for long. before halftime, thomas muller. while coutinho's astonishing shot could barely have been closer to the goal, just look at the replay. ball, crossbar, line? do you want to see a perfect finish from philippe coutinho? here we go. he is just at bayern on loan from barcelona. without harry kane, spurs, in truth, offered little in attack. a 3—1 defeat could easily have been worse. he has had a great start to life in scotland, and it looks like steven gerrard is going to be rewarded with a new contract at rangers. he joined them in may last year and has them right on celtic‘s tails
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at the top of the premiership this year. he is in talks over a new deal and says he is happy at ibrox. they play the swiss side young boys in the europa league tonight. arsenal also play tonight. theyjust need to avoid a heavy defeat away at standard liege to qualify from their group. it is freddie ljungberg's first european match in charge, and he says he is not getting involved in speculation about his own future. that's not a conversation i've had with the bosses. myjob is to go from day—to—day, game to game, and try to help this fantastic club, and that's what i try to do. then all those decisions are up to the top dogs to do. and it was yet another strange evening in the life of ronnie o'sullivan. here he is refusing to shake the hand of his opponent and the referee at the scottish open, choosing to fist—pump instaead. he said it is because he is a bit 0cd with germs. he did shake james cahill‘s hand at the end of the match, but the ref still got a fist—pump. he also says he can't open door
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handles without tissues. we often admire sportspeople who go abroad and manage to immerse themselves in culture, learn the language, settle into their new home. well, england footballer toni duggan, now playing for atletico madrid, has been in spain for a little while now. she has been talking about some of the early pitfalls of making yourself at home. little things like that when you moved to somewhere abroad. it's not what you think of, is it? it would be the same in america. you think of the language, whatever, but you don't think of them. i think honestly my first supermarket shop in spain! honestly my first supermarket shop in spain i bought catfood instead of cereal. i swear. did she eat it? i don't think you would admit to it. we have been to spain to visit toni duggan, her spanish is brilliant now. did she speak any already? no, she has had
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lessons. as well as playing, really demanding lifestyle with barcelona and atletico madrid, she has had lessons. so to buy catfood instead of cereal is pretty extreme.” lessons. so to buy catfood instead of cereal is pretty extreme. i love herfor admitting it. of cereal is pretty extreme. i love her for admitting it. the of cereal is pretty extreme. i love herfor admitting it. the kind of thing i would do. want to sign off in spanish? no. well, at least you said no in french. it is the only language i can manage. we are almost halfway through december, which means the christmas party season and hangover season is in full swing. one public relations firm in bolton have come up with a solution — hangover days for employees who have over—indulged. we went out to ask what workers thought of the idea. the idea of a hangover is a good idea, because people already take days off for hangovers anyway. they just don't tell their employer. some companies have duvet days, which i actually think that's a better idea, because it means that people who maybe don't drink, as well, can benefit from looking
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after their own well—being. why would you need a hangover day? just take a normal holiday. if you're expecting to go out and get leathered, then a little obduraty about the whole thing, and just back to bed and a half day. i would love a hangover day, but i think you can just soldier through it, really. 'tis the season, christmas. i do think it's useful for students to go out drinking, but i still go into work, or uni, but i am still not productive, so sometimes it's better for us to stay home. we are joined now by company co—founder lee frame, who introduced hangover days, ellie entwistle, the company's pr manager, and professor cary cooper, president of the chartered institute of personnel and development. good morning to you. we will come to you injust a moment. just good morning to you. we will come to you in just a moment. just explain, for those people who are a bit confused, this isn't the day off. the idea is it is a hangover day, so you call in and say you don't have
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billion, but you are still expected to work. is that right? it is a last—minute work from home day. we have a lot of social events, a lot of digital marketing conferences, a lot of entertaining clients, and it is only fair that if we expect our staff and the team to stay out late into the evening they have the ability to call us up the next day and say... you don't expect them to drink, though, do you? no, it is not a lwa ys drink, though, do you? no, it is not always about the drinking. we have pa rents always about the drinking. we have parents who take advantage of the perks, that was the coin name, yes. so this is if you are tired orjust haven't got the energy that day to perhaps make it into the office.” think too tired to come into work as another way to put it. but yes, for late nights out entertaining clients, late—night conferences. there is a lot in manchester, we are ina digital there is a lot in manchester, we are in a digital hub in manchester and there are a lot of conferences go on, where you want to go and want to meet new people. it is only fair that we give back. have you done this, ellie? i have. i have been out
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with clients, a few times i have been out with my partner for a meal, may had a bottle of wine, may be felt a bit tired and rang and said i will work from home today. thank you for telling me you are feeling worse for telling me you are feeling worse for wear. and did you actually do work from home? i did, because if! had had to commute, i would have felt tired sitting at my desk, whereas i grabbed my duvet and worked from my desk. we have had some response from people saying do you know what? just deal with it. if you know what? just deal with it. if you want to go out late, go out late, but be in the office to do yourjob. at this time of year, what they are doing is pretty sensible stuff. saying work from home, because we're all going to parties. wea because we're all going to parties. we a little bit, i don't drink much at all, but other people do, and working from home is fine. but you know what the big issue is? the law has changed. in the coalition government they passed a law that every employee who has been working foran employer
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every employee who has been working for an employer for every employee who has been working foran employerfora number of months has the legal right to ask for flexible working. we don't need to call it a day. i am a bit worried about calling it this day, i will tell you why. say you have had four hangover days you are allowed to ta ke hangover days you are allowed to take during the year. do you think employees would take it in a job insecure time? they wouldn't. and what message might it send back to the employer that you are drinking that much. because it implies you are kind of drinking. sol that much. because it implies you are kind of drinking. so ijust think what we need is flexible working. and we have it, you have a legal right to do it, you have a legal right to do it, you have a legal right to say to him i would just like to work partly from home, partly from the central office. won't take hold duvet days? you would have a duvet day? that was a day that had to be booked in about two we e ks day that had to be booked in about two weeks in advance, which just doesn't work for parents, it might be the middle of the night, conferences that go on late into the night, it is not practical in this time. but in your industry and most service based industries now, working from home, we have the
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technology to work partly from home, partly from central office. take kids to school and do work at night, that flexibility is now enshrined in law. i willjust be a little bit curmudgeonly about this, seeing as i am inajob curmudgeonly about this, seeing as i am in a job where i can't do that, because there is no flexibility in terms of the hours we are here. you are adults. you are in the workplace. you can respond to this, ellie, and come back at me hard. you go into work, you have a job, you have responsibilities. look after your own time, look after your own behaviour, your own intake, do the job, save your socialfor behaviour, your own intake, do the job, save your social for the weekend. 100%, but a lot of my friends work shifts and do i not see them because they work on the weekend and i work from home? i'm doing the same and getting my targets but i do it from the couch because i went out. our people happier and does it work?” would like to think so. we haven't
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had a personal leave in three years, the team is doing really well. it's about well—being. in the service industry in the digital marketing space, there's a lot of technically minded managers and what we are trying to get out of the managers is for them to be more socially aware. and let their guys have a bit more flexibility in the role. how many daysis flexibility in the role. how many days is it, five? there is no cap, it is self policed by the team, as is, it is fair to say, we have other perks, unlimited holidays, we work 10-4, perks, unlimited holidays, we work 10—4, they are the core working hours and some guys come in at 8am and don't leave until 6pm. is there someone who has... who has had the most? i don't know, probably between the two of us. like, what, are we talking? i have had five this year. a few personal ones and you have had a similar number? yeah, yeah. well—being, wellness, this is the key, isn't it? green it's the key,
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people want to work more flexibly. we have netflix, we have virgin having unlimited holidays. it's about trusting people and we have the possibility to work flexibly and we are tied with italy in the g7 and we are tied with italy in the g7 and we are tied with italy in the g7 and we are 20th per capita. long—term sickness absence last year, 26% was stress at work. let's lighten up the workplace, let's get good management and be flexible. these kids are trying to do flex ability for their employees, i like it, but other people are entitled to it, notjust people are entitled to it, notjust people with kids. if you don't drink... if you are a non—smoker and smokers get cigarette breaks and have those four or five ten minute breaks, if you don't drink and have late nights, isn't that some kind of resentment? you make the point that it's actually not about drinking, is that
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right? it's not related to that. if you don't feel like coming in, you can call it hangover day. that's it and to be honest, this whole thing started because parents get quite a lot of privileges with us, if they up lot of privileges with us, if they up in the night and they can't get into nursery, they can work from home so this is giving back to the non— parents if they go out for a drink at the pub quiz. thank you. carol, when was your last hangover day? i've never had one actually, naga.” notice you had to put the word "day" after that. i'm saying nothing! listen, pot and kettle, i'm leaving it at that! good morning, we have some frost around, especially in central and eastern areas where the temperature is full and overnight and a beautiful weather watchers to ascend in this morning from west sussex. a fair bit of and the cloud
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coming in from the west ahead of rain and we have rain coming in with hill snow embedded in that. if you're in scotland, watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. we've got all this rain coming in from the west, some of that is heavy, depositing some snow on the hills and it will continue in the east through the day. blustery winds but behind it, look at isobars. the wind will strengthen later with some parts of the southwest and english channel having gales. first thing, a bit of brightness and the cloud moving in followed by the rain but the sunshine prevailing the longest in north—east scotland. the rest of scotland, fairly cloudy with showers and the rain moving across southern areas. rain continuing to push out of northern ireland through the day, followed by a lot of cloud and some showers and the rain getting in across eastern england with some hill snow. in northern england in some of the heavier bursts, particularly in the north—east, we might see some of that at lower
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levels for a time and it won't last and we don't expect it to settle because milder air is coming in behind this band of rain, as well as showers and temperatures, ten and 11 in the south—west, still pretty cool elsewhere. as i mentioned, the wind strengthening in parts of southern wales, south—west england, the english channel and the channel islands, touching gale force and there will still be showers and hill snow around and the rain will come backin snow around and the rain will come back in across north—east scotland. that's where it will be tomorrow but for many tomorrow, a relatively dry day with a few showers. still some showery outbreaks in northern ireland, some getting into north—west england and also north wales, and it's still going to be windy across southern parts of wales, south—west england and the enlist channel and the channel islands. still the risk of that wind gusting up to gale force. temperature—wise, best once again in the south—west. heading on through saturday, a lot of dry weather, still those showers and still windy,
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particularly across england and wales but a cold wind coming from the north across north—west scotland, where we'll also have some rain. later on in the day, we'll see another system coming in across the south—west bringing in some rain. its northern extent overnight still open to question, it might get as far as northern england overnight but it might not. this is what we think at the moment, coming in across wales, parts of the midland and heading into northern england but a lot of dry weather around, and windy, particularly the further south you travel. com and a nominator, feeling rather cool, naga and charlie. carol, thanks very much. speak to you later. i'll tell you some people who pay close attention to the weather is people who get up early to deliver the milk. out in all weather to deliver the milk. there's been an increase in the number of people getting their milk delivered on their doorstep. traditional milkman making the comeback? dani hewson is out
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on the milk round for us. on the move delivering the milk. good morning! good morning! good morning, charlie and naga. yes, i've swapped my driver this morning, i've swapped my driver this morning, i've got the boss of the dairy because in the 805, milk deliverie5 we re because in the 805, milk deliverie5 were commonplace but over the decade5 they have slipped away because mostly we been buying our milk from the supermarkets in plastic dolls. however, environmental concerns have seen a big change in our habits. in fact, we've seen a 7% increase in the number of people getting their milk delivered. chris, this has been a big boost for your business, hasn't it? huge, we've seen a 50% increase in hourglass production and we've now got over 10,000 customers buying glass bottle melt on our online platform. it's notjust milk you deliver now? -- milk. a huge range of convenience produce and fruit and veg and meat and fish and a full
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range of groceries. what do you put the increase down to? is it really environmental concerns? we saw a massive increase when the blue planet programme came on the tv and that pricked everyone's conscience and asa that pricked everyone's conscience and as a result we have seen sales grow and grow. thank you very much indeed. i'm going tojump off and have a quick chat to rachel from keep britain tidy. it's allison, actually. sorry, it was rachel earlier. it's freezing cold, we are out here very early, are we seeing people wanting to make a difference in their habits? at keep britain tidy we have done research that showed 91% of people know consumer behaviour is damaging the planet but only 22% have changed their behaviour. this kind of consumption, which is ultimately about reusing rather than recycling, has to be better for the planet and it will be pa rt of better for the planet and it will be part of the 22% of people who are
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using the keep, changing their behaviour and doing something that makes a difference. these glass bottles make a difference because the plastic containers we get in the supermarket, they have been a success story? they have been, about 70- 90% of the success story? they have been, about 70— 90% of the plastic milk containers will be recycled and there will be a content of recycled material in them so in many ways they are a bit of a success story, but having said that, as i said, recycling still isn't as good as reusing and you will get infinite amount of use from a glass bottle because even when it is damaged or broken it can be ground down and reused. thank you. allison was telling me earlier that she used to drive these things for a living. i've been absolutely rubbish at making the deliveries and i ended up at making the deliveries and i ended up leaving some milk at houses that hadn't paid for it so i will let andy crack on with the deliveries andi andy crack on with the deliveries and i will get to do with —— do the
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fun and i will get to do with —— do the fu n stuff and i will get to do with —— do the fun stuff assuming i can get it working. ok, here we go!” fun stuff assuming i can get it working. ok, here we go! i love it, dani, driving that! thank you very much! was she there laughing? slightly sinister delivery driver! we are asking a question: what do robbie williams, joanna page from gavin and stacey, and elsa from frozen all have in common? they're the latest celebrities to sign up to read a cbeebies bedtime story. they'll all be featuring in this year's festive episodes, and in a twist, singer gregory porter will sing winter wonderland rather than read it. here's a little taster of robbie and gregory in action. cbeebies bedtime story. hello, i'm robbie and this is coco. we are getting very excited about christmas, and so the dogs in
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tonight's bedtime story, one little pup tonight's bedtime story, one little pup in particular. #in pup in particular. # in the meadow you can build a snowman, and attend that he's a sa nta snowman, and attend that he's a santa clown. we'll have lots of fun with mr snowman, until the other kids not him down. # when it snows, ain't it thrilling? though your nose gets a chilling. # they frolic and play, the eskimo way, walking in a winter wonderland. discussing it because they are stories, but instead of reading the story, just as a song. why wouldn't you? it is a song. i know, sounds beautiful. wonderful, sounds beautiful. wonderful, sounds beautiful. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. polls have opened across the capital
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until 10pm this evening. it means some schools used as polling stations will be closed with pupils having an extra day off. for their parents that's meant having to find childcare at short notice. and some christmas events, like concerts and nativities, have had to be rearranged. my mum and dad were supposed to come for the evening performance, but as it got changed at the last minute, they couldn't work anything out so they couldn't come. it's a little bit annoying that my kids have to be offjust sprung on me, i had quite a lot of plans. the body which represents doctors is warning homeless people are in desperate need of better support. new research found hospitals seen a three—fold increase in the number of patients with no fixed abode over the past eight years. figures from the bma have revealed there were more than 36,000 a&e visits in england by homeless people last year, with almost a third of those in the capital.
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for decades it was rumoured parakeets were introduced to london byjimi hendrix, or during a humphrey bogart film, but those urban myths may have been disproved by experts. scientists have now mapped sightings of the birds over the last 50 years and found no evidence to support the theories. it's thought an outbreak of fatal parrot fever may have encouraged owners to release them in the 19205 and '505. let's take a look at the travel situation now. things have improved a bit on tube, but there's no service between earl's court and ealing broadway/richmond following a signal failure at west kensington. on the trains, there's no strike action today on south western railway but an amended timetable is still in place. on the roads, works at east smithfield are causing westbound tailbacks on the highway heading towards tower hill. in mayfair, brook st is closed for works with no access to brook gate from park lane. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a chilly start to the day, and there's a touch of frost out
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there for most spots too, with temperatures hovering around freezing. not the greatest day of weather — it's set to turn wet and windy for much of the day, but there will be a bit of early brightness out towards eastern areas first thing and then the cloud will start to thicken from the west. a band of rain pushing in from the west as we head through the late morning into the afternoon, some of it possibly quite heavy at times and it will be raining for much of the day and also strong gusts of wind around. temperatures not up to much — peaking between seven and nine degrees celsius through the afternoon. still raining for much of the first part of the evening rush—hour with the band of rain clearing east followed by showers through the evening period and overnight as well. it's staying windy overnight and into tomorrow morning but it will feel a touch milder tomorrow with temperatures between 3—5 celsius to start the day. lots of dry weather around tomorrow, quite a bit of cloud. it will be staying rather windy, remaining blustery over the weekend but again, mostly dry. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. the polls have opened for the uk's third general election in less than five years — and the first in december for almost a century. the reformed killer who tried to fight off the london bridge attacker with a fire extinguisher speaks, for the first time, about what happened. do you think of yourself as a hero? a hero? no. jack gave up his life. he's... yeah, he would be my hero. jose mourinho says tottenahm will be a "team to be feared" in the knock out stages of the champions league. that's despite losing to bayern
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munich in theirfinal group game. good morning, andy is back in the hot seat, i have hijacked his milk round in manchester because we have been hearing that a growing number of us have gone back to having our milk delivered. good morning, a frosty start in some areas, bring in the west with hilts no pushing east, and it will be blustery with winds strengthening in the south later. the 0ldham the old ham college the 0ldham college choirjust for you. # silent night. christmas comes early for terrence, the age uk volunteer who won't be home alone for the first time in 20 years. good morning. it's thursday, the 12th of december. our top story. after six weeks of campaigning, polls have opened across the uk for voting in the general election. it's the third ballot in less than five years,
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and the first to be held in december in nearly a century. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster for us this morning. jonathan, talk us through the day ahead. good morning. decision day is here, politicians have been persuading us over the last few weeks and it is time for us to deliver our verdict. for the last hour, tens of thousands of polling stations had been open in the 650 constituencies that make up the 650 constituencies that make up the electoral map of the uk come in schools, community centres and other buildings across england, scotland, wales and northern ireland. you will have until 10pm to cast your vote going into one of those polling stations and putting a cross in the box next to the candidate and party you would like to represent you at westminster. some will have already voted by post. if your postal ballot is still on the kitchen table, you can drop that off at your local
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polling station at any time before 10pm. when the polls close, we will get an exit poll to give us an idea of the outcome. the first actual results are expected before midnight and this time tomorrow we should know exactly what kind of a result this election has delivered. jonathan, thank you very much. results coverage starts as polls close tonight. huw edwards and the team will be here on bbc one and the bbc news channel from 9.55 tonight. there ll be special coverage on bbc radio 4 and five live and of course, there 5 full coverage online at bbc.co.uk/news police in new zealand say they're finalising plans to recover the bodies of those killed by a volcanic eruption on white island on monday. at least eight people are known to have died and another nine are missing, presumed dead. the salvage operation has been hampered by ongoing volcanic activity on the island.
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lawyers for the hollywood producer harvey weinstein say he's reached a $25 million settlement with dozens of women who've accused him of sexual misconduct. the money will be shared among more than 30 former employees and actors. he still faces criminal charges and is set to stand trial injanuary. he has pleaded not guilty and denies any wrongdoing. tributes have been paid to the naturalist and broadcaster david bellamy who's died at the age of 86. he presented a series of nature programmes in the '705 and '805, and was a campaigner for conservation. he's been described as a "larger—than—life character" who "inspired a whole generation". there's nothing like a good drying day to put spring back into your polyester... david bellamy — for more than 30 years, he was the enthusiastic face of botany on television.
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he had failed his exams at school, but a job in a lab fostered a love of science, and a few years later he was a lecturer at durham university, specialising in marine biology. it was that which lead to the interview when the torrey oil tanker ran aground in 1967, releasing thousands of tonnes of oil into the sea. all of a sudden, a very large stretch of coast was going to be changed. the whiskers, his voice and his easy—to—understand style led to his celebrity. i think i was interviewed byjohn craven in the very early days, on a sewer pipe in redcar, and i think that made me. in the late 19905 he was linked to hundreds of conservation and wildlife organisations. but when he declared climate change to be "poppycock", invitations began to dry up. but the conservation foundation he set up in 1982 has issued a statement describing him as a friend, a teacher, and a larger—than—life character, who inspired people with his knowledge and enthusiasm. and that's where all the action is. a painting worth around
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£50 million may have been found inside the wall of the gallery from where it disappeared. "portrait of a lady" — by the austrian artist gustav klimt — went missing from a gallery in northern italy in 1997. now tests are being carried out on a painting which was found in a secret compartment inside the gallery wall, discovered by a gardener as he cut back ivy. it isa it is a good story. the reformed killer who fought the london bridge attacker with a fire extinguisher, john crilly, has told the bbc that he was prepared to die to protect others. mr crilly, a friend ofjack merritt — one of the two cambridge graduates killed in the attack ? has been speaking exclusively to our legal correspondent clive coleman. nearly two weeks ago, ex—offenderjohn crilly found himself at the centre of mayhem and butchery at a prison education event at fishmongers' hall where his good friend
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jack merritt was murdered. and what was the first thing that sort of made you think, hang on, something is going on here? just a very high—pitched girl's — not to be sexist, and that, but a very high—pitched girl's scream. so, i thought, was that girls messing about? was it screaming or laughter? girls laughing or screaming, i wasn't sure. and for a second, itjust got proper, a lot louder, a lot more intense. it was obvious something was kicking off. you came down the stairs, around the corner of the stairs, presumably. as soon as i came out of there, i could clearly see usman is at the bottom of the stairs, in the corridor. he's just stood there with his two knives. john screamed at khan,
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"what are you doing?" his reply was chilling. something like, "kill everyone," or "kill youse," or something about killing people. and then — yeah, laughing. john attacks khan with anything he could find, first a wooden lectern, then a fire extinguisher, all the time aware that khan was wearing what looked like a suicide vest. i'm just basically screaming at him to blow it. you're asking him to blow it up? calling his bluff, sort of thing, saying you haven't got the bottle to blow it. he said, "i'm waiting for the police." he said he was waiting for the police? before he blew it, yeah. i was prepared to probably lose my life, yeah. yeah, i was. john and others with makeshift weapons pursued him on to the street.
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he was struggling with the spray, couldn't see what he was doing with it, so i was spraying him, hoping someone else was going to be able to take him from the side orfrom behind or whatever. and that's exactly what ended up happening. the spray distracted him, and the guy with the tusk gave him a prod. within minutes, police arrived. it seemed like ages before they shot him. and they weren't all gung—ho and trigger—happy. they took their time, to the point where i did scream as well to shoot him. you screamed shoot him? yes. why? in case he blew the belt. afterwards, his thoughts turned to jack merritt, the cambridge graduate who saved his life, and who died along with saskia jones. easy to talk to. made you feel important,
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sort of thing, like, listened, and you could tell he was really genuinely interested. can you tell me what he meant to you? jackjust basically meant hope. do you think of yourself as a hero? a hero? no. jack gave up his life. he's... yeah, he would be my hero. sally will have the sport in a little while, talking aboutjose mourinho, not doing so well last night. he is still confident. also, a lot of people engaging with the discussion about handover days
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when you can call in even on the day and say, not feeling too good, going to work from home. called handover days. we were talking to the guys who get five a year, you can call up not to be in work because you don't feel like being there. i am of the opinion you turn up and do the job. we don't have that option anyway. it has been divisive. we will talk about it later on. handover days, you just plough on through! i come icome in, i come in, yes. good morning, everybody. we have seen some beautiful sunrises, clear skies in eastern areas. we have also had some frost. in the west, temperatures are higher because we have rain across
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northern ireland, wales and west and england continuing towards the east. the showers in scotland mean the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. the rain across western areas pushing east, accompanied by blustery winds. these isobars mean the wind will strengthen later. this morning, the rain continues with hill snow pushing steadily east. brighter skies today. sunniest across north east scotland. elsewhere in scotland, north east ireland, showers. the rain in wales and the south—west pushing to eastern parts of england with hill snow. heavier bass is possible —— heavier bursts are possible. but it will be transient. behind this band
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of rain, things improved in terms of temperatures, not as cold but there will be showers around. later on, the wind strengthens across south wales, south—west england, the english channel and the channel islands, touching gale force at times. some clear skies, some showers, the rain today pushing in the north sea will move back into eastern parts of scotland. tomorrow, we start off with rain there, some showers around across northern ireland, northern england and northern parts of wales. the winds still a feature across southern areas especially the south—western quarter. touching gale force. this is where we will have the highest temperatures at 11 degrees. saturday, still a lot of dry weather but showers some falling as snow on
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the hills. blustery winds across southern areas, a northerly wind across the north of scotland bringing rain. later on, the next system bringing rain. later on, the next syste m m oves a cross bringing rain. later on, the next system moves across the south—west introducing rain. there is an element of uncertainty how far north that will travel overnight. it may make it into northern england but what we think is it will move across the south west, through wales, heading into northern england with hill snow. hill snow for northern ireland and western scotland, showers moving across the english channel. in between, some drier and brighter conditions. still blustery winds. are those temperature is about right now? as we head into the weekend, for some, they are a degree below average. and for some, a little bit
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above average. so, not far off. describe the perfect weather for you on christmas day. i love the snow, when you don't have to travel and you can watch it fall in coming it is so romantic. what will the weather be like on christmas day! charlie, we have had this conversation already! i thought you might have changed your mind. are you sticking by your prediction for easter, a snowy easter! it depends went east it is and how cold the winter is. there is a greater chance you will have a cold and snowy easter if easter falls early because the winter will be ensconced then and the winter will be embedded. it is not like you to hedge your bets on the weather. 0h, bets on the weather. oh, look at the time! she is predicting the 2021 easter weather as well!
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if you were watching yesterday, you might remember 78—year—old terrence — who was on to talk about loneliness at christmas. it isa it is a time when you get together with family and friends. but if that is not what you have, it can be a bleak time. he told us that, for 20 years, he hasn't been able to celebrate in the traditional way. when you came in and sat here and you were talking about our christmas tree, i asked you whether you had a christmas tree yourself, and you don't have a christmas tree. would you like a christmas tree? yes, i would. social media can be a horrible place, i'm sure, and we don't often do this. if you're out there and can help terrence get a christmas tree, decorate your house, if you'd like that, yes? we'll sort that out for you before christmas. we'll make sure this christmas is a great one.
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it would come as no surprise our audiences react and is in as that happened, guess what. —— and after that. well, after the programme, 0ldham college got in touch to say they'd like to give terrence a christmas tree. so, last night, dan went to pay him a visit at home to see what happened next. terrence! oh, hello! it's dan walker from the telly. what are you doing here? nice to you again! we made you a promise, can we come in? yeah, of course you can! do you know what we've had, terrence — an incredible reaction to you coming on. i think the thing that struck home was when you mentioned how many times you've been alone on christmas day. yes, like i said, what used to happen is i used to go round to my mother's on christmas day because i always cooked a meal for her evey year, and i always took the things round to her, and i used to buy her little bits all the time, and all this sort of stuff, and i used to parcel them all up
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at christmas and put them in a pillowcase and take them round to her. one day, i'll never forget her saying to me, she said, "do you know, without you bringing me my presents at christmas, i wouldn't have any presents, would i?" and i have to think about that now. you know, people on their own now don't get any presents from people. and the good news is this year you have got christmas dinner ta ken care of because of your work with age uk. i have indeed, yes, i have indeed. who are you going to go for christmas dinner with this year? i'm going to go with our nancy. she's the good friend you've been talking to through age uk? yes, she's 90 and she's got dementia. but having said that, because i've already dealt with a lot of people with dementia, there's a way to do it. do you think the fact you've struggled with loneliness in the past has made you far more aware of the issues that other people go through? yes! i always think with anything, unless you've actually been there, you don't know what it is like.
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i didn't know what it was like to have depression until i got it. you had such an impact on our viewers, we'd love to do something for you, and you said on—air you didn't have a christmas tree, which we promised we'd sort out for you. am i allowed to go and open yourfront door? yes. 0k. you stay there, terrence. we've got some people waiting outside. hello, everybody. would you like to come in? terrence, can i introduce these lovely people who have come to meet you from 0ldham college. hi, sir. they have got an early christmas present for you, terrence. nice to see you, guys. hello, sir. good evening. how are you, sir, today? are you ok, terrence? it's ok. you got a tissue at the ready?
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while terrence is sorting himself out. are you ok? do you need a seat? no, i'm all right, thank you. tell us what you wanted to help out and get involved? we are here to decorate your tree and be with you. we brought you a christmas tree to brighten up your christmas! thank you! oh, terrence! we've had a lot of people who said they would love to do something for you, but we thought old ham college, they're only round the corner from you, they were so keen to help and come and do something. that's so nice. now, terrence, we've got one more surprise for you, because i heard you like a carol. yes, i do. do you have a favourite? silent night. do you want to come with me? all right?
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come to your front door. we've got a few more friends from 0ldham college. come out here, terrence. this is the 0ldham college choirjust for you. # silent night, holy night. # all is calm, all is bright. # round yon virgin, mother, mother and child. you all right? all right, thank you. # holy infant so tender and mild. # sleep in heavenly peace.
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that is one of those moments. what occurs to me watching that is there will be lots of other people in similar situations like terrence, looking forward to christmas and thinking, itjust isn't going to be that special because they don't have someone to share it with, or little things like a christmas tree. it isa things like a christmas tree. it is a wake—up call to those lucky enough to be with family and friends to look around your community. it is worth saying this. details of organisations offering information and support with loneliness are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded
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information on 08000 564 756. lots of you have been getting in touch, our viewers love stories like this, thank you for getting in touch. diana says this is what christmas is about, more people out there need this. rosie and ss, eve ryo ne there need this. rosie and ss, everyone coming together from all faiths, all walks of life, i had tea rs faiths, all walks of life, i had tears in my eyes watching this. —— rosita. and another viewer says, terrence, a lovely guy, everyone do this to your nearest old person. that is the sentiment, maybe there is someone near you who would benefit from a bit of attention. sue says, good to see some peace and goodwill being shared. and what a lovely man terrence is, thanks to everyone who has helped in brightening up his christmas.
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grace fell apart and cried when she watched the clip and hearing the singing, thank you for making me redo my make up! but it was worth it. people are going to the polls today, for the first time in a century we have an election day in september schumacher in december, third election in five years. let us see some of the images coming to us this morning —— and election day in december. conservative party leader borisjohnson hasjust left his polling station in westminster having just cast his vote. he took his dog with him, his dog is called dylan. casting his vote, 8:24am. a little
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wave for the cameras. borisjohnson has cast his vote. we are expecting to see the leader of the labour partyjeremy corbyn heading to his polling station between —— and nicola sturgeon. and jo swinson we understand will be voting after 9:30am. there won't be any surprise how they will be casting their vote. polling began at 7am this morning. still to come. john is in gloucestershire where they re using technology and citizen science to tackle falling hedgehog populations. there has been an odd way in which
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habitation has been happening. good morning. good morning. this young lady, we have figured out is a girl, was brought in last night. number 311 this winter. they only had 180 brought in last year which proves something is different this year, it is causing issues. what is up year, it is causing issues. what is up with her, she is not a well add a little too light. aside from the fact she is only 356 grams which is too small to hibernate and enough of a reason to come into rescue, she has a puncture wound on her head and will be going to the vet. the volunteers here will look after this particular hedgehog and all the others until they get to double her weight at least and ready to be
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released into the wild. i this is the ground of the pennines. this is the satellite imagery. this is a weather system moving across the uk. we have rain spreading north and eastward and the white lines are getting closer together across southern areas so the breeze will pick up in southern areas where as in the north the wind will not be as strong. this is the snow over the higher ground
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of the pennines. for much of scotla nd of the pennines. for much of scotland and northern ireland a bit drier this afternoon. temperatures 48 celsius so it will feel fairly chilly. tonight the rain clears into the north—east and there will be more showers into western area centre friday morning. going through friday with more rain moving into the far north of scotland. elsewhere there could be one or two showers for wales and north west england drifting away to the midlands. sunny spells either side of that and maximum temperatures on friday similarto maximum temperatures on friday similar to today. the weekend, low pressure is going to be the dominant driving force and with that we are going to see some severs moving in and more persistent rain saturday night into sunday and they will be cold enough air in place to produce
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snow. there will also be some sunny spells. quite blustery and temperatures five to 8 degrees.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and karin giannone. breaking the glass ceiling. european central bank boss christine lagarde heads a growing list of women in top jobs. live from london, that's our top story on thursday 12th december. christine lagarde at the european central bank is just one. we look at a small, but growing number of women at the top

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