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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 16, 2020 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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laughter. a higher pitch or deeper voice, they're obviously going to react to a lot different to a calmer voice. so just calm music is really nice to them, it's soothing, it's relaxing, it just helps their stress levels go down. s0, yeah, it's really good. our last hope rests with girl power, and juice the lurcher, regal and self assured, she seems relaxed and well used good morning. to receiving compliments. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: or it might be because you are the moment of crisis has come — an absolutely amazing, wonderful, unique form, sir david attenborough calls an amazing creation that us humans for an urgent response to tackling global warming. simply don't deserve. staff here are impressed with the podcast, but say dogs this is not just this is notjust having nice little debates and arguments and then because it's important that the dog feels that it's not coming away with a compromise, this going to be abandoned. is an urgent problem that has to be you know, four hours is plenty enough time. solved. what is more, we know how to and if you have something like the podcast on, do it! and i'm sure there are ways we speak to the mother whose of doing it remotely, daughter's fatal asthma attack could be linked to air pollution. through and alexa or she's fighting for clean air something like that, just because they are listening for everyone with to something like that, doesn't mean it is ok
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hollywood's last action hero. to leave them for twice, three times as long as that. pollution kills and 7 million people anything, so long as it's not silent. it's like humans, you know, around the world every year. the governments around the world should there's lots goes on in your head when there's a silence. and it's the same with animals. acknowledge that and not look the so think of it in terms other way. of the classics, pet sounds are good, but the sound this is crucial, mr s, that we get of silence is not. the message out to everybody. i was i could stay here with you. ahead of his first public appearance john maguire, bbc news, bristol. since stepping back as a senior royal, prince harry lends his support to a new mental health campaign. and we'll hear from the lorry driver awarded for his bravery after rescuing a woman trapped in this burning car seconds before it exploded. john maguire has a magic touch. even if the music and words don't work, children in scotland are to be banned from it isjohn if the music and words don't work, heading footballs. the announcement is set it is john maguire. you mean his to be made this month following a report voice? yes. we are going to talk linking it to dementia. after the collapse of thomas cook, is there a future for the package holiday? about a story now, that if you have well, two—thirds of us say we'd still choose one. so i'll speak to the husband and wife team that bought youngsters playing football this thomas cook's stores and tell weekend, you may be interested in. us there's still life scotland could become in the package deal. the first country in europe to ban children under the age of 12 from heading footballs over fears it might lead to dementia good morning. a bright and breezy in later life. the scottish fa is expected start to the day but we've got rain to announce the ban after it found and strengthening winds coming in a report that suggested former
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players are more at risk of dying from the west, moving eastwards and from the disease. we spoke to some parents at children reaching gale force in some western at a st mirren academy training areas. i'll have all the details in session to see what they 15 minutes. it's thursday the 16th january. thought of the idea. our top story: the moment of crisis has come — in the fight against climate change, i think it's a great idea. i think that's the warning today from the naturalist and broadcaster, sir david attenborough. anything that protects the kids from in an exclusive interview to mark head injuries in the future is a the start of the bbc‘s our planet matters series, great idea and i think most parents sir david called on governments would be agreeing with that. when to do more to tackle the threat before it's too late. you are older you can do it, but maybe not when you are younger, because you might get like brain... here's our science editor, david shuckman. the fires in australia are ferocious, out—of—control because they are hard balls. they and far worse than usual. might hurt you. because it is a really ha rd ball they've made headlines around might hurt you. because it is a really hard ball and, like, the world and scientists have warned that climate change has might hurt you. because it is a really hard balland, like, probably you get hurt on your head. if you made them more severe. now, sir david attenborough agrees with them. get hit on the top of your head you probably get really hurt. it's a as i speak, south—east good idea, because at that age they australia is on fire. why? don't really need to head the ball, because the temperatures the ball should be played on the ground with both feet. i don't see
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of the earth have been increasing. dominic it's a good thing in the long run. —— i don't see... that is a major national... international catastrophe, and to say, "oh, it's nothing to do with the climate". dominic it's a good thing in the long run. -- i don't see... if you it's palpably nonsense. are worried, it is safe enough. we and because of the most recent talks will talk about this later in the programme, discussing the research on climate change in madrid last month ended with little agreement, with alan stubbs. sir david says that key decisions can no longer be delayed. time now to get the news, travel, we have been putting things and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. off year after year. i'm alison earle. the head of the fire services watchdog has urged building owners we've been raising targets to remove any unsafe cladding and saying, "oh, well, as quickly as possible to avoid another fire like grenfell. if we do it within the next 20 sir thomas winsor says it's years or if we do it..." ‘alarming' more than two years the moment of crisis has come. after the tragedy over 300 buildings still have similar cladding to the tower in north kensington. the first part of an inquiry as new research says the melting of the ice sheets is accelerating into the disaster found it was the main reason and extremes of weather are set to become more severe, sir david hopes the world will now respond. the flames spread. david will now respond. shukman, bbc news. you can find out more major work to repair wandsworth bridge is set to get about our plans for covering climate under way in the next few weeks. change in 2020 at bbc.co.uk/news
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at least two lanes will remain open during the £6 million overhaul or on the bbc news app. which will include improving the structure, as well as road surfacing. the number of vehicles using the crossing has increased prince harry will make his first public appearance today since hammersmith bridge since he and his wife meghan announced they will be "stepping closed last april. back" from their roles as senior royals. the duke of sussex will conduct the draw for the 2021 a south londoner is proving it's rugby league world cup and, never too late to follow your dreams in his role as patron of the sport, after getting a record will launch a new mental deal at the age of 82. fitness charter to run alongside the competition. rex martey from sydenham has jon donnison has more. performed in pubs and clubs across london over the last 60 years. he decided to put together an album of afrobeats music and sent it prince harry, seen here at the challenge cup final to a label. it paid off as he's now last summer, is patron of the rugby football league. has been signed up. today his first public appearance since he and his wife announced they want to step back it's great. i didn't even think i could do it. from their roles as senior royals i thought it was too late. will be to host the draws for the rugby league world cup to be 82 years old, i thought it's too held in england in 2021. late, you can't do that at age 80 rugby league isn'tjust a sport, it's a community. and someone will give in the run—up to the tournament, you a contract to do an album. harry is launching a charter to look you can't. so that's great. at mental health within the sport. something like a mentalfitness charter will help us make real
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. progress in getting rid there's a good service of the stigma associated with mental on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, there are long delays illness and remind people on woolwich road towards the greenwich one—way that it is notjust about being system due to roadworks. a lane is closed on the a3 east hill southbound from tonsley hill physically fit but more importantly mentally strong. so prince harry is not stepping back to fairfield street due to an accident. temporary traffic lights and roadworks on cricklewood lane near thejunction with claremont road. from a public role just yet. now the weather with he also appeared in an invictus games video, elizabeth rizzini. released last night. the 2022 invictus will travel to a new country... hello, good morning. the wet and windy weather is set how much of this kind of thing the sussexes will be doing to return later on today, but to begin with, well, in the future remains unclear. it's fairly quiet out there. meghan is now in canada, where she was photographed there's some morning sunshine at a local women's centre. around, then the wind will start to strengthen, cloud will increase, it might provide some respite and it will be quite a wet from the headlines at home and questions over whether and a windy evening rush hour home. the duchess's father might testify against her in her lawsuit but lots of morning brightness out against the mail on sunday. there, a little bit of sunshine prince harry is expected to join his around as well, lasting longer towards the east. wife in canada next week. that southerly wind strengthens jon donnison, bbc news. as we head through the afternoon. eventually we'll get some downpours of rain just moving in from the west. so the wet end to the day. temperatures 9—12 celsius. through the evening rush hour home that could be some gusts of wind
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we can speak to our royal again up to 40—45 mph. correspondent, sarah campbell, this weather front stalls over us, outside buckingham palace. good quite a lot of surface water around morning. is this back to business through the night. eventually, our weather front just and back to normal? good morning. moves its way eastwards into tomorrow morning. but still the chance of a few after the week it has been, i don't showers around first thing tomorrow. know what we can call normal. 0nly 0vernight lows between 6 and 7 celsius, so not too chilly, last wednesday did the statement but we do have cold air to get drop from harry and meghan saying they wanted to step back from royal in behind that weather front today. life, then there was the sandringham summitand the life, then there was the sandringham summit and the personal statement issued by the queen saying she would so tomorrow set to feel prefer if they didn't step back but cooler, sunny spells, they understood the decision and some afternoon showers. dry, cooler, and settled yesterday in the news, asjon was over the weekend. some night—time frosts, saying, make an‘s father, thomas but also some sunshine. markle, might come over to testify that set for the moment. plenty more on our website against her in her court case against her in her court case against the mail on sunday. sort of at the usual address. business as usual. this is prince 0n the back in around half—an—hour. -- i'll be harry has been doing for most of his 0n the back in around half—an—hour. —— i'll be back. royal adult life, representing the good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today. royal adult life, representing the royalfamily for the royal adult life, representing the royal family for the rugby league world cup in 2021 and he will "the moment of crisis has come" — sir david attenborough calls for an urgent response interact with children playing by, interact with children playing
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rugby, something we see him do so to tackling global warming. naturally, but as we are watching this is notjust having nice little him, the questions will be asking oui’ him, the questions will be asking our is this the last time we will debates and arguments and then see him do a royal engagement, at coming away with a compromise, this is an urgent problem that has least for some time? will he be able to be solved. what is more, we know how to do it! to remain patron of organisations a breakfast exclusive. like this, and if it does, how is arnold schwarzenegger sends a message of support to the air that going to work if he is spending pollution campaigner fighting for answers about the a significant amount of his time in death of her daughter. canada? a significant amount of his time in canada ? there was a significant amount of his time in canada? there was talkie would fly immediately back to canada to be reunited with make an and archie but we know that's not case because he has beatings in the diary early next week. —— meetings. then there's i know who you are. hello. hello. discussions going on behind closed hello, mrs! palace doors, deciding exactly what ahead of his first public appearance since stepping back as a senior royal, harry and meghan‘s future role might prince harry lends his support be. sarah campbell, thank you very to a new mental health campaign. much. ministers from five countries that lost citizens when a ukrainian passenger plane was shot down over iran are meeting in london today. that story coming up later. it is the representatives will demand a transparent investigation, expected to be his first public accountability and engagement since the events of the financial compensation for the past week.
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victims' families. children in scotland are set in iran, there have been to be banned from heading more anti—government footballs. protests, including the capital the announcement could of tehran, with some protestors be made this month following a report linking head publicly criticising the supreme leader. injuries to dementia. the head of nhs mental health good morning many starting on a dry services in england has demanded and bright and blustery know but by urgent action from the gambling industry to reduce the number the end of the day windy wherever of people becoming addicted. claire murdoch is urging companies you are and wet with the strongest to do more and described tactics to entice customers, wins in the west but i will have such as offering promotions or free more details in 15 minutes. gifts, as shameful. the betting and gaming council said it takes its responsibility to customers incredibly seriously. the number of cases being looked into by an independent inquiry into maternity care at shrewsbury and telford hospital the moment of crisis trust has risen to 900. has come in the fight against climate change, that's the warning today the cases include the deaths and serious injuries of babies and women, from the naturalist and broadcaster, and those where families have sir david attenborough. in an exclusive interview to mark concerns about the care the start of the bbc‘s ‘0ur planet matters' series, they received. sir david praised the efforts of young people and called some date back a0 years. on governments to do more. the moment of crisis has come. we a ban on children heading footballs could come into force could no longer prevaricate. as i in just a few weeks in scotland
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speak south—east australia is on because of fears of a link fire. why? because the temperatures between the sport and dementia. the scottish fa could announce the ban on under—i2s heading the ball soon after it of the earth are increasing. that is highlighted a report that said former players are more at risk of dying from the disease. a major international catastrophe. sports news correspondent and to say it is nothing to do with the climate is palpably nonsense. chris mclaughlin has more. and who has been affecting the commentator: as usual, climate? we have, we know that billy mcneill will be up for this. perfectly well. so that we have to it's mcneil, it's a goal! realise this is not playing games. billy mcneill scoring for celtic in 1969 — typically with a header. commentator: brilliantly taken by mcneil. this is not having debates and the club's former captain and manager died last year arguments and coming away with a after suffering from dementia. this just months before a study compromise. this is an urgent revealed former players are three problem that has to be solved. and a half times more likely prince harry will make his first public appearance today since he and his wife meghan to die of the disease. announced they will be "stepping back" from their roles as senior royals. they've been discussing the issue the duke of sussex will conduct here at the national stadium the draw for the 2021 rugby league world cup and, for months, and although there's no firm evidence linking heading a ball in his role as patron of the sport, will launch to dementia, the scottish fa a new mental fitness charter are taking no chances and children to run alongside the competition. under the age of 12 will be banned jon donnison has more. from heading in training.
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prince harry, seen here at the challenge cup final last summer, we need to take some sensible, is patron of the rugby football pragmatic steps at the moment league. and that's largely going to be today his first public appearance to try to reduce the overall burden, since he and his wife announced the overall number of times that you players head, they want to step back from their roles as senior royals and heading in training is much more will be to host the draws common than in matches. for the rugby league world cup, archie, good! good! to be held in england in 2021. kyle mcculloch does one—to—one youth coaching. he's also coached in the us. rugby league isn'tjust where a ban on children a sport, it's a community. heading the ball has been in the run—up to the tournament, in place since 2015. harry is launching a charter to look at mental health within the sport. they see players like ronaldo on tv scoring wonderful goals something like a mentalfitness with his head. charter will help us make real progress in getting rid of the stigma associated i think that might be with mental illness, the problem here — how we try and un—coach them. and remind people that it is not there has been some serious situations where players have just about being physically fit, lost their lives, ex—legends but, more importantly, and players have gone on to get mentally strong. dementia and things like this. so prince harry is not stepping back so i'm glad the sfa are leading from a public role just yet. the rest of football and doing he also appeared in an invictus games video, something like this, released last night. because it's very, very important. chris mclaughlin, bbc news. sally will be looking at that a
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but how much of this kind of thing little bit later as well. the sussexes will be doing whitney houston, t rex and notorious b. 1.6 are among the 2020 inductees in the future remains unclear. meghan is now in canada, where she was photographed at a local women's centre. into the rock & roll hall of fame. it might provide some respite from the headlines depeche mode, at home, and questions over nine inch nails and the doobie whether the duchess's father might testify against her in her lawsuit brothers were also voted for by more against the mail on sunday. than 1,000 people in the music industry. prince harry is expected to join his nominees are judged on their body of work, innovation, wife in canada next week. musical influence, style and technique. jon donnison, bbc news. an official ceremony will take let's speak now to our royal correspondent sarah campbell, who is place in ohio in may. outside buckingham palace. good morning. isuppose good morning. i suppose it is back those are the main stories and sally has the sport. good morning. you are to work as normally can be possibly donein silently nodding away to depeche to work as normally can be possibly done in terms of headlines this week for prince harry. that is right it mode? you will be singing that all day. the depeche mode track? yeah! i is back to what we are used to seeing him doing which is shining a have forgotten it already, not a good sign, is it? just can't get light on organisations of which he isa light on organisations of which he is a patron but what a week. 0nly enough? that's it, isn't it? i'm looking over here, that was it! good last wednesday they dropped the dancing, love that! as you mention, shock announcement they wanted to
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step back as full—time working we will talk about that story we royals and on monday there was the just heard from chris mccaw,, sandringham summit followed by a children in scotland banning heading personal statement issued by the for children under 12, an queen saying she preferred if they interesting story that we will hear about during the day. manchester united are through to had not wanted to step back but the fourth round of the fa cup. understood their reasons and juan mata scored the only goal yesterday meghan markle's father of the game as they beat wolves might testify her in court in her 1—0 at old trafford. the win may have come at a cost privacy case with the mail on sunday though with striker marcus rashford coming off injured. so with that in mind today we will be thinking about whether this is one of the last royal engagements we he didn't manage to play that many see him carrying out for the time minutes. we know he's been being and asking is he going to struggling with a back injury and he is so important to them. remain patron of organisations like the third test between england this, particularly if he wants to and south africa gets under way spend time in canada. in the in the next couple of hours. it looks likejoe root‘s side background the discussions are still will be withoutjofra archer going on as to what exactly the who is injured. and stuart bingham is through future of harry and meghan and their to the quarter—finals of the masters. connection with the royal family he beat the two—time winner mark williams 6—2 at alexandra will be. thanks. palace. ministers from five countries that lost citizens when a ukrainian passenger plane was shot down over an incredible result iran are meeting in london today. for ireland's cricket team. the representatives will demand they beat t20 world champions the west indies by four runs a transparent investigation, accountability, and financial
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in a high—scoring compensation for the victims‘ families. international in grenada. in iran, there have been 0ne one of the reasons to watch cricket more anti—government at this time of year. the sunshine. protests, including the capital of tehran, with some protesters publicly criticising looked so nice! something i have the supreme leader, ayatollah khamenei. missed! i wonder if there is more the number of cases being looked coming our way? very good! you have into by an independent inquiry into maternity care been here before! for many years! at shrewsbury and telford hospital trust has risen to 900. but you say that but look at what the cases include the deaths and serious injuries of babies and women, mrs is delivering, barely a rainbow and those where families have and loads of grey clouds! concerns about the care they received. some date back 40 years. there is a bit of sunshine in the forecast but not a lot today, but some to start with. good morning, children in scotland could be banned from heading footballs everybody. we're starting with some in a matter of weeks following a report linking head sunshine in some parts of the uk but injuries to dementia. also got strong winds and heavy rain the scottish fa could announce later this month that it wants coming our way. already quite gusty all under 12s to be banned from heading a ball during training. across parts of the north, the west it comes after experts and also parts of the south at glasgow university found former players were three and a half times currently, but those winds will more likely to die of dementia strengthen through the day and you than people of the same age. can see from the closeness of these isobars, where you are will be windy. we have one front moving across scotland and another coming from the west, both bringing heavy
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rain. moving north with snow from we are going to talk to carol and the mountains and the one from the find out what is happening with the west is moving east through the day. weather. it is getting bp, a word the winds will pick up. gales to the you used this morning. west, even inland gales, especially across wales, south—west england but we are looking at widespread frost along the coastlines, we are also looking at so the gales with as well this weekend but today it is exposure. temperatures, 8—12, quite getting wet and windy. if you are mild for the time of year but they will be tempered by the winds. as we stepping out, sunshine around beautiful sunrises and already some head through the evening and rain in parts of the west but all overnight, well, the first band of rain pushes to the north and there will have rain today and will be gales across the northern strengthening winds. it is courtesy and western isles in the second band ofan area will eventually push from the strengthening winds. it is courtesy south—east and in between, clear of an area of low pressure. the skies but also showers and some will first bringing rain across scotland be heavy and thundery with snow on in the second across northern the scottish hills. we could see ireland, england and wales. and it temperatures dipping in rural areas lower than you can see in the chart, will become increasingly windy especially in the north, meaning a through the day. you might start touch of frost and ice on untreated with sunshine and not particularly windy but it will strengthen. we surfaces. that leads us into tomorrow and tomorrow we have a have rain heading across scotland
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couple of weak weather fronts moving with mountain snow and rain moving across us couple of weak weather fronts moving across us but check out those isobars, they are widely spaced so east across england, wales and not going to be as windy, except for northern ireland. the strongest winds will be in the west particular the far north of, where we will hang onto the gales. here are our weather wales and south—west england. if you go to exposed parts of wales and fronts, both producing showers, some south—west england you could have wintry on the hills, especially in scotland, but you could catch a severe gales. although temperatures look not bad. it is not going to shower almost anywhere but the nature of showers means you could also miss them so a fair bit of feel particularly mild because of sunshine around tomorrow but feeling cooler with temperatures down and the strength of the wind. as we head the wind won't be as strong either. through the evening and overnight we are looking at twin seven and ten the rain pushes away and we see a 01’ we are looking at twin seven and ten or 11 degrees. as for the weekend, return to gales in the northern isles and we say goodbye to rain in high pressure is taking charge. with the south—east but behind it, sunny spells but feeling colder. showers and some of them overnight high pressure builds in and it will be heavy and thundery with hail and hill snow. despite the remains with us on sunday, the system sinks to the bay of biscay. temperatures in the north, we are looking at the risk of frost and ice 0n system sinks to the bay of biscay. on top of that high pressure at times in scotland we could see on untreated surfaces in rural showers, some wintry on the hills areas. tomorrow a couple of weather and quite breezy. for england, fronts. the large space in isobars wales, northern ireland and the rest
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of scotland, if you like it drier means it will not be as windy except and brighter, we are looking up in the far north of scotland, who sunshine but still feeling cold, will hang on to gales. and these 7-10. this sunshine but still feeling cold, 7—10. this is overnight into sunday, fronts producing showers, some of a widespread frost denoted by the which could be heavy and thundery blues and temperatures will be close with hail and depositing snow on the to freezing or below and on sunday, hills but tomorrow you could catch a a lot of dry weather again on the shower almost anywhere but not cards with some sunshine. although eve ryo ne shower almost anywhere but not everyone will and many will have a it didn't look like we were going to dry day with sunshine but it will a lot of sunshine, naga and charlie, feel cooler than today. into the there is quite a bit coming our way this weekend. good to hear! we will weekend, high pressure. the weather settles down and it will be cool by see if that happens, hey, carol! day and night. saturday, sunshine let's take a look at today's papers. around. we could see some showers the times reports that tens of thousands of high earners will receive a pension tax windfall, across the north of scotland and under government plans to solve a staffing crisis among nhs doctors. windy here at times. snow on the the paper also carries a picture of deborahjames, co—host of the podcast you, hills but temperatures 6—9. me and the big c, who we spoke to on the programme yesterday, 0vernight saturday into sunday, look after she found out at the blue across the british she's cancer free. isles. we are looking at a frosty night. temperatures below freezing in many parts but that leads us into a drierand in many parts but that leads us into a drier and brighter sunday. you
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0ne one of the joyous moments of the have to take the positives. it might programme yesterday, for me, that. the widower of pc sharon beshenivsky be cold but it will be crisp and has told the daily mirror of his relief after the arrest sunny and fresh and refreshing. of a man in pakistan, yes, winter weather. who was wanted over his wife's killing in bradford, in 2005. ant mcpartlin will give his ex—wife the world‘s climate crisis is never lisa armstrong £31 million — far from the headlines, more than half his £50 million especially after another year of record breaking temperatures, fortune — reports the sun. rising sea levels a pay—out it says is "one and melting ice caps. of the biggest celebrity divorce now in an exclusive bbc settlements in british history". interview, sir david attenborough lisa has described the story say‘s his generation have as ‘nonsense' and told the sun newspaper they would be made a mess of it, but he praised the actions hearing from her lawyers. of young people in the fight against climate change. 0ur science editor david responding later to the star's shukman went to meet him. online coverage of the story, the moment of crisis has come. she said she was denying it, because it was untrue. 0nline, bbc newsbeat we can no longer prevaricate. reports on a great way to impress your new boss. as i speak, south—east australia is on fire. why? 17—year—old wolf cukier was working as an intern at nasa and discovered because the temperatures of the earth are increasing. a new planet on his third day! that is a major international catastrophe. and to say, oh, it‘s nothing to do with the climate, what a way to make an impression. is palpably nonsense.
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he was checking images from its super—strength satellite when he noticed something strange. it turned out to be a new planet, and who has been affecting the climate? we have. 1,300 light years away from earth. we know that perfectly well. laughter. what i like about this young man is so that we have to realise that this that he had the... what?|j is not playing games. this is notjust having nice little what i like about this young man is that he had the... what? i think are such a great story. the third day debates and arguments and coming away with a compromise. you are in nasa, sorry, ben, sally, this is an urgent problem good morning, your third day in that has to be solved. and what is more, we know how to do it. nasa, you would be quite intimidated that is the paradoxical thing. by the people around you, to just then say i think i have spotted... you would just think that someone we are refusing to take steps had spotted it already, wouldn't you? you that we know have to be taken and, had spotted it already, wouldn't you ? you have had spotted it already, wouldn't you? you have seen this right, this whole new planet? he has flagged it. every year that passes makes those steps more difficult to achieve. good on him! no accusation. he was what is your take on the degree of urgency that needs to be felt now? just staring at the screen. in other we have to change and we have circumstances you could be time to change not by appeals wasting. in fact he found a new planet. very good. then what you to different kinds of optimism, have? sally? we're being good. the but to deliberate, compelling, life—or—death decisions. back page of the times, they have and so where on a bigger scale to
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picture ofjuan back page of the times, they have picture of juan mata. back page of the times, they have picture ofjuan mata. this is a story about elliott, we have interviewed him more than once, and these decisions need to come next? his trainers. he is sponsored by answer — china. nikkei. and he of course recently china is the most populous country in the world and it is also having problems. rana sub—2 it is also having problems nikkei. and he of course recently ran a sub—2 hour marathon in a particular pair of nike shoes —— with its climate. kautu. world athletics is looking into the shoes very closely because if the chinese come and say not because we are worried they give the athlete, they say, a about the world, but for our own reasons we are going to take significant advantage. they have a major steps to curb... bit of metal or something in the because our climate is changing. bottom, like a spring. they we are going to do it. essentially have springs on them. that would be the big bottom, like a spring. they essentially have springs on them]! he the only one who has them. my change that would happen. thought other people had them. he from your observations, had a very particular pair. he has travels, what is your sense stepped in and said ok, that's about whether people understand the importance to their own great, i have these fantastic shoes, lives of the functioning of the natural world? but it is about me, it is my talent the natural world is not and training and my feet in them just an inanimate object that makes me run fast. exactly. from which you can plunder riches and plunderfood and which is none of us is going to run a sub two whatever you require. hour marathon with new trainers. we actually depend upon the natural world for every breath of air speak for yourself. good morning. we take and every mouthful of food
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inflation figures suggest we could that we eat. be in line for a cutting interest rates. not great news if you have that may sound extreme, money in the bank as a saver, but if but if you have the basic understanding of the way the world you a mortgage that could make it works, the natural world, cheaper. inflation falling to its lowest level in three years. many you know that we breathe oxygen and that oxygen isn‘t renewed automatically, it comes from plants. markets now pricing in a cut to the and if you wreck the oceans cost of borrowing. and a brilliant and knock down the forests, story that caught my eye in the telegraph this morning. this. a you reduce the amount of oxygen there is in the atmosphere brick that can repair itself. scientists have come up with a for us to breathe. we depend upon the oceans more and more. combination of concrete, stone, and as the human population increases, bacteria, so if it starts to degrade we cannot afford to eat it can repair itself using the in the way that we have. bacteria. 0n the idea, they say, as because we can‘t grow they build a metal frame, poor in enough to do that. if we are going to exploit the earth in the way we need to do this stuff, and it will start in order to get food, producing. so one parent brick, it says, can produce eight children the way to do that is to produce vegetable food. bricks. that's just weird. says, can produce eight children bricks. that'sjust weird. it could be good in places like space and the the steps that have taken place itiooi'i be good in places like space and the moon where they could take up this in this country in the past decade stuff. but it has to be contained have been extraordinary. many people would never have predicted them. there has been a huge otherwise it would just grow and grow and grow. also it does not tell change in public opinion.
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people can see the problem, you how long. it would not be much particularly young people can see the problem. good if it took 12 months to mend a that must force governments brick. but the idea can organically to take action. create a solid structure, very the nations of the world, exciting. want to play a guessing particularly young people in the nations of the world, game? very quickly. what claw is that? i can't see past charlie's can see the writing on the wall more care? that would be a feat in itself. i am going paratore clearly than perhaps older people something like that. a lizard typing who are set in their ways and set in their opinions and do not want to shift and for —— parrot or something. whom it is easier to say, don‘t worry about that. something like that. a lizard typing -- parrot or something. these pictures, how do you think they were it‘ll happen. that no longer holds. created, without looking too hard? young people realise that is not the case. pencils? a printer. no, i can see there are serious problems facing us unless we change our ways. the picture on the left now. typewriter! well done, charlie. it's and for that we must thank the younger generation really good. christopher eggleston that is coming along, is brilliant. look at that. really, because my generation really good. i'd just like they were has made a mess of it. nice pictures. an old-fashioned typewriter. you don't see many of those. if you routinely still use an in a moment we will speak to our australia correspondent, old—fashioned typewriter those. if you routinely still use an old —fashioned typewriter in shaimaa khalil, who is
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those. if you routinely still use an old—fashioned typewriter in your in new south wales, everyday life, send us a picture. one of the areas most affected by the wildfires, but first to our science editor better yet, write a thing and send david shukman whojoins us now it by post! i would love to get a from regent‘s park in central london. he spoke to david attenborough. just typewritten letter. it is a proper art form. did you ever type on a listening to sir david attenborough proper typewriter?” there, people familiar with his passion but i suppose listening to art form. did you ever type on a that for the first time it‘s the proper typewriter? i did. very good. urgency of the message may be that we will see you later on. is the thing people will listen to most. that is right, it is striking. take a hollywood action hero, turned california governor, and a motherfrom south london, who's fighting for answers we have heard him speak about the over her daughter's death. they've teamed up to urgency of needing to deal with terminate deadly emissions. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin brought them together to talk climate change before and he about a problem which its estimated could kill 160,000 people addressed the united nations in 2018 here in the next decade. with a very stirring address. to hear him use the language he is using now, it is clear he is exasperated because you have on the one hand the science of climate 0ur our love. they miss everything about change becoming clearer, scientists more and more convinced of the her. her smell, she used to touch my face. she didn't want to be evidence building for how our gases
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forgotten. and i hope her death we release our leading to difficult hasn't been in vain. this little situations, and on the other, the cough turned into the chronic asthma absolutely painstakingly slow that killed ella when she was just nine. ever since her mother rosamund process of the international negotiations. add to that the mix of has made it a life goal to fight for young people rising up and being clea n has made it a life goal to fight for clean airfor all. has made it a life goal to fight for clean air for all. just over there is where she used to cross the road fascinated and motivated and angry every day. they lived on london's about the situation and i think he is putting that together and south circular, one of the busiest wondering why on earth the world has roads in the country. so there are illegal levels of air pollution all not yet responded properly. that is over the uk. we keep on hearing the other interesting thing, it is about waiting lists getting longer personal, he is saying my and they personally believe air generation, it has happened on our watch. that is absolutely right, he pollution is a contributory factor. and it's not just pollution is a contributory factor. and it's notjust you, is it? the thai foundation, the royal college of physicians, everybody is on your feels that acutely. for great part, side. yes, we'll know now. medical majority of his career, global warming was not a concern. nobody evidence is mounting. today this former school teacher is an advocate thought about their carbon footprint. nobody worried about the former school teacher is an advocate for health and air quality for the world health organization, lobbying gases cars and planes and heating governments around the world. are adding to the atmosphere and how world health organization, lobbying governments around the worldm world health organization, lobbying governments around the world. it is a public health emergency. what you they drive up temperatures. it was wa nt to
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a public health emergency. what you want to see change this year. i do. not a concern. now in the past 15 yea rs or because the environmental bill is not a concern. now in the past 15 years or so, he has recognised it andi years or so, he has recognised it going to be introduced any time now. and i think he feels acutely this all i'm asking is that the action is generational difference that it is more radical and more urgent. and not his generation that will live to this year is a key year in see all the effects the scientists rosamund's fight for answers, after predict for climate change, it is a campaigna rosamund's fight for answers, after a campaign a second inquest will be the younger people who have decades held into a la's death is november, ahead in their lives. that is when the hope that for the first time everair the hope that for the first time ever air pollution will be stated as the most dangerous impact is likely a contributory cause of death, to kick in, halfway through the something that has put a lot on the century or later. thank you. we will radar of the world's press. 0h, come back to you in a second. goodness me, there was an article in let‘s speak now to our the new york times, south korea, correspondent shaimaa khalil who is in new south wales. france, sweden. there's nobody in the world that has had it put on their certificate ever before, good to see you but not good to see because it is an incredibly is the devastation behind you. it difficult thing to prove. and her does make you wonder and must make campaignfor difficult thing to prove. and her so many people there wonder about campaign for awareness has the support of people in high places. the impact of climate change. listen, we have arranged a little chat with somebody who wants to wish absolutely. up until three days ago you well. are you ready? laughter. some of the trees around me are
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smouldering —— were still i know who that man is! i know who smouldering —— were still smouldering and would still have a little bit of smoke around here and you are! hello. hello, rosamund. some were on fire, i have been told. bushfires have always been the story hello, mr s. i'm coming to london of the australian summer but almost everybody here has said they have andl hello, mr s. i'm coming to london and i wanted to see if you are never seen anything on this scale coming —— getting together. and most link it to climate change political 7 million people around and most link it to climate change and are saying something is the world every year. the different, this is not normal. it governments around the world should acknowledge that are not look the started early, it is relentless and other way. this is crucial, mr letta the scale is huge. the bureau of s, that we get this message out to everybody. as california's governor, meteorology confirmed 2019 was the arnold schwarzenegger introduce some hottest a nd meteorology confirmed 2019 was the hottest and driest year on record in of the most radical reforms to australia and we are already seeing reduce emissions, and year the two the effects of that in the past few centre stage to continue the weeks. despite the rain and this being a little bit of a break in the crusade. i'm very, very proud of you. you just keep on finding, you weather with the cooling down, you are likely terminator, keeps going can see temperatures rise and the and keep going. thank you for your bushfires flare up again. a kind words. rosamund says her firefighter said to me, we arejust journey now is about more than just at the mercy of things we have zero control of. if it gets dry and her daughter, who would have turned temperatures rise and the wind picks 16 next week, who she believes is by
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her side helping her fight for up, you cannot control these fires. change for everyone. in weight is you can contain them but not control still with me, so i hope whatever them. what about the pressure put on them. what about the pressure put on the government? we are examining governments around the world but no she changes i hope it will be long doubt scott morrison‘s government is lasting —— in a way. and maybe that in focus now and he has been was her wish that she's remembered for something good. so, criticised personally for his response. how has this tragedy going was her wish that she's remembered forsomething good. so, darling daughter, wherever you are, this is to you. such an important story and to affect policy? it has affected the government‘s tone and rhetoric. we have seen the prime minister it is worth saying that today in the recently admit australians are living in longer, hotter, drier programme we are doing a lot on summers. but that is as far as it climate change, amongst other goes. he goes on to defend his things. so it really is very topical, such a personal story there, played out around the world. government‘s policies, saying they i love the way she refers to arnold schwarzenegger as mr s. hello, i will beat and beat emissions targets know who you are, she says. time now to get the news, travel, of the paris agreements. those targets a re of the paris agreements. those targets are already criticised for being too low and the un said australia is not on track when it and weather where you are. comes to emissions and the core of this really is the fossil fuel good morning from bbc london.
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industry. sir david attenborough i'm alison earle. the head of the fire services mention china, which is one of the watchdog has urged building owners to remove any unsafe cladding biggest customers of australian coal as quickly as possible to avoid and this is at the heart of it. you another fire like grenfell. sir windsor thomas says it's alarming that more than two years after the tragedy over 300 buildings cannot tackle climate change still have similar cladding seriously without tackling to the tower in north kensington. australia‘s dependency on fossil the first part of an inquiry into the disaster found fuels. thank you. another big it was the main reason problem affecting many of us is air the flames spread. pollution. it is estimated it could kill 160,000 people in the next major work to repair wandsworth bridge is set to get under way in the next few weeks. the crossing will remain open decade. 0ur reporter has been during the £6 million project which will include improving the structure, as well as road surfacing. the number of vehicles speaking to a mother whose has been using the crossing has increased since hammersmith bridge fighting for answers after her closed last april. daughter‘s asthma attack. a south londoner is proof that it's never too late to follow your dreams i miss everything about her. her smell. after getting a record she used to touch my face. deal at the age of 82. rex martey from sydenham has she didn‘t want to be forgotten. performed in pubs and clubs and i hope her death across london over the past 60 years. hasn‘t been in vain. he put together an album of afrobeats music and sent it this little cough turned into the chronic asthma which killed to a label and has ella when she was just nine. ever since, her mother rosamund has
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now been signed up. made it a life goal to fight for clean airfor all. just over there is where she used it's great. they didn't even think i to cross the road every day. could do it. i thought it was too they lived on london‘s south late. 82 yea rs could do it. i thought it was too late. 82 years old, i thought it's circular, one of the busiest roads in the country. too late, you can't do that at age so there‘s illegal levels of air 80 and someone will give you a pollution all over the uk. contract 80 and someone will give you a co ntra ct to 80 and someone will give you a contract to do an album. you can't we keep on hearing about waiting stop so that's great. lists getting longer and i personally believe air let's take a look at pollution is a contributory the travel situation now. factor to that. there's a good service and it‘s not just on the tubes this morning you, though, is it? no. the chart foundation, the royal college of physicians... southeastern services are disrupted yep, everybody. through grove park due to a fault with the signalling system. ..science is on your side. 0n the roads, the usual traffic on the a13 into town from the goresbrook interchange. yeah, we all know now. a lane is closed on the a3 east hill medical evidence is mounting. southbound from tonsley hill to fairfield street today this former school teacher due to an accident. is an advocate for health and air temporary traffic lights and roadworks on cricklewood lane quality for the world near thejunction health organization, it is a public health emergency. with claremont road. you want to see change this year. i do. because the environmental bill now the weather with is going to be introduced elizabeth rizzini. any time now. all i‘m asking is that the action is more radical and more urgent.
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hello, good morning. the wet and and this year is a key year in rosamund‘s fight for answers. after a campaign, a second inquest windy weather is set to return later will be held into ella‘s death this november. the hope — that for the first time ever air pollution will be stated on today, but to begin with, well, as a contributory cause of death. it's fairly quiet out there. this morning sunshine around, then the wind will start to strengthen, cloud something that has put ella will increase, and it will be quite on the radar of the world‘s press. a wet and a windy evening hour home. but lots of morning brightness out 0h, goodness me, there was there, a little bit of sargen around as well, lasting longer towards the an article in the new york times, east. that's rather —— southerly south korea, france, sweden. wind strengthens as we head through the afternoon, eventually we will get some downpours of rain is moving there‘s nobody in the world that has had it put on their death in from the west. so the wet into the day. temperatures 9— 12 celsius. certificate ever before, because it‘s an incredibly difficult through the evening rush hour home thing to prove. and her campaign for awareness has that could be some gusts of wind the support of people again up to 40—115 mph, this weather in high places. front stalls over us, quite a lot of surface water around through the listen, we‘ve arranged a little chat with somebody who wants night. eventually a weather front to wish you well. just moved its way is with into phone rings. are you ready? tomorrow morning. but still the yeah. chance of a few showers around laughter. i know who that man is! tomorrow morning. 0vernight lows between six and seven celsius, so i know who you are! not too chilly, but we do have cold hello. airto get in hello, rosamund. not too chilly, but we do have cold air to get in behind that weather hello, mr s. front today. so tomorrow is that of i'm coming to london bill kollar, sunny spells, some and ijust wanted to see
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afternoon showers, drier, cooler, if you want to get together. and settled over the weekend. absolutely! nighttime frosts, but some sunshine. pollution kills seven million people around i'm back with the latest the world every year. from the bbc london the governments around the world newsroom in half—an—hour. should acknowledge that. plenty more on our website they should not look the other way. at the usual address. now though it's back this is crucial, mr s, to naga and charlie. that we get this message bye for now. out to everybody. as california‘s governor, arnold schwarzenegger introduced some of the most radical reforms hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. to reduce emissions, we'll bring you all the latest news and last year the two shared a stage and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this to continue his crusade. morning: the heart—stopping moment a hero lorry i'm very, very proud of you. driver dragged a young thank you very much. woman from a burning car you just keep on fighting. seconds before it exploded into a huge fireball. we'll speak to him, you are like the terminator — and the woman he helped to save. keeps going and keeps going. thank you for your kind words. rosamund says herjourney now prince harry back on royal duties today with a message about mental health. we'll speak to former 0lympian is about more than just her iwan thomas about opening up to is about more than her daughter, who would have turned 16 next week, the prince about his own struggles. who she believes is by her side helping her fight for change for everyone. in a way she is still with me, so i hope whatever she changes, the benefits of playing music to relax is well documented, i hope it will be long lasting. but what about playing and maybe that was her wish that music to pets?
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maybe going one step further she‘s remembered for something good. by leaving on a podcast while you so, darling daughter, go out. we'll discuss spotify‘s lastest streaming service for dogs. wherever you are, this is to you. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: let‘s return to our science editor david shukman. i arrived at work yesterday morning and we did the story in the that is such a personal story and newspapers that i rip it up because very moving. we will wait to see it annoyed me so much. what happens in the inquest but the notion a court would make a ruling newspapers that i rip it up because it annoyed me so muchlj newspapers that i rip it up because it annoyed me so much. i understand we we re it annoyed me so much. i understand we were asking people to send in between the link between air images or sequences if their dogs listen to things, how they respond pollution and in this case a child‘s death, it could be a significant and keep them calm. did you do it moment. it is a fascinating and as with your own dog? i tried. what did you say moving and hugely the dog do? not munch, not eventful! significant development. with air does the dog normally react? yes. pollution one of the great challenges, very often we do not see it, we often think it is a problem there you go, says it all! if you can see it sitting in front of your face but most air pollution here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: the moment of crisis has come scientists are worried about is in the fight against climate stuff that is invisible, gases, tiny change — that's the warning today from the naturalist and broadcaster particles, too small to see with the
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sir david attenborough. in an exclusive interview to mark naked eye. and as years have gone the start of the bbc‘s our planet matters series, sir david praised the efforts on, scientists have a better of young people and called on governments to do more. understanding of what the particles and gases can do, how they do not just to get into the lungs but the bloodstream and from the bloodstream they can reach your brain and all the moment of crisis has come. we your organs. this is a sense of can no longer prevaricate. crisis about air pollution, notjust as i speak, south—east australia is on fire. why? because the temperatures in the uk, but globally. look at of the earth have been increasing. cities around the world. the that is a major national — international catastrophe, and to say, "oh, it's nothing staggeringly bad air quality in a to do with the climate" great number of them and the un is palpably nonsense. reckons we are storing up a health crisis for so many around the world. i think all eyes will be on this case in london to see what the and who's been affecting the courts decide. it illustrates rather climate? we have, we know that well the point you are making. you perfectly well. we have to realise are in central london and you look at the scene behind you, sometimes that this is not playing games, this is not just having these things are not instantly that this is not playing games, this is notjust having a nice little debates and arguments and then apparent. that is right. yes, coming away with a compromise. this regenfs is an urgent problem that has to be apparent. that is right. yes, regent‘s park at its most beautiful and the wildlife behind me having a
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solved. great, noisy time of it. we often go the duke of sussex will make his first public appearance since announcing he and his wife meghan are to step about our lives without realising back from their roles the true effects of something like as senior royals. later today prince harry will conduct the draw air pollution, i think because you for the 2021 rugby league world cup and launch a new mental fitness cannot always see it. my parents‘ charter for the tournament. the duchess of sussex remains generation thought you have not lived through the pea soup fog in in vancouver with their son archie. london when you could not see yourself walking but it is a ministers from five countries that lost citizens when a ukrainian passenger plane was shot down over different situation now. iran are meeting in london today. the representatives will demand you can find out more a transparent investigation, about our plans for covering accountability, and financial compensation for the victims' families. climate change in 2020, at bbc.co.uk/news or in iran, there have been more anti—government on the bbc news app. protests, including the capital time now to get the news, of tehran, with some protestors travel and weather where you are. publicly criticising the supreme leader, ayatollah khamenei. good morning. yesterday, we had a brief respite in the conditions, the number of cases being looked sunshine from many parts but, into by an independent today, it‘s going to turn inquiry into maternity care wet and windy again. at shrewsbury and telford hospital trust has risen to 900. the cases include rain is moving its way the deaths and serious in from the west, the breeze picks injuries of babies and women, and those where families have up, some strong winds concerns about the care into the afternoon. they received. you can see it‘s because of this some date back a0 years. area of low pressure here, the white lines getting closer together. the strongest winds will be around the irish sea coasts, particularly
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the head of nhs mental health wales and the south—west, services in england has demanded where gusts could be as high as 60—65 mph, urgent action from the gambling with gales likely and as that rain industry to reduce the number moves its way further eastwards. of people becoming addicted. claire murdoch is urging companies to do more and described tactics to entice customers, it‘s not going to reach such as offering promotions or free the far east of england, gifts as shameful. the far north—east of scotland, until much later on into the evening, but with a south—westerly wind, it‘s going to be quite mild. maximum temperature is getting to be the betting and gaming council said it takes its responsibility around eight or 13 celsius. to customers incredibly seriously. through tonight, this area of low a second—hand bookshop in hampshire pressure will continue to move away, it will take the rain with it, eventually clearing away those are the main stories at 6:34am from the south—east. another weather system follows, but one other for you. you though, behind that for friday those are the main stories at 6:34am but one otherfor you. you might have heard this story: and that willjust bring in showers a second—hand bookshop in hampshire on friday, particularly that tweeted about not making in the west in the morning, a single sale on tuesday moving their way eastward has been inundated with across england and wales. orders after going viral. further showers feeding it's brilliant! in across northern ireland petersfield bookshop tweeted a picture of the store, saying: and the north—west of scotland "tumbleweed. but there will be some sunny spells not a single book sold today. in between those showers we think this may be and maximum temperatures, the first time ever." they will be getting the message hit home from 7—11 degrees, for thousands of book lovers, so turning a little bit chillier. who retweeted it, including author neil gaiman. now, that theme of getting colder 0vernight the store had more than 300 messages inquiring will continue as we go after books, as well as 95 orders. into the weekend but high pressure develops as we go into the weekend.
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that means it‘s going to become quieter weather—wise. the sceptic in me, and i love it now, we‘ve got this because i'm a big fan of bookshops, weather system here. thankfully, that slips away to the south, but it is great marketing! a very, so high—pressure in for saturday. very good marketing ploy, which many lighter winds, lots of dry, lots of sunny weather expected, big companies should adopt if they just a few showers affecting the far north. wa nt to big companies should adopt if they want to do as well. lots of blue skies. imagine sitting there all day, there could be a bit though! imagine spending all day in of a chilly start on saturday morning and temperatures, they will be lower than they‘d a bookshop. i believe that would be been recently so we‘re heaven! i don't think they're not looking at around six, seven, eight celsius. telling the truth but i think it is brilliant marketing. love a second maybe a degree also lower than the weather should be of the time of year. hand bookshop, really good! talking sunday morning, a bit of a frosty about children learning to play start but more sunshine expected. bye— bye. football, boys and girls, if you have ever watched them train and play football, you will see they all wa nt play football, you will see they all want to emulate their heroes heading the ball into the back of the net and it's one of those things that i'iow and it's one of those things that now we could see being stopped because children in scotland could because children in scotland could be banned from heading footballers ina be banned from heading footballers in a matter of weeks now following a report linking the sport to dementia. the scottish fa could announce later this month
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that it wants all under—12s to be banned from heading a ball during training. it comes after experts at glasgow university found former players were 3.5 half times more likely to die of dementia than people of the same age. i think it's a great idea. i think anything that protects the kids from head injuries is a great idea, and i think most parents would agree with it. when you're older, you can do it, but maybe not when you're younger because you might get, like, brain this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and karin giannone. injuries because they are hard balls and they might hurt you. app-happy! because they're really hard balls mobile users spent more three and a half hours a day and, like, probablyjust you might on their phones last year — making tech firms $300 billion. get hurt on your head and if you're so who are the big winners hit on the top of your head, you from our global addiction? live from london, that‘s our top probably get, like, really hurt. story on thursday 16th january. it's a good idea because the fact is they don't really need to head the
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ball, the ball should be played on the ground with both feet and no reason for them to head the ball at that age. so i think it's a good thing at the moment. those kids training with st mirren at the moment and isn't it good to we are in love with our see progress? good to see these phones more than ever — reports are being listened to and and there are now millions of apps and websites vying for our the scottish fa are taking a stand attention, in an industry and they are expected to change the worth billions each year. rules so in training the kids won't be heading the ball. we were saying as that was playing, we have both headed a football and it hurts! have you headed a football? no. and these balls are lighter than the ones they were playing with decades ago.|j lighter than the ones they were playing with decades ago. i vividly remember soggy foot all days with those... i think the bulls were smaller but when they got what they we re really smaller but when they got what they were really heavy. soak full of water and really heavy. like heading a medicine ball! now the gauntlet has been laid down for other associations to say if it isn't safe there, then why here? we will see.
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and in other contact sports, other measures coming into protect kids who at this early—stage in their development, their brains are still developing, they are really vulnerable so it is good tuesday progress being made. —— good to see progress being made. —— good to see progress being manchester united are into the fourth round of the fa cup after a 1—0 win over wolves. juan mata's second half goal was the difference between the sides at old trafford. victory may have come at a cost though with forward marcus rashford going off injured. patrick gearey watched the action. a glance at old trafford's stands indicated this wasn't the hottest ticket in town, but for wolves fans it was among the most expensive. some paid £55 to get in — too much, in the words of their manager. at least manchester united were holding a giveaway at the back. this somehow ended up with pedro netto at checkout with no queue. the teenager's guilty look was telling. in the var room they'd spotted the ball hit an arm in the build up, enough now to take the goal back. the next decisive wolves' arm was their goalkeeper‘s. john ruddy out to deny danjames.
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a clearer united chance than they created in the whole of the first game. but like the goalless draw at molineux, this was meandering until the wolves defence made it interesting. into the vacuum wentjuan mata. what he lacks in velocity he makes up in sheer quality. those moments of belated joy gave way to another of concern, for england as well as united. having come on as a substitute, marcus rashford was soon off again, an injury that will be watched closely. wolves couldn't give them much else to worry about. a squad that's been playing since july showed some of its mileage. their road to wembley takes an early exit. united march on, despite the detour. patrick geary, bbc news. the third test between england and south africa gets underway in the next couple of hours with jofra archer set to miss out through injury. yesterday, we brought you news of ben stokes being named the icc player of the year. well, this is how he celebrated — performing a hand—stand for his team mates at training. his captain joe root was full of praise for his star all—rounder, saying the award was fully deserved
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for an incredible year. it's the right decision, hands down the right decision. he's been outstanding. for me at the moment he is the best player in the world co mforta bly. is the best player in the world comfortably. he's affected a number of games across the formats in all three departments, and he's an invaluable member of our team, our squad, as a senior player, as a role model and obviously with his performances out on the field. ireland have beaten west indies in the first of three t20 matches in the caribbean. west indies fell five runs short of their target of 209. it's ireland's first win of the tour after losing the one day series 3—0. fernando alonso escaped serious injury after rolling his car at the dakar rally in saudi arabia. the two time f1 world champion was able to continue without a windscreen but fell from 10th to 14th by the end of the stage. wait and see what he does after
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rolling his car down the sand dune. can you guess? hejust rolling his car down the sand dune. can you guess? he just carries on. he has lost his windscreen. went from 10th to 14th. did the windscreen fallout? he lost the windscreen fallout? he lost the windscreen but he was unhurt. do you think later he will say that is what he planned? definitely, a fantastic trick! can you imagine sitting in a car that rolls over like that? and being so disorientated but having the mind tojust being so disorientated but having the mind to just carry on. that's why they get the big bucks. he's a competitor, he wanted to win! former world number one kim clijsters has explained why she's returning to tennis at the age of 36. the belgian player retired back in 2012 before the birth of her second child. here she is. it‘s a challenge, that trigger, it's that step to ride, "let's see, let's do this,
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and take it all, let it alljust happen," the good, the bad, and it's the challenge that i'm really enjoying. kyren wilson is through to the quarter—finals of the masters snooker but not without drama during his win overjack lisowski at alexandra palace. as you can see here, a wasp made it's way onto wilson's collar which he had to take evasive action from. it gives me the creeps! referee ben williams then intervened to remove it from the table, but was stung for his efforts despite his gloves being on. look at that, he stepped in and he was all brave. it would prey on your mind... playing snooker it would prey on your mind, is the wasp around? exactly! i have never been stung by a wasp. haven't you? it is really painful! thanks, sally, see you later on. thanks forjoining us this morning. the duke and duchess of sussex might have announced
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that they want to step back from their duties as senior royals, but they haven't stepped back from their charity work. in canada, meghan has already made her first public appearance at a women's shelter, but with prince harry concentrating on promoting mental health in his capacity as rugby league patron, when is he expected tojoin her? sophie long is on vancouver island. good morning, sophie. tell us more, we are getting an idea to some extent royal duties are carrying on from today? that's right. what we've seen on vancouver island over the last 2a hours is a huge amount of wind and snow but we haven't seen any sign of the duchess of sussex. she was pictured for the first time in public after the sandringham summit on tuesday when she was seen boarding a plane leaving vancouver island to the mainland and she carried out a number of visits. she went down to the downtown women's centre and discussed issues with staff and women and it came to light
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over the next 2a hours she visited another charity, justice for girls, where she discussed climate change and issues affecting indigenous people in canada. a sense while they've made that announcement and it's been sanctioned by the queen that they can step back from frontline royal duties and spend at least part of the year in canada, they will continue with their humanitarian work. another sign megan in particular is starting to connect with the community and make relations here —— national energy guarantee. i've been speaking to people here on vancouver island excited about the royal couple spending time here and in canada and that's the key, people are relaxed and there's a sense of pride they wa nt to and there's a sense of pride they want to spend time in canada and that's the way of making relations in the community. a sign that meghan has started doing that already. we've seen no sign of harry, of course. there was speculation after
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the sandringham summit when he completed some of his engagements in the uk that he might come here and be reunited with his wife and baby son, archie, after what can only be described as a turbulent time for the couple and the wider royal family. that spec elation has moved on and we know he has meetings to carry out next week in the uk and then perhaps he might come here and we might ca sign of him there. i imagine still detailed negotiations to be carried out between the royal couple and the royal family before he makes his way over here. something tells me, sophie, there's a little bit of a nasty windchill factor going on there? there is, yeah. i'm told this is freak weather conditions and everyone i spoke to said they can understand why the royal couple want to come here. it isa royal couple want to come here. it is a lovely place to live, a wonderful, temperate climate but a p pa re ntly wonderful, temperate climate but apparently in the last couple of days we've seen a huge amount of snow, not what was expected. there's a huge amount of reports in the
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media about the royal couple spending more time in canada, as you can imagine, but one of the sticking issues they need to talk about with the royal family on the senior members of the royal family and the state to state is the money and who will pay for their security during the time they are in canada. there's been surveys carried out and speculation in the canadian press and one survey says a large majority of canadians aren't willing to pay for that in excess of 70%. i have to say the people i have spoken to here seem very relaxed about it and don't seem very relaxed about it and don't seem to mind but that's the sense you get from canadians. they are theire relaxed, the media much more relaxed, and if the royal couple wa nt to relaxed, and if the royal couple want to lead a more relaxed life then this is the place to do it —— very relaxed. yesterday it was -13 and today —9. very relaxed. yesterday it was -13 and today -9. with that wind, ouch! i'm sure we won't get anything like that! carol will tell us.
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good morning everyone. we have is quite a quiet start of the day, it is windy at the moment across the north, west, and south. that wind will strengthen through the day and be accompanied by some rain. so we're going to get a dose of rain before the day is through. have two weather fronts, one before the day is through. have two weatherfronts, one moving north and one moving east, both wearing rain. look at all those isobars. it will be windy, they are close together. as we head through the first half of the day, many of us will be dry, believe and see some sunshine, but cloud building from the west. the first run pushes north. temperature wise, looking at 8—10. it will be tempered by the wind. the strength of wind, we're looking gales across the north and west, strongest winds across wales and western england. we could have severe gales with gusts up could have severe gales with gusts up to 70 mph. it will be windy
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wherever you are. as we had on through the evening and overnight the gales return to the north of scotland. we say goodbye to our weather front from the south—east of england and behind we will have a plethora of showers following. in the hills in scotland it will be wintry, for england and wales you could see some thunder and lightning coming out of those and also some hail. in rural areas temperatures in the north will be a bit lower than you can see in this chart. there is the risk of frost and ice on untreated services. as we head into friday, we have two weather fronts coming away and both will produce showers. a look at us like the isobars are, which means it will not be as windy, except for any far north of scotland, where you will hang onto gales. you could catch a showers almost anywhere, but where we had the weather fronts, one across scotland and one across northern england, one across northern ireland the showers could be heavy, blustery around the showers, and have some hail and thunder in them. for the weekend,
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things quite down. it will be dry with sunny spells. you will notice it will turn that bit colder. that is because high pressure starts to dominate our weather. this system pushes off to the bay of biscay and does not affect us stop around the top of the high times to the north of scotla nd top of the high times to the north of scotland it will be windy and we will see some showers and some of the showers will be wintry on the hills. the rest of the uk you can see we are looking at some sunshine, with temperatures between seven and nine degrees. there is no heatwave in prospect. as we had overnight saturday into sunday, we are looking ata saturday into sunday, we are looking at a widespread frost. again with the risk of ice where it will have had some showers. a quick peek at what is happening on sunday. a lot of dry weather around once again. lighter winds, but still feeling cold. thanks very much. speak to later on. the collapse of thomas cook was one of the biggest news stories of last year but does it mean the age of the traditional package
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holiday is over? ben's been finding out. good morning. i spend a lot of time here talking about companies struggling or going under. but when thomas cook went under in september things seemed different. there was so much history associated with thomas cook, 70 stories, so many people who had spent their entire tree is working the —— so many stories. it felt like a different sort of unwinding. it prompted the question about whether the age, the time of the package holiday, the traditional two weeks and the son was over. the collapse meant that there were a lot of stores closed, about 500 stores across the country, about 2500 south we re across the country, about 2500 south were affected. but amidst all of that worry that those jobs are going to go, the stores would close, in steps a couple, john and irene hayes, they run hays travel, a rival to thomas cook, they chose to buy all of the stores and safeguard all of thejobs. all of the stores and safeguard all of the jobs. they stepped in at the
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11th hour. the question is can they succeed where thomas cook failed? they will try to answer that question in a moment. let us look at where the thomas cook story all began. it's here again, that time to start thinking about faraway places with strange sounding names. temping brochures promise delights in sunny places. the package holiday, all those glossy brochures that opened up those glossy brochures that opened upa those glossy brochures that opened up a world of travel for millions. at their peak, nearly two—thirds of holidaymakers chose a package deal. it all began in 1841, when this man, thomas cook, arranged a train trip for locals from his home town of leicester to nearby loughborough. and those railway trips for a shilling soon became foreign to greece, and italy. by 1898 there was even a thomas cook store here in venice. but the real growth came in
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the 19505. changes to aviation rules sparked a boom in charter flights to new destinations. many more could afford a sunny summer getaway. but how we book tho5e holidays has changed. fewer trips to the travel agent, more browsing online, traditional tour operators struggled to keep up with our desire to do it ourselves. it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to me that it has not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel. thank you. do you take personal responsibility? after nearly 180 years, thomas cook is no more. but then camejohn and irene hayes. they stepped into by all the thomas cook stores, saving thousands ofjobs. saving thomas cook stores, saving thousands of jobs. saving the thomas cook stores, saving thousands ofjobs. saving the package holiday could be much harder. it is
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fascinating looking back. so what about the future now? for thomas cook it was a specific case. the reason thomas cook collapsed is because it was hit with debt, huge amounts of debt, nearly £2 billion when it went under, but some of my collea g u es when it went under, but some of my colleagues at radio 4 asked holidaymakers what their plans were for holidays of the next couple of yea rs, for holidays of the next couple of years, and nearly half of them said they would still choose to have a package holiday. two—thirds said they would be confident in taking they would be confident in taking the type of holiday. think it is worth saying that is probably because that repatriation, those emergency flights that kicked in when thomas cook went under passed off so smoothly. people were able to get back. the scheme worked as it was intended to do. but we should also be clear that this is not plain sailing. most people tend to book their holidays online or on the phone. what haze do and 76% used to do it online, what haze do is ensure there are staff in stores and on high street. that is expensive, you
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have to pay overheads for the stores and for the stal. it will be interesting to hear what their plans are and we will speak to them in an hour. john and irene hayes are coming in. it will be interesting to hear what was on them mind when they chose to save although stores and jobs and to hear what their plans are to make package holidays work for the future. looking forward to speak them. thanks. most pet owners might wonder what their animals get up to when they're out, and probably worry about whether they're happy without someone around. now, a new spotify podcast has been launched to help dogs feel calm when their owners are away. the playlists feature ambient sounds and even the voice of game of thrones actor ralph ineson. 0ur reporterjohn maguire has been testing it out. first to try out the my dogs favourite podcast is rambo. he's one of around 40 dogs here at the bristol animal rescue centre and, understandably, any precious time out of his cannel is playtime. so
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will the dulcet tones of the actor jessica unrein snap him out of it? now, you just take it easy today —— jessica rain. you are so loyal, and vigilant, and they really appreciate that. but i'll be fine out there and you are all safe in here, so don't worry about a thing. not really. as well as voices and sounds, the podcast includes music. and the benefits of calming tunes and tones are well known here. the dogs here, they listen to classic fm throughout they listen to classic fm throughout the day. and, surprisingly, it does make a difference. we went through a trial period as well of using stories on cds of late children's books. and you do kind of see a bit ofa books. and you do kind of see a bit of a decrease in their behaviour a little bit, especially when they are in kennel. next up is kaiser, i predict a riot. he too is excitable
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and very affectionate. you know something that's brilliant about dogs like you? you help people make friends. and even find love. but, strangely, prefers me tojessica. stop it! laughter. a higher pitch or deeper voice, they are going to react to a lot different to a calmer voice. so just car music is really nice to them, it's soothing, it's relaxing, it just helps their stress levels go down —— calm. just helps their stress levels go down -- calm. our last hope rests with girl power, and juice the local, regular self assured, she seems relaxed and will use to receiving compliments. it might be because you are an absolutely wonderful, wonderful, unique, amazing creation that us humans simply don't deserve. staff here are impressed with the podcast, but say dogs should be left alone for more than four hours a day. because it is important that the dog feels that it is not going to be abandoned. four
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hours is plenty enough time. and if you have something like the podcast on, and i'm sure there are ways of doing it remotely, just because they are listening to something like that, doesn't mean it is ok to leave them for twice, three times as long as that. anything, so long as it not silent stop its like humans, you know, there's lots goes on in your head when there's a silence. and it's the same with animals. so think of it in terms of the classics, pet sounds are good, but the sound of silence is not. i was i could stay here with you. john maguire, bbc news, bristol. ithink what we have learned is thatjohn maguire has a calming effect on dogs. he works well with dogs. he does that with humans as well. thoughts are welcome. get in touch. time now to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm alison earle. the head of the fire services watchdog has urged building owners
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to remove any unsafe cladding as quickly as possible to avoid another fire like grenfell. sir windsor thomas says it's alarming more than two years after the tragedy over 300 buildings still have similar cladding to the tower in north kensington. the first part of an inquiry into the disaster found it was the main reason the flames spread. major work to repair wandsworth bridge is set to get under way in the next few weeks. at least two lanes will remain open during the £6 million overhaul which will include improving the structure, as well as road surfacing. the number of vehicles using the crossing has increased since hammersmith bridge closed last april. a south londoner is prooving it's never too late to follow your dreams after getting a record deal at the age of 82. rex martey from sydenham has performed in pubs and clubs across london over the past 60 years. he put together an album of afrobeats music and sent it to a label and has now been signed up.
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it's great. i didn't even think i could do it. i thought it was too late. 82 years old, i thought it's too late, you can't do that at age 80 and someone will give you a contract to do an album. you can't. so that's great. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, traffic is building on the a406 north circular westbound from bowes park towards finchley. a lane is closed on the a3 east hill southbound from tonsley hill to fairfield street due to an accident. temporary traffic lights and roadworks on cricklewood lane near thejunction with claremont road. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. the wet and windy weather is set to return later on today,
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but to begin with, well, it's fairly quiet out there. there's morning sunshine around, then the wind will start to strengthen, cloud will increase, and it will be quite a wet and a windy evening hour home. but lots of morning brightness out there, a little bit of sunshine around as well, lasting longer towards the east. that southerly wind strengthens as we head through the afternoon. eventually we will get some downpours of rain is moving in from the west. so the wet end to the day. temperatures 9—12 celsius. through the evening rush hour home that could be some gusts of wind again up to 40—45 mph. this weather front stalls over us, quite a lot of surface water around through the night. eventually, our weather frontjust moves its way eventually, our weather front just moves its way eastwards into tomorrow morning. but still the chance of a few showers around tomorrow morning. 0vernight lows between 6 and 7 celsius, so not too chilly, but we do have cold air to get in behind that weather front today. so tomorrow set to feel cooler, sunny spells, some afternoon showers.
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drier, cooler, and settled over the weekend. night—time frosts, but some sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning. and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: the moment of crisis has come — sir david attenborough calls for an urgent response to tackling global warming. this is notjust having nice little debates and arguments and then coming away with a compromise, this is an urgent problem that has to be solved. what is more, we know how to do it! a breakfast exclusive — arnold schwarzenegger sends a message of support to the air pollution campaigner fighting for answers about the death of her daughter. pollution kills and 7 million people around the world every year. the governments around the world should acknowledge that and not look the other way.
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this is crucial, mr s, that we get the message out to everybody. ahead of his first public appearance since stepping back as a senior royal, prince harry lends his support to a new mental health campaign. and we'll hear from the lorry driver awarded for his bravery after rescuing a woman trapped in this burning car, seconds before it exploded. children in scotland are set to be banned from heading footballs. the announcement could be made this month following a report linking head injuries to dementia. after the collapse of thomas cook, is there a future for the package holiday? well, two—thirds of us say we'd still choose one. i'll speak to the husband and wife team that bought thomas cook's stores and ask whether there's still life in the package deal. you may be starting the day with bright and breezy weather but heavy rain and strong winds are coming in from the west, moving east through
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the day with gales in some western areas. i'll have all the details in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 16th january. our top story: the moment of crisis has come in the fight against climate change — that's the warning today from the naturalist and broadcaster sir david attenborough. in an exclusive interview to mark the start of the bbc‘s our planet matters series, sir david called on governments to do more to tackle the threat before it's too late. here's our science editor, david shuckman. the fires in australia are ferocious, out—of—control and far worse than usual. they've made headlines around the world and scientists have warned that climate change has made them more severe. now sir david attenborough agrees with them. as i speak, south—east australia is on fire. why? because the temperatures of the earth have been increasing. that is a major national —
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international catastrophe, and to say, "oh, it's nothing to do with the climate" is palpably nonsense. and because of the most recent talks on climate change in madrid last month ended with little agreement, sir david says that key decisions can no longer be delayed. we have been putting things off year after year. we've been raising targets and saying, "oh, well, if we do it within the next 20 years or if we do it...", the moment of crisis has come. as new research says the melting of the ice sheets is accelerating and extremes of weather are set to become more severe, sir david hopes the world will now respond. david shukman, bbc news. worth saying: you can find out more about our plans for covering climate change in 2020, at bbc.co.uk/news
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or on the bbc news app. prince harry will make his first public appearance today since he and his wife meghan announced they will be stepping back from their roles as senior royals. the duke of sussex will conduct the draw for the 2021 rugby league world cup and, in his role as patron of the sport, will launch a new mental fitness charter to run alongside the competition. jon donnison has more. prince harry, seen here at the challenge cup final last summer, is patron of the rugby football league. today his first public appearance since he and his wife announced they want to step back from their roles as senior royals will be to host the draws for the rugby league world cup, to be held in england in 2021. rugby league isn'tjust a sport, it's a community. in the run—up to the tournament, harry is launching a charter to look at mental health within the sport. something like a mentalfitness charter will help us make real progress in getting rid of the stigma associated with mental illness, and remind people that it is notjust about being
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physically fit but, more importantly, mentally strong. so prince harry is not stepping back from a public role just yet. he also appeared in an invictus games video, released last night. the 2022, the invictus games will travel to a new country.. how much of this kind of thing the sussexes will be doing in the future remains unclear. meghan is now in canada, where she was photographed at a local women's centre. it might provide some respite from the headlines at home, and questions over whether the duchess's father might testify against her in her lawsuit against the mail on sunday. prince harry is expected to join his wife in canada next week. jon donnison, bbc news. let's speak now to royal correspondent sarah campbell, who is
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outside buckingham palace. prince harry back doing some of what he would normally be doing? well, yes indeed. after quite a week for the sussexes, it was only last wednesday that they made that shock announcement that they were hoping to step back as senior working members of the royal family and then, of course, there was the sandringham summit on monday followed by the queen's highly personal statement issued saying she preferred if they wouldn't step back but she understood the decision, and yesterday the news meghan's father might testify against her in the privacy case against the mail on sunday. some sense of normality today, back to what harry has been doing for so many years, shining a light on organisations he is interested in, in this? is the patron of the rugby football league, and as he does that today, some questions me, people might ask, is
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this the last royal engagement he will carry out for some time? will he remain patron of organisations like this one if he's going to be spending a significant amount of time in canada? and if so, exactly how is that going to work? it was thought he would fly back to canada after this engagement. we now know that's not the case. he will be staying because he has meetings in the early part of next week. then there's the small matter of those discussions taking place behind closed palace doors, working out exactly what role harry and meghan will have in the future. for the moment, sarah, forthe moment, sarah, thank for the moment, sarah, thank you. ministers from five countries that lost citizens when a ukrainian passenger plane was shot down over iran are meeting in london today. the representatives will demand a transparent investigation, accountability, and financial compensation for the victims‘ families. in iran, there have been more anti—government protests, including the capital of tehran, with some protestors publicly criticising the supreme leader, ayatollah
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khamenei. four arrests have been made in connection with immigration offences after people were spotted jumping from a lorry in somerset. it happened yesterday evening in north petherton, eyewitnesses say people were later found hiding nearby by police. no—one is thought to have been injured. a ban on children heading footballs could come into force in just a few weeks in scotland because of fears of a link between head injuries and dementia. the scottish fa could announce the ban on under—12s heading the ball soon after it highlighted a report that said former players are more at risk of dying from the disease. sports news correspondent chris mclaughlin has more. commentator: as usual, billy mcneill will be up for this. it's mcneill, it's a goal! billy mcneill scoring for celtic in 1969 — typically with a header. commentator: brilliantly taken by mcneill. the club's former captain and manager died last year after suffering from dementia.
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this just months before a study revealed former players are three and a half times more likely to die of the disease. they've been discussing the issue here at the national stadium for months, and although there's no firm evidence linking heading a ball to dementia, the scottish fa are taking no chances and children under the age of 12 will be banned from heading in training. we need to take some sensible, pragmatic steps at the moment and that's largely going to be to try to reduce the overall burden, the overall number of times that you players head, and heading in training is much more common than in matches. coach: archie, good! good! kyle mcculloch does one—to—one youth coaching. he's also coached in the us, where a ban on children heading the ball has been in place since 2015. they see players like ronaldo on tv scoring wonderful goals with his head. i think that might be the problem here — how we try and un—coach them. there has been some serious
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situations where players have lost their lives, ex—legends and players have gone on to get dementia and things like this. so i'm glad the sfa are leading the rest of football and doing something like this, because it's very, very important. chris mclaughlin, bbc news. a remarkable story now. when a lorry driver on the m1 saw a car crash and burst into flames, he rushed to the driver's aid and pulled herfrom the burning wreckage. these images, caught onjohn rastrick‘s dashcam, from the car 30 seconds later the car exploded. yesterday, john was rewarded for his bravery, hejoins us now alongside paramedic katie bannister, who was also on the scene.
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pari mistryjoins us from leicester. good morning to all of you. hello, good morning. lovely to you. not sure where we can start, john, take us through what happened? you are driving, this is your dayjob, take us through the sequence?” driving, this is your dayjob, take us through the sequence? i am on my way back up north to find somewhere to sleep, because it took me 14 hours, i have an hour left on my 15 hours. i see the matrix come up, the traffic is backing up, i moved to the left hand lane and the car in front of me literally explodes. the car hit it from nowhere, it lifts up and spinsa car hit it from nowhere, it lifts up and spins a few times and it goes back onto the floor and bursts into flames. yeah, we are looking at the pictures. several of the cars drawing to a halt. this is from your duchess of cambridge and that is u!
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can see running towards the fire? —— this is you i can see. the door opens quite easily because it has been hit from the back and there is pari and luckily she is in the foetal position. she is looking at me with her knees tucked under her chin. i look under the seatbelt knowing i've only got a few seconds before it comes up and out she goes. your instincts was to run to the car. 100% focused your instincts was to run to the car. 10096 focused on what i needed to do —— your instincts. car. 10096 focused on what i needed to do -- your instincts. let's talk 21. i know this happened last january but the members of that must be so vivid —— to pari. what is great as you have managed to be in contact withjohn great as you have managed to be in contact with john and great as you have managed to be in contact withjohn and seejohn. what do you remember about what happened? i don't really remember much, but i was driving home from work, just a regular day, and i had a massive
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accident. luckilyjohn was there to save my life and, yeah, i remember being on the pavement and i wasjust cold. i was a bit confused. i couldn't really talk much and the memories after that were after critical care four days after that. i realised i was bald and i had this massive accident. we must say, you look in fantastic shape now but you had a nine—hour operation on your skull after the crash. you had a long way del macro tattoo recovery. are you well now? i am getting there and my friends and family support me so and my friends and family support me so much —— you had a long way del
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macro tattoo recovery. -- you had a long road to recovery. you must have felt very joined to long road to recovery. you must have felt veryjoined to each other in a moment of crisis? yes, we had a weekend a few weeks ago. it was the first and we had met. and then i met her again yesterday, for the second time. so it's very... what it lowe, i know you are smiling now, john is here with us now, you had a chance to chat, do you talk much when you meet? i am just imagining you mainly having a big hug. is that what happens? yes. yeah, i think so. it must be very overwhelming. katie, in your experience, as a paramedic, you we re your experience, as a paramedic, you were on the scene, and please
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correct me if i'm wrong, it's not something that is advised for members of the public to go to a burning car, even though human instinct, kindness kicks in. so the first thing you get caught when you do any kind of ambulance service training to your safety first. watch yourself first because if you get hurt you basically can't help the person who is heard. so ideally safety first. but like you said, john's instincts kicked in and it is kind of that fight—or—flight and he we nt kind of that fight—or—flight and he went with it. and there were other people helping as well, but it was you... there was a woman who came a few seconds after me saying don't touch the girl, i said i didn't have much choice. she was from the californian fire department. could not have been better. and she looked after pari while the ambulance arrived. she looked up to her putter in the recovery position. and then
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you have been rewarded for this as well. you are proudly clutching your commendation there.” well. you are proudly clutching your commendation there. i got this yesterday from the ambulance. so it's really incredible. it is interesting, when you gave your account at the beginning, what your instinct was, to do something straightaway, i mean, often, the event, post—traumatic shock and kick m, event, post—traumatic shock and kick in, and when you get home to your own family and you try to recount what happened... has that been? have you been through that? not really, no, i was emotion after —— michl of the accident. i had a bit of a web, but after that it was fine. a lot of things have happened over the last year and the company i worked for, so they had a lot of people bringing them up and texting them. the ceo sent me and my wife out for a meal. and then the company agency iwork for best connection, they sent us out for a hotel for the night. oettl
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you what, talking to —— tell you what, talking to john, you what, talking to —— tell you what, talking tojohn, is there anything you would like to say to him all you are with us this morning, to say directly tojohn? him all you are with us this morning, to say directly to john?” just want to say thank you to john andl just want to say thank you to john and ijust just want to say thank you to john and i just hope just want to say thank you to john and ijust hope that we are just friends forever and you have always got a place in my heart. here, i know they, yes, she is beautiful people. she is a beautiful person and her family is unbelievable. people. she is a beautiful person and herfamily is unbelievable. she hasn't told you about her brother, learning to speak again. her brother sat with her for hours and hours and hours, because she had to learn to talk stop pari, you didn't tell us that. you really have come a very long way. she can do anything. pari, it is great to see you. you are smiling and on your road to say you are on the road to recovery. and,
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john, so deserved. very deserved. they had the privilege of passing it over to john they had the privilege of passing it over tojohn yesterday they had the privilege of passing it over to john yesterday and awarding him completely by surprise. it was truly deserved. also we are saying, katie, you had your moment when you are able to help. you and your colleagues, this is every day, so full of respect for the work that you do. my colleagues are amazing, there are loads of them hard at work at the minute, so it is a fantastic job that we do. we don't necessarily do it for reward or recognition, to meet pari yesterday to see her recovery and how well she is doing, thatis recovery and how well she is doing, that is why i do myjob. recovery and how well she is doing, that is why i do my job. a very fine glance, john is looking over my shoulder. i dare say you will get together quite a bit in the years to come stop thank you very much. thank you. brilliant story. let us talk to carol. wasn't that a heartwarming story, carol? such a lovely feeling in the studio this morning oh my goodness, what a herojohn ‘s,
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this morning oh my goodness, what a hero john '5, but this morning oh my goodness, what a herojohn '5, but the ambulance service, the emergency services our heroes and amazing. good morning, everybody, today we are starting off ona everybody, today we are starting off on a windy note, gusts of wind already, 50 mph. if anything, that wind is going to strengthen as we go through the course of the day and is accompanied by some rain. we have two weather fronts. 0ne across northern ireland, england, and heading east. taking rain. 0ne northern ireland, england, and heading east. taking rain. one look at the proximity of those isobars, it tells you it will be windy everywhere. some of us are starting off on everywhere. some of us are starting offona everywhere. some of us are starting off on a dry note, even a bright note with a little bit of sunshine. but it won't last. we have varane scotland, moving northwards, with some hill snow or even mountain snow. then the rain pushing easter. -- rain snow. then the rain pushing easter. —— rain across. —— east. the wind will be to the north and west. the strong list of those will be in wales and south—west england. around
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exposed coastal hills we could have gales of 70 mph. these temperatures look on the mild side for this stage injanuary, look on the mild side for this stage in january, but it look on the mild side for this stage injanuary, but it will look on the mild side for this stage in january, but it will feel cooler because of the strength of the wind. through this evening and overnight the band of rain pushes northwards, gales will return to the far north of scotla nd gales will return to the far north of scotland and we say goodbye to the rain in the south—east. behind that there will be a lot of showers and some will be heavy and thundery with hail and some hills no. some rural areas in the north, temperatures lower than those you see on the charts, so we're looking at touch of frost and the risk of ice on untreated services. tomorrow we have got two weather fronts crossing us. they will produce some showers. the isobars are well spaced, it tells you that it will not be as windy tomorrow as today, except for any far north of scotland. tomorrow will be a showery day, you could catch one almost anywhere, but especially where we have those weather fronts. the showers could be heavy with hail and thunder and some hills no.
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temperatures down on today and feeling that it cooler. then as we head into the weekend, a ridge of high pressure builds across us, so that means things will settle down. at times there will be some showers across the north of scotland as weather fronts topple around the high pressure. here two times it will be windy with al snow —— here too. for the rest of scotland, northern ireland, and wales, it will be mostly dry with a fair bit of sunshine, but it will feel cold. cold by night as well. this night into sunday. a widespread frost across the uk, with temperatures widely below freezing. that leads us into another dry day on sunday and a cool one with some sunshine. charlie and naga. thank you very much. we will see you later. prince harry will today launch a new mental fitness charter to run alongside the 2021 rugby league world cup. the duke of sussex, who is a patron for the sport, has praised rugby league for being "at the forefront of promoting and supporting good mentalfitness" something he has
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championed since opening up about his own struggles. former england captain kevin sinfield has been part of the rugby league community since the age of 16 and is one of the most successful players of all time. he's here with us now. is that a big enough lead in for you? very kind. prince harry's official capacity is to announce the draw for the competition. he has been fantastic for the sport. he has had an involvement for just been fantastic for the sport. he has had an involvement forjust over 18 months now and attended a number of events i have benat and his enthusiasm, his energy, is engagement with young people in particular has been outstanding. engagement with young people in particular has been outstandingm is important having a figure like him in the sport, isn't it? very much so. i thinkjust so prestigious, it brings awareness stop a loss of the things he is involved with outside of sport tie in perfect with the community and
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the values of rugby league. he has been great for us. how is rugby league developing in terms of mental health, in terms of how as a team, as individuals, in terms of supporting each other when it comes to mental health, being more open about mental health, what is it like now? i think it is better than it has ever been. this port is often in front of other sports in tackling some of these issues —— the sport. this support for players at grassroots and professional levels is as good as anything out there. i think there is a real awareness, education, training, people talk a lot more, which is really important. and i think this charter as part of the rugby league world cup will leave a lasting legacy and it is important that the messages look after yourself, not just important that the messages look after yourself, notjust physically, but mentally. have you seen are changing in real terms during your career? rugby league is seen as a really tough sport and have you seen it changed, may be in a changing
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room with management people do feel free to talk about issues around mental health? very much so. when i first started my playing career nobody talked about any of the issues they had away from the field. in fact, nobody really spoke about anyissues in fact, nobody really spoke about any issues whatsoever, just got on with that and they were tough and a bottle stuff up so why does he think back, do you think that was unhealthy, detrimental? very much so. think it is probably part of society at that stage. 20 years, 25 yea rs society at that stage. 20 years, 25 years ago that is how society was. now through the education, training, the awareness, through campaigns of people wanting to look after themselves it is important to look after what is going on inside your head as well. used to be the attitude that if you were weak by talking, he was seen as being weak by talking about your mental health, then you would weaken the team. i imagine the opposite is actually what happens. when you are part of a team, with the changing room or the training pitch, and you know someone
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has exposed themselves or expose the mental health to you, it almost makes you want to put your arms around them and be more of a team.” think there is still a stigma attached to some of it, especially around male sport and male teams, but i think they problem shared is a problem halved and when you talk about stuff... i think he wrap stuff up about stuff... i think he wrap stuff up to bea about stuff... i think he wrap stuff up to be a lot worse than it is, but when you speak about it and open up a thing it has to go away. you can put things into perspective. after being ina put things into perspective. after being in a team, if you are willing to give more yourself you find the trust and honesty harnesses what you are trying to get out of it together anyway. spores, of course, you have these extraordinary highs and lows —— sports. the bad times in your career and sometimes after your career, those things can be compounded as well. very much so. the fact that people are talking about it now, what the rugby league world cup are aiming to do is that people check in with each other and
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ask questions, checksum someone is 0k. they think it is really important that players, ones that retire in particular, do show some of the issues and problems they are having. do you think there has been an acceleration in terms of openness in recent years and what kind of effect do you think prince harry, the royals themselves, they have been very open, this generation of royals, prince harry, prince william, kate, maga, have been very open, does that help with openness around the issue was yellow massively. awareness like nelias could have done. certainly prince harry with his work in rugby league has really driven this stop and like isaid, the has really driven this stop and like i said, the sport is at the forefront of a loss of this type of work anyway and they have been fantastic. but you have a real figurehead involved in it who is championing at left, right, and centre. who will win in 2021? hopefully england and all three tournaments. lovely to see this morning. thank you. we will be back
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with you in about three minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm alison earle. the head of the fire services watchdog has urged building owners to remove any unsafe cladding as quickly as possible to avoid another fire like grenfell. sir thomas windsor says it's ‘alarming' more than two years after the tragedy over 300 buildings still have similar cladding to the tower in north kensington. the first part of an inquiry into the disaster found it was the main reason the flames spread. major work to repair wandsworth bridge is set to get this under way in the next few weeks. at least two lanes will remain open during the £6 million overhaul, which will include improving the structure, as well as road surfacing. the number of vehicles using the crossing has increased since hammersmith bridge closed last april. a south londoner is proving it's never too late to follow your dreams
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after getting a record deal at the age of 82. rex martey from sydenham has performed in pubs and clubs across london over the last 60 years. he decided to put together an album of afrobeats music and sent it to a label. it paid off as he's now has been signed up. it's great. i didn't even think i could do it. i thought it was too late. 82 years old, i thought it's too late, you can't do that at age 80 and someone will give you a contract to do an album. you can't. so that's great. well done. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. in leicester square, charing cross road is closed at the junction with cranbourne street due to gas mains work. a lane is closed on the a3 east hill southbound from tonsley hill to fairfield street
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due to an accident. temporary traffic lights and roadworks on cricklewood lane near thejunction with claremont road. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. the wet and windy weather is set to return later on today, but to begin with, well, it's fairly quiet out there. there's some morning sunshine around, then the wind will start to strengthen, cloud will increase, and it will be quite a wet and a windy evening hour home. but lots of morning brightness out there, a little bit of sunshine around as well, lasting longer towards the east. that southerly wind strengthens as we head through the afternoon. eventually we'll get some downpours of rain is moving in from the west. so the wet end to the day. temperatures 9—12 celsius. through the evening rush hour home that could be some gusts of wind again up to 40—45 mph. this weather front stalls over us, quite a lot of surface water around through the night. eventually, our weather front just moves its way eastwards
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into tomorrow morning. but still the chance of a few showers around tomorrow morning. 0vernight lows between 6 and 7 celsius, so not too chilly, but we do have cold air to get in behind that weather front today. so tomorrow set to feel cooler, sunny spells, dry, cooler, and settled over the weekend. some night—time frosts, but some sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning to you. the time is 7:31am. thanks for joining good morning to you. the time is 7:31am. thanks forjoining us. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the moment of crisis has come in the fight against climate change — that's the warning today from naturalist and broadcaster sir david attenborough. in an exclusive interview to mark the start of the bbc‘s our planet matters series, sir david praised the efforts of young people and called on governments to do more. the moment of crisis has come.
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we can no longer prevaricate. as i speak, south—east australia is on fire. why? because the temperatures of the earth have been increasing. that is a major national — international catastrophe, and to say, "oh, it's nothing to do with the climate" is palpably nonsense. and who's been affecting the climate? we have, we know that perfectly well. we have to realise that this is not playing games, this is notjust having a nice little debates and arguments and then coming away with a compromise. this is an urgent problem that has to be solved. the duke of sussex will make his first public appearance since announcing he and his wife meghan are to step back from their roles as senior royals. later today prince harry will conduct the draw for the 2021 rugby league world cup
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and launch a new mental fitness charter for the tournament. the duchess of sussex remains in vancouver with their son archie. ministers from five countries that lost citizens when a ukrainian passenger plane was shot down over iran are meeting in london today. the representatives will demand a transparent investigation, accountability, and financial compensation for the victims‘ families. in iran, there have been more anti—government protests, including the capital of tehran, with some protestors publicly criticising the supreme leader, ayatollah khamenei. the number of cases being looked into by an independent inquiry into maternity care at shrewsbury and telford hospital trust has risen to 900. the cases include the deaths and serious injuries of babies and women, and those where families have concerns about the care they received. some date back 40 years. the head of nhs mental health services in england has demanded urgent action from the gambling industry to reduce the number of people becoming addicted.
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claire murdoch is urging companies to do more and described tactics to entice customers, such as offering promotions or free gifts, as shameful. the betting and gaming council said it takes its responsibility to customers incredibly seriously. the time is 7:34am. coming up on the programme: carol will be here with the weather. first, though, it's time for the sport with sally. progress? actually i'm talking to you about a new story in the last couple of moments, because we're talking about the tennis in melbourne and air conditions there and the conditions the players are having to work in and do theirjobs in... we saw someone collapsed the other day. we did, and lots of players who don't have asthma have been seen taking ventolin inhalers because of the air quality and this from a british tennis player. british tennis player liam broady has described an email
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sent to players about air quality at the australian open as a slap in the face. in a post on twitter, broady says it boils his blood to think he was made to play a qualifying match on tuesday. the player goes on to question whether conditons were healthy at a time when people were being warned to keep animals indoors. just to give you a little tiny bit of context, we know the organisers of context, we know the organisers of the tournament are testing the air quality every four—minute. it is an ongoing changing problem, the winds are changing direction all the time and the players are struggling and liam broady says a lot of the young players are under pressure to keep their matches going. it is their job, keep their matches going. it is theirjob, they are there to win prize money. you know as well as me, anyone who is half sensible, if you are not feeling well and you are very fit and very athletic, something isn't right and you shouldn't be in those conditions. this is the responsibility of the board. he's put his hand up and said it is time for everybody to stick
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together. have the organisers got a protocol? if you're on the court and you're saying it's not ok, is it ok to stop? they are following it, and the air quality figures they are playing in are within the range and they are a difficult situation. more on that through the programme. manchester united's1—0 win over wolves in the fa cup was marred by an injury to marcus rashford. was all that separated the teams and enough to secure a trip to watford or tranmere in round four. with a visit to anfield coming up on sunday, united fans would have been concerned to see rashford only last 16 minutes as a substitute before going off with a back injury. in the night's other game, cardiff just about got the better of league two carlisle, winning 4—3 in the end. their reward is a trip to fellow championship side reading. fernando alonso escaped serious injury after rolling his car at the dakar rally in saudi arabia. the two—time f1 world champion was able to continue
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without a windscreen but fell from 10th to 14th by the end of the stage. he did what you do in those situations! brilliant! that event does have some very spectacular crashes, doesn't it? white it does happena crashes, doesn't it? white it does happen a lot. they are designed to roll. not unusual but it makes great television. the windscreen still fail out. it could have been horrific. —— fell out. fail out. it could have been horrific. -- fell out. there you go! the third test between england and south africa gets underway in the next couple of hours with jofra archer set to miss out through injury. yesterday, we brought you news of ben stokes being named the icc player of the year. well, this is how he celebrated — performing a hand—stand for his team mates at training. captain joe root was full of praise for his star all—rounder, saying the award was fully deserved for an incredible year. charlie, you made a really good point and charlie, you made a really good pointand our charlie, you made a really good point and our ago about ben stokes, didn't you? there's been that stuff about them getting injured doing
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various things, clearly he is good at doing that butjust be wary various things, clearly he is good at doing that but just be wary of that. don't show off to much! thanks, sally. see you later. the collapse of thomas cook was one of the biggest news stories of last year but does it mean the age of the traditional package holiday is over? ben's been finding out. what is the picture? it's been a tough yearfor the what is the picture? it's been a tough year for the travel industry. this week we are talking about flybe and at the end of last year it was about thomas cook, the 180—year—old firm collapsing, and before that, so many other problems with monarch, the airline, going under, flybe and bmi, so is there a future for the package holiday industry? well, you might remember that thomas cook's stores and staff were saved by a rival travel firm, hays. foundersjohn and irene hays bought thomas cook's 550 stores and safeguarded 2,500 jobs.
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we'll going to speak to them in a moment. first let's have a look back at the history of the humble package deal. newsreel: it's here again, that time to start thinking about faraway places with strange sounding names. temping brochures promise delights in sunny places for all the family. the package holiday — all those glossy brochures that opened up a world of travel for millions. at their peak, nearly two—thirds of holidaymakers chose a package deal. it all began in 1841, when this man, thomas cook, arranged a train trip for locals from his home town of leicester to nearby loughborough. and those railway trips for a shilling soon became foreign to spain, greece and italy. by 1898, there was even a thomas cook store here in venice. but the real growth came in the 19505. changes to aviation rules sparked a boom in charterflights to new destinations.
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many more could afford a sunny summer getaway. but how we book those holidays has changed. fewer trips to the travel agent, more browsing online, traditional tour operators struggled to keep up with our desire to do it ourselves. it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel. thank you. reporter: do you take personal responsibility? after nearly 180 years, thomas cook is no more. but then camejohn and irene hays. they stepped in to buy all the thomas cook stores, saving thousands of jobs. saving the package holiday could be much harder. well, john and irene hays from hays traveljoin us now. good morning and lovely to see you.
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here we are three months on and overnight essentially you tripled your stores and doubled your number of staff, have you stop for breath yet? no, absolutely not. —— stopped. it's been an absolutely hectic three months. ajoyful three months obviously. we were deeply disappointed when thomas cook went down, much loved brand, fantastic partner of ours for 40 years but since then it has beenjoyful in terms of getting the staff back in the stores and of the 555 as it stands today, we have 461 open.” wa nt to stands today, we have 461 open.” want to talk about the stores and staff in a minute but talk about that call, how did you deal with a lot of late—night discussions? we saw the chief executive telling us the firm couldn't be saved, when did you get involved? we had a look the retail estate and when we looked at it, the retail estate actually was profitable in its own right and
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it got brought down by the collapse of the bigger entity, the airline and the tour operation and it came down with the rest of the group. when we saw that we thought there's something here to work on. a lot of people have suggested that a lot has changed in the travel industry. lots of people want to go on the internet and search things out themselves and the independence of travel. what gives you the confidence that the notion of walking into a shop and having a chat with someone nice across the table has any future? we think it's a combination of the two. we think... we know that more than two—thirds of our customers will have actually researched online with us before they walk through the door. so you have an online presence? very much though. can you book through that as well? you can book through that as well? you can book through that as well? you can book through that as well. many people are happy with that if it's a straightforward transaction but if it's complicated a little bit, what
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they want is the reassurance, knowledge and confidence of speaking to somebody who understands how to do that and absolute assurance that their holiday will be nice. that costs money, though, doesn't it? you have a lot of rates, rents and stores to pay for and you have a lot of staff on your books. we know the travel industry is tight margins and you can't make a lot of money on the trip, how do you make that pay? we had nearly 200 shops before the acquisition which were profitable, don't have any debt, unlike thomas cook, and over £1 billion of sales, so we won't that small. we doubled the number of sales and we are forecasting more than £2 billion. 0ur shops were and are profitable, and we think if we can apply the same formula to thomas cook we will do well. we are independent and our staff wa nt do well. we are independent and our staff want to get the right holiday for a client. we book everyone.
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thomas cook didn't sell a lot of major tour operators, now they can, and the staff love that so all we wa nt to and the staff love that so all we want to do is get the right holiday for the client, they have a great holiday and they come back next year. that's the ambition of every travel company. how many people walk into a shop each day? take on ben's point, rents are high and we talk about the high street all the time, struggling with high rents and businesses struggling. how many customers walk into a shop each day to make it pay? i think really if we just rely on the high street and we just rely on the high street and we just sat there and we said, "that's it, that's all we do", then we would failing as well. we would be closing. we engaged with clients via social media, our website, and there's an interaction before they come into the actual store. so how many would walk in? they don't have
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to walk in. individual branches have their own facebook pages and they've often their own facebook pages and they've ofte n got their own facebook pages and they've often got tens of thousands... their own facebook pages and they've often got tens of thousands. .. but how many walk into the shops?l often got tens of thousands. .. but how many walk into the shops? a good enough number... come on, tell me the number! i'm genuinely interested , the number! i'm genuinely interested, is it seven, is it eight per day? tens of thousands a day. not into one shop but into the whole estate. i think your point is that we need to do more on the high street, we need to engage with the places where you are and you need to be part of the community where we are, and we are really passionate about that. we want our staff to actually contribute to places and create a sense of purpose, so all of our staff have got a £500 grant where they can actually contribute to something. it could be an environmental project, a poorly child that wants to go to disney, a foot ball child that wants to go to disney, a football strip for the local school.
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we think this is a duty for people on the high street to be part of the community where they are. 0n on that issue our branches, you will have a hays and a former thomas cook one. you are committed to not cutting anyjobs. one. you are committed to not cutting any jobs. what one. you are committed to not cutting anyjobs. what are you going to do? well, we are taking a commercial decision, if we have two in the same town then, in many cases, we are keeping them open and they are trading really well. some places we have three. and that's doing well. i think the key thing is jobs. thomas cook had 2500 jobs when they went down. more than 2000 of those staff have joined us. but what we found is, like many companies in financial difficulties, they were cutting staff. and we realise that
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the 2500 stuff were not enough. they we re the 2500 stuff were not enough. they were understaffed. so currently we have over 3000 staff in those stores that went down. a quick thought on brexit, of course, leaving the european union and a certain amount of uncertainty, how our bookings right now? they are terrific. they are right now? they are terrific. they a re really right now? they are terrific. they are really good. it is a mixed picture across the country. but they are higher overall than they were la st are higher overall than they were last year. injust are higher overall than they were last year. in just to take your point, we have three shops in sunderland and they are all achieving more than 140% of the numberof achieving more than 140% of the number of holidays that they did, even though we have three in close proximity. good luck with it. there will be lots of stuff who are really grateful that you did take it on. it's an interesting approach to business, isn't it smacked i want to ask quickly, talking about flybe, quickly, you have rescued thomas cook. just tell me about flybe, what
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you make of a bailout for them, a rescue? we didn't save all of thomas cook, it was just the retail estate. flybe, i'm not privy to the exact details. it appears that the government have merely postponed a person —— payment of tax for a few months, pushing it back, ratherthan a baler to give them time to get their act together, is a perception -- bail their act together, is a perception —— bail out. their act together, is a perception -- bail out. it is important for the country. nice to see you both. thank you john and irene. let us talk to carol to find out what is happening with the weather. good morning, everybody. if you have not started off on everybody. if you have not started offona everybody. if you have not started off on a windy notice strong winds coming our way today. st mary's, gusting 50 mph. south—west wales, 46. milford haven, wales, you get the picture. the wind
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is already gusty in the west and also parts of the south. it will get stronger through the day and we will see some more rain. some of us already have rain courtesy of the weather front pushing north across scotland. more rain coming across northern ireland, in three england and wales travelling east through the day. the isobars are close together, that tells you it will be ready across the board. we will start off with some areas on a bright note and a dry note and a blustery note. but then we have the rain coming in from the west, pushing east, the rain in scotland pushing east, the rain in scotland pushing north, and the strong winds, especially in the west, where we are looking at gale force. across wales and south—west england, with exposure, we could have severe gales. temperature today 10— 13 degrees, tempered by the wind. through the evening and overnight it will still be windy with girls across the north of scotland stop we say goodbye to the weather front in the south—east, taking rain with it, and behind we see a return to some showers. some of those showers will be heavy a boundary with hail
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depositing some snow on the tops of the hills. and in the north, in rural areas, temperatures will be lower than you can see in the charts. these indicate towns and cities, so we may see some patchy frost and the risk of ice on untreated services. that leaves us into tomorrow. we have two weather fronts living across the british isles. look at the spacing of the high the breeze will feel lighter —— moving across. gail across the far north of scotland. when we have the weather fronts that is where we will see some heavy showers, again with haylen that are likely, snow in the hills. tomorrow you could catch a showers almost anywhere. not all of us will. —— hailand showers almost anywhere. not all of us will. —— hail and showers. it will feel cooler. temperatures will be down. as we head through the weekend, high pressure builds across us, really settling things down. at times there will be weather fronts toppling over the north of scotland, introducing showers, some wintry in the hills. for the rest of scotland,
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england, wales, northern ireland, areas of cloud at times as well. but we're at sunny spells as well. feeling a bit nippy. cold overnight as well as we move from saturday into sunday, widespread frost across the board with temperatures widely below freezing and by sunday another dry day on the cards for most of us, with some sunny spells, but still the emphasis will be on it still being a little bit on the nippy side. charlie and naga. wrapping up warm these days. there is no such thing as bad weather. it is how you dress. wise words from carol, as always. thank you, charlie. she's thinking you, charlie. she likes you this morning. lovely to see you. you too, always a pleasure. shall we move on? most pet owners might wonder
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what their animals get up to when they're out, and probably worry about whether they're happy without someone around. now, a new spotify podcast has been launched to help dogs feel calm when their owners are away. the playlists feature ambient sounds and the voices of actors. 0ur reporterjohn maguire has been testing it out. first to try out the my dog's favourite podcast is rambo. he's one of around 40 dogs here at the bristol animal rescue centre and, understandably, any precious time out of his kennel is playtime. so will the dulcet tones of the actorjessica raine snap him out of it? now, you just take it easy today. you're so loyal, and vigilant, and i really appreciate that. but i'll be fine out there and you're all safe in here, so don't worry about a thing. 0h, not really. 01:52:51,419 --> 2147483052:33:10,424 as well as voices and sounds, 2147483052:33:10,424 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 the podcast includes music.
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