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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 7, 2020 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you re watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11.003m, and these are the main stories this morning. a british teenager is given a four—month suspended sentence after being found guilty of lying about gang—rape in cyprus. her lawyer says she'll appeal the conviction. an 18—year—old man admits killing pc andrew harper, who was dragged along the road by a van in berkshire last year, but denies murder. dozens of people are killed in a stampede in the huge crowd attending the funeral of iranian military commander qasem soleimani. the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey, and joker leads the pack with 11
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bafta film nominations. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. the british teenager who was convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus has been given a four—month suspended sentence. it means she's now free to return to the uk. her lawyer told the bbc there was huge relief that she was being allowed to go home — but confirmed that she would be appealing against her conviction. the 19—year—old was found guilty after she retracted her original statement alleging she'd been attacked by 12 men in ayia napa. she says she was coerced into changing her story. joining me now is our correspondentjohn maguire, who is in paralimni in cyprus for us.
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some relief at this sentence, because it had been possible she could have been sentenced up to a yearin could have been sentenced up to a year in prison. yes, exactly, so there are two ways of looking at this, really. positively, you can say that it was at the more lenient end, and the judge jury say that it was at the more lenient end, and thejudgejury and sentencing remarks the whole process in the court behind me this morning we took about 20 minutes. the judge said he was giving her a second chance, partly they of her youth, and partly about how much time she had spent in custody here, and had to remain in cyprus. remember, this happened lastjuly, she has not had the chance to go home until now, so crucially from this morning, the one thing that has emboldened the family is that for the first time, she is able to return to the uk, but what the campaigners outside court here, there must have been a crowd of around 150 campaigners, very noisy, lots of banners, lots of chanting. they were representing women's rights groups, not only from cyprus
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the uk, but very interestingly, from israel, where the 12 men originally arrested and accused, but then released, came from. one woman i spoke to has travelled here forjust 20 her son was flying straight back tojerusalem to 20 her son was flying straight back to jerusalem to go 20 her son was flying straight back tojerusalem to go back to work, but she felt she was motivated to come here by the way the men had behaved and going back tojerusalem. —— for just 20 hours and was flying straight back. two parts, one for the young women to get back to the uk and recover, and for the lawyers to stop looking at a process of aid appeal. earlier, ispoke to stop looking at a process of aid appeal. earlier, i spoke to the family's barrister. —— start looking ata family's barrister. —— start looking at a process of appeal. we are delighted. of course, we came to court this morning with trepidation, notjust because of the damaging effect of the conviction, not knowing whether it would be immediate custody or, in fact, a suspended sentence, so we are pleased that she's going home. tell us a little bit about her. i think we heard her mother has told the bbc previously she's been diagnosed with post—traumatic stress disorder. how have the last several months
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been for her and indeed herfamily? it's been a very traumatic ordeal for her. she's had to wait effectively six months. she's had several adjournments in terms of the trial of this matter. preliminary legal matters. she was in custody for about four and a half weeks in a cell that she had to share with eight other women in a prison in nicosia, and thereafter she's been on fairly stringent bail conditions, so there is just a huge relief that she's going home today. but whilst of course we are delighted with the sentence, i can tell you now that we will be appealing the conviction. we will be seeking an expedited appeal to the supreme court of cyprus and will also be considering going to the european court of human rights. this case is not finished by any means. tell us if she's been aware of the amount of support. at the conviction, there's a lot of people here, campaigners, not only from cyprus, also from the uk, also from israel and indeed very, very vociferous at the sentencing this morning. she's been completely aware of all the support. it's been international.
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she has had well—wishers from all around the world, particularly from israel, who were concerned about her plight and about her treatment and concerned as to whether she was actually getting justice and we feel we have had justice today in terms of the sentence, but we do not feel that we have had justice in terms of how the trial progressed, the manner in which it was conducted, the initial police investigation and the fact that we say she did not receive a fair trial. we heard not quite an intervention but some comments from the foreign secretary over the weekend urging, if you like, leniency. do you think that any of those comments, the behind—the—scenes negotiations, have made any difference? we know that the foreign office have intervened in the last week and we applaud that intervention. we know that dominic raab has spoken to his counterparts in the cypriot government. we know that he has phoned the cypriot president. we know, of course, that he has made very clear comments. in fact, he said on the andrew
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marr show last week, that he made his position crystal clear to the cypriot government, so we think that the pressure that has been brought to bear has had some influence, although, of course, we cannot comment on the political nature of this case. as you heard there from lewis para qc, during the last six months, some real concern about the way that this case was handled by the cypriot authorities. —— power. but it is worth saying that the government in cyprus has maintained that the police, the court, all acted properly, but all of those discussions are now for the lawyers, for the young woman and her family, and for the first time in around six months, they can return it to the uk as soon as possible and started to try to put this ordeal behind them. thank you, john.
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a short while ago, the foreign secretary, dominic raab gave this reaction. well, i was relieved that this vulnerable young lady will now be returning home to begin the process of recovery, given all that she's been through. i spoke to her mother on friday, i understand quite how much she's been through, how much the family has been through, so my first priority has been her welfare. we will be following up on some issues in relation to the case. i spoke to the cypriot foreign minister about that. and there is a broader issue for brits travelling, notjust in cyprus or indeed europe, but travelling abroad, whether it's holidaying, backpacking, to make sure they can do so as safely and as possible. that was the foreign secretary. we can now speak to zelia gregoriou, who teaches gender studies at the university of cyprus and is a member of the newly created network of women against gender based violence. thank you forjoining us. what are your thoughts on this case and what has happened here? let's start with
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the decision, the sentencing today. i think it was a kind of risk management. i think suspended sentence are enabled the government to have two things at the same time, to have two things at the same time, to show that they received the outcry in response to that, and at the same time, not to give the impression that the judiciary of cyprus is susceptible to influences. so actually, the president avoided having to decide if he would grant clemency. this is a case, obviously, that has been under the spotlight. what about other rape cases in cyprus? actually, i wasjust now add a panel discussion at a local news
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station, and they were stressing how large is the number of which actually is not that large, 150 cases since 2013. of this, however, there were very few convictions. what is invisible, though, and silenced in this play of numbers, is that many rape claims, they never make it to court, so they never make it to statistics. in the same way this young woman complained there are many attractions of claims and complaints for gender violence, including rapes. what happens in the case of rape, most of the time, the victim does not show up at court, so you do not get a trial, so the
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statistics pretty much lie. in the case of other kinds of gender violence, where you have beatings, threats, there are many cases where the victim makes exude attraction state m e nts the victim makes exude attraction statements just like this woman did. sorry to interrupt you. what is the evidence in terms of... i mean, it is difficult to know, obviously, if cases are not going to court, but the evidence to back up how often thatis the evidence to back up how often that is happening. how often do you think it is happening if it is a repeated problem? we have for example, on our website, repeated problem? we have for example, on ourwebsite, close repeated problem? we have for example, on our website, close to 6000 subscribers. there are hundreds of women who have reported this to us, how to us, how utterly very last moment, they've retracted the statement. and if attraction is done in sucha statement. and if attraction is done in such a way that the person who
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originally made the statement is not vulnerable to public mischief, it is because they claim they retract the statement for the benefit of the family, and so on. so the contraction of accusations and state m e nts contraction of accusations and statements of gender violence is the role in cyprus. in this case, the victim did not have any support, and she would have such guidance, she would have avoided making such a blank attraction statement. thank you very much, zelia. more than 30 people have been killed in a stampede as iranians flocked to the burial of top commander qasam soleimani, who was killed in a us drone strike last week, according to iranian media.
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dozens more have been injured. huge crowds have lined the streets cities around the country over the past few days to mourn the iranian general killed in a us air strike in iraq. he was due to be buried in his hometown of kerman today, following a four—day funeral procession. let's speak to our middle east correspondent lina sinjab who is in beirut. what is the latest, lina? there has been a crush on several people killed in the area around where the burial is happening. hundreds of thousands took to the streets, even in his hometown of kerman, this has been happening over the last three days, where nationwide funeral processions have been taking place before the burial. but now because of the huge crowd surrounding the coffin of major general qasem soleimani. reports of at least 30 killed and a0 more injured during this huge influx of people. it is a
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time of mourning, and a time of anger and grief for the loss of a leader that they have seen as someone who shaped iran's presents inside the region. —— iran's presence. but in other areas, they saw him as a man who was responsible for destruction and instability for the —— and was to blame for the death of hundreds in syria and iraq. and of course, we are still waiting to see how iran might retaliate over the killing. there has been a lot of tit—for—tat, escalation and state m e nts tit—for—tat, escalation and statements between tehran and the united states. tehran has announced that they vowed to take revenge harshly against the united states,
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and america has said that any threats made to america or american assets, they will also target iranian sites, including cultural sites. so the atmosphere is very heated, anger is dominating the scene, especially among the followers of iran, who also said that they are willing to fight and defend iran and to take revenge for the killing of qasem soleimani. that could be through iran or through a proxy of shi'ite militia that follow iran in the region. but it is hard to tell how this is going to come down at the moment. the us has denied a visa to the un foreign minister —— iranian foreign minister, he was expected to attend the un in new york this week, so it is hard to see how diplomacy is going to work at a time where the anger and heated threats are coming from both sides. thank you very much, lina. the pentagon has been forced to deny
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that american forces will be leaving iraq, after the leak of a letter that suggested that troops would be moved. it follows a vote in the iraqi parliament calling for the withdrawal of foreign forces from the country — in response to the us‘s killing of qasim soleimani in baghdad on friday. gareth barlow has more. helicopters fly over baghdad as the united states insists its forces will remain in iraq. washington has been forced to deny that this draft letter written by a senior us army general suggests american troops are withdrawing from the country. in it, brigadeer general william seely writes... as requested by the iraqi parliament and the prime minister, we will be repositioning forces over the course of the coming
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iraqi mps have called on american troops to leave and us government officials acknowledge the letter is genuine, but says it explains the us is moving troops out of the capital to provide protection elsewhere and isn't withdrawing. the defence secretary mark esper said the letter was inconsistent with us policy. with regard to that letter which i've read once, i can't tell you the voracity of the letter, i can tell you what i read. that letter is inconsistent with where we are right now. the clamour for clarity comes amid the fallout from america's killing of iran's top military commander qasem soleimani as he visited the iraqi capital. thousands of mourners have gathered for his burial in his home town kerman in south—eastern iran. qasem soleimani was the brains and brawn behind iran's policies in the middle east, tasked with protecting and boosting tehran's influence in the region.
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in death, as in life, he inspires fervent passions and his impact on the world is far from over. gareth barlow, bbc news. meanwhile, the white house has refused to grant iran's foreign minister a visa to visit the united nations in new york later this week. mohammad javad zarif, seen here on a previous visit, had been expected to speak to the security council about the killing of general soleimani. there's been no official comment yet from either side but washington has previously said it can deny access to the un for security, terrorism and foreign policy reasons. the foreign secretary dominic raab has been speaking this morning about the situation in the middle east. we wa nt we want to de—escalate the tension. we want to de—escalate the tension. we are concerned that, if we see a full—blown war, it will be very damaging, and actually the terror and particularly daesh will be the only winners. we are working with
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oui’ only winners. we are working with our us partners, our eu partners, which as i am travelling to brussels today, to make sure we send a clear and consistent message on the need for de—escalation to find a diplomatic route through. the headlines on bbc news — a british teenager is given a four—month suspended sentence after being found guilty of lying about gang—rape in cyprus. her lawyer says she'll appeal the conviction. dozens of people are killed in a stampede in the huge crowd attending the funeral of iranian military commander qasem soleimani. an 18—year—old man admits the manslaughter of pc andrew harper — who was dragged along the road by a van in berkshire last year — but denies murder. and in sport... england have got a couple of wickets as they try to win the second test against south africa. england now need six wickets today to win just their fifth test match in a year. arsenal legend ian wright says he's encouraged by what he's seen from the club's new manager mikel arteta. his side beat leeds united in the third round of the fa cup last night. and organisers of this month's australian open say
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they don't expect any delays to the start of the tournament despite the ongoing bush fires. reigning men's champion novak djokovic had suggested that the start could be delayed because of the air—quality in melbourne. i'll be back with more on those stories later. in australia, hundreds of volunteer firefighters have attended the funeral of one of their colleagues, who died while battling bushfires. andrew 0'dwyer was killed in new south wales last month when a tree fell in the path of his fire engine. his 19—month—old daughter charlotte was presented with her father's medal for bravery at the service. meanwhile, crews fighting the fires are preparing for conditions to worsen. officials in australia say almost 2,000 houses have now been destroyed in the crisis. my colleague lucy hockings sent us this update from wandandian, in new south wales. i'm standing by the princess highway near the town of wandandian, and driving here we came
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through mile after mile of charred out forest. and we've just had some local firies, some volunteer firemen, pull up to chat with us, and they told us the story of their little local town. on new year's eve a massive fire came through here and at one point they were fighting a fire on four different fronts, and they managed to save a lot of their little town. so you're hearing quite tragic stories here in australia, but little nuggets where the firefighters have had some success as well, which is so good for morale. and i have to say the cooler weather is a psychological boost for people here too. just to give them a bit of respite from the heat and from the wind, give people a sense that they can recharge, because you are right, in the coming days, the next few days, that hot, windy weather is set to return. so the sense of people being in limbo here is very strong, because they know that with that hot weather, the fires are really going to start up again, and that's a massive concern right across this part of australia.
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the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey, has become the sixth candidate in the race to become the next labour leader. she said the party needed a proud socialist to succeed jeremy corbyn and stay true to his radical vision. she joins sir keir starmer, emily thornberry, clive lewis, lisa nandy and jess phillips in the contest. nominations for the three—month contest formally open today and the result will be announced on four april. registered supporters can vote between the 1ath and 16th of january by paying £25. let's get more from our assistant political editor norman smith. tell us more about the candidates, have a breakdown, because rebecca long bailey has been described by some as effectively the continuity jeremy corbyn candidate. what about
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the others, is there much difference in views across them? it is clear that rebecca long bailey is the carry on carbon candidate, she has also been extremely loyal, she has a lwa ys also been extremely loyal, she has always been extremely loyal to jeremy corbyn and the shadow cabinet. she has gone out of her way to defend jeremy corbyn personally, and his policies, she has abducted a lot of the same rhetoric, talk about resisting the tories in parliament, and on the streets, it was noticeable this morning, she clearly sought to identify herself with jeremy corbyn. have a listen to her speaking about mr carbon. —— corbyn. jeremy had suffered unprecedented levels of criticism and attack against his own personal character, and he was very resilient throughout. i supported jeremy. i still support jeremy because i felt that he was the right man with the right moral integrity to lead the party... he lost catastrophically, didn't he? doesn't he accept responsibility for that? of course he does. any leader who leads us into a general election defeat needs to take ultimate responsibility. but he also set out a radical platform for policy development that
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involved the grassroots in our trade unions and developed some of the most exciting and innovative policies that we've seen in a generation. i think he'll go down in history as being remembered as the leader who has done that. now, we are rebecca long bailey differs from a mr corbyn is obviously, she is a woman, she is a northern mp, and let's be honest, she is not quite as grim faced and osteo as mr corbyn, so that may broaden her support, but basically, she is the corbyn camp candidate. —— not as austers. someone who is most certainly not the corbyn camp candidate is ian murray, standing for the deputy leadership. what is your argument that labour now needs to do to get itself in a place where it might have a chance of winning an election? i feel i am it might have a chance of winning an election? i feeli am uniquely placed to listen to the public and to change the labour party to win again, andi to change the labour party to win again, and i do feel that the
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architect of the disaster of the 12th of december should not be the architects of the future. i have beaten the odds all my life, both in politics and out of politics. i know how to campaign, how to win, how to build a broad coalition of support, which is what i think the labour party now needs. but first, it has to listen to people in the seats we lost, and in the sense that we won, and also in the seats we will never win to understand what the public are saying out there. that scottish voice in the top of the labour party is incredibly important because it is incredibly important because it is not just about is incredibly important because it is notjust about understanding devolution in scotland, it is about understanding all the communities across the country screaming at the labour party at the moment to listen, and i think we have to listen, and i think we have to listen so we can change. what do you say to the likes of rebecca long bailey, the problem is not the policies but they really are presented, set in without any clear distinctive narrative?” presented, set in without any clear distinctive narrative? i think we have to change the journey at the direction as well as the voice into the face. if it is just a continuation of what we have had before, the public have rejected that, they have told us that. there
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may be one or two individual policies in the manifesto we should continue with and we should champion, the new green deal, for example, climate change is the biggest issue of our time. butjust to choose the voice and face and continue with the same language and policies will not change the amount of the public. we have to do both, andi of the public. we have to do both, and i think the position of uk deputy leader of the labour party is to bring the party together, to organise the party, and to make sure we can listen to the public and to ta ke we can listen to the public and to take that forward. bluntly, is the difficulty you have that your style of labour politics is now very much in retreat in the labour party, and the corbynites are the majority, your time has passed and the labour party? my time in the labour party is about honesty, principle, winning when the chips are down, that is what we labour party needs be about 110w. what we labour party needs be about now. it is not about me or about the past, it has to be about the future, which is key here. the only way we can shape the future is to listen from communities all over the country and to respond with labour values in a labour way. we are all pa rt values in a labour way. we are all part of the labour movement, the
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brass church of the labour movement, we all share labour movement values. but the only way we will to turn this around is to listen to the public. we cannot say that the message is wrong republic did not hear it. the message was wrong, the public added, they responded in the election. and as angela rayner said yesterday, this party has to listen and respond in change, or it will die. when you say it will die, are you saying that if rebecca long—bailey was elected leader and persisted with jeremy long—bailey was elected leader and persisted withjeremy corbyn's policies, that in effect would be the deathknell for the labour party? the public are screaming at us. they desperately wanted to vote for it labour party that could be a credible alternative government. first of all it has to be a credible opposition, and the way we do that as we listen to what the public were screaming at us on the 12th of december. i knocked on many doors with labour supporters, who had voted labour all their life, who we re voted labour all their life, who were in tears. you listen to any member of parliament who just scraped home or lost their seats in the seats we have held for a number of decades, never mind years, they
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will tell you exactly the same thing. we have to listen to that and respond, and the role of the uk deputy leader is to go into those communities, listen to what they are saying, and make sure the labour party and structure is fit for the future. let's talk about the future, not the past. ian murray, thanks very much. i think there are seven candidates for deputy leader, i want to try and name them all, there are six for leader. there will be the first hustings for labour mps tonight, then the hustings for deputy leader tomorrow. so the contest as well and truly getting under way. you, norman. contest as well and truly getting underway. you, norman. —— thank you. an 18—year—old man has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of pc andrew harper. the 28—year—old police officer was killed when he was runover and dragged under a car when investigating a burglary in berkshire in august. henry long — who is from reading — denied murder. he's due to go on trial in march. 0ur correspondent daniela relph is at the old bailey. bring us up to date with what has happened there. 18—year—old henry
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long from near reading appeared before a judge via a video link from a belmarsh prison, where he is in custody. and it was put to him, and ask for his plate, the manslaughter charge against pc andrew harper from august last year. when the charge was put to henry long, his reply was, i plead guilty, guilty. ithink we all remember the death of andrew harper last august. there was an outpouring of public grief after his death, and very emotional statements from his new wife as well. he had been married just four weeks before his death. he had been called to reports of a break—in at a property in berkshire, close to reading, when he was there, there was some kind of incident involving a vehicle, where he appeared to get trapped under the vehicle and dragged along. it is alleged that henry long was the driver of that vehicle. but he had
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pleaded guilty today, to the manslaughter of andrew harper. but it is very important to stress that he and two others have pleaded not guilty to the charge of murder, and they will face a trial here at the 0ld they will face a trial here at the old bailey in march. thank you, daniela. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. some strong winds in the north of the uk so far this morning. cause some disruption to the transport network. strong winds will continue through the afternoon, may be severe gales and parts of north—west scotland. also in south—east scotla nd scotland. also in south—east scotland in the north—east of england. accompanied by heavy rain across scotland, northern england, and north and west of wales. some patchy rain in these, lastly dry air. gusty winds whenever you are, especially in the north—east, where we could see some severe gales of up to 80 mph. temperatures, 12 to 15 celsius, maybe one or two spots in
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the north—east of scotland and wales reaching 16 celsius. through tonight, still some cloud across southern areas, wintry showers coming to the north, turning chilly here. temperatures are staying in double figures across the south, the command during wednesday, a split across the country. four southern areas, quite cloudy, rain eventually moving on and during the afternoon. the country is drier, a few showers, and maybe some sunny spells. goodbye for now. hello. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines. dozens of people are killed in a stampede in the huge crowd attending the funeral of iranian military commander qasem soleimani. a british teenager is given four—month suspended sentence after being found guilty of lying about gang—rape in cyprus. her lawyer says she'll appeal the conviction. an 18—year—old man admits the manslaughter of pc andrew harper who was dragged along the road by a van in berkshire last year, but denies murder.
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the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey, joins the race to become the next labour leader. and joker leads the pack with 11 bafta film nominations. we'll have more on that and the other contenders. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's holly. good morning. let's start in cape town where england started the final day of the second test against south africa needing eight wickets to win just their fifth test in a year and they've got off to a decent start. jimmy anderson removed the nightwatchman keshav maharaj lbw. dom bess then got the wicket of captain faf du plessis, and sam curran'sjust got pieter malan out for sa. south africa are 171 for five chasing a38 to win. remember the highest ever successful run chase in test cricket is a18 so england are in good shape as long as they can take the final six wickets. meanwhile, there's been an update on the fitness of rory burns. he flew home from south africa
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after injuring his ankle whilst playing football in training. well he's now had surgery on ruptured ligaments, and will be out for up to four months so that means he misses the series in sri lanka in march. manchester united have warned that they will eject any fan "visibly or audibly" supporting city in any home area of old trafford during their league cup semi—final tonight. both clubs have agreed to limit the number of tickets available for away fans in both matches as a security measure. but the match isn't a sell out, and there are concerns that city fans could buy tickets in the home ends because they're on general sale. and there is full coverage of that league cup semi final, first leg between manchester united and manchester city is on 5 live from 7 o'clock tonight. arsenal legend ian wright says he's encouraged by what he's seen from the new arsenal manager mikel arteta. arsenal beat leeds united in the third round of the fa cup last night,
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despite being completely out—played by the championship side in the first half. according to captain alexandre lacazette, the difference came from arteta who "shouted a lot" at half time. as for leeds, their attention turns back to the main goal which is getting back into the premier league. they're currently top of the championship, and theirformer striker jermaine beckford says they're ready for a promotion push. this may come as a blessing in disguise, you know, there's no more fa cup games so you don't need to worry about an extra game, an extra couple of games in the season. you can focus now on the real aim, which is getting out of the championship and playing against teams like arsenal on a weekly basis. 0rganisers of this month's australian open say they don't expect any delays to the start of the tournament despite the ongoing bush fires. reigning men's champion novak djokovic had suggested that the start could be put back because of the air—quality in melbourne, which has been rated as very unhealthy. tournament officials say the health of fans, players and staff is their priority at all times, and the weather
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forecast is good. great britain have a good chance of reaching the quarter finals of the atp cup. this is a new knockout tournament that's been set up by the men's professional tour to kick off the 2020 season. jamie murray and joe salisbury won their final group game against moldova in sydney, and britain will qualify for the quarters if results go their way later. now, when the commonwealth games are held in birmingham in 2022, a couple of the events could be held thousands of miles away in india. shooting and archery have been dropped by the organisers to make way for other events. that's really annoyed india, who threatened to boycott the games completely. they've now said they want to host those two events, and will pay for the cost of staging them. the commonwealth games federation will consider the proposal in the coming weeks. and before we go, spare a thought for cricketer liam livingstone.
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the perils of modern cricket and being mic‘d up whilst playing in australia's big bash. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much. see you later. the chancellor, sajid javid, is to deliver a budget on the eleventh of march , the first after britain is due to leave the european union at the end of this month. on a visit to greater manchester, mrjavid said the government would set out how it plans to take advantage of the opportunities presented by brexit. the bbc understands the treasury is re—thinking public spending , with the aim of bolstering economic growth in more disadvantaged areas. up to an extra, for example, £100 billion of investment in infrastructure over the next few years, that will be transformative for every part of our country, but especially for those places that feel left behind. we've seen more investment over
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the last few years in the north, for example, but we need to see more. we need to see more in the midlands and we need to make sure every part of our country is seeing the benefits of increased opportunity. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity is here with more. so, andy, talk about spreading the wealth and investing and funding more infrastructure in the north. and over the christmas holidays, there was discussion around its not actually straightforward without rewriting the rules, so tell us more. that's right, the rules for the last ten years really, the whole of economic policy has been focused on trying to get the deficit down by which we mean the amount by which the government overspent its income, so if your income is a thousand and you spend 1100, you've got a deficit of 100, you spend 1100, you've got a deficit of100, and you spend 1100, you've got a deficit of 100, and similarly the government for the last ten years have been trying to reduce that so our income is more than the government spending but what's changed now as the rules have been loosened. sajid javid,
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after saying he was sticking to the office rules, you would be able to overspend but only by up to 2% of the value of the economy, so the deficit had to be less than 2% of the value of gdp, he loosened out and said we can spend up to 3% which gives them a lot more leeway to not reduce the deficit and also said it would only apply to current budgets, which means day—to—day spending. rather than investment spending. day—to—day could be petrol for your car, investment spending is buying a car, investment spending is buying a car, so the new rules say, you might buy the car and you can evaluate what that asset might be worth to you, as well as the borrowing you have taken to purchase it. the day—to—day petrol spending must be within what the income is. so he has loosened that and also there is talk of what they call infrastructure revolution. here they are echoing what labour was promising to do, had it won power. namely to change the way we account for big infrastructure projects like hs2, or
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the northern powerhouse. underwear you evaluate those, so don'tjust look at your debt, but also the asking purchasing price, like if you look at the house you buy, you don't just look at the mortgage. in terms of extra money for spending, the rules being changed to allow the deficit to increase, will taxes be raised? will there deficit to increase, will taxes be raised ? will there be deficit to increase, will taxes be raised? will there be extra borrowing? is it just raised? will there be extra borrowing? is itjust going to come from the deficit? you have to borrow to plug the deficit because the deficit is an overspend. if there is a gap between what we spend on our income we have to borrow to cover the difference. borrowing is largely similarto the difference. borrowing is largely similar to the deficit. what sajid javid has said it is i'm not going to stick to them strict fiscal rules, george osborne wanted, and philip hammond wanted, i'm going to loosen the purse strings. they have jettisoned the hold project of austerity and adopted something like what ed miliband was proposing back in 2015. namely, we only stick with income and spending for day—to—day
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spending. petrol for your car. rather than the price of your car. there's a bias in the way because great benefits for infrastructure projects and has to do with productivity and the fact the south—east of england and tends to be more productive on the basis that the most productive industries are there, not the workers work harder, and that means when you evaluate money will be best spent, it is biased towards the south—east. the argument is from a lot of economists, it's unfairly led to lots of money being allocated to infrastructure projects in the south—east rather than the rest of the country. if you can rewrite that formula, you get a different result, so what they are doing here is flagging up the fact billions of extra pounds will be spent on infrastructure and they will change the way they account for it. thank you very much, andy. the budget is the 11th of march. the home secretary has called for an urgent review of the classification of a drug thought to have been used by the uk's most prolific rapist. reynhard sinaga was jailed for a minimum of 30 years yesterday
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for more than 150 offences. his victims were men, who he's thought to have drugged using a form of class c drug ghb. following the sentencing yesterday, it's understood that the rape charity survivors manchester have had calls from 30 men who think they may have been a victim of reynhard sinaga. graham satchell has been speaking to sam — a survivor of sexual assault — about the stigma associated with being a male victim of the crime. the face of a monster. reynhard sinaga, grinning on his social media pages, is the most prolific rapist in british legal history. police say there may be as many as 200 victims. sinaga prowled the streets of manchester, searching for men before luring them back to his flat. we've been speaking to one man, not one of sinaga's victims, who was raped in 2016. when i broke down to my mum on the phone and told her that ijust wanted to die, i genuinely meant it. i didn't want to be... i didn't want to be anywhere.
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i didn't want to live with it. sam was assaulted by two men in a hotel room in manchester. he'd been out with his girlfriend, but at the end of the night, they became separated. sam got chatting to a group of men and went for one more drink. i think the first thing when people hear male rape is they automatically associate it with homosexuality. i think that there's a certain stigma attached to it, masculinity, that we say that you can't be a masculine man if you've not fought back and you've allowed this thing to happen and you've not...yeah, done whatever you can to go and find the perpetrators or even allow, you know, there to be perpetrators. so i think that what defines us as men or supposedly defines us as men is impacted from the offset as soon as something like this happens. this is st mary's in manchester, a sexual assault referral centre. it's where sam was treated, as were many of the men raped by sinaga. we've seen an increase of around the 33% mark for men coming forward.
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i'm an optimist. so, i like to think it's not an increase in sexual violence. i think it's an increase in confidence in people being able to come forward. the shame, the stigma associated with sexual assault, means it's been a dramatically underreported crime. some studies suggest 90% of male rapes are never reported. sam did go to the police but says it was an experience that made things worse. they asked me about my sexuality, about whether i'd ever cheated on my girlfriend before, about whether i'd ever had a male sexual encounter. but it all made me feel at the time that i really wasn't being believed here, like, i didn't understand what — whether or not i'm straight or gay, why does that have any difference? obviously, the issue's over consent. greater manchester police told us they've learned lessons from sam's case and they're now urging anyone who thinks they may have been assaulted by sinaga to come forward. graeme satchell, bbc news. greater manchester police has set up
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a dedicated number to provide support for anyone affected by this story. it s on your screen now, 0800 056 015a. or if you wish to contact the police and make a report related to this case, the number is 0800 092 0a10. details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 077 077. training for and completing a marathon can improve the health of a new runner‘s arteries, cutting about four years off their "vascular age", according to a new study. researchers tested over a hundred runners attempting the london marathon, and over six months of training, their arteries regained some youthful elasticity, which should reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
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here to tell us more is the bbc news online health editor, michelle roberts. so, where these runners across all different age groups? their ages we re different age groups? their ages were from 21 was the youngest, 69 was the eldest, but across the board, it seemed to have this beneficial effect of making their arteries a bit more elastic, which is good for your risk factors for stroke and heart disease, but also lowered their blood pressure. it went down by about as much as taking blood pressure pills. it's an amazing result. 0bviously doing exercises going to have beneficial effects on our health, and cardiovascular, it will improve our cardiovascular, it will improve our cardiovascular issues, but at what point because running a marathon is an extreme thing, so how much do you need to do to get this level of benefit? certainly shouldn't run a marathon without training first.
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it's important to say get checked out beforehand. if you've got any existing health conditions particularly. from this study we know six months of training where they were building up the distance that they ran orjogged or walked even, you can walk a marathon too, that seems to happen and it has this beneficial effect. even walking will have the same impact? if the amount of training you're doing they think is important but we have guidelines how much all of us should be getting and it's half an hour a day of moderate to vigorous activity, so a brisk walk would count as moderate but vigorous would be a jog or run but vigorous would be a jog or run but all of that gets your heart pumping and you will be healthy. when it was about the training that they were actually doing and how much exercise they were doing, when you talk about the half an hour a day, how did that compare with what happens when you are training for a marathon? what were these people doing over six months? with a marathon new start—ups will eventually before are about to the
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race, you should roughly be able to run for 15 miles comfortably. i know it doesn't sound realistically. but by that they mean after the 15 miles you should feel like you could continue a bit more running rather than collapsing on the floor. 0k, thank you very much. in a moment the business news but first the headlines on bbc news. more than 30 people are killed in a stampede in the crowd attending the funeral of iranian military commander qasem soleimani. a british teenager is given a four—month suspended sentence after being found guilty of lying about gang—rape in cyprus. her lawyer says she'll appeal the conviction. an 18—year—old man admits the manslaughter of pc andrew harper who was dragged along the road by a van in berkshire last year, but denies murder. i'm alice baxter. in the business news. supermarket morrisons has released trading numbers for the important pre—christmas period —
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the 22 weeks to fifth january. they reported a 1.7% fall in like—for—like sales, excluding fuel — blaming challenging trading coniditons and customer uncertainty. tokyo prosecutors have issued an arrest warrant for the wife of fugitive ex—nissan boss carlos ghosn who skipped bail in december. accoding to investigators, carole ghosn is suspected of making false statements to a tokyo court in april. electronics giant sony surprised attendees of the ces tech show in vegas by unveiling an electric car dubbed the vision s. the vehicle is a prototype designed to show off the firm's sensors and in—car entertainment. but, sony did not reveal any plans to sell the car to the public. the run up to christmas is always crucial time for uk supermarkets and never more so than in 2019. fraser mckevitt is head of retail
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and consumer insight at kantar. fraser, really good to talk to you, so just talk us through how those supermarkets did during that important period. was there a post—election rush which so many retailers had been banking on? post—election rush which so many retailers had been banking 0mm split the market in terms of the supermarkets. very distinct halves here. the number did pretty well. top amongst those were little, who we re top amongst those were little, who were in double—digit growth, i'll do not far behind, co—op and iceland and also on the flip side there is the more traditional supermarkets, who struggled and sold less this year than they did last year. and this is in the context of a really sluggish sector growth. so sales we re sluggish sector growth. so sales were only about £50 million this year on last year. 50 million might sound like a lot of money but bear in mind overthe sound like a lot of money but bear in mind over the quarter we spent £29 billion through those supermarket tills are basically
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sales were flat as consumers held back on their shopping this year. shoppers are still watching their budgets. did some supermarkets, the big four, did they do better or worse than the others, like the german discounters? the story of christmas 2019 in some senses is the story of the last decade, so lidl and aldi did very well but did well by opening new stores. we know consumers don't have much loyalties to supermarkets, not like when you buy a car to supermarkets, not like when you buya carand to supermarkets, not like when you buy a car and stick with it for a few years. the easiest way for a supermarket to grow is to open a new store in your town and then you might choose to consider shopping there. that's what lidl and aldi have been doing but you can see the results, record christmas shares for those german supermarkets. also over the last decade they have moved away from just talking about price to talking about other things, as well, particularly around quality so their premium lines of sold very well and
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in the case of lidl, they've been selling a lot of branded goods too, household favourites. you can now get them in the discounters, something they were not famous for. let's talk about what people are putting in their baskets. the kinds of foods and drinks people were buying on the run—up to christmas. it's different to previous years?m all comes back to consumers holding back on spending this year. i think we can understand the reasons why. there's been uncertainty around brexit, the election, the economy hasn't been great, and the weather hasn't been great, and the weather has been a little bit poor, so none of that will make you rush out and spend more in the supermarkets, so people didn't cancel christmas, let's be clear, but when they were spending they were being careful. people weren't buying whole turkeys but cheaper roasting joints like crowns and legs and breasts, and when they buy alcohol, not buying sparkling wine and champagne, and the seco which has been so popular, but they'd bought the cheapest beer
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and wine, to save money which add up over the entire industry as a whole toa over the entire industry as a whole to a pretty soft set of christmas numbers. interesting. fraser, as ever, good to talk to you. in other business stories, swedish furniture giant ikea has agreed to pay £35 million pounds to the californian parents of a two—year—old who was killed in may 2017 when a chest of malm drawers fell on him. the item, which weighs 70 pounds, had been recalled a year earlier over safety concerns after three other children were killed. it is the largest child wrongful death settlement in us history. drivers are already feeling the effects of climbing oil prices, with growing tensions between the us and iran set to push them higher. that's according to the rac. they say prices at the pump have already increased by about a penny a litre with petrol is currently £1.27 and diesel costing £1.32 per litre. but other industry experts say prices were due to rise anyway. a plant—based pork substitute has been launched in las vegas
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by one of the leading "alternative meat" producers. impossible foods, the firm behind the impossible burger, says it hopes to appeal to a global audience with its latest vegetarian—friendly meal, which it unveiled at the ces tech show. pork is the most widely consumed meat in the world, and paricularly popular in china. like all european shares, london's ftse 100 rebounded on tuesday, snapping a two—day losing streak as concerns over a us—iran standoff eased. among midcaps, premier 0il shares surged 12% after a deal to buy certain bp assets. but it's retailers who were the standout performers among bluechips, as better—than—expected sales by morrisons helped strike out some worries of dismal trading updates for the key holiday period. that's all the business news. the nominations for this year's baftas have been announced this morning.
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up for best film — 1917, the irishman, joker, once upon a time in hollywood and parasite. joker tops the list with the most nominations at 11, including best actorforjoaquin pheonix. the irishman and 0nce upon a time in hollywood both have ten nominations. 1917, directed by sam mendes, is the best—performing british film, with nine nominations. earlier, entertainmentjournalist caroline frost came into the studio to give her thoughts on the nominations. most surprisingly as you mentioned, joker which only scooped two golden globes this weekend in la, but, clearly, the bafta voting academy have decided that's the one that they most favour. some critics called it the biggest disappointment of the year. 0ther critics thought it was very surprising and of course it's got that great spine ofjoaquin phoenix's central performance as joker. we should point out, of course, heath ledger won an oscar for the same role 11 years ago. extremely different treatment. i think this is seen as a bit of a breakthrough for that superhero genre. we don't normally see this kind of film critically looked at in such a way.
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so very interesting that the bafta voters have picked up on it. followed by the irishman. good news for netflix, they haven't lost all their love which they lost in the golden globes. we thought they were going to totally be the juggernaut of the golden globes. didn't happen. they're back in the game with ten nominations. and once upon a time in hollywood, quentin tarantino, still the bad boy that everybody loves. he keeps telling, in a ricky gervais m0, this is his last everfilm. we'll see. we shouldn't forget our welsh boy taron egerton. he picked up the golden globe best actor in a musical or comedy, similar to rami malik last year who then, of course, went on to win the oscar. so perhaps all bets are not off. he is in this category along with extra—strong competition. leonardo dicaprio for once upon a time in hollywood, also adam driver, similarly nominated for marriage story, and jonathan pryce, another brit, for two popes, another netflix title. good news for a few women, particularly scarlett joha nsson and margot robbie, both picking up two nods each.
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margot robbie playing against herself unfortunately, both in the same category for bombshell and 0nce upon a time in hollywood, best supporting actress. surely she gets one unless it divides the vote thelma and louise style? similarly, scarlettjohansson might go home with two, because she's in two different categories for marriage story and jojo rabbit. but the story about the women is actually not so positive for many others, because i've seen on twitter this morning "bafta so white" is already trending. this is pointing to a lack of diversity particularly in this category of women, so they are pointing to names like lupita nyongo. where is she? awkwafina, where is she? jennifer lopez. all of these people were nominated at the weekend in the golden globes. no sign of any nominations on the bafta lists. this morning, amanda berry, the ceo of bafta, was quick to express her disappointment and we do know that she has put what measures she can in place to extend the voting range and to bring new members through so different voices and opinions are expressing themselves when it comes to the awards. they also have schemes to try and support the infrastructure of the film industry as a whole
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with things like elevate, pushing social mobility to the fore, women particularly as well. black, non—male and pale faces. however i think it's a bit of a red herring to point all the arrows at awards season because clearly these decisions start upstream of that. you have to make films that people want to go and see, so it can't be accused as a box—ticking exercise come the awards season. you want films to be popular, appealing. you want stories to be told all the year through, i think, and then perhaps hopefully we won't be having this conversation. a quick update on the death toll in the stampede at the funeral of qasem soleimani in i ran. we are hearing about a0 people have died in that stampede and 230 have been injured. millions of people have turned out in iran overthe millions of people have turned out in iran over the last few days for
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the funeral processions for the military commander. we have the very latest of the top of the hour. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. it's quite stormy at the moment across the north—west of the uk. for many of us, quite cloudy out there but i want to show you this photo from telford a hours ago. look at that fantastic pattern in the cloud. quite unstable cloud, so we will see that cloud continuing with a deep area of low pressure towards the north—west. that will bring some rain, strong winds, but also some very mild air moving its way in from the south. temperatures above the average for the time of year. so it's the wind that will be the main thing on the forecast through today. severe gales likely across the north west of scotland. strong winds likely in south—eastern scotland and north—east of england, already causing travel disruption in parts of scotla nd causing travel disruption in parts of scotland through this morning. the strong winds will continue on with a heavy rain moving its way
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through northern england, wales, much of scotland, but the wind gusts, it is windy for all of us. the focus will be across the northern half of the uk. 70—80 miles an hour in exposed parts of western scotland. further south and east, patchy rain but these are the temperatures. 12—15. maybe 16. those are more typicalfor temperatures. 12—15. maybe 16. those are more typical for march and april rather than the early part of january. to mud, rain will clear from the north but they will be wintry showers have a higher ground and staying quite cloudy across the south which is why temperatures will stay in double figures. further north, chillier and there is temperatures down to about a—6. wednesday will be a day when you can split the country into two. the north, quite quiet, southern areas, with this weather system moving its way, so they will be quite a bit of cloud for wales, eastern areas of england, patchy rain starting to move its way in here later in the
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day. to the northern half of the uk, some showers. wintry over high ground but sunny spells. a much chillier day tomorrow compared to today. there's temperatures down to 6-7. 13 today. there's temperatures down to 6—7. 13 across the far south. for thursday, there are some uncertainties in the forecast for thursday. an area of low pressure which is developing, bringing some rain. it could also bring us some fairly strong winds. stay tuned to the forecast for thursday. that's what it looks like. by friday, dryer, sunny spells, further outbreaks of rain were gradually move into the far north and west. that's all from me. by day. —— abide by.
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you re watching bbc newsroom live. it's midday, and these are the main stories. more than 30 people are killed in a stampede in the crowd attending the funeral of iranian military commander qasem soleimani. a british teenager is given a four—month suspended sentence after being found guilty of lying about gang—rape in cyprus. her lawyer says she'll appeal the conviction. she's coming home! cheering thank you. an 18—year—old man admits the manslaughter of pc andrew harper — who was dragged along the road by a van in berkshire last year — but denies murder. the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey, joins the race to become the next labour leader.
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and joker leads the pack with 11 bafta film nominations. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. in iran, more than a0 people have been killed in a stampede as huge crowds gathered for the funeral of top commander qasam soleimani, who was killed in a us air strike last week. state media say the burial in his hometown of kerman has now been postponed. it was due today, following a four—day funeral procession. very upsetting that so many people have lost their lives in a stampede at the funeral. yes, and it is
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surprising and shocking events, as people taking to the streets at morning and there are leader and we re morning and there are leader and were hoping to bury him today for his last arrest. —— mourning. but we have from the state media that the burial has been postponed because they had to deal with the unfolding events and the death, and also many others injured in this stampede. it is obviously because of the huge influx of people who took to the streets for the funeral processions today, and the burial. this is the third day of mourning, funeral processions took place in different cities and towns across iran. it is a moment of mobilising support among the shi'ite community, and the supporters of qasem soleimani's policies. he is someone who was seen asa policies. he is someone who was seen as a hero inside his own country and among his followers, who imposed
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iran's presence and power in the region, but many others in the region, but many others in the region see him as a war criminal responsible for destabilising the region, imposing sectarian agenda, and is responsible for hundreds of death cases among civilians, especially inside syria and iraq. the pictures are so striking, seeing so many people out on the streets, as you say. how many are estimated to have turned out over the days, across the country? the numbers are suggested to be in the hundreds of thousands. it is hard to tell the exact number, but the pictures are telling by themselves, a sea of people took to the streets, we can see them in tehran and today in kerman, and various other places. so hundreds of thousands took to the streets, and this is definitely the image that the leadership in iran wa nts to image that the leadership in iran wants to show to the world, to
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project their defiance and tell the world how angry the iranian people are against this loss and the killing, and they vowed to take revenge harshly on the united states. it has been tit—for—tat announcements from both countries of retaliation and counter retaliation, while other international powers call for de—escalation and coming down. thank you, lina. iran's foreign minister, mohammad javad zarif, has said the end of what he called america's malignant presence in the middle east has begun. i don't think the united states has chosen the path of de—escalation. talking about de—escalation is different from choosing the path. the united states killed a number of people, important personalities, both iraqi officials as well as iranian officials, in a foreign
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territory. that is an act of war. it sent messages, both public as well as private, now that were rude, ignorant, arrogant, and that was an escalation in and of itself. it is threatening the iranian people. i think secretary pompeo is misleading president trump. he believes people we re president trump. he believes people were dancing in the streets of tehran and baghdad. even put up a video clip on his twitter account to that effect. now i think he has seen the sea of humanity in iran and in iraq yesterday in three days before. does he not want to admit that he has been misdirecting american foreign policy? the pentagon has been forced to deny that american forces will be leaving iraq, after the leak of a letter that suggested that troops would be moved. it follows a vote in the iraqi parliament calling for the withdrawal of foreign forces from the country,
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in response to the us‘s killing of qasim soleimani in baghdad on friday. gareth barlow has more. helicopters fly over baghdad as the united states insists its forces will remain in iraq. washington has been forced to deny that this draft letter written by a senior us army general suggests american troops are withdrawing from the country. in it, brigadeer general william seely writes...
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iraqi mps have called on american troops to leave and us government officials acknowledge the letter is genuine, but says it explains the us is moving troops out of the capital to provide protection elsewhere and isn't withdrawing. the defence secretary mark esper said the letter was inconsistent with us policy. with regard to that letter which i've read once, i can't tell you the voracity of the letter, i can tell you what i read. that letter is inconsistent with where we are right now. the clamour for clarity comes amid the fallout from america's killing of iran's top military commander qasem soleimani as he visited the iraqi capital. qasem soleimani was the brains and brawn behind iran's policies in the middle east, tasked with protecting and boosting tehran's influence in the region. in death, as in life, he inspires fervent passions and his impact on the world is far from over. gareth barlow, bbc news.
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the british teenager who was convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus has been given a four—month suspended sentence. it means she's now free to return to the uk. her lawyer told the bbc there was huge relief that she was being allowed to go home, but confirmed that she would be appealing against her conviction. the 19—year—old was found guilty after she retracted her original statement alleging she'd been attacked by 12 men in ayia napa. she says she was coerced into changing her story. there are two ways of looking at this really, you can say it was at the more lenient end and the judge during his sentencing remarks that the whole process and we caught behind me only took around 20 minutes, he said he was giving her a second chance, partly thinking about her youth, partly thinking about how much time she had spent in custody here and had to remain in cyprus.
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remember, this happened last july, she has not had the chance to go home until now, so crucially from this morning, the one thing that has emboldened the family is that for the first time, she is able to return to the uk, but what the campaigners outside court here, there must have been a crowd of around 150 campaigners, very noisy, lots of banners, lots of chanting. they were representing women's rights groups, not only from cyprus and the uk, but very interestingly, from israel, where the 12 men originally arrested and accused, but then released, came from. one woman i spoke to has travelled here for just 20 hours and was flying straight back to jerusalem to go back to work, but she felt she was motivated to come here by the way the men had behaved when released and going back tojerusalem. two parts forward, one for the young women to get back to the uk and recover, and the other for the lawyers to stop
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looking at a process of aid appeal. earlier, i spoke to the family's barrister. —— start looking at a process of appeal. we are delighted. of course, we came to court this morning with trepidation, notjust because of the damaging effect of the conviction, not knowing whether it would be immediate custody or, in fact, a suspended sentence, so we are pleased that she's going home. tell us a little bit about her. i think we heard her mother has told the bbc previously she's been diagnosed with post—traumatic stress disorder. how have the last several months been for her and indeed herfamily? it's been a very traumatic ordeal for her. she's had to wait effectively six months. she's had several adjournments in terms of the trial of this matter. preliminary legal matters. she was in custody for about four and a half weeks in a cell that she had to share with eight other women in a prison in nicosia, and thereafter she's been on fairly stringent bail conditions, so there is just a huge relief that she's going home today. but whilst of course we are delighted with the sentence, i can tell you now that we will be appealing the conviction. we will be seeking an expedited
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appeal to the supreme court of cyprus and will also be considering going to the european court of human rights. this case is not finished by any means. tell us if she's been aware of the amount of support. at the conviction, there's a lot of people here, campaigners, not only from cyprus, also from the uk, also from israel and indeed very, very vociferous at the sentencing this morning. she's been completely aware of all the support. it's been international. she has had well—wishers from all around the world, particularly from israel, who were concerned about her plight and about her treatment and concerned as to whether she was actually getting justice and we feel we have had justice today in terms of the sentence, but we do not feel that we have had justice in terms of how the trial progressed, the manner in which it was conducted, the initial police investigation and the fact that we say she did not receive a fair trial. we heard not quite an intervention but some comments from the foreign secretary over
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the weekend urging, if you like, leniency. do you think that any of those comments, the behind—the—scenes negotiations, have made any difference? we know that the foreign office have intervened in the last week and we applaud that intervention. we know that dominic raab has spoken to his counterparts in the cypriot government. we know that he has phoned the cypriot president. we know, of course, that he has made very clear comments. in fact, he said on the andrew marr show last week, that he made his position crystal clear to the cypriot government, so we think that the pressure that has been brought to bear has had some influence, although, of course, we cannot comment on the political nature of this case.
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some real concern about the way the case was handled by the supreme authorities. but the government has maintained all along that the police, the kerneljustice system and all acted properly. but all of those discussions are now are the lawyers, the young woman and her family, and for the first time in around six months, they can return to the uk as soon as possible, and start to try to put this ordeal behind them. —— criminaljustice system. john maguire reported there. the mother of the victim spoke a while ago in cyprus. ijust want i just want to ijust want to thank each and everyone of you for turning up today, having belief, having faith, making sure that we getjustice. thank you all of you for turning up, it is so appreciated, we can't thank you enough. cheering she's coming home! thank you.
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it is expected she will be on a flight it is expected she will be on a flight home later today. more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. a short while ago, the foreign secretary, dominic raab gave this reaction. well, i was relieved that this vulnerable young lady will now be returning home to begin the process of recovery, given all that she's been through. i spoke to her mother on friday, i understand quite how much she's been through, how much the family has been through, so my first priority has been her welfare. we will be following up on some issues in relation to the case. i spoke to the cypriot foreign minister about that. and there is a broader issue for brits travelling, notjust in cyprus or indeed europe, but travelling abroad, whether it's holidaying, backpacking, to make sure they can do so as safely and as possible.
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the headlines on bbc news — more than a0 people are killed in a stampede in the crowd attending the funeral of iranian military commander qasem soleimani. a british teenager is given a four—month suspended sentence after being found guilty of lying about gang—rape in cyprus. her lawyer says she'll appeal the conviction. an 18—year—old man admits the manslaughter of pc andrew harper — who was dragged along the road by a van in berkshire last year — but denies murder. now all your sport news. england need just five wickets to win the second test against south africa in cape town. they got off to a decent start on the final day, taking three wickets — including the captain faf du plessis and pieter malan who'd frustrated england on his way to sa.
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south africa are 189—5, chasing an almost impossible a38 to win. but they're digging in at newlands. meanwhile, there's been an update on the fitness of rory burns — he flew home from south africa after injuring his ankle whilst playing football in training. well, he's now had surgery on ruptured ligaments, and will be out for up to four months, so that means he misses the series in sri lanka in march. manchester united have warned that they will eject any fan "visibly or audibly" supporting manchester city in any home area of old trafford during their league cup semi—final tonight. both clubs have agreed to limit the number of tickets available for away fans in both matches as a security measure. but the match isn't a sell—out, and there are concerns that city fans could buy tickets in the home ends because they're on general sale. meanwhile, the manchester city boss pep guardiola had a rather dismissive answer when asked if he'd ever consider managing manchester united.
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after training city, i would never train at united. it is like i would never train at madrid. definitely not, whatever happened in the future? if it was the only offer?” will be in the maldives if i don't have offers. not a noun leaves, because no golf courses, but a place like that. —— not in the maldives. 0rganisers of this month's australian open say they don't expect any delays to the start of the tournament — despite the ongoing bush fires. reigning men's champion novak djokovic had suggested that the start could be put back because of the air—quality in melbourne, which has been rated as "very unhealthy". tournament officials say the health of fans, players and staff is their priority at all times, and the weather forecast is good. plenty more on the bbc sport website and app
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including details of a new deal for max verstappen at red bull. more from me after the 1.00 news. an 18—year—old man has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of pc andrew harper. the 28—year—old police officer was killed when he was runover and dragged under a car when investigating a burglary in berkshire in august. henry long — who is from reading — denied murder. he's due to go on trial in march. 18—year—old henry long from near reading appeared before a judge via a video link from belmarsh prison, where he is in custody. and it was put to him, and ask for his plea, the manslaughter charge against pc andrew harper from august last year. when the charge was put to henry long, his reply was, "i plead guilty, guilty." i think we all remember the death of andrew harper last august. there was an outpouring of public grief after his death, and very emotional statements
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from his new wife as well. he had been married just four weeks before his death. he had been called to reports of a break—in at a property in berkshire, close to reading. when he was there, there was some kind of incident involving a vehicle, where he appeared to get trapped under the vehicle and dragged along. it is alleged that henry long was the driver of that vehicle. but he had pleaded guilty today to the manslaughter of andrew harper. but it is very important to stress that he and two others have pleaded not guilty to the charge of murder, and they will face a trial here at the old bailey in march. in australia, hundreds of volunteer firefighters have attended the funeral of one of their colleagues, who died while battling bushfires. andrew 0'dwyer was killed in new south wales last month when a tree fell in the path of his fire engine. his 19—month—old daughter charlotte was presented with her father's medal for bravery at the service. meanwhile, crews fighting the fires are preparing for conditions to worsen.
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officials in australia say almost 2,000 houses have now been destroyed in the crisis. my colleague lucy hockings sent us this update from wandandian, in new south wales. i'm standing by the princess highway near the town of wandandian, and driving here we came through mile after mile of charred out forest. and we've just had some local firies, some volunteer firemen, pull up to chat with us, and they told us the story of their little local town. on new year's eve a massive fire came through here and at one point they were fighting a fire on four different fronts, and they managed to save a lot of their little town. so you're hearing quite tragic stories here in australia, but little nuggets where the firefighters have had some success as well, which is so good for morale. and i have to say the cooler weather is a psychological boost for people here too. just to give them a bit of respite from the heat and from the wind, give people a sense that they can recharge, because you are right,
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in the coming days, the next few days, that hot, windy weather is set to return. so the sense of people being in limbo here is very strong, because they know that with that hot weather, the fires are really going to start up again, and that's a massive concern right across this part of australia. a convicted murderer has revealed how he managed to restrain the london bridge attacker. he has spoken publicly for the first time about tackling khan after his attack on prisoner rehabilitation conference last november. he was out on licence to attend the event, and was serving a minimum of 17 years for killing x firefighter barry jackson in hull.
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harvey weinstein has been charged. he denies all allegations of sexual misconduct. london's crossrail train line could be delayed was three yea rs later line could be delayed was three years later than originally planned. the project was originally supposed to be finished in december 2018, but has suffered several setbacks. last year, the company behind the new line admitted it probably would not open until spring 2021. the development could end up costing £2 billion more than expected. the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey, has become the sixth candidate in the race to become the next labour leader. she said the party needed a proud socialist to succeed jeremy corbyn and stay true to his radical vision. she joins sir keir starmer, emily thornberry, clive lewis, lisa nandy, and jess phillips in the contest. registered supporters — who are not full party members —
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will have a8 hours from 1a—16 january to secure a vote by paying £25. the ballot will be open from 21st february to the 2nd of april, with the results announced two days later on the ath. let's get more from our assistant political editor norman smith. the complete line—up is out there, and we know when the new leader will come in. what is the spectrum of views across those different candidates? they are all positioning themselves pretty much on the left, but let's be honest, rebecca long—bailey has staked out our territory pretty clearly as the first black candidate. no big surprise, she has been a long—time loyal supporter ofjeremy corbyn, but she did so pretty explicitly today, not only defending his leadership, saying he had faced unprecedented criticism as a leader, showed tremendous resilience, she also unswervingly defends all his
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policies, and she mimics some of his language, talking about how she would seek to resist the tories in parliament, on the streets, in the workplace, and just have a listen to her talking about mr corbyn this morning. jeremy had suffered unprecedented levels of criticism and attack against his own personal character, and he was very resilient throughout. i supported jeremy. i still support jeremy because i felt that he was the right man with the right moral integrity to lead the party... he lost catastrophically, didn't he? doesn't he accept responsibility for that? of course he does. any leader who leads us into a general election defeat needs to take ultimate responsibility. but he also set out a radical platform for policy development that involved the grassroots in our trade unions and developed some of the most exciting and innovative policies that we've seen in a generation. i think he'll go down in history as being remembered as the leader who has done that.
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the only real area she has set out any differences as far as i could see with mr corbyn was anti—semitism, saying she had argued bind the scenes for a more robust response, and there is no doubt she will capture a large amount of support because the party is seen as overwhelmingly now pro corbyn. however, there are voices in the middle mainstream right of the party who are deeply uneasy about carrying on with the corbyn project, fearful it will result in exactly the same sort of catastrophic election result as the december election. among them, the labour mp ian murray, who is standing to be deputy leader. we are all part of the labour movement, we are all part of the broader church of the labour movement, we all share a labour movement, we all share a labour movement values, but the only we we re movement values, but the only we were going to turn this round is to respond to the public. we cannot say that the message was wrong and the public did not hear it, and the message was wrong, the public had it, they responded on the 12th of december, and as angela rayner said yesterday, as i did at my speech at
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the declaration, this party has to listen and respond and change, or it will die. i expect ian murray knows that he faces quite an uphill task in this election, because the party now seems to be overwhelmingly pro—corbyn, which means rebecca long—bailey has a good chance of becoming the next labour leader. added to which, she is a woman, she represents a northern seat, it will probably have the organisation of momentum, the grassroots organisation behind her. so it is quite possible that rebecca long—bailey, yes, could become the next labour leader. thanks, norman. 60 firefighters have been targeting a fire at a london nightclub. it has held gigs for the likes of madonna, issued sheeran, and prince and was due to open in the spring after a
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major state—of—the—art redevelopment. no major injuries we re redevelopment. no major injuries were reported. the us company ‘spacex' has launched another 60 mini—satellites into orbit. it's part of its plans to build a giant constellation of thousands of spacecraft that will form a global broadband internet system. the satellites were launched on a falcon 9 rocket from cape canaveral in florida. the us firm wants to send up thousands of satellites. now it's time for a look at the weather forecast. this is the scene in the west of scotland, wet and windy fair air, destructively so. already had problems widely across northern britain, likely to continue for the rest of today. not just about the wind, it is also very wet indeed across northern and western parts of scotland. north—eastern quarter getting away from the west of the conditions, with regard to the rain. a snapshot mid afternoon, school run sort of time, look at the strength of the justice we move across
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northern and western parts of the british isles. up and over the pennines, that is where you are heading this afternoon, very gusty indeed. a lot of surface water and spray. further south, indeed. a lot of surface water and spray. furthersouth, dribs and drabs of rain. enough cloud for them to be the odd bit of rain, overnight, the weather front will drag down across all northern parts, so it turns much colder here, staying miles across the south, and the wind still a into wednesday across northern scotland. —— still a factor into wednesday.
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bye hello. this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines. more than 30people are killed in a stampede in the crowd attending the funeral of iranian military commander qasem soleimani. a british teenager is given a four—month suspended sentence after being found guilty of lying about gang—rape in cyprus. her mother expressed her relief
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to reporters outside court. she's coming home! thank you. an 18—year—old man admits the manslaughter of pc andrew harper, who was dragged along the road by a van in berkshire last year, but denies murder. the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey, joins the race to become the next labour leader. the chancellor, sajid javid, is to deliver a budget on the 11th of march the first after britain is due to leave the european union at the end of this month. on a visit to greater manchester, mrjavid said the government would set out how it plans to take advantage of the opportunities presented by brexit. the treasury is re—thinking public spending with the aim of bolstering economic growth in more disadvantaged areas.
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up to an extra, for example, £100 billion of investment in infrastructure over the next few years, that will be transformative for every part of our country, but especially for those places that feel left behind. we've seen more investment over the last few years in the north, for example, but we need to see more. we need to see more in the midlands and we need to make sure every part of our country is seeing the benefits of increased opportunity. earlier i asked our economics correspondent andy verity what we can expect from the budget. the rules for the last ten years, the rules for the last ten years, the whole of economic policy has been focused on trying to get the deficit down by which we mean the amount by which the government overspends its income, so if your income is 1000 and you spend 1100, you have got a deficit of 100 and similarly the government for the last ten years has been trying to reduce that so our income is more than its spending. what's changed now is the rules have been loosened, sajid javid, after saying he was sticking to the old fiscal rules, he would be able to overspend but only
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by up would be able to overspend but only by up to 2%, of the value of the economy, so the deficit had to be less tha n economy, so the deficit had to be less than 2% of the value of gdp, he loosened that and said we can spend up loosened that and said we can spend up to 3% which gives them more leeway. do not reduce the deficit. he said it would only apply to current budget so day—to—day spending, rather than investment spending, rather than investment spending, like petrol for your car and your investment spending is buying the car itself. the new rules say, well, you might buy the car, and you can evaluate what that asset might be worth to you, as well as the borrowing you have taken on to purchase it, but the petrol, the day—to—day spending must be within what the income is. so he has loosened that and also there is talk of what they call an infrastructure revolution. here they are echoing what labour was promising to do had it won power. namely to change the way we account for big infrastructure projects like hs2 or the northern powerhouse. and the way you evaluate those, so don'tjust let your date, but also look at the
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purchasing. it's like if you buy the house can be don'tjust look at the mortgage but also the rent which could come in. in terms of extra money for spending, use of the rules being changed to allow the to increase, will taxes be raised? will they be extra borrowing? is it going to come from the deficit? you have to come from the deficit? you have to borrow to plug the deficit because it is an overspend like you we re because it is an overspend like you were me if there's a gap between what we spend and our income we have to borrow to cover the difference. the borrowing is similar to the deficit, so what sajid javid has said it is i'm not going to stick to those strict fiscal rules, george 0sborne wanted an philip hammond wanted, i'm going to loosen the purse strings. what they have done is jettison the whole project of austerity and adopted something like what ed miliband was proposing back in 2015, namely we only stick within current spending for day—to—day spending, petrol for your car rather than the purchase of your car, and
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what is also saying is there's a bias in the way we calculate the benefits of infra structure projects. it has to do with productivity and the fact the south—east of england tends to be more productive on the basis that the most productive industries are there, not the workers work harder, and that means that when you evaluate where the money would be best spent, it is biased towards the south—east. and the argument is from a lot of economists to criticise that that is unfairly led to the money allocated to best spent, it is biased towards the south—east. and the argument is from a lot of economists to criticise that that is u nfa i rly economists to criticise that that is unfairly led to lots of money being allocated to infrastructure projects in the south—east, rather than the rest of the country. if you can rewrite that formula, you get a spent on infrastructure and they will change the way they account now all the business news. for it. hello. in the business news: supermarket morrisons has released trading numbers for the important pre—christmas period — the 22 weeks to fifth january. they reported a 1.7% fall in like—for—like
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sales, excluding fuel, blaming challenging trading coniditons and customer uncertainty. tokyo prosecutors have issued an arrest warrant for the wife of fugitive ex—nissan boss carlos ghosn who skipped bail in december. according to investigators, carole ghosn is suspected of making false statements to a tokyo court in april. electronics giant sony surprised attendees of the ces tech show in vegas by unveiling an electric car dubbed the vision s. the vehicle is a prototype designed to show off the firm's sensors and in—car entertainment. but, sony did not reveal any plans to sell the car to the public. the ces show in las vegas is where the great and good from the consumer tech world get together and show off their latest gadgets. this year saw the launch of a plant—based pork substitute by one
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of the leading "alternative meat" producers — impossible foods. samsung unveiled a tennis ball—like robot called ballie that beeps and rolls around, following its owner. apparently it can double as a fitness assistant and help with household chores. intel unveiled a foldable computer that resembles a computer monitor when flat and an all—screen laptop when half—closed. and there was this, from lg. this is a rolled down screen from lg display, for those of us who don't have tvs on show all the time. now technically this is not a brand—new idea and we saw something very similarafew idea and we saw something very similar a few years ago. the screen rolled up from the table top. the innovation here it rolls down. from the ceiling. seriously, though, this technology is not only flexible but also flexible in that you can do lots of things with it. around here there are examples of transparent led screens too. interestingly, although this is just a concept,
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led screens too. interestingly, although this isjust a concept, but original roll—up screen we saw a few yea rs original roll—up screen we saw a few years ago was going on sale this spring. the price is $60,000. the pitch is if you have a small living room, pitch is if you have a small living room , you pitch is if you have a small living room, you can maximise the space by rolling the screen out of the way. if you are paying $60,000 for a screen, i suspect you don't have a small living room. $60,000, is it worth it? bbc click‘s spencer kelly there. some other business stories. swedish furniture giant ikea has agreed to pay £35 million to the californian parents of a two—year—old who was killed in may 2017 — when a chest of malm drawers fell on him. the item, which weighs 70 pounds, had been recalled a year earlier over safety concerns after three other children were killed. it is the largest child wrongful death settlement in us history. drivers are already feeling the effects of climbing oil prices, with growing tensions between the us and iran set to push them higher — that's
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according to the rac. they say prices at the pump have already increased by about a penny a litre with petrol is currently £1.27 and diesel costing £1.32 per litre. but other industry experts say prices were due to rise anyway. facebook has announced it will remove videos modified by artificial intelligence, known as deepfakes, from its platform. deepfa kes are computer—generated clips that are designed to look real. facebook says the videos distort reality and present a "significant challenge" for the tech industry. like all european shares, london's ftse100 rebounded on tuesday, snapping a two—day losing streak as concerns over a us—iran standoff eased. among midcaps, premier 0il shares surged 18% after a deal to buy certain bp assets. but it's retailers who were the standout performers among bluechips, as better—than—expected sales
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by morrisons helped strike out some worries of dismal trading updates for the key holiday period. that's all the business news. reaction from downing streetjust through to the news that the british teenager has been given four months suspended sentence in cyprus after being found guilty of lying about a gang rape, the prime minister's spokesman has said they are very pleased that the 19—year—old can now return home. they have said that they have had numerous concerns throughout the process about the right to a fair trial and have raised things with the cypriot authorities. they will be working with cyprus and other countries to ensure a case like this can never happen again. also a couple of lines on iran. the prime minister maghreb spokesman was asked about possible troop withdrawals from iraq, the
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response to that was we keep our forces protection under constant review. the spokesman for the cabinet agreed this morning that general soleimani was responsible for a pattern of destabilising behaviour in the region and was a threat to all of our interests and also has spoken about the importance of protecting british citizens and de—escalating tensions, so those lines on iran and also that rape case in cyprus just through from downing street. back to our main news. the white house has refused to grant the foreign minister a visa to visit the united nations in new york later this week. he had been expected to speak to the security council about the killing of general soleimani. there's been no official comment yet from either side but washington has previously said it can deny access to the un for
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security terrorism and foreign policy reasons. he's been speaking about the situation. the secretary called and said they didn't have enough time to review my request. although the request had been made in 2019 in december, 2019. i could have told you that this is a violation of the headquarters agreement but for a country that has no regime, should america be different from this regime? it has no respect for international law. it commits acts of war crime. and threatens to commit further war crimes, attacking cultures, a war crime, and! crimes, attacking cultures, a war crime, and i don't expect them to remain committed to anything. it's not unexpected. but my question is, what are they afraid of? i didn't expect to engage in any dialogue with the united states during this
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visit. but it would have provided an opportunity for me to engage with think tanks, with journalists, opportunity for me to engage with think tanks, withjournalists, for better understanding. i don't think the united states has chosen the path of the escalation. talking about a de—escalation is different from choosing the united states killed a number of people, important personalities, both iraqi officials and iranian officials, in a foreign territory. that's an act of war. it sends messages, both public as well as private, that we are rude, ignorant, arrogant, and that was an escalation in and of itself. it is threatening the iranian people. i think mike pompeo is misleading president tom. he believes that people were dancing on the streets of tehran and baghdad. he even put
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up of tehran and baghdad. he even put upa of tehran and baghdad. he even put up a video clip on his twitter account to that effect. now i think he has seen the sea of humanity in iran and in iraqi yesterday. doesn't he want to admit he has been misdirecting american foreign policy? that's the iranian foreign minister. the home secretary has called for an urgent review of the classification of a drug thought to have been used by the uk's most prolific rapist. reynhard sinaga was jailed for a minimum of 30 years yesterday for more than 150 offences. his victims were men, who he's thought to have drugged using a form of class c drug ghb. following the sentencing yesterday it's understood that the rape charity, survivors manchester, have had calls from 30 men who think they may have been a victim of reynhard sinaga. graham satchell has been speaking to sam, a survivor of sexual assault, about the stigma associated with being a male victim of the crime.
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the face of a monster. reynhard sinaga, grinning on his social media pages, is the most prolific rapist in british legal history. police say there may be as many as 200 victims. sinaga prowled the streets of manchester, searching for men before luring them back to his flat. we've been speaking to one man, not one of sinaga's victims, who was raped in 2016. when i broke down to my mum on the phone and told her that ijust wanted to die, i genuinely meant it. i didn't want to be... i didn't want to be anywhere. i didn't want to live with it. sam was assaulted by two men in a hotel room in manchester. he'd been out with his girlfriend, but at the end of the night, they became separated. sam got chatting to a group of men and went for one more drink. i think the first thing when people hear male rape is they automatically associate it with homosexuality. i think that there's a certain stigma attached to it, masculinity, that we say that you can't be a masculine man if you've not fought
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back and you've allowed this thing to happen and you've not...yeah, done whatever you can to go and find the perpetrators or even allow, you know, there to be perpetrators. so i think that what defines us as men or supposedly defines us as men is impacted from the offset as soon as something like this happens. this is st mary's in manchester, a sexual assault referral centre. it's where sam was treated, as were many of the men raped by sinaga. we've seen an increase of around the 33% mark for men coming forward. i'm an optimist. so, i like to think it's not an increase in sexual violence. i think it's an increase in confidence in people being able to come forward. the shame, the stigma associated with sexual assault, means it's been a dramatically underreported crime. some studies suggest 90% of male rapes are never reported. sam did go to the police but says it was an experience that made things worse.
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they asked me about my sexuality, about whether i'd ever cheated on my girlfriend before, about whether i'd ever had a male sexual encounter. but it all made me feel at the time that i really wasn't being believed here, like, i didn't understand what — whether or not i'm straight or gay, why does that have any difference? obviously, the issue's over consent. greater manchester police told us they've learned lessons from sam's case and they're now urging anyone who thinks they may have been assaulted by sinaga to come forward. graeme satchell, bbc news. greater manchester police has set up a dedicated number to provide support for anyone affected by this story. it s on your screen now, 0800 056 015a. or if you wish to contact the police and make a report related to this case, the number is 0800 092 0a10.
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details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 077 077. but first the headlines on bbc news. more than a0 people are killed in a stampede in the crowd attending the funeral of iranian military commander qasem soleimani. a british teenager is given a four—month suspended sentence after being found guilty of lying about gang—rape in cyprus. an 18—year—old man admits the manslaughter of pc andrew harper, who was dragged along the road by a van in berkshire last year, but denies murder. 2000 homes have been destroyed in australia's bushfire crisis. 0fficials australia's bushfire crisis. officials say fire crews are frantically preparing for worsening conditions. temperatures are likely to soaragain on conditions. temperatures are likely to soar again on friday. this has
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prompted fears to big fires could form a new mega blaze. victoria derbyshire is guest told was told how they my home burned to the ground. nothing left. probably all my worldly goods have gone. at 7a, you can imagine working all my life, my home, my children, working hard, now i'm in my 75th year, i think i deserve now some peace and quiet and calm. but this has happened to me. and it is very
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devastating. you have given us permission to show pictures to our british audience showing what remains of your home, actually. we can see the, your zimmer frame, remains of your home, actually. we can see the, your zimmerframe, it is unimaginable for people in this country. it is. i was iwas in i was in the centre for safety. i was hearing stories from other people. giving people cuddles and saying how sorry i was. their homes have gone too, you know. it was just a weird feeling to know that your house has gone. it's gone. that's
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it. there's just yourself left. house has gone. it's gone. that's it. there'sjust yourself left. i had three animals. and i got those out. to where we had to stay. where we we re out. to where we had to stay. where we were evacuated to. and i've got the three animals. i have a rabbit, a cut and dog. the three animals. i have a rabbit, a cutand dog. —— the three animals. i have a rabbit, a cut and dog. —— cat. they were so good. i sat in the centre with lots of other people all around and the cat, her basket, the rabbit sat in his basket, and they did not move. i
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just cover them over and they did not move and my little dog sat on my lap. it was as if they knew something terrible was happening. training for and completing a marathon can improve the health of a new runner‘s arteries, cutting about four years off their "vascular age", according to a new study. researchers tested over a hundred runners attempting the london marathon, and over six months of training, their arteries regained some youthful elasticity, which should reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes. earlier i spoke to our bbc news online health editor, michelle roberts, who explained the research across the board, it seemed to have this beneficial effect of making their arteries a bit more elastic, which is good for your risk factors for stroke and heart disease, but also lowered their blood pressure. it went down by about as much as taking blood pressure pills.
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it's an amazing result. 0bviously doing exercises going to have beneficial effects on our health, and cardiovascular, it will improve our cardiovascular issues, but at what point because running a marathon is an extreme thing, so how much do you need to do to get this level of benefit? certainly shouldn't run a marathon without training first. it's important to say get checked out beforehand. if you've got any existing health conditions particularly. from this study we know six months of training where they were building up the distance that they ran orjogged or walked even, you can walk a marathon too, that seems to happen and it has this beneficial effect. even walking will have the same impact? if the amount of training you're doing they think is important but we have guidelines how much all of us should be getting and it's half an hour a day of moderate to vigorous activity, so a brisk walk would count
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as moderate but vigorous would be a jog or run but all of that gets your heart pumping and you will be healthy. when it was about the training that they were actually doing and how much exercise they were doing, when you talk about the half an hour a day, how did that compare with what happens when you are training for a marathon? what were these people doing over six months? before are about to the race, you should roughly be able to run for 15 miles comfortably. i know it doesn't sound realistically. but by that they mean after the 15 miles you should feel like you could continue a bit more running rather than collapsing on the floor. the nominations for this year's baftas have been announced this morning. up for best film —— 1917, the irishman, joker, once upon a time in hollywood and parasite. joker tops the list with the most
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nominations at 11 —— inluding best actorforjoaquin pheonix. the irishman and 0nce upon a time in hollywood both have 10 nominations. 1917 —— directed by sam mendes is the best performing british film with 9 nominations. earlier, entertainment journalist caroline frost came into the studio to give her thoughts on the nominations most surprisingly as you mentioned, joker which only scooped two golden globes this weekend in la, but, clearly, the bafta voting academy have decided that's the one that they most favour. some critics called it the biggest disappointment of the year. 0ther critics thought it was very surprising and of course it's got that great spine ofjoaquin phoenix's central performance as joker. we should point out, of course, heath ledger won an oscar for the same role 11 years ago. extremely different treatment. i think this is seen as a bit of a breakthrough for that superhero genre. we don't normally see this kind of film
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critically looked at in such a way. we don't normally see this kind of film critically looked at in such a way. so very interesting that the bafta voters have picked up on it. followed by the irishman. good news for netflix, they haven't lost all their love which they lost in the golden globes. we thought they were going to totally be the juggernaut of the golden globes. didn't happen. they're back in the game with ten nominations. and once upon a time in hollywood, quentin tarantino, still the bad boy that everybody loves. he keeps telling, in a ricky gervais m0, this is his last everfilm. we'll see. we shouldn't forget our welsh boy taron egerton. he picked up the golden globe best actor in a musical or comedy, similar to rami malik last year who then, of course, went on to win the oscar. so perhaps all bets are not off. he is in this category along with extra—strong competition. leonardo dicaprio for once upon a time in hollywood, also adam driver, similarly nominated for marriage story, and jonathan pryce, another brit, for two popes, another netflix title. good news for a few women, particularly scarlett joha nsson and margot robbie, both picking up two nods each. margot robbie playing against herself unfortunately, both in the same category for bombshell and 0nce upon a time in hollywood, best supporting actress. surely she gets one unless it divides the vote
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thelma and louise style? similarly, scarlettjohansson might go home with two, because she's in two different categories for marriage story and jojo rabbit. but the story about the women is actually not so positive for many others, because i've seen on twitter this morning "bafta so white" is already trending. this is pointing to a lack of diversity particularly in this category of women, so they are pointing to names like lupita nyongo. where is she? awkwafina, where is she? jennifer lopez. all of these people were nominated at the weekend in the golden globes. no sign of any nominations on the bafta lists. this morning, amanda berry, the ceo of bafta, was quick to express her disappointment and we do know that she has put what measures she can in place to extend the voting range and to bring new members through so different voices and opinions are expressing themselves when it comes to the awards. they also have schemes to try and support the infrastructure of the film industry as a whole with things like elevate, pushing social mobility to the fore, women particularly as well. black, non—male and pale faces. however i think it's a bit of a red herring to point all the arrows at awards season because clearly these decisions start
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upstream of that. you have to make films that people want to go and see, so it can't be accused as a box—ticking exercise come the awards season. you want films to be popular, appealing. you want stories to be told all the year through, i think, and then perhaps hopefully we won't be having this conversation. now it's time for a look at the weather with philip avery hello. the picture behind me was taken not at dawn, but at mid—morning on the western side of scotland. for that, you have to do see low pressure, a lot of cloud and rain in the circulation. notice the number of isobars, very windy indeed. the one plus on the day perhaps is that it is extraordinarily mild for the time of year. but the wind is a real concern, widely across northern ireland, disrupting travel. a lot of
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ferries cancelled in scotland. and there are speed restrictions and road closures as well. there you see the extent of the rain into the middle part of the afternoon. away towards the north—eastern corner of scotland, occasionally, glimpses of brightness but the feature of the day is that it is mild, yes, but also very windy indeed. some of the gusts in excess of 70 miles an hour, that's had an effect on travel plans already. even further south, the odd glimpse of sunshine could be ruled out as the cloud parts, but in other areas, you will get the odd heavier burst of rain. a lot of changes in the evening. doesn't quite completed journey, this weather front, the evening. doesn't quite completed journey, this weatherfront, so the evening. doesn't quite completed journey, this weather front, so we have a vestige of mild air across the south, but further north, a much colder feel and the shower is turning wintry, giving a couple of centimetres of snow above 2—300 metres or so. here we are on wednesday, isobars metres or so. here we are on wednesday, isoba rs in metres or so. here we are on wednesday, isobars in scotland, so
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gusts in excess of 60 miles an hour. still fairly cloudy down across the south and later on, we see the cloud will thicken across wales and the south—west and the return of some rain. further north, scotland and northern ireland, sunshine, cool blustery day with some sunshine and showers but double figure temperatures win out across the south by thursday. this area of low pressure will track, we suspect, somewhere across the uk but it could bea somewhere across the uk but it could be a lot deeper, there could be a lot more lines on this chart indicating much stronger winds. that's why the met office have issued even at this range a weather warning about the potential strength of winds on thursday, however, friday is going to be acquired today. a cooler day with a better chance of sunshine.
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scores of people are killed in a stampede, as iranians flock to the funeral of qasem soleimani, killed by the us the barrel of the general has been postponed as the british government continues to urge restraint. -- the burial. we are concerned that if we see a full—blown war it would be very damaging and actually, the terrorists in particular, da'esh, would be the only winners. we'll have the latest from the middle east and from westminster. also this lunchtime: the 19—year—old british woman convicted of lying about being raped in cyprus is given a four month suspended sentence and allowed to fly home a teenager admits killing newlywed pc andrew harper in berkshire last summer joker leads the way in this year's
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bafta film nominations but there's criticism of the lack of diversity — with only white

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