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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 8, 2020 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: iran fires missiles at two us military bases in iraq in revenge for the killing of its top commander. the uk puts in place urgent measures with the royal navy on standby in the middle east. a ukrainian passenger plane crashes in iran with 180 people on board. did sainsbury‘s feel the festive spirit? the supermarket giant is the latest to update the city on how it fared over the crucial christmas period. i'll speak to the boss this morning. "the worst we've played this season" — that's ole gunnar solskjaer‘s assessment, as manchester united are totally outplayed by man city
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in their league cup semi—final. britain's most successful ever gymnast, max whitlock, will be here on the sofa. good morning. for many today, it's going to be dry with some sunshine. however, we still have strong winds gci’oss however, we still have strong winds across the north of scotland, here too some showers and later some rain coming in from the south—west. i'll have more details in about 15 minutes. it's wednesday the 8th of january. our top story: iran has attacked two air bases housing us troops in retaliation for the killing of general soleimani last week. more than a dozen ballistic missiles were used to target the bases in irbil and al—asad, west of baghdad, but it's not yet clear if there are any casualties. 400 british troops are currently stationed in iraq. dan johnson reports. could this be the site and sound of
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a further move towards deeper conflict between iran and the us? local tv says these are the missiles launched from iran, heading over the border, targeting iraqi airbases used by the americans and their allies. and all this as iran was still laying to rest the body of its assassinated general, qasem soleimani, killed by a us drone strikes. a martyr to the millions on the streets for his funeral calling for retaliation. but the us says he's a murderer who was planning attacks to extend iran's influence over its neighbour. and this was the white house warning yesterday. if iran does anything that they shouldn't be doing, they're going to be suffering the consequences of an very strongly. with the damage it still being assessed, iran's foreign minister posted on social media, proportional
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measures of self defence, adding we do not... the president was untypically low—key, saying all is well and restating american military might. he will give more reaction today. on the streets of baghdad yesterday, people called for foreign interference from all corners to end. this country already faces a deep crisis of conflict and violence. these attacks appear to be limited but daylight will reveal their true impact, damage done and their true impact, damage done and the wider repercussions. dan johnson, bbc news. we'll be explaining what this means throughout the morning. in about 15 minutes, we'll be speaking to a former intelligence officer. a ukrainian plane with 180 people onboard has crashed in iran. all passengers and crew are reported to have died. iranian state media says the boeing 737 came down due to technical problems shortly after taking off
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from tehran airport. rescue teams have been sent to the area near the airport where the aircraft crashed. it's unclear whether the incident is linked to the iran—us confrontation. preliminary reports suggest that the plane was en route to the ukrainian capital of kyiv when it came down. —— kiev. there are anymore developments, we will bring them to you. —— if there are. “— will bring them to you. —— if there are. —— any any more. the prime minister will face mps today for the first time since tensions began escalating in the middle east. borisjohnson had previously been criticised for failing to return early from a holiday in the caribbean. let's speak now to our political correspondent, nick eardley, whojoins us from westminster. nick, we've had further escalation overnight. are there fears for the 400 british troops stationed in iraq? that's right, the latest from the ministry of defence this morning is there have been no uk casualties in there have been no uk casualties in the strikes overnight. the
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government is working hard to try to figure out exactly what went on and says its priority remains making sure that all personnel are safe. we heard yesterday that some urgent measures have been put in place to make sure that that safety is ensured, things like getting helicopters to the middle eastjust in case there needs to be any early evacuations. but the latest sign seems to be there haven't been any uk casualties. big question asked in downing street this morning, though, is whether this is it, whether now this situation will start to de—escalate or whether there's more to come. like so many of us, i'm sure borisjohnson will be trying to figure out exactly where the us and iran stand on that. the same questions everyone is asking themselves this morning. in terms of what else we hear from borisjohnson terms of what else we hear from boris johnson today, terms of what else we hear from borisjohnson today, obviously terms of what else we hear from boris johnson today, obviously that will be top of the agenda but he's also meeting the european commission? we haven't seen or heard from boris johnson in person for a couple of
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weeks. he is up at pmqs later this morning but he's also got the meeting with the new head of the european commission in downing street. it's an important one because she's going to be heading the next set of talks with the uk on brexit. we know we are leaving at the end of the month, that's happening, but talks will happen over the next 11 months or so over the future trade relationship. that meeting this morning will be really important. expect borisjohnson to say that that process has to end by the end of this year and there won't be any extending that as far as he's concerned and he is also expected to push for a free trade deal, a slightly more distant relationship that the last government under theresa may might have tried to negotiate. important meeting this morning. nick, good to talk to you. thank you very much. customers of currency exchange firm travelex say they are thousands of pounds out of pocket as the company remains in the midst of a cyber attack. travellers who ordered money online say they have not been allowed to collect it.
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the hackers are demanding more than £4 million in ransom. travelex says there is no evidence that customer's data has been compromised. the number of people killed in cases of murder and manslaughter in the uk fell in 2019 for the first time in four years. the situation was different in london, which saw its third annual successive rise in a row. the figures, compiled by the bbc, suggest some forces may be getting to grips with the rise in serious violence. here's our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds. shouting relentless — that's how merseyside police describe their battle against organised crime. in the last year, they've seized drugs, cash, guns, even hand grenades. they've been using these quad bikes to search for the weapons gangs hide in the undergrowth and they've been persuading communities to turn against the serious criminals. the result — the force appears to have turned a corner, cutting murders and manslaughters. organised crime and killing,
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it says, are inextricably linked. we know a lot of those homicides are related to serious organised crime, which is why we are relentless in targeting those who lead, who bully, who exploit young people, who will carry guns and knives in order to dominate a certain territory. merseyside police, emergency. another strategy is better training for handling domestic violence. we've examined 100 of last year's killings in detail. a fifth took place in the home. we've tracked every single murder or manslaughter in the uk in the last year, and our figures show that for the first time in four years, the number of killings has fallen, with 650 in 2019. hopeful, but only a start.
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london's recorded its third rise in as many years. it now has 150 outstanding homicide cases, including this one, the murder of a delivery riderjust this weekend. tom symonds, bbc news. prince charles has sent a message of support to people in australia who've spent months dealing with devastating wildfires across the country. at least 25 people and millions of animals have died since the blazes broke out in september. in his message, prince charles said the scale of loss was beyond belief. ifear i fear this ifear this is a hopelessly inadequate way of trying to get a message to all of you. we wanted to say how much we've been thinking of all those remarkable, courageous, determined firefighters who have done so much and work ceaselessly to exhaustion. i mean, you feel so
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deeply with the families of those who have been lost and lost their lives in the course of carrying out their remarkable duties as only they can do. that was the message from prince charles to the firefighters and the people of australia. jonathan head is in nowra in new south wales, one of the towns devastated by the fires. the scene is devastating but it looks like that house may have had a really lucky escape? yeah, this houseis really lucky escape? yeah, this house is one... i've seen it in quite a few places where the owner stayed but then his wife and children were sent away and he has described the most apocalyptic scenes but he had firefighters coming in and then they left to go to other fires. fires were storming up to other fires. fires were storming up the hill this way and coming from the back, but he put sprinklers on the back, but he put sprinklers on the roof and he cleared things that could burn from around and he had water tanks and hoses ready and pumps to pump water up and he was able to keep it at bay. talking to him today, he is still pretty
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shattered and trying to come to terms with it but his house is saved. he has brought down to trees that are so damaged they are a real danger and that's a real problem here. he is clearing brush because we expect more hot weather later this week and of course the hot season has many weeks to run. people here are taking stock of the damage. those who have lost homes have got huge decisions, no—one is quite sure how much help they are going to get, yet they are all having to prepare for the possibility that this hot season will continue for many more weeks. it is emotionally exhausting. they are tough people, they are very philosophical living in the bush and they are used to fires, but this has been a tough experience and it is draining their resources, especially those of the firefighters who are co nsta ntly those of the firefighters who are constantly on call. even now it is quiet here but there are big fires burning further inland and to the south of us. thanks, donovan. we will speak to the red cross in 20
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minutes because prince charles, as well as sending his sympathies, people are asking him to donate to the red cross because so many people have been affected. millions has been donated. already, yeah. a british woman who was found guilty of lying about being raped by a group of men in cyprus has arrived back in the uk. the 19—year—old was given a four—month suspended sentence and ordered to pay £125 in legal fees. her lawyer said she is planning to appeal against her conviction and the case was not finished by any means. more than 400 schools in england are stuck in a cycle of poor performance and need more help to improve according to the schools regulator. a new report from ofsted says more than 200,000 children are affected. it says they're generally in deprived areas, where teacher retention and disruption to pupils are big issues. we are also talking about schools today with regards to phones and should they be in the classroom?
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tell us what you think. one head teacher says they should be, that is the future and eight is a great way of communicating and we shouldn't demonise them but others are saying no. no! get in touch with us. before the sport, have you been chewing over what to do with your old christmas tree? have you got rid of yours? it is out of the house. this is an eco— friendly way of doing it. the owners of this alpaca farm in derbyshire have discovered that their herd have an appetite for firs. after they posted about it on social media, they've been inundated with tree donations. the alpacas eat the needles, and then use the stripped trunks as scratching posts. it brings a whole new meaning to christmas leftovers. absolutely brilliant. you have to have a strong guard to get that through without having issues at the other end! you have to be an alpaca! they are hardy animals. they come
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from chile and peru and eight pampas. they love eating stuff like that! -- pampas. they love eating stuff like that! —— eat pampas. a great eco— friendly way to get rid of your christmas tree. sally? you would have to have a strong gut and be resilient to be manchester united manager at the moment! he is in a spot of bother! i don't know if you saw last night, lots of manchester united fans talking about who could replace him, is here in the right job and is he the right person to lead the club forward? he is in a very difficult position. city were brilliant. united — really, really poor in the manchester derby last night. a brilliant goal from bernardo silva set city on their way to a 3—1win in the first leg of their league cup semi—final at old trafford. united boss ole gunnar solskjaer said it's the worst his side have played all season. what more can you say about ben stokes? england's x factor once again. he takes the final three wickets to win the second test against south africa in cape town.
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stefanos tsitsipas had a mid—match meltdown at the atp cup in australia. he caught his dad, who's also his coach, as he smashed his racket, and then got told off by his mum who was in the crowd. look at that, in terrible trouble! and there was a bit of history at the bdo darts last night. this is leighton bennett, he's just 14 years old, and he's the youngest player ever to play at the world championship. he lost to former champion scott mitchell. what an incredible achievement to even be there. he only turned 14 on new year's eve. that's incredible! just 14! and to be told off by your mum in front of people... embarrassing! sometimes your mum has to step in. always mums know best! you will be here in a second to do the papers. carol, you have been mentioning mild
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temperatures and it did feel mild this morning. yesterday we had 15 degrees, unseasonably mild. today, they are going down, for some already. not as windy as yesterday. the exception to that in the far north of scotland where you can expect gales. a cold front which is now producing a band of cloud and drizzle. this area of cloud moving to other parts of the uk. turning to sunshine, easy. behind the moulder yellows, we have colder air coming our way. cloudy in the south first thing this morning. a lot of dry weather and of sunshine. continuing with the show is packing in across parts of scotland, wintry end of the hills and windy in the far north, still with some gales. these are the
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temperatures... in part of the north 10 degrees down on it yesterday. further south, particularly in the far south, still in the milder air, 11- far south, still in the milder air, 11 -13 far south, still in the milder air, 11 — 13 degrees. it then gets complicated. rain coming in in the afternoon pushing northwards. getting in across northern england. snow on the hills, the pennines, and further south. it could change and start heading north. the other half of the story is, depending on how much the low pressure will deepen, as to how windy it will be. for deep and small, with different parts of wales, the midlands, temperature and northern england. —— cambridge. what happens overnight will have a bearing on what happens through the course of tomorrow. we think this
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system will push off into the north sea taking its rain with it. things dry up. sunshine across scotland, northern england and sunny spells across northern ireland and southern england and wales before the next area low pressure comes in and that will introduce more rain. temperature was, still very mild in the south but quite cool as we push further north. for friday, well, you can loosen your courses because it looks like it would be a dry, prior to date with sunshine. not as windy. —— brighter. the wind will strengthen and some rain coming our way and some will be heavy. temperature wise five in aberdeen and ten in plymouth. as we head into the weekend, on saturday the same area of low pressure will be with
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us, introducing some rain and, as you can see from the isobars, it will also be a windy day, the strongest beans in the north and some of the rain particularly heavy. when you add up the totals, the risk of some localised flooding. it will slowly sink southwards but it will also be another mild day. 10— 12 degrees. did youjust also be another mild day. 10— 12 degrees. did you just say don't loosen your corsets? no, loosen them. you can breathe.” loosen your corsets? no, loosen them. you can breathe. i love that! thank you, carol. carol is brilliant. let's take a look at today's papers: the guardian says, hundreds of british troops are on standby for deployment in iraq, in case of a further escalation in the iran crisis. the daily mail says the fa cup's new betting deal, which allows bet365 to show matches on its website,
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is a "slap in the face" to fa president, prince william. the article says it makes a mockery of mental health campaigns backed by the duke of cambridge. the daily express has it's own investigation on its front page, which shows emergency service workers in the uk were attacked 200,000 times last year. it found only 9% of offenders reach the courts. and online, american broadcaster cnn is reporting the news that a ukrainian boeing 737, carrying 180 passengers and crew has crashed in tehran. something else we're talking this morning. obviously that happened not long ago and not yet clear how that happened and what the causes might be. the back page of the garden, a gorgeous picture. ben stokes... i love him. just brilliant, just say it like you mean it. you do not often it like you mean it. you do not ofte n get it like you mean it. you do not often get people able to produce when you needed. england needed him
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to play, like he did yesterday. his dad at the moment is in hospital in johannesburg, quite serious. he has a knee injury, his had a virus, and he just says i have three lines on my chest and i have to come out and play. -- my chest and i have to come out and play. — — lyons. my chest and i have to come out and play. —— lyons. money matters, how much does it cost to sack someone? until your content given £27 million. the power of a good contract. it is a consumer electronics show in las vegas with all sorts of weird and wonderful stuff being announced. this one unveiled by a japanese firm stop it follows you around the house and does all the chores you might need.
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it will sort your lights, open the curtains... and it will patrol your house when you not there. this is the next evolution of those speaker devices and this one will basically trail you around the house. i cannot think of anything worse. awful. what if you have two dogs. this story was in the papers yesterday but i like it. running linked with health benefits for many years and scientists at the university college london have found that training for a marathon and reduce the biological age of the aorta, the largest artery in the body, bite for years, and especially encouraging given all participants are all first—time marathon runners. it is quite heartening that walking is a great as well so you do not fancy a
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marathon... no, you do not have to doa marathon... no, you do not have to do a marathon. get out there, walk, run. soaring sales of milk, pastrami and public —— lebanese tips. we can return now to our top story. iran has launched more than a dozen ballistic missiles against american forces in iraq, in retaliation for the killing of the country's top commander. joining us now from washington is mike pregent, former american intelligence officer and adviser to general david petraeus in iraq. thank you very much for giving us a bit of your time on bbc breakfast. i would be interested to get your assessment. what it looks like is a saving face gesture... sorry, i am kind of tired i've been up all night
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dealing with this. it symbolised a response to qasem soleimani's death they use precision guided ballistic missiles in order to miss the american side of these iraqi bases. the bad part is the injured iraqis but these 15 missiles lodged without killing or injuring an american and also the language sent to the united states that, you know, this is our proportionate attack, if we that that you respond we will hit allied target. it looks now... right now we're looking at the escalation and the president being able to say, ok, they did not kill any americans and they did not kill any americans and the iranians able to say were responded to the death of qasem soleimani. the wildcard is in iraqi,
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the malicious tied to qasem soleimani who may still want revenge. it is still a very dangerous situation in iraq. iran may still conduct it death by proxy terrorist campaign but as far as this nation on nation confrontation, looking at deescalation. it allows the iranians to say they have retaliated but also allows the americans look that retaliation say, we can leave it there and not act again. wright, one of the capabilities were trying to put inside iraq and the middle east is the capability to degrade the effects of uranian uranian attacks. this allows both countries to say, we both have dealt with this let's
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call it deescalation. the problem is it looks a little bit too obvious. i mean, everyone in the media is saying this is a face—saving gesture so are qasem soleimani's follow is 0k so are qasem soleimani's follow is ok with this. that ready dog on social media that there was a deal between the us and iran to have this happen in iraq even though it killed iraqis on the basis so they can go back to the status quo which does not help the protesters and stabilise the region. we may almost overplay the analysis that that's it. this is the revenge for qasem soleimani's death and, as a former intelligence officer, we have always wa nted intelligence officer, we have always wanted him to be a target but if
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this is the iranian response for taking out the number one general than that is a good thing for the us. it gives the us leveraged and, if this is it, that is good for now. really good to talk to you. mike pregent speaking with his assessment of what is happening, significant development but not an escalation. just after seven we will be speaking to our middle east editor, jeremy bowen to get his analysis. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alpa patel. london's homicide rate has risen to its highest level since 2008. that's despite the national figure falling across the uk 152 people were killed in the capital last
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year, making up nearly a quarter of all those killed in the country. the metropolitan police said tackling violence remained a top priority, saying it aims to have more than 32,000 officers in place by the summer. london's transport system needs more investment and must not lose out to other regions, according to a report from the greater london authority. the capital spends a third less than the national average on rail services per person. city hall says transport funding has fallen by £1 billion in the past three years. the department for transport says, "future funding will be considered as part of this year's spending review". the latest sculpture to appear on the fourth plinth in trafalgar square has been unveiled, and it's this — a giant replica swirl of whipped cream topped with a cherry, a fly and a drone. the design by heather phillipson will be on show from march for two years. a worker in one of south
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london's oldest tea huts had to be rescued by a group of bikers last night after a car crashed into it. the blackheath tea hut has been on same spot on shooters hill road for around 100 years. the accident happened around 7pm and three people were taken to hospital with minor injuries. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, minor delays on the district line between wimbledon and earls court due to a signalling failure. minor delays on the northern line at edgware to camden town southbound due to a faulty train. on the roads, its slow on the northbound approach to the blackwall tunnel. queues go back to blackwall lane. kidbrooke park road is closed southbound near kidbrooke park station for water main works. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a very mild start out
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there this morning. temperature is widely in double figures. one or two spots starting the day at 12 celsius. a largely cloudy day then rain heading in our direction later this afternoon. last night ‘s weather front drifting away south—east. some glimmers of sunshine this morning ahead of the cloud thickening and increasing through the afternoon with the rain arriving. a less breezy day but temperatures are still mild. pulses of rain moving through this evening and overnight. initially the temperatures drop a couple of degrees but slowly it starts to rise as we had to dawn on thursday. starting tomorrow with temperatures 10- 12 starting tomorrow with temperatures 10— 12 celsius. a wet start. the breeze strengthening and becoming quite brisk through the afternoon. dry spells through the middle part then more rain. temperatures feel mild. a dry, calm day on friday. it will feel colder. i'm back in half—an—hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to louise and dan. iran has attacked two us air bases in retaliation for the killing of general soleimani last week. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we'll speak to the schoolboys who became unlikely heroes after saving a mum and her baby from a canal. they've now had a police commendation for their bravery. when martyn hett was killed in the manchester arena attack his mum figen murray began a campaign to get better security at public venues. she'll be here to tell us how she's made a breakthrough. and we're catching up with double olympic gold medal winning gymnast max whitlock. he's on the sofa later. hopefully he will be doing some of that on our sofa later. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news:
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iran has attacked two us air bases in retaliation for the killing of general soleimani last week. more than a dozen ballistic missiles were used to target the bases in irbil and al—asad, west of baghdad, but it's not yet clear if there are any casualties. 400 british troops are currently stationed in iraq. earlier, north america correspondent nick bryant sent this report. donald trump is facing the biggest foreign policy test of his presidency so far and the question before him is whether to continue the cycle of escalation with iran or whether to show more circumspection. now, he's been mourning on twitter, of course, that he would retaliate very strongly if iran attacked us targets, but after they actually did so, he's been surprisingly low—key on social media. "all is well", he wrote on twitter, after the iranian attacks. " so far, so good", he said about the damage
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and fatality assessment. tehran sees this as its proportional response to the killing of general soleimani, that it doesn't want war with america, that it doesn't want further escalation. one us official has described that approach as a "now let's call"" approach. there's signs president trump has heeded it. there were talks last night that president trump would address the people from the oval office, as has been done in the oval office, as has been done in the past, but he decided not to do that. he will speak to the american people later on today. a sign perhaps that he is showing caution and he wants to lower the temperature. but, with president trump, of course, you never know. we will explain what this means and the significance throughout the programme and we will speak to middle east editorjeremy bowen about it at 7am on breakfast. a ukrainian plane with 180 people onboard has crashed in iran.
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all passengers and crew are reported to have died. the reports from iranian state media say the boeing 737 came down due to technical problems shortly after taking off from tehran airport. it's unclear whether the incident is linked to the iran—us confrontation. we can speak now to our correspondentjonah fisher, who is in kiev. this happened in the last few hours. what more can you tell us? that flight, what more can you tell us? that flight, 737—800, was due to land in kiev in the last half—an—hour or so and we got information about an hour ago that the plane crashed shortly after ta keoff ago that the plane crashed shortly after takeoff and after that it information came through on iranian media that all those on board have been killed. estimates vary on that, somewhere between 167 and 180 people on board. iranians state media has been very quick to say that this was
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a technicalfault been very quick to say that this was a technical fault and in been very quick to say that this was a technicalfault and in no been very quick to say that this was a technical fault and in no way linked to what else is going on in the middle east and iran and iraq at this very point in time and that has been echoed for now in the ukraine. over the past half—an—hour the ukrainian president has put out a statement calling edge terrible news from the middle east and a tragedy. they are working in kiev to try to establish exactly what happened and exactly why this plane came down. jonah fisher, thanks for the latest from the ukraine. thank you. the prime minister will face mps today for the first time since tensions began escalating in the middle east. borisjohnson had previously been criticised for failing to return early from a holiday in the caribbean. the prime minister is also expected to meet new eu commission president, ursula von der leyen, for the first time. prince charles has sent a message of support to people in australia, who've spent months dealing with devastating wildfires across the country. at least 25 people and millions of animals have died since the blazes broke out in september. in his message, prince charles said
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the scale of loss was beyond belief. the country is braced for more fires, with temperatures set to rise again later this week. a british woman who was found guilty of lying about being raped by a group of men in cyprus has arrived back in the uk. the 19—year—old was given a four—month suspended sentence and ordered to pay £125 in legal fees. her lawyer said she is planning to appeal against her conviction and the case was not finished by any means. that is all the latest news. sally is here to tell you about all the sport. i like it when a football manager is honest after a game, don't you? ligue1solskjaer manager is honest after a game, don't you? ligue 1 solskjaer was certainly honest last night. —— ole gunnar solskjaer. ole gunner solskjaer said it was the worst manchester united have played this season. they were totally outplayed by manchester city for large parts
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of the first leg of their league cup semi final at old trafford. katie gornall was watching. on the lookout for noisy neighbours. fans arrived to increased security for this derby following concerns that events off the pitch could once again grab unwanted attention. manchester city were entitled to 7000 tickets here at old trafford, but the last time the two sides met there were a number of incidents, including the alleged racist abuse of united midfielder fred by a city reporter and because of that both clu bs got reporter and because of that both clubs got together and decided to dramatically reduce the away allocation —— city supporter. officially just 3000 allocation —— city supporter. officiallyjust 3000 city allocation —— city supporter. officially just 3000 city supporters we re officially just 3000 city supporters were inside old trafford and before long, they were the ones making all the noise. according to united's manager, city have raised the bar under pep guardiola, and here they we re under pep guardiola, and here they were at their brilliant best. bernardo silva with a derby classic after only 16 minutes. siti aisyah
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had no out and out striker in their starting xi. turns out they didn't need one as luiz inacio lula da silva send riyad mahrez on his way for goal number two. united were anything but, as once more in the first half their defence was overwhelmed by a dizzying swell of blue. for the majority in old trafford, this was difficult to watch, but this city defence will a lwa ys watch, but this city defence will always give you a chance and marcus rashford, captain for the first time, seized his. another goal could change everything, but city held out. they may be getting left behind in the title race, but in this semi—final they have surged ahead and it's only half—time. katie gornall, bbc news, manchester. the england cricket captainjoe root says ben stokes is born for the big occasions. stokes was the star once again as england won the second test against south africa. the match looked to be drifting to a draw, with england needing five wickets in the final session. but they got themselves going, and stokes took the last three
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wickets in a thrilling spell of bowling in cape town. it's england's first test win at newlands in more than 50 years, and the series is now level. he's born for this stage, he is born for big moments in games. you know, he's someone that never backs down from a challenge. you put him in difficult situations and he will never shy away from it. he's been through both sides of it, and still very keen to keep trying to deliver for england. he's a great example to a young group of players. stand by for a mid—match meltdown at the tennis. this is the stefanos tsitsipas, who's absolutely furious with himself at the atp cup in australia. he caught his dad, who's also his coach, as he smashed his racket, and then got a telling off from his mum who was in the crowd. he laterjoked that he'll probably now be grounded. he got into proper trouble. did he catch his dad with the racket? caught him on the arm. he is holding
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his arm. he says he thinks he will be grounded! have his mobile phone taken off him and a couple of other things. i would love to know what his mum actually said to him!l things. i would love to know what his mum actually said to him! a bit of mum wisdom! it is the fact it is in front of so many people. "how dare you, young man! go to your room!" he is definitely in trouble! and a lovely story from the bdo darts last night. this is leighton bennett making history as the youngest player to take part in the world championship. he's just 14 years old. onlyjust as well — his birthday was on new years eve. he's already the youngest ever youth world champion. he didn't win, losing to former champion scott mitchell, but i'm sure he'll be back. 14 years old! good on him! brilliant! good on him! we are speaking to max whitlock later, double olympic champion. a p pa re ntly
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double olympic champion. apparently showing us how to keep fit while not leaving the sofa. big fan of that! excellent! you are ready to test some of these out?” have looked at them already. i love exercising when watching tv. have looked at them already. i love exercising when watching tvi have looked at them already. i love exercising when watching tv. i love the fact he still has to qualify for the fact he still has to qualify for the olympics even though he is really and. exactly! p is amazing and his... he is young but has a wise old head. he is a dad. lots to talk to max about. he is on later. prince charles has paid tribute to them, saying he's proud to know the australian people. the australian bushfires have left 25 people dead, thousands of homes destroyed and an area of land larger than scotland completely wiped out. in his message, prince charles said the scale of loss was beyond belief. ifear this is a hopelessly inadequate way of trying to get a message to all of you.
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we wanted to say how much we've been thinking of all those remarkable, courageous, determined firefighters who have done so much and work ceaselessly to exhaustion. i mean, you feel so deeply with the families of those who have been lost and who've lost their lives in the course of carrying out their remarkable duties as only they can do. prince charles asking people to donate to the red cross. we can speak to noel clement from red cross australia. thanks for speaking to us in challenging times. what is your main challenge at the moment? we have communities that sadly have been surrounded by fires since september. we have responded to over 30 emergency events since then and we have communities at various stages of recovery and still dealing with fires, so we have more heat
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coming through this weekend and we had a couple of quieter days but sadly the fires are still burning. what happens when a community is really badly affected and houses are being burnt down? what can you do to help? we are assisting people with recovery and relief centres while evacuations are happening and while the fires are happening we are registering people so families can check their well—being and we are providing psychologicalfirst—aid, dealing with the immediate trauma of the event and also practical support. then we go in afterwards to provide support, including emergency gra nts provide support, including emergency grants for people who have lost their homes. what about long-term support? if you have lost everything, it must be absolutely devastating? absolutely. it takes communities years to recover from the sorts of events though certainly from the australian red cross perspective, we've been committing to spend the next three years with these communities with whatever it ta kes these communities with whatever it takes and we have got great support from the public to make sure we can
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do that. there's been lots of people, celebrities, tennis players, prince charles supporting with donations et cetera. how much financial support do you need and are you getting? we've already received over $44 million, which is quite amazing and most of that has been since new year's eve. the support is certainly coming through. it is hard to know with these events how much support will be needed but we appreciate what support people can provide. we will work with these communities in the weeks and months to come, so all of the support is appreciated. does it help that prince charles is sending messages to all those incredible volunteer firefighters as well? it is lovely to receive messages like those from prince charles so people recognise the work we are doing and somebody of his stature recognising that work, and also recognise australian red cross. people have been very buoyed by his support and other support we have received globally.
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i know are mostly dealing with the human impact but there's been a massive impact on the wildlife as well? yeah. sadly, absolutely. reports of millions of animals sadly perishing, and that obviously does a lot for the psyche. while ourfocus isn't the psyche. while ourfocus isn't the wildlife, we are aware the impact that has on communities. it is part of the trauma we deal with and the support we provide. we are seeing various animals being helped. thank you so much, noel clement from the red cross. thank you. thank you, pleasure. carol has been looking at the weather in australia but also what it looks like for the uk in the next few days. good morning. it is certainly to psy—tu rvy few days. good morning. it is certainly topsy—turvy for the next few days. not as windy with the exception of the far north of scotla nd exception of the far north of
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scotland and the northern and western isles where you can expect some gales. we have the remnants of the cold front pushing south and in the cold front pushing south and in the south of england this morning, a fair bit of cloud and drizzle. hi cloud turning the sunshine hazy. the line of demarcation between the mild and the colder air travelling across scotland, northern ireland and eventually through england and wales. first thing this morning, a lot of dry weather. this system coming up from the south—west introducing some rain and wintry showers in the hills of scotland. temperature was, some seeing a good 10 degrees drop compared to yesterday. yesterday the top temperature was around 15 degrees. in the south we are still hanging onto the milder air. the drop in temperature is not necessarily referring to the temperatures you can see on the screen. overnight, this is where the weather forecast
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becomes complicated because we have this band of cloud and rain, low pressure moving northwards across england, wales, northern ireland and southern scotland by the end of the night, depositing some snows on the hills of the lake district and this area. it may well affect you if you're travelling there but that is half the story. depending on how the low pressure deepens, we can end up with a windy night across wales, central england and what we are thinking at the moment it will be the south but that may change. temperatures below freezing. cloud and rain tomorrow. pushing off into the north sea. what happens overnight will have a bearing to what happens tomorrow. another area of low pressure coming into the south moving into southern counties. in between a lot of dry weather, some sunshine and some of it hazy.
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three degrees in aberdeen, and 13 in norwich. if you like something dry, friday is the day for you. lengthy spells of sunshine, dry, and later in the day the cloud building up to the winter strengthening an event the winter strengthening an event the arrival of the weather front coming our way the arrival of the weather front coming ourway and the arrival of the weather front coming our way and that will bring some heavy rain through friday night and into saturday. those are our temperatures, going down across much of the uk. on saturday, the weather front in the north producing all this rain. it is going to be windy. the strongest winds around the weather front and with all this rain the risk of localised flooding across parts of scotland because of the totals will be mounting and the rain pushing into northern ireland and slipping southwards for the course of the day. again, the wind coming from a southerly direction so
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it will be mild on saturday. temperatures once again above average for this stage injanuary. carol, thank you. the six candidates in the running to become the next labour leader have had a chance to impress potential voters in the first hustings of the campaign last night. but what do people in a labour constituency think of the six hopefuls? breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to ellesmere port to see what people there are thinking. last night, while leadership hastings were going on behind closed doors here, we travelled 200 miles north for a cheap night out. here ellesmere port in labour club. we brought the contenders with us. this is brexit voting town where labour held on but lost votes and one of the votes they lost belong to michael. did it kill you? it killed me. vote conservatives, it killed me. vote conservatives, it killed
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me. but to get brexit done he said he lent his back to the tories and it wasn't for caves. you're looking for new blood to convince you to go back. yes. are you ready? keir starmer, even though he was a remainer, i still think that this man could be a good leader. sir keir starmer told the hastings labour had a mountain to climb. i would say them to our my stronger sir keir starmer and keir starmer mahmoud abbas for me, this is more of the same. back in london, rebecca long—bailey said she was not the
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continuity candidate but still gave him a ten out of ten. we got more votes in 2019 then we got in 2015 and more votes than 2010 after gordon brown. i do not think we will be in the wilderness. we will be in the wilderness for a little while. it cannot be ignored. but wasn't policy or personality cost labour dearly? and willoughby policy or personality to turn it around? marie works in the nhs. how did you vote? i voted conservative. have you voted labour in the past? i have, yes. i did not believe him. you did not believe jeremy corbyn? no. leading contenders. they do not look familiar to me. these are them.
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nobody i could see voting for. familiar to me. these are them. nobody i could see voting fonm that because they are not on your raider? i do not know much about them. back in london, lisa nandy told her party now it is not the time to steady that ship. if we do not change because we will die and we will deserve to but first she and they have to fight to simply sell themselves. a new labour leader is picked on aprilfour. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. so countdown to that. it's results week for retailers who are revealing the details of their crucial christmas sales. ben's been following all the twists and turns. tuesday was yesterday. it is wednesday, sorry.
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yes, we're all counting the cost of christmas, and the retailers are no exception. i really important time for the retailers. well, aldi reported on monday, telling us this christmas was it's best ever in the uk. sales were up nearly 8%. not such good news from morrisons. yesterday it saw a 1.7% fall in sales over the last three months, compared to the same time last year. this morning it's the turn of high street retailer greggs. how many mince pies did it sell this year? and we get an updates from the uk's 2nd largest supermarket sainsbury's. greggs has had a great year — profits up last time we heard from them thanks to its vegan sausage roll, and plans to open 100 stores — they've already got more stores than mcdonalds in the uk.
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so will be interesting to see how they've done over christmas. but it's been a tough year for supermarkets — we're cutting back our spending and although the big 4 — tesco, morrisons, asda and sainsburys — still dominate the market and have the most customers, their market share is falling —— and being chased by the discounters aldi and lidl. they both expanded rapidly this year. but why are shoppers holding back this year in their food shop. we have been spending less because fundamentally people are looking to be careful with their money and not wanting to be extravagant or indeed indulgent and we know why because it has been a difficult autumn and winter, uncertainty about brexit, the election and poor weather has hit some people very hard as well. both the election we did not see an uptake. people were shopping late christmas and once you start late you simply cannot catch up. no time to visit shops more. maybe people
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held off and then just to visit shops more. maybe people held off and thenjust rain out of time. it was so close to christmas. things like the weather, people stay at home. if you are feeling the pinch a little bit, you might not buy the extra bottle of wine, the extra packet of mince pies and that has an effect on the bottom line. thank you. if you are a fan in death in paradise, we have one of the stars who his back. ralph oettl is in as the new detective. they tend to switch around. one of the news doesn't be here later on the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm alpa patel. london's homicide rate has risen to its highest level since 2008. that's despite the national figure falling across the uk. 152 people were killed in the capital last year, making up nearly a quarter of all those killed in the country. the metropolitan police said tackling violence remained a top priority, saying it aims to have more than 32,000 officers in place by the summer. london's transport system needs more investment and must not lose out to other regions, according to a report from the greater london authority. city hall says transport funding has fallen by £1 billion in the past three years. the department for transport says future funding will be considered as part of this year's spending review. a worker in one of south london's oldest tea huts had to be rescued by a group
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of bikers last night after a car crashed into it. the blackheath tea hut has been on same spot on shooters hill road for around 100 years. three people were taken to hospital with minor injuries. a mother has started a petition to stop secondary schools from making boy's cut their hair. her son, faroukjames, is an instagram sensation because of his long hair. but his mother says they have been subjected to online abuse. we have had trials that have diem me, starting eight pages against myself, not particularly for my son but majorly me, claiming it was exploitation, et cetera et cetera. let's take a look at the travel situation now. all lines clear on the tube. on the roads, its slow on the northbound approach to the blackwall tunnel. queues go back to blackwall lane. kidbrooke park road is closed
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southbound near kidbrooke park station for water main works. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a very mild start out there this morning. temperatures widely in double figures. one or two spots starting the day at 12 celsius. it's going to stay mild at least for the next 24 hours or so. a largely cloudy day, then rain heading in our direction a little later this afternoon. last night's weather front drifting away south—eastwards. we'll got some brighter spell, some glimmers of sunshine this morning, ahead of the cloud thickening and increasing through the afternoon with the rain arriving. it's a less breezy day than yesterday. temperatures still mild though, at 13 celsius. now, some heavy pulses of rain moving through this evening and overnight. initially the temperatures drops a couple of degrees but then slowly it starts to riseas we head through to dawn on thursday. so starting the day tomorrow with temperatures somewhere in the region of 10—12 celsius. a wet start tomorrow. that south—westerly breeze will gradually start to strengthen, becoming quite brisk through the afternoon.
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some dry spells through the middle part, though then more rain. temperatures still mild — 13 or 14 celsius, tomorrow. a drier, calmer, brighter day, with some sunshine, on friday. but it will feel colder. i'm back in half—an—hour. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: iran fires missiles at two us military bases in iraq in revenge
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for the killing of its top commander. the uk puts in place urgent measures with the royal navy on standby in the middle east. a ukrainian passenger plane crashes in iran with 180 people on board. sainsbury‘s feels the festive spirit. the supermarket giant says sales fell 0.7% over the crucial christmas period, but that was down to poor sales of toys and games at its argos business. food sales were up. i'll speak to the boss in about half—an—hour's time. "the worst we've played this season" — that's ole gunnar solskjaer‘s assessment as manchester united are totally outplayed by man city in their league cup semi—final. britain's most successful ever gymnast, max whitlock, will be here on the sofa. he will be trying out some of his tricks. not as windy for most today than
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yesterday, except for the north of scotland, where you will have gales. most will be dry with sunshine until the rain sweeps in from the south—west later. i'll have more details in about 15 minutes. it's wednesday the 8th of january. our top story: iran has attacked two us air bases in retaliation for the killing of general soleimani last week. more than a dozen ballistic missiles were used to target the bases in irbil and al—asad, west of baghdad, but it's not yet clear if there are any casualties. 400 british troops are currently stationed in iraq. we can speak now to our middle east editor, jeremy bowen. jeremy, thank you very much fought talking to us on bbc breakfast this morning. first of all, how significant a retaliation do you think this is? the iranians are saying that it is a
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legal, proportionate retaliation that effectively draws a line on this matter. not on the big conflict between them but on this matter. essentially what they've done is bat the ball to the americans to say, if you want to escalate this thing to make it worse, then it has to be your move and you will get the blame for it because they are routeing what they are saying, the iranians, in international legality, saying it is in line with the un charter, article 51, which deals with a nation's right to self—defence, and the iranians are that in contrast, the iranians are that in contrast, the american action was an act of warand an act the american action was an act of war and an act of terrorism. if you look at what both sides are saying this morning, you have the iranian foreign minister saying we do not seek an escalation or. we have president trump, who we expect to hear from later, have president trump, who we expect to hearfrom later, starting his social media comments with all is
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well. does that mean we have may seen an end to the violence here? i think, you seen an end to the violence here? ithink, you know, it is seen an end to the violence here? i think, you know, it is the diplomacy via twitter which seems to be very much the way things are done these days. i think the message put out by foreign minister mohammad javad zarif on the iranian side is they calibrated and worked out what they calibrated and worked out what they can do which will feel like honour is satisfied at home but won't be so much that president donald trump goes through with his most bloodcurdling threats, to cause massive damage inside iran. now, will that be acceptable to hardliners in iran? has enough been done? this decision must have been signed off by the leadership, so yes, probably, for now, it will be. the question, though, again, is the americans and trump. i think the tone of his twitter response was to say, you know, maybe not as bad as we thought and perhaps, i'm
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speculating of course, his advisers might be saying, when he wakes up, they are asleep on the west coast of they are asleep on the west coast of the us, they might say something like this, "look, mr president, look at the profit and loss account here. we have knocked off one of their most powerful and dangerous men and one of our worst enemies". and on the iranians side, what have they done? lob missiles into american daisies, bases and perhaps there are casualties, we don't know, but in other words, we have absorbed the best shot they feel they can do and we have got rid of their guy, so, mr president, that looks like a win. if trump can be convinced of that he would think he's made another great decision. one area where it will be interesting from this point forward which we discussed with a former intelligence adviser to the cia, from a government point of view, with what you were saying in terms of the response from iran and
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washington, he was talking about what might happen with some of the iraqi militia groups that had links to soleimani and how they might respond to what's happened. yeah, they've been talking to their allies, paymasters, call them what you will, in tehran, and how disciplined will they be in their response? don't forget, alongside soleimani in that car that was blown up soleimani in that car that was blown up wasa soleimani in that car that was blown up was a very senior iraqi militia leader. they might want to do some things of their own. we will have to see on that. i think at the moment, pending an american response, they are pending an american response, they a re pretty pending an american response, they are pretty much in step with what's going on in tehran. cani going on in tehran. can i ask as well, you are speaking to us live from baghdad this morning, what has been your judgement of the atmosphere there over the last 24 hours or so? i think people are very nervous about what might happen. in this
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country, they are used to war. they have had a succession of wars involving foreign powers particularly, who have sometimes been settling there differences on iraqi soil and they've had the walls as well and over the years the whole thing has been quite catastrophic with huge numbers killed. people understand war and they are scared about what it can do. i went to the centre yesterday afternoon and before the assassination was a rebellion that had seized the centre of the city of baghdad. they are still there and the security forces, including pro iranians militia, have killed hundreds of those people when disturbances were going on at the end of last year. all that is still to be revived as well. this is an u nsta ble to be revived as well. this is an unstable place and people were
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saying to me it would be so much better for them if these foreigners, if they want to fight, they fought somewhere else. jeremy bowen, really good to get your assessment this morning. our middle east correspondent live from bag this morning. —— from baghdad. we'll be getting reaction from westminster all this morning, and speaking to former foreign secretary sir malcolm rifkind just after 8am. a ukrainian plane with 180 people onboard has crashed in iran. all passengers and crew are reported to have died. this is the scene where the boeing 737 came down. iranian state media says it was due to technical problems. rescue teams have been sent to the area where wreckage could be seen close to the airport. it's unclear whether the incident is linked to the iran—us confrontation. this is the flight tracking website flightradar, which shows the plane taking off from tehran airport. it travels for a short distance before the plane stops. it crashed near to the airport.
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earlier we spoke to our correspondentjonah fisher, who is in kiev. yeah, that flight, 737 800, was due to land in kiev in the last half—an—hour or so. we received information a few hours ago that the plane had crashed shortly after ta keoff plane had crashed shortly after takeoff and shortly after that, information came through on iranian media that all those on board have been killed. we don't have an exact numberfor that, been killed. we don't have an exact number for that, estimates vary somewhere between 167 and 180 people on board. iranians state media has been very quick to say this was a technicalfault and been very quick to say this was a technical fault and in been very quick to say this was a technicalfault and in no been very quick to say this was a technical fault and in no way linked to what else is going on in the middle east and in iran and iraq at this very point in time and for now that has been echoed here in ukraine. ukraine's president has, in the last half—an—hour or so, put out a statement calling it terrible news
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from the middle east and a tragedy and they are now working in kiev to establish exactly what happened and exactly why this plane came down. uk foreign secretary dominic rob has condemned the attack as the prime minister prepares to face mps or the first time since tensions began escalating in the middle east —— for the first time. let's speak now to our political correspondent, nick eardley, whojoins us from westminster. this is a tightrope of diplomacy and what part does the uk play in it? absolutely. the uk approaches so far has been to urge deescalation but in the last few minutes we have heard from the foreign secretary, dominic raab, specifically about the attacks on iraqi bases overnight. let me ta ke on iraqi bases overnight. let me take you through what he says. understandably the uk condemning the attacks, you would expect him to do that because the us are our allies, saying they are concerned about
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reports of casualties and the use of ballistic missiles. i should point out the defence department has said none of those casualties are british and we haven't had any confirmation yet, but nevertheless dominic raab is concerned. also urging iran not to repeat what it calls reckless and dangerous attacks and instead to pursue the urgent deescalation the uk has been talking about over the last few days. so far, as you say, we've not actually heard from boris johnson on this. we've not heard from the prime minister since before the christmas break. that will change later today. he's up at prime minister's questions and we will get some formal response from him on the latest developments. nick, for the moment, thank you very much. prince charles has sent a message of support to people in australia, who've spent months dealing with devastating wildfires across the country.
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at least 25 people and millions of animals have died since the blazes broke out in september. in his message, prince charles said the scale of loss was beyond belief. the country is braced for more fires, with temperatures set to rise again later this week. you're watching bbc breakfast, good morning. carol talked earlier in the week about mild weather and it feels like that? yesterday we had unseasonably high temperatures, 15 in some parts of the uk, just over. normally it would be single figures. also a windy day yesterday, especially the further north you travelled. today, not as windy for most, a except in the far north of and the northern and western isles, here we look at gales. a weather front has crossed over the night, resting in southern england, producing thicker cloud and drizzle and the other cloud is high cloud turning the early morning sunshine hazy. we return to blue behind the
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cold front, cooling down, and that colder air going further south today. first thing we are looking at sunny skies, hazy at times, wintry skies in scotland over the hills and still the strong wind, but dry for the rest of the uk. later we see thicker cloud producing rain in south—west england and south wales. here look at the temperatures in southern england and south wales, as far north as hull, then through scotla nd far north as hull, then through scotland and northern ireland temperatures have gone down. for some, a good 10 degrees drop. through the evening and overnight, this area of rain will push across england, wales, northern ireland and southern scotland by the end of the night, depositing snow on the pennines, the hills and the like district and the southern uplands, which might affect some of the higher trans— pen routes. in addition to that, we will have quite addition to that, we will have quite a windy night across england and wales. how windy depends on how deep
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the area of low pressure crossing us develops. that is something we are keeping a close eye on. temperatures holding up in the south and cold enough for frost as we push further north. what happens overnight will affect tomorrow, but this is what we think the rain and the transient snow pushing into the north sea will do. for scotland, northern ireland, much of england and north wales, a dry day with variable cloud and sunny skies. our next area of low pressure comes from the south—west, introducing rain, pushing across southern counties through the day. still mild here, 14 in norwich compared to three in aberdeen. friday, if you want dry weather, dislikes looks like being not a bad day for it. dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine. later in the day the wind will strengthen to the west, heralding the arrival of this next
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atla ntic heralding the arrival of this next atlantic weather front, bringing heralding the arrival of this next atlantic weatherfront, bringing in heavy rain with temperatures down for most. you can see the heavy rain is courtesy of our weather front, with us through saturday, windy on saturday. that heavy rain could lead to localised flooding in parts of scotla nd to localised flooding in parts of scotland and saturday because the amounts will be ramping up. dry and bright and milder. thank you very much, carol. thank you. customers of currency exchange firm travelex say they are thousands of pounds out of pocket, as the company remains in the midst of a cyber attack. travellers who ordered money online claim they have not been allowed to collect it. the hackers are demanding more than £4 million in ransom. the metropolitan police are leading the investigation into the attack, and travelex says it is taking steps to contain the spread of the ransomware. we're joined now by holly grace williams, an ethical hacker from cyber security company secarma.
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ethical hacking, how does it work? we break into computer systems and buildings to find risks and fix them. you look at this all the time, them. you look at this all the time, the common themes companies should be looking at to make sure they are safe from. one of the things people might not appreciate is the complexity of the scale of these organisations. updates are easy to do but when companies are big, it can bea do but when companies are big, it can be a struggle. how damaging is this for a company like travelex, in terms of personal information. it is not yet clear what has been compromised? there are several different risks. brand damage risk, people are aware of the attacks.
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also what has actually happened. they have lost control of data but has been stolen and will come out? from what we understand, they have access to it sometime ago so they have been on this information? the attackers are claiming they have had access for six months. it is not unusual. i do not believe travelex have confirmed that but it is typicalfor have confirmed that but it is typical for these kind of have confirmed that but it is typicalfor these kind of attacks. we understand they have asked for ransom. give us a sense of how common that is? it is incredibly common that is? it is incredibly common and not new. they have been around for years. 1999 was one of the first. as a concept it is old but it is effective and that is why criminal groups continued to do that and can be very profitable as well.
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iam very and can be very profitable as well. i am very ignorant here. you get into the computer system, since and gathers data and when they feel they have enough data to go to the company and say we have all this, if you do not pay us, we will release it or use it against you. they block the compa ny‘s access it or use it against you. they block the company's access to the data typically. they hold them at ransom to get the data. but they have come up to get the data. but they have come up with new techniques. they can steal the data, take some, and that can complicate the attack because talking about data breaches. we understand travelex have had to go back to pen and paper, goodness me, what other things will they be having to do to make sure they are safer into the future and sort this out as well? that looking at remediating, can they restore from backups but another concern will be, will more attackers target them now that they have been exposed having
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previously had security issues. hardening their systems will be a priority. how do you do that? you go toa priority. how do you do that? you go to a company and say without this and this. isn't the latest software, making sure are up—to—date? and this. isn't the latest software, making sure are up-to-date? those are one of the core things, software updates. talking about personal style. this is a big company, travelex. i have heard of friends who have had ransomware supposedly in theircomputerso we who have had ransomware supposedly in their computer so we can happen to anybody? it can. what is your advice? i would be wary of suspicious e—mails and links which can lead to a personal individual being attacked. i am assuming you do not have password one is a password? i would not recommend it. that is
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not my password, in case you were wondering. after facing criticism for failing to cut short his caribbean holiday, boris johnson is preparing to address mps for the first time since tensions began escalating in the middle east. it follows a night in which an iranian attack on two us bases was condemned by the foreign secretary as "reckless and dangerous". we can speak now to the brexit secretary stephen barclay, who joins us now from westminster. thank you for coming on. can we start with your response and the government response to the escalation with iran? it is a concern development and that is why we have been urging all parties to de—escalate and that is by the prime minister has been engaging with leaders across the world. he has spoken with president macron, chancellor merkel, and that is why the foreign secretary was in brussels. we are engaging with
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leaders but these are concerning developments. many people are talking about this being one of the most serious policy issues in years —— foreign policy? but we have not sent the prime minister. where has it been? he's meeting the president today, he will lead us in this along with other issues. the foreign secretary was in brussels, and in house of commons yesterday. we have engaged heavily in this and liaising with leaders around the world. do you think the uk is directly under threat? a concern on the minds of many viewers this morning, what would you say to that? it is very early. these events happened overnight so we need to assess them and teams are doing that but the key m essa g es we and teams are doing that but the key messages we need to de—escalate. it is in no side's interest to see
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while or see these events continue in the middle east. all parties need to de—escalate and that has been the clear message from the prime minister and foreign secretary and thatis minister and foreign secretary and that is what we urge this morning. as well as talking about iran, this slogan of getting brexit done, this is where the rubber hits the road. the message resonated during the election campaign but there is no way brexit will be done by that date because it is an incredibly long process. we are getting done and we will get it done by the 31st of january. for your viewers it was a key m essa g e january. for your viewers it was a key message and if they saw events in the house of commons yesterday, they would have seen the detailed scrutiny of the bill passed by a
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large majority. we have another full day to day... what i am saying is leaving the eu might happen on that date but brexit will not be done by that point. you're talking about a trade deal and you are right, there will be a trade deal, notjust with europe but with many countries around the world, the us, australia, new zealand. many countries have expressed an interest of having better trading and a key part of thatis better trading and a key part of that is we will get control of our trade policy just that is we will get control of our trade policyjust as we will our money, laws and border which is a key pa rt money, laws and border which is a key part of my people voted the way they did. the bill is literally going through the house of commons now. we are back in the house of commons, going through clause by clause to get legislation in place to deliver on what many of your viewers voted for which was to leave, to get the vote on it, to lead by the 31st of january. of course, they will then be a trade deal to discuss with the eu and the
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prime minister is meeting with the commission president today. i will be meeting with michel barnier as well. we are having those discussions at the key thing is we are living on the 31st of january and honouring the commitment we gave your viewers. when you meet with michel barnier, from what he has said, one of the points he will be making is that 11 months is not enough time to sort out that trade relationship before that deadline of december 31 at the end of this year. it is there planning taking place for a no—deal scenario? it is there planning taking place for a no-deal scenario? firstly, the eu themselves have agreed to the timetable so both in the withdrawal agreement, they are committed to negotiating with best endeavours and the political declaration they have committed to having a trade deal in place by the end of 2020. when people say cannot be done, both the
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uk and the eu have agreed in the political declaration that is part of the deal that is the timeframe. secondly, many of the people saying it cannot be done to that timescale, with the same people who said we could not change the backstop, we could not change the backstop, we could not change the backstop, we could not get a deal, that the negotiations were a shame, that we we re negotiations were a shame, that we were not serious when clearly that was not the case. people want to see a sleep on the 31st of january and thatis a sleep on the 31st of january and that is what they voted for the referendum, we got a clear mandate for that in the general election and thatis for that in the general election and that is what we are delivering for your viewers. to be honest, you will be the first to come and ask me, if we had a manifesto commitment to live by the end of 2020 and the first thing we did was to come to parliament as a we're not going do that. we gave a clear promise and we agreed with the european union in any political declaration to live by 2020 and that is what we're going to do. i asked you about whether you
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are preparing for a no—deal scenario? it does not apply in the way you are suggesting. many of the things we have discussed previously about a no—deal, for example about the citizens and is in the uk and in europe, what would happen on the border of northern ireland, do not apply at the end of 2020 because the bill going through parliament now safeguards the rights of those 3 million eu citizens in the uk and the citizens from here in the eu. it deals with the issues with issues in northern ireland and we will be debating that in more detail today. it also settles the financial arrangement between the uk and europe in terms of our departure so when people say they will be a no—deal at the end of 2020, it is missing the point that the bill safeguards many of the key issues which people clearly asked about
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when talking about a potential no—deal brexit. when talking about a potential no-deal brexit. i can see where you are coming from. i understand the mandate but you still have not a nswered mandate but you still have not answered the question. let's say there is no trade deal in place at there is no trade deal in place at the end of this year, what happens? many of the issues people were concerned about a no—deal uncovered in the bill. citizens rights, they are in the bill. citizens rights, they a re protected in the bill. citizens rights, they are protected whether we have a deal or not... ido are protected whether we have a deal or not... i do not want to keep asking the same thing so there are no preparations in place for a potential no deal except? what is within your question is what happens if there is a trade deal in practice but it is not the same as an ideal... that is why i asked. if there is no trade deal, firstly we have agreed with the eu to do a
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treadmill and we're confident can and that is what we're on. of course, there will be planning for any eventuality but we aim to get a trade deal, the commission president is there, the first visit since april 27. both sides are clear they wa nt april 27. both sides are clear they want a trade deal. the political declaration says it can be done to the timetable so let's be positive and work on that. stephen barclay, thank you very much. coming up later, is a good to let children have mobile phones in the class room? some very strong views. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alpa patel. london's homicide rate has risen to its highest level since 2008. that's despite the national figure
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falling across the uk. 152 people were killed in the capital last year, making up nearly a quarter of all those killed across the country. the metropolitan police said tackling violence remained a top priority, saying it aims to have more than 32,000 officers in place by the summer. london's transport system needs more investment and must not lose out to other regions, according to a report from the greater london authority. city hall says transport funding has fallen by £1 billion in the past three years, the department for transport says future funding will be considered as part of this year's spending review. a worker in one of south london's oldest tea huts had to be rescued by a group of bikers last night after a car crashed into it. the blackheath tea hut has been on same spot on shooters hill road for around 100 years. three people were taken to hospital with minor injuries. a mother has started a petition to stop secondary schools from making boy's cut their hair.
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her son, faroukjames, is an instagram sensation because of his long hair. but his mother says they have been subjected to online abuse. we have had tolls that have diem me, starting eight pages against myself, not particularly for farouk but majorly me, claiming it was exploitation, et cetera et cetera. let's take a look at the travel situation now... on the tube — all lines are clear at the moment on the roads, it's congested on the northbound approach to the blackwall tunnel. queues go back well past blackwall lane. there are queues on the anticlockwise m25 towards the m40 turn off following a collision. in catford, the south circular is slow westbound through the roadworks towards the gyratory. now the weather with kate kinsella good morning. it's a very mild start out there this morning. temperatures widely
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in double figures. one or two spots starting the day at 12 celsius. it's going to stay mild at least for the next 24 hours or so. a largely cloudy day, then rain heading in our direction a little later this afternoon. last night's weather front drifting away south—eastwards. we'll got some brighter spell, some glimmers of sunshine this morning, ahead of the cloud thickening and increasing through the afternoon with the rain arriving. it's a less breezy day than yesterday. temperatures still mild though, at 13 celsius. now, some heavy pulses of rain moving through this evening and overnight. initially the temperatures drops a couple of degrees but then slowly it starts to riseas we head through to dawn on thursday. so starting the day tomorrow with temperatures somewhere in the region of 10—12 celsius. a wet start tomorrow. that south—westerly breeze will gradually start to strengthen, becoming quite brisk through the afternoon. some dry spells through the middle part, though then more rain. temperatures still mild — 13 or 14 celsius, tomorrow. a drier, calmer, brighter day, with some sunshine, on friday. but it will feel colder. i'm back in half—an—hour.
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now it's back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: iran has attacked two us air bases in retaliation for the killing of general soleimani last week. more than a dozen ballistic missiles were used to target the bases in irbil and al—asad, west of baghdad. 400 british troops are currently stationed in iraq. earlier we spoke to brexit secratary stephen barclay and asked him whether britain was under threat. we have personnel out there. it is very early. as dan said, this happened overnight, so we need to assess things and teams are doing that. the key message is we need to de—escalated. it is in no side's interest to see war or to see these
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events continue in the middle east stop you all parties need to de—escalate, that's been the message from the prime minister and the foreign secretary and that's what we urge this morning. dan johnson is outside the ministry of defence for us this morning. it seems listening to analysis and eve ryo ne we have it seems listening to analysis and everyone we have spoken to this morning, this is a real tightrope of diplomacy. yes, it looked like when these rocket attacks were launched during the night that this was a serious escalation and this was iran getting back on the front foot. it looks like the damage inflicted by these missiles is fairly limited. we know from the ministry of defence there have been no british casualties and we understand no american service men or women have been injured or killed and no iraqi forces have been injured or killed either, so it looks like the impact on the ground is fairly limited but iran is able to say we retaliated, we fired these missiles and we made an impact. the tone of the response
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seems to be that maybe it, everyone can move on and things can simmer down and that can certainly be the hope, that things don't escalate any further. that's been the call from the secretary of defence here, calling for all sides to tryjudy de—escalate theirs and tone things down and they hope will be that is the direction things travel in —— to try to de—escalate this. a ukrainian plane with 180 people onboard has crashed in iran. all passengers and crew are reported to have died. this is the scene where the boeing 737 came down. iranian state media says it was due to technical problems. rescue teams have been sent to the area where wreckage could be seen close to the airport. it's unclear whether the incident is linked to the iran—us confrontation. this is the flight tracking website flightradar, which shows the plane taking off from tehran airport. it travels for a short distance before the plane stops. it crashed near to the airport.
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those are the main stories. are you going to be doing gymnastics later? not gymnastics, sally is doing the gymnastics! i was told louise is suitably dressed to do some stuff with max whitlock. he is going to talk to us about plans for 2020, olympics, but in his book he has a sofa workouts. we sit on a sofa so i thought he could give us some tips. is that why you are wearing trousers?” could give us some tips. is that why you are wearing trousers? i didn't get the memo! no—one mentioned it to me! you don't have to do it! classic excuse, i can't do gymnastics, i'm ina skirt! excuse, i can't do gymnastics, i'm in a skirt! i can do it on the sofa if it is like this! get the guns
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out! frazar beach! stop it! if you area out! frazar beach! stop it! if you are a foot ball fan, a manchester united fan, it is a bit like ole gunnar solskjar i's face, not happy this morning. he was scathing about manchester united's performance last night. they lost to manchester city in the first leg of their league cup semi—final. it was the manner of the defeat that really upset solskjaer. united were completely outplayed by city for large parts of the game. city won it 3—1, but they could realistically have been 5—0 up at half—time. from their goal to half—time, it is the worst we've played. before then, it could have gone either way, a goal, but that doesn't matter now. we've just got to focus on saturday, norwich. after that second half, we've got something that we can believe in. the england cricket captainjoe root says ben stokes is born for the big moments. stokes was the star once again as england won the second test against south africa. the match looked to be drifting to a draw, with england needing five wickets in the final session.
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but they got themselves going, and stokes took the last three wickets in a thrilling spell of bowling in cape town. it's england's first test win at newlands in more than 50 years, and the series is now level. a huge boost for us going forward in the series, and i think it's just great. test cricket has been a bit ofa great. test cricket has been a bit of a talking point recently in terms of a talking point recently in terms of how many days it should be played for, but today showed why it should be five days. the first two series, being a result is great for the game of cricket and great for the series. you might remember that ben stokes' dad ged was taken really ill in the run up to this test match. —— test match in. he's still in hospital in south africa, and stokes dedicated his performance to his father with this gesture during the post—match celebrations. his dad lost part of his middle finger during his career in rugby league. isn't that fantastic? stand by for a mid—match meltdown at the tennis. this is the stefanos tsitsipas, who's absolutely furious with himself at the atp cup in australia.
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he caught his dad, who's also his coach, as he smashed his racket, and then got a telling off from his mum who was in the crowd. she came over and had a word. you can't do that to your dad, or anyone in fact! he laterjoked that he'll probably now be grounded. rightly so! couldn't blame them. great britain play in the quarter—finals of the competition tonight. i would love to have a microphone to hear what she said. it worked, he did the embarrassed thing where he put his head down. when your mum steps in, you know you have crossed the line. when your mum steps in publicly! ouch! and a lovely story from the bdo darts last night. this is leighton bennett making history as the youngest player to take part in the world championship. he's just 14 years old. onlyjust as well, his birthday was on new years eve. he's already the youngest ever youth world champion.
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he didn't win, losing to former champion scott mitchell, but i'm sure he'll be back. wonder if he is back at school this morning already. that is a mum comment! he looks very mature, doesn't he? you said he onlyjust turned 14. new eve was his birthday, only just turned 14. new eve was his birthday, onlyjust 14, turned 14. new eve was his birthday, only just 14, incredible performance —— new year's eve. we had the naughty side with tsitsipas and now a bit of positivity. that's what i like to bring you! a question for you, phones in the classroom?” would have said no, but i know in my son's school, they are allowed in some lessons to help them do their work. do research on their phones and they sometimes listen to things teacher gives to them. part of life, i think. thanks for your comments. divina mccall has got involved and she has said absolutely not.
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you might expect that would earn you a telling off from the teacher or a confiscation but in one school that could be about to change. jane prescott is the head teacher at portsmouth high school, where she is actually encouraging the use of phones in certain classes and saying they can be a force for good. let's hear what she has to say. hello, i'm jane hello, i'mjane prescott, headmistress of portsmouth high school g dst and president of the girls school association this year andi girls school association this year and i think schools should look at the usefulness of mobile phones and how they can be used for research and helping children organise their daily life. what we find here is if the girls have access to their phone, it doesn't drive it underground. we have a very open culture, so they feel they can discuss anything with us to do with their mobile phone, particularly if they've been using it and they feel they're not very co mforta ble it and they feel they're not very comfortable with it. in lessons, it means they can use their phone to look something up with the teacher's
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permission, that they can enter into quizzes. some schools ask their pupils to buy a tablet or some other sort of device, but my view is they already have that device that pa rents a re already have that device that parents are paying for, so why not useit? parents are paying for, so why not use it? why are we doubling up on it? we shouldn't demonise mobile phones. children today are going to be working with mobile phones for a long time and we can't retract, we can't go back. the genie is already out. very interesting and thank you so much for everyone getting in touch. divided opinion on this. richard said they will be on snapchat, taking selfies and other inane activities. fred said it can be a good tool in lessons but only if smart phones are used and the culture of respect is in the school so they can't go off task. not every phone is the same. capability wise. there is fairness as well. that might not have been thought of.
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colette said it can be useful but can cause issues. teenagers can't resist taking photos. zoe says phones have no place in schools because it can encourage bullying and it leaves schools and teachers vulnerable. schools are one place where children can have a long breakfrom place where children can have a long break from phones. and this person says i am glad it is turned off when my child is at school. cathy says i am glad they are turned off at school, too many kids walking around and texting while not concerned with others. we are talking to a head to where they don't have mobile phones later. keep your comments coming in. you can't do your homework from the encyclopaedia britannica. you can but... there is so much information people need access to. carol has been telling us it is mild and it really feels like it. good morning. yesterday was mild,
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temperatures in double—figure, today, though, a bit different. at stornaway it is four degrees, but in london, it is 12. less windy for most london, it is 12. less windy for m ost u nless london, it is 12. less windy for most unless you are in the far north of mainland scotland or the northern and western isles, and you will have gales. we have a weather front moving across the country overnight, a cold front, introducing cloud and drizzle. you can see the demarcation between the milder air ahead of the cold front and the colder air behind, so temperatures are coming down. we start this morning with some sunshine, albeit hazy, there is high cloud as well. showers across scotland, wintry over the hills and don't forget the strong winds. for northern ireland, northern england and the south—east behind that front, hazy sunshine. later, a new system coming from the south—west will introduce a thicker cloud and rain in south—west england and wales. it is england and wales, especially in the south, where we
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are looking at higher temperatures but farther north in northern england and scotland, temperatures are much lower. 10 degrees lowerfor some than yesterday. through the evening and overnight, we have this band of rain, it is an area of low pressure moving north across england, wales, into northern ireland and into southern scotland by the end of the night. it will deposit snow on the hills of the la ke deposit snow on the hills of the lake district, the pennines and the southern uplands and it might affect some of the higher trends routes. bear that in some of the higher trends routes. bearthat in mind. some of the higher trends routes. bear that in mind. the other half of the story is it is low pressure and how deep it develops and deepens will have a effect on the strength of the wind. a windy night in england and wales and we will keep an ion that. further north in scotland, cold under clear skies. cold enough for ice frost. tomorrow hour band of rain, wind and transient hill snow will push through the north sea, drier behind it, but then another area of low
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pressure will come our way bringing low pressure to southern counties and south—west wales and england. temperatures hanging on in the south, 12—14. 14 is high for the time of year but only three in aberdeen and seven in belfast. by friday, a largely dry day. some sunshine, hazy at times with cloud but you can see the thickness of the cloud in the west, the wind strengthens and the rain comes our way and some of it will be heavy. temperature—wise, down for most. 7-10. this temperature—wise, down for most. 7—10. this will cross us overnight friday and saturday we could see localised flooding in parts of scotland. thank you very much, carol. good morning, you are watching brea kfast. the mother of a victim of the manchester arena bombings who has been lobbying to make it a legal requirement for venues to have anti—terror measures in place is celebrating a break—through in her campaign. martyn's law, named
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after martyn hett who died in the attack, will now be implemented by manchester city council. his mum, figen murray, joins us now. thank you for coming to see us. first of all, explain what has changed? i am absolutely over the moon with manchester council doing this because, obviously, it is not a legal requirement yet and they have voluntarily said we will implement and kick start it. to me it is massive because i have been working so hard with a lot of wonderful people to try and get the government to change this... what will change? they are going to implement some security measures in terms of the licensee acts —— licensing acts and while they cannot enforce it, counsellors are hoping on a lot of
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venues counsellors are hoping on a lot of venues and organisers to voluntarily embrace it enthusiastically and we hope that is the case. the council said it will be in the process of saying best practice which means martyn's law can be implemented across the city and more broadly used across the uk and is for them into legislation as well? obviously things take a long time. there is lots of paperwork to do for the government but i am hoping that a lot of other cities will take a lead from manchester. what is it that will be done differently? let's say a pub whatever it is, what differences would they have to make to prepare for a terror attack because i prepare for other emergencies? martyn's law, if you
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look at the guidelines, is suggesting people have counterterrorism training which is freely available by the government andl freely available by the government and i would encourage anybody to go on their website and actually do it. it is only 45 minutes and it is really educative. the other thing is, it is asking venues to have a counterterrorism action plan. it is asking venues to work together with local government and authorities. it is that kind of stuff that obviously the council would not be able to implement everything but they will implement everything but they will implement as much of martyn's law as they can. what drives you on? losing a child. losing a child. what else cani a child. losing a child. what else can i do asa a child. losing a child. what else can i do as a mother? i can either disintegrate and i absolutely
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refused to do that so what drives me is when! refused to do that so what drives me is when i go across the road from my house where i have a tree planted in his name, plundered on my own and i said to him, i will try to implement martyn's law. i will do my best for you, martin. what else can i do? you are also studying counterterrorism? i needed to understand how terrorism comes about and what can be done about it but how it has even happened. i need to understand that. does it help? totally. because i knew nothing. i was really ignorant in terms of terrorism. it just was not on my radar but it has opened my eyes, the course. as you go through the process, are you trying to educate others as well? do you find
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your banking your head against a brick wall on occasion? since starting the course, i can talk about things slightly more educated and it is good because i can now say, actually, you are wrong, this is the reason. and it has helped me with martyn's law as well. it kind of makes me realise, as i am learning stuff, it makes me realise how important martyn's law actually is. as i said, i cannot thank the council enough and, not only the council, could not done this on my own. i have had some wonderful, wonderful people. brendan cox, he help me massively with the organisation. he set up survivors
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against terror. an others. i could not have done this on my own. thank you so, so much to see us. thank you. nice to see you again. yes we're all counting the cost of christmas, and the retailers are no exception. all retailers are counting the cost. wasn't good christmas? —— was it. lots of them are reporting back this week on how they fared over that crucial christmas period. today it is the turn of sainsbury‘s. sales are down. down 0.7% — but a better performance than last year. it's also better than rival morrisons which reported a larger fall in sales yesterday. but if you look at the detail, grocery sales were up and it was a record christmas for online food deliveries but sales
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of general merchandising as it's know, things like toys and games they sell through their argos business fell sharply. well, we can speak to the man in charge now. mike coupe, the chief executive of sainsbury‘s, joins me from the london stock exchange. good morning. good morning. two big stories. one is that your food sales look pretty good and it was the argos that proved difficult. really pleased with the groceries sales, not just pleased with the groceries sales, notjust on line but also in our digital business overall. total on line sales grown by 5%. clothing was also an outstanding performance, up 4.4%. within the general merchandise business we saw particularly gaming and toys that if you take the toys alone it has fallen and that clearly
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had a significant impact on our quarter. clothing, blame weather is often blamed for poor sales but actually the cold weather was good for you? yes, it certainly help. we had a cold november and that meant we saw warmer weather gear sold. a good performance over christmas with seasonaljumpers, good performance over christmas with seasonal jumpers, ladies wear good performance over christmas with seasonaljumpers, ladies wear in particular. we are pleased with the clothing performance at least in pa rt clothing performance at least in part driven by on line business. sales are growing by 40%. christmas is an important time for all retailers. you need to make it work because it sets you up for the rest of the year. let's talk about the competition. that merger with asda was blocked. you are now on the heel of audis. how do you make people
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come through your door? —— aldi. with over 32 million customers over christmas and we do a brilliantjob at customer service and i would like to thank my colleagues in particular over the work over the christmas period. it was very smooth. but we need to do the things we do brilliantly well, serve our customers with great food and fantastic prices but also recognise the way customers are shopping is changing and 20% of our business is now on line over christmas and that grew by 5% year on year, representing the way customers are choosing to shop differently. what does that mean for the year ahead? customers are changing the way they shopper you have lots of big shops and stuff to pay, what will 2020 look like for you? we expect the market backdrop continued to be challenging but we will continue to do the things which has led us to
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outperform the market. invest in quality of the food we sell, to invest in lowering our prices which we have done during the course of this quarter but also recognise that the way customers are choosing to shop is changing and changing pretty rapidly and if we adapt our business to that, we will be successful into the future. when you see the headlines about the expansion plans of your competitors. moving into areas close to you. does it keep you up areas close to you. does it keep you up at night? i sleep easily but it isa up at night? i sleep easily but it is a fact we operate in a competitive market. customers enjoy that. it is notjust aldi and other detailers right across the retail spectres. it is important we focus on what the right thing for our customers is, great quality, great
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value and improving our service and recognising that customer shopping habits are changing and if we do that, we will compete notjust with the discounters by the other big operations. good to talk to you. the chief executive of sainsbury with the results. later in the week marks & spencer is an tesco results will be out. i love a few states every now and then. black friday, they had 12 orders every single second. 8 million mince pies and 34 million of those easy healer tangerine thing. 34 million of them. i do love tangerine. thank you very much.
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still struggling with the christmas cold, stay away. loads to come this morning. it's got sun, sand and sea but the tranquil island of saint marie also has a darker side. death in paradise is back — we'll be speaking to one of the stars nina wadia. also the stars of bochs. i tried the cashew carries. you bring it in? no. unbelievable. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alpa patel. london's homicide rate has risen to its highest level since 2008. that's despite the national figure falling across the uk. 152 people were killed in the capital last year, making up nearly a quarter of all those killed across the country. the metropolitan police said tackling violence remained a top priority, saying it aims
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to have more than 32,000 officers in place by the summer. london's transport system needs more investment and must not lose out to other regions, according to a report from the greater london authority. city hall says transport funding has fallen by £1 billion in the past three years, the department for transport says future funding will be considered as part of this year's spending review. a worker in one of south london's oldest tea huts had to be rescued by a group of bikers last night after a car crashed into it. the blackheath tea hut has been on same spot on shooters hill road for around 100 years. three people were taken to hospital with minor injuries. a mother has started a petition to stop secondary schools from making boy's cut their hair. her son, faroukjames, is an instagram sensation because of his long hair. but his mother says they have been subjected to online abuse.
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we have had trolls that have dmed me, started hate pages against myself, in particular, not particularly for farouk, but majorly me, claiming it was exploitation, you're exploting your child, et cetera et cetera. let's take a look at the travel situation now... on the tube — all lines are clear at the moment on the roads, the a23 is slow on the approaches to purley cross following a collision. there are queues on the clockwise m25 from junction 5 to j8 following a collision a little earlier this morning. in hounslow, bath road is congested near wellington road north following a collision. now the weather with kate kinsella good morning. it's a very mild start out there this morning. temperatures widely in double figures. one or two spots starting the day at 12 celsius. it's going to stay mild at least for the next 24 hours or so. a largely cloudy day, then rain heading in our direction a little later this afternoon.
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last night's weather front drifting away south—eastwards. we'll got some brighter spell, some glimmers of sunshine this morning, ahead of the cloud thickening and increasing through the afternoon with the rain arriving. it's a less breezy day than yesterday. temperatures still mild though, at 13 celsius. now, some heavy pulses of rain moving through this evening and overnight. initially the temperatures drops a couple of degrees but then slowly it starts to riseas we head through to dawn on thursday. so starting the day tomorrow with temperatures somewhere in the region of 10—12 celsius. a wet start tomorrow. that south—westerly breeze will gradually start to strengthen, becoming quite brisk through the afternoon. some dry spells through the middle part, though then more rain. temperatures still mild — 13 or 14 celsius, tomorrow. a drier, calmer, brighter day, with some sunshine, on friday. but it will feel colder. if you are heading out, have a lovely morning. i'm back in half an hour.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. iran fires missiles at two us military bases in iraq in revenge for the killing of its top commander. the uk puts in place "urgent measures" with the royal navy on standby in the middle east. a ukrainian passenger plane crashes in iran with 180 people on board. sainsbury‘s feels the festive spirit. the supermarket giant says
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sales fell 0.7% over the crucial christmas period — but that was down to poor sales of toys and games at its argos business. food and clothing sales were up. "the worst we've played this season." that's ole gunnar solskjaer‘s assessment as manchester united are totally outplayed by man city in their league cup semi final. britain s most successful ever gymnast, max whitlock, will be here on the sofa. good morning. today will not be as windy as yesterday for most of us, u nless windy as yesterday for most of us, unless you are in the north of scotla nd unless you are in the north of scotland was that you still have gales. sunshine and showers there, winter in the hills but for the rest of the uk, dry with sunny spells, more rain into south—west england and wales later. i'll have more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday the 8th of january. our top story. iran has attacked two us air bases in retaliation for the killing of general soleimani last week.
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more than a dozen ballistic missiles were used to target the bases in irbil and al—asad, west of baghdad, but it's not yet clear if there are any casualties. dan johnson reports. could this be the sight and sound of a further move towards deeper conflict between iran and the us? local tv says these are the missiles launched from iran, heading over the border, targeting iraqi airbases used by the americans and their allies. and all this as iran was still laying to rest the body of its assassinated general, qasem soleimani, killed by a us drone strikes. a martyr to the millions on the streets for his funeral calling for retaliation. but the us says he's a murderer who was planning attacks to extend iran's influence over its neighbour. and this was the white house warning yesterday.
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if iran does anything that they shouldn't be doing, they're going to be suffering the consequences and very strongly. with the damage it still being assessed, iran's foreign minister posted on social media, proportional measures of self defence, adding we do not want war... the president was untypically low—key, saying all is well and restating american military might. he will give more reaction today. on the streets of baghdad yesterday, people called for foreign interference from all corners to end. this country already faces a deep crisis of conflict and violence. these attacks appear to be limited but daylight will reveal their true impact, damage done and the wider repercussions. dan johnson, bbc news. in a moment we'll speak to dan, who is at the ministry of defence. but first, we can speak now to our middle east correspondent lina sinjab who is in beirut.
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thank you very much for your time this morning. i suppose everybody, wherever they are watching this film, is wondering what happens next. we have seen the response from the iranians foreign and east are and what donald trump has been saying is, whichever move we see next. yes, indeed. all the information about the overnight attacks are coming from iranians sources. the iraqi security media sale also said they have received 22 missiles at two bases, but concerning damages, casualties, we still do not know. we have to wait and see first the confirmation from the united states about these missiles, what did they target, if they are any casualties. suddenly they are any casualties. suddenly the us will not stay quiet about it. if they don't react to this, that
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means iran can go ahead and do further attacks. it is not enough for iran to do little damage after the big loss that they had. they wa nt to the big loss that they had. they want to hit american presence in the region, they want them out of the region, they want them out of the region, and it is hard to see how the us, you know, submitting to that. they have made it clear they are staying and we will have to wait and see how the reaction will take place, but it is definitely putting the region in more volatile and dangerous situation and sadly it is all happening on iraqi soil and iraqi people are the ones who are paying the price of. thank you for speaking to us live from beirut. danjohnson is outside the ministry of defence for us this morning. dan, we've been hearing from the uk government this morning. it is very interesting. it is so nuanced and it is such a tightrope to walk. it is indeed. we knew there we re to walk. it is indeed. we knew there were 400 british troops in iraq will stop the ministry of defence has
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said that their mission there is not in combat. they are there to train iraqi forces and we didn't know exactly which basis they were stationed at butter earlier this morning the ministry of defence has said it has accounted all 400 of those service personnel, that they are allok, those service personnel, that they are all ok, there are no casualties on the british side. we have also had from the iraqi security forces that they have not suffered any casualties in this attack either. it looks as though although this was a serious attack, to launch missiles on to the us bases, the actual impact on the ground has been fairly limited. earlier we got reaction from stephen barclay, the british brexit secretary. we have personnel out there, it is very early. obviously these events as yourself said, they happened overnight, so we need to assess them and teams are doing that. the key message is that we need to de—escalate it. it is an no side's interest of the war or see
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these events continue in the middle east. all parties need to de—escalate, that has been a very clear message from the prime ministerand clear message from the prime minister and foreign secretary and thatis minister and foreign secretary and that is what we urge again this morning. that message of de—escalation has been reinforced by the british government again this morning. all eyes will be on the us president to see what his response is later today. the ball now very much in donald trump's court to see if he will escalate this any further, having suffered those attacks on us bases, or he sees the fa ct attacks on us bases, or he sees the fact that the impact on the ground appears to be very limited with hopefully no casualties as a sign that things can now submit down in what has been a really intense few days. certainly the message, the hope, is that things will now progress in a more positive direction, that things will now come down in the region. and q.
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a ukrainian plane with 180 people onboard has crashed in iran. all passengers and crew are reported to have died. the reports from iranian state media say the boeing 737 came down due to technical problems shortly after taking off from tehran airport. it's unclear whether the incident is linked to the iran—us confrontation. we can speak now to our correspondentjonah fisher, who is at the airport in kiev. you can hopefully give us more detail. very little information. what more do we know? in the last few minutes we have had a press conference here at the airport here in kiev. it has been announced there we re in kiev. it has been announced there were 168 passengers on board this ukrainian international airlines flight ukrainian international airlines flight and nine crew, bringing the total to 177 people on board that aircraft. what we do know is that it crashed shortly after take—off in tehran earlier this morning and all
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indications from iran is that nobody has survived but crashed. with what is going on in that part of the world, clearly in everybody‘s mines, overnight, iran launched military strikes on military bases in iraq. there have been those people who are quick to link these things together. it does have to be stressed at the moment that there is nothing to suggest that these two things are linked. the ukrainian embassy in tehran has put out a statement to that effect. iranian state tv has been saying a similar thing and so far that has been echoed from top officials here in the ukraine that this is a tragedy as far as they can see and they want investigators to be allowed to do theirjob and people not to speculate as to the cause of the crash. thank you, good to talk to you. a british woman who was found guilty of lying about being raped by a group of men in cyprus has arrived back in the uk. the 19—year—old was given a four—month suspended sentence and ordered to pay £125 in legal fees. her lawyer said she is planning
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to appeal against her conviction and the case was "not finished by any means". customers of currency exchange firm travelex say they are thousands of pounds out of pocket, as the company remains in the midst of a cyber attack. travellers who ordered money online claim they have not been allowed to collect it. the hackers are demanding more than four million pounds in ransom. let's speak with cyber—security reporterjoe tidy. what's the latest? thank you forjoining us at. bring us up to date with what exactly has known to have happened. we know that around new year's eve they launched around new year's eve they launched a cyber attack. the gang, i have spoken to them, and they say they we re spoken to them, and they say they were inside the system of travelex for around six months before they launched the attack full stop we know with ransomware, accies gain entry to a network, probe around, looking for weaknesses, download any data that may be valuable. they then
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press a couple of buttons and encrypt the entire network and lock a company out of their systems. they either then ransom the access to the system or the data that they may have or they ransom both. in this case we believe, according to the hackers, that they have both. thank you very much indeed. ongoing problems. sir eltonjohn has pledged $1 million to the fundraising effort to tackle the australian bushfires. the singer, who was performing in sydney, told the audience they should be in "awe" of the work the firefighters are doing and urged people in the crowd to come together and help. he is one of many celebrities who have donated an awful lot of money. this is a magnificent country that i've been coming to since 1971. i love it here so much. to see what is happening here breaks my heart, and so we have to come together, we have to fight, and... this is my bit towards it and i love australia so much. and to those who have lost their homes, god bless.
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i hope that your lives will be repaired very, very soon. one of many people donating money. so many millions of pounds have already been donated. more on that breaking news overnight. it was the retaliation that the international community was waiting for — iran has carried out over a dozen ballistic missile strikes on us air bases. earlier we spoke to our middle east editorjeremy bowen — he explained what president trump may decide to do next. his advisers might be saying to him well, look, mr president — when he wakes up, they are asleep at the moment, of course, on the east coast of the us — they might say something like this. look, mr president. look at the profit and loss account, here. we have knocked off one of their most powerful and dangerous men and one of our worst enemies and, on the iranian side, what have they done? they have lobbed some missiles into one of our bases and as far as we know right now, there aren't casualties, perhaps there are, but we don't know, but in other words,
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we have absorbed their best shot, the best shot they feel they can do, and we have got rid of the guy so, mr president, that looks like a win. and if trump can be convinced of that, he might say, yeah, you know, ithink i made another great decision. the former foreign secretary, sir malcolm rifkind, joins us now from our westminster studio. good morning. good morning. thank you forjoining us. what is your analysis of where we are now? does this mean the situation is more dangerous, what is it?” this mean the situation is more dangerous, what is it? i broadly agree withjeremy bowen but i would add a cautious note. the iranians had to make an immediate response in order to show their own public opinion, and the world, that they we re opinion, and the world, that they were not taking it lying down. it has been a pretty tame response. missiles randomly fired at bases in the middle of the night, probably no casualties. that is not very significant. i would casualties. that is not very significant. iwould not casualties. that is not very significant. i would not rule out, though, that it takes time to actually plan if they want something
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more dramatic. they might still have in mind trying to assassinate some senior american military figure or someone of that kind, or a more dramatic military response. i am not saying that will happen, the iranian foreign minister said they are now concluded their response. if that is so, that is a very significant sign of the ultimate weakness of iran in military terms, and of course they never could contemplate defeating the united states. but if all they are able to do when one of their most seniorfigures has been eliminated is the response we saw last night, that says something about the capability of that country and how much of a threat it ultimately can be to the wider interests that the world is concerned about. that is very interesting to hear your point of view. i suppose so much as well relies on what donald trump does next. yes. not only do we not know that, i suspect the pentagon and the state department don't know it and it is possible the president himself
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doesn't. without wanting to sound rude, the problem we all have, americans as well as the rest of the world, not that he has some brilliant unpredictable strategy... you could argue, isn't this marvellous yellow he keeps saying one thing and doing another, this is a very clever technique. that i don't think is a description it deserves. it is not a strategy, it isa deserves. it is not a strategy, it is a series of tactical decision taken on a day—to—day basis, some of which are inconsistent with other things he is doing. a few weeks ago he was pulling american troops out of the kurds and now we find additional troops have been sent to kuwait. that is not a strategy, that isa kuwait. that is not a strategy, that is a series of spasmodic reactions as circumstances change.” is a series of spasmodic reactions as circumstances change. i want to ask you from a british, uk point of view... we know there are british voices out there, the royal navy on standby and, if necessary... are uk citizens in that area under threat? what do you think? it is extremely
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unlikely with the iranians. they can be irrational from unlikely with the iranians. they can be irrationalfrom time unlikely with the iranians. they can be irrational from time to time but i think it is extremely unlikely for this reason, that the uk, along with france and germany and other european countries, has never supported president trumper‘s decision to abandon the iran nuclear deal and have been trying to act as honest brokers to get some diplomatic progress. they were not in any way involved in the attack on the general, they were not even informed in advance, nor should they have been. there is no rational reason for it britain or any other nationality being subject to attacks at this stage. how significant is it that iran has lost effectively their top general? it is hugely significant, not just because top general? it is hugely significant, notjust because he is a general. the whole significance of soleimani is he was a first class political strategist. if you look at what iran has been up to over the last few years, iran is a country
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thatis last few years, iran is a country that is a long way away from the mediterranean. it has now come on board israel or any of these other sensitive countries. what it has done, largely through soleimani's military skill, is not only become the most powerful external power in iraq with a very close relationship with the iraqi government, we see them today still in southern assyria quite close to the israeli border, although the syrian civil war is over “— although the syrian civil war is over —— the southern syria quite close. that links them to lebanon, where they more or less created his—brother—mac,, and where they more or less created his—brother—mac, , and i where they more or less created his—brother—mac,, and i am not saying it is just soleimani, but he has contribute more to the success so fight more than any other iranian. -- so fight more than any other iranian. —— hezbollah. it is not just taking out a general, it is taking out the most senior political figure, other than the supreme
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leader himself of the country has to offer. thank you for your analysis here. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. she has been saying mild temperatures. we have experienced that in the last few days. good morning. yesterday we had exceptionally high temperatures in the time of year. today things are changing what you can see quite a bit of cloud from one of our lovely weather watchers pictures taken in london. we have had a drizzle from a cold front in london and the south—east which is clearing away. todayit south—east which is clearing away. today it will not be as yesterday, most of us, unless you are in the north of scotland. here we are still looking at gail's. a cold start in scotla nd looking at gail's. a cold start in scotland this morning. manchester, cardiff and london, look at the temperature romps. that is because we have had the cold front sinking south. ahead of it we still have the male heir. behind it, we are already
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in colder conditions that will prevail as we go through the course of to day. first this morning, we have the remnants of the weather front in the south to clear, taking cloud and drizzle with it. for many, high cloud around so hazy sunshine, a lot of dry weather, showers across scotland. they will be wintry in the hills and the far north of the mainland scotland, the northern and western isles, also having gales. later in the day, thick cloud and rain pushing in across south—west england and south wales. for england and wales, we are hanging on to the milder conditions. move north and some of us will have a good 10 degrees drop in temperature compared to yesterday. this evening and overnight, rain in across the south—west and wales will continue to push northwards, getting in across southern scotland and northern ireland by the end of the night, depositing snow on the hills across the lake district, the pennines and the southern uplands. it may well affect some of the trans—pennine it may well affect some of the tra ns—pennine routes first it may well affect some of the trans—pennine routes first thing tomorrow morning. this is an area of
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low pressure. it will be windy across england and wales tonight, but just how windy will depend across england and wales tonight, butjust how windy will depend on how this low pressure develops, how deep it becomes. move north of that and we are looking at a touch of frost. tomorrow we expect this area of low pressure to clear off with its rain and hill snow into the north sea. behind once again there will be a lot of dry weather. they will be a lot of dry weather. they will also be some cloud around and sunny spells. later in the day, our next area of low pressure starts to come in across the south—west. temperatures in the south still high for the time of year, low as we push further north. for friday, this is looking more promising if you want a drier weather. a largely dry day, because some cloud floating away so they will be hazy sunshine, but later in the day, winds will strengthen to the west. that heralds the arrival of our next weather front, which will introduce some rain. temperatures down a touch on friday and as this rain crosses us
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friday and as this rain crosses us friday into saturday, it will deposit a lot of rain across parts of scotland, which could lead to some localised flooding. something we are keeping a close eye on. thank you. do stay with us. everyone has to watch this next interview because it is brilliant. it will make you feel good. if you're feeling down, this will lift you up. it was a normal trip to feed the ducks an unexpected turn. when lifei wang and her daughter ending up in the canal it was a group of schoolboys who came to their rescue. i say daughter, she is a tiny baby! they jumped into action and managed to pull them out — and now they've received a police award for their heroics. we're joined now by lifei, reya and eva and chief inspector catherine pritchard, as well as three of the boys — campbell, joe and ethan. we have the most packed studio ever! good morning, lovely to see you all. thank you so much to all of you for coming. shall we go back to the beginning? what happened? on that
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day we just went to the park to feed the swans. i pushed the pram with the swans. i pushed the pram with the baby and reva was feeding the ducks. i think this swans were quite hungry. they were chasing her and she was scared. it was really big, this one. i didn't think and i left the pram and helped her out there we re the pram and helped her out there were another two swans tried to eat bread from the pram and they pushed the pram and it rolled into the water. i didn't think. i thought the water. i didn't think. i thought the water was warm that day but ijust jumped in... of course you did, because your baby was in the pram! she was in and i thought i could swim so i could help her out. but it
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was so heavy. i was just trying and ijust was so heavy. i was just trying and i just can't. was so heavy. i was just trying and ijust can't. can you explain to us? you sell your mum and your baby sister in that water and you are calling for help, won't you? are you too shy to tell me? yeah. get the lads to explain. it was literally just a normal day with our mates, trying to play football and all of a sudden this girl ran over, upset and in distress. it was like... we went over and saw two people in the water at struggling to cope for any longer. we all snapped into gear and done what we needed to do. who went into the water? none of us. so how did you get them out? clinging onto the wall and when we went over we pulled them out, make sure they were 0k. pulled them out, make sure they were ok. we got the baby warm and called the ambulance. you didn'tjust get the ambulance. you didn'tjust get the baby warm. she is tiny, isn't
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she? you did cpr a. how you needed to? when i took the baby out, i saw bubbling and i was worried for the ba by‘s bubbling and i was worried for the baby's health. bubbling and i was worried for the ba by‘s health. i bubbling and i was worried for the baby's health. i tried to get all the water out. campbell, when reya came over, what was she saying? she was shouting help and we went over to find out what she needed help with and we saw them in the water. how old are you? 14. it shows incredible presence of mind to be able to do that. you have given them able to do that. you have given them a certificate for this, but tell us about your thoughts.” a certificate for this, but tell us about your thoughts. i am immensely proud of the boys and they acted so quickly and there were no other adults around for quite some time, and they acted brilliantly and i am proud of them and it shows what good there is in the community. feel so proud and we wanted to commemorate it to say what good work they had
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done and feel really proud. was it nice when the boys came over to help your money and your sister? yes, say yes. was it nice? i'm sure it was. the microphone is off, as well! what was it like from your perspective when these lads came over and started to help? i was really grateful they were there and then they did everything they could. when they did everything they could. when they pulled me out of the water and...i they pulled me out of the water and... ithink they pulled me out of the water and... i think he asked me, are you all right? i said, called 999 because i worry about the baby, but they had already called! so they know everything, like... it was like a carefully planned operation. one person is giving cpr, one person is helping you out of the canal and one is calling 999. are you like superheroes at school? how do you manage to be so calm and clear thinking in that situation with xi andi thinking in that situation with xi and i don't know, really. one of those things where you don't have a choice in what you do. you just do it straightaway and kind of like...
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i don't know, it'sjust what you do. you don't know actually what you are doing. when you organising or did you just know what to do? we all knew individually what to do. you just know what to do? we all knew individually what to dom you just know what to do? we all knew individually what to do. it is like they planned already. really? in the first time, only two boys came to me first, and i think ethan, he said, he tried to pull me out and isaid, no, he said, he tried to pull me out and i said, no, take the baby, he said, he tried to pull me out and isaid, no, take the baby, so he said, he tried to pull me out and i said, no, take the baby, so he took the baby. i can see he is doing cpr and! took the baby. i can see he is doing cpr and i just tried took the baby. i can see he is doing cpr and ijust tried to... rest, because i am tired. and then they all because i am tired. and then they a ll start because i am tired. and then they all start to take off the cold and called 999, like everything was organised. so brilliant. have you done first aid at school? yeah. so the training helps you in that moment. in a way, yeah. it is one thing you learn but don't really forget because it is a necessity
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that you need. yeah, yeah. you don't think you will ever need to use it but since you do use it you are grateful you lent it. of course you are! what is it like, seeing that this little baby here who is ok because of you lot? it is a good feeling. event, it is interesting that you said there it is something you learn and neverforget, hopefully you will never have to use it. when you are doing it, did you feel quite calm even though it was a stressful situation? yeah, i just tried to keep my head on straight so i wouldn't start flailing about and not know what i'm doing. listen, you have given them the award, what is your advice to other people in this situation? they have done so fa ntastically. situation? they have done so fantastically. we would advise to do exact what they have done. keep your head straight, don't put yourself in danger, accidents happen. call the emergency services. all the things they have done, they are an inspiration to everyone. they asked who went in the water but they did
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the right thing by not doing because then someone else gets in danger. they are a true inspiration and exactly what they did. call emergency services, stay calm, help out. there were no other adults around and all the good work they did... that we should mention the other lads. joe, who isn't here, jacob, ellis and tyler. is that everybody? i'm jail. sorry, you are atjoe. —— i amjoe. seven of you in total. congratulations, you did a fantastic job. thank you for coming to see us. nice to meet you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. today we can split the country into two halves. in northern areas it
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will be mostly dry but chillier than yesterday. to the south, cloudy with some rain moving its way in. that rain will push into wales and south—west england after lunchtime, extending its way further north and east was. across the northern half of the uk some of the way from cumbria northwards, some sunny spells, one of two showers across higher ground, temperatures of around seven in the north, 11 further south. that rain will continue its progress northwards overnight tonight. quite a wet night for many parts of england and wales. to the north there could be some frost across scotland, particularly the north—east with clear skies. throughout thursday, quite complicated. some rain at times. some dry or brighter spells and some potentially windy weather across the south. stay tuned. goodbye.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and karin giannone. iran hits back at the united states. missile attacks on us troops in iraq give another jolt to oil prices. in iraq give another live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 8th of january. what will the us do next? the prospect of more tensions in the middle east sends asian shares falling whilst the price of safe havens like gold rises again.
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