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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2020 7:00pm-7:46pm GMT

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this there. this was your favourite. this was the hardest week ever, i was crying, i lost a couple of nights of sleep, but it was the first week i felt i belonged there. watching it backis felt i belonged there. watching it back is painful. can we turn that off? but it was an amazing show. back is painful. can we turn that off? but it was an amazing showm is off? but it was an amazing showm is cringe when they show a clip of you dancing. but you were brilliant and it's nice to have you be here. it's a pleasure to be here. what's coming up tonight, including this... it's not the new one show washing line but the world's largest harp. it's so large that alex here didn't even spot it when she walked past on her way in. i was on the phone! i said, have you seen the massive harp, she went no! on fridays we say hello to a few people. we want to say a big hello to this horse, this is bbc news. the headlines.
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two of the candidates for the labour party leadership launch their campaigns. emily thornberry kicked off her bid by saying she didn't believe the contest should focus on which direction the party would be led in. we shouldn't make the mistake of thinking who will take us to the left, the right, the centre. the only issue the only issue that really matters now is who is going to take us forward. and this is the scene in manchester where rebecca long bailey prepares to set out her pitch in the next few minutes. glasgow re affirms its pledge to become a carbon neutral city by 2030 amid fresh warnings about global warming. psychiatrists call for social media companies to hand over their data so they can research what the online world does to children's mental health. iran's supreme leader, ayatollah ali khamenei, appeals for national unity, following the anti government protests last week over the accidental shooting down of a passenger plane. calls for a public inquiry into cuts to the probation service following the inquestinto the death of conner marshall, killed by an ex offender who was on probation. the coroner said that support for his killer's probation officer was "woefully inadequate". for £1 million pounds. is bbc newsjoining in the media feeding frenzy over the duke and?
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join us later. two of the candidates to succeed jeremy corbyn as leader of the labour party are launching their campaigns today. in a moment, we'll be going over live to manchester to hear rebecca long—bailey set out her pitch to the party's membership. she's expected to promise to end what she'll call the "gentlemen‘s club of politics", by devolving powers to the regions. earlier, it was emily thornberry‘s turn. she opened her campaign in her home town of guildford, in surrey, saying it was important to choose a leader who would take labour forward and bring back the voters the party had lost. political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster.
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he has been following the twists and turns of the labour leadership campaignfor turns of the labour leadership campaign for us. first off, remind us campaign for us. first off, remind us what emily thornberry had to say earlier today. argument seems to be mostly about experience. she has been a labour mostly about experience. she has beena labourmp mostly about experience. she has been a labour mp for a while, and that she has been a prominent campaigner for even longer. a that she has been a prominent campaignerfor even longer. a lot that she has been a prominent campaigner for even longer. a lot of the pitch we heard from her earlier this evening was about her track record in taking on borisjohnson. she is the shadow foreign secretary, she went up against borisjohnson when he was the foreign secretary. but also, a warning we're hearing from a lot of the leadership candidates, that the path back to power is not going to be easy. labour were thumped at the general election as we know last month. i think there is a bit of realism in all these campaigns. everyone saying look i won't do this overnight. it would be a case of in six months as
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an later, we will be doing considerably better. the next four yea rs considerably better. the next four years will be hard for the opposition. i have got to say, this leadership campaign, so far, has been pretty hard for emily thornberry too, although she is a prominent frontbencher, the polls that we have seen so far suggest she is languishing in last place of those still left in the contest. struggling to get support from unions or local parties, the candidates still need to get on to the final ballot. that has been one poll tonight, just one, the usual bbc caveat, that put emily thornberry on just 3% of the vote of labour members. have a listen to what she said a little earlier when she was asked about those polls. what she said a little earlier when she was asked about those pollslj she was asked about those polls.|j have never ta ken the she was asked about those polls.|j have never taken the easy way. i have never taken the easy way. i have never taken the easy way. i have never ta ken the have never taken the easy way. i have never taken the easy way. i have never taken the easy way. i have never taken the easy way but this campaign is just have never taken the easy way but this campaign isjust starting. i am watching tonight, it is a long campaign and what we need to do is get on the platform, and people can
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then work out who they think is potentially the best leader. i think that the idea of stopping the campaign before the campaign has started is... short—sighted. anything that in the end, i can show lam the anything that in the end, i can show i am the one with the vision, i am the one with the experience of the passion then i can take on boris johnson and that is the sort of leader that the labour party needs and frankly, after 100 years, weight not be nice to have a woman? —— would it not be nice. that was emily thornberry. went all the hustings kick—off? thornberry. went all the hustings kick-off? tomorrow. not long to wait. we will get the first hustings tomorrow. they will run for a few weeks. there is a long way in this process still to go. although we know the candidates who got enough support in parliament from mps and meps, support in parliament from mps and meps, to stay on the ballot. they do have another hurdle to cross by
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february, they need the backing of either two of labour's but union supporters or of around 30 local parties. if they get that, they are on the final ballot. but then, it's not until the end of april that we actually, the beginning of april, that we find out who the leader will be. the process of voting begins on the 2ist of february. 0ne be. the process of voting begins on the 2ist of february. one member, one vote, runs till the 2nd of april and then on the 4th of april, we will find out who the new labour leader is. so there is a long way to go. as i say, keir starmer and rebecca long—bailey who we are about to hear from rebecca long—bailey who we are about to hearfrom a peer—to—peer frontrunners by some distance. but lisa nandy and jess phillips and indeed emily thornberry will be looking at the few weeks they have to change members names, saying it is also playful. nick, thanks very much. let's take another look at the scene live in manchester, we're just for rebecca long—bailey. scene live in manchester, we're just for rebecca long-bailey. to take to
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the podium, she will be introduced bya the podium, she will be introduced by a fellow mp. and we will finally hear her set out her pitch to the party membership. we will bring you the latest. stay with us. don't forget, we will be finding out how this and many other stories are covered this and many other stories are in tomorrow's front pages at 10:40 and 11:30 this evening in the papers our guestsjoining me tonight are david bond, brexit editor at the financial times and nicola bartlett, political correspondent for the daily mirror. a number of british cities are aiming to go completely carbon neutral by 2030, removing as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as put in to it in a bid to tackle climate change. glasgow, which is hosting a major un climate change summit later this year is one of them. it's promising to achieve the ambition by radically cutting emissions and planting enough trees
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to absorb the carbon in any remaining fumes. 0ur science editor david shukman reports from glasgow in the latest part of the bbc‘s 0ur planet matters series. from a proud history as an industrial powerhouse, glasgow now wants a future that is carbon neutral. no easy task in a city that depends on fossilfuel. its motorways encourage commuters to use their cars. the council's first move is with its gritting lorries. they run on diesel and are now being adapted to use cleaner hydrogen as well. they are as clean as possible... just one step, says the councillor in charge, anna richardson, of many needed in the next ten years. we need to work as quickly as we can to decarbonise this city, as do all cities across the world. a 2030 target is hugely challenging, certainly. and it is going to mean everybody has to work hard to achieve that. in your heart of hearts,
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do you think you could ever make it? i think we need to give it our absolute best shot. the biggest challenge in glasgow is that most people live in flats, many of them badly insulated, and nearly all heated by gas. in this social housing scheme, an old heating system is being removed to make way for a greener alternative. it's gone down well. new pumps draw warmth from the air. by contrast, another project on one of the poorest estates involves building this miniature power station. tenants we met described their shock at their bills, which went up by different amounts. worry, panic, anxiety. whether i'm gonna be able to afford it when the bill hits the mat. anxiety to the point of illness. the scheme was imposed on tenants. now, to a certain extent, that blindsided us. james and nick, in these tower blocks, are among thousands of tenants in this particular scheme
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and cube housing association and sse, which run it, told us they are committed to greener energy and to tackling fuel poverty. according to chris stark, the uk government's independent climate adviser, it is vital that everyone's views are heard. there is a huge risk in foisting upon people solutions that have not had a full process of public consent behind that, behind them. and that is the bit that we haven't done yet. already, more and more electricity, for glasgow and the rest of the country, is becoming cleaner. here, on the edge of the city, there are lands to expand this wind farm and to fit solar panels, but getting to zero carbon power is still a big struggle. as things stand, it is hard to see how glasgow, or any major city, could possibly be carbon neutral in as little as ten years. but the council says it wants to send a signal that at least it's trying. and this comes at an important time.
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because an international summit on climate change is due to take place here in november so the world will be watching what the city does. we will have more on glasgow's ambitious targets after 730. doctors say social media companies like facebook, instagram and twitter should be forced to hand over their data to researchers so that they can investigate the impact on children's mental health. the royal college of psychiatry says the information should be shared with researchers. they want tech companies to also pay a tax in order to fund that research. and they say that all new apps developed should
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be age—appropriate. here is angus crawford. public anger at the tech giants for failing to police their own platforms means regulation is on the way. and today, some of the most radical proposals yet. in part, sparked by the death of molly russell who had been looking at self—harm and suicide material online. and took her own life. protecting children like molly is what her father ian believes these proposals are all about. we are not asking for people's privacy to be invaded here. we are asking for the data that is available, the data that those tech companies use and monetise, to be notjust turned into their profits but to be used for good as well. do you really think the tech companies will willingly hand over their data ? i think the tech companies' first step seems to me to be a caution. they are very suspicious of people's motives,
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but i would hope the tech companies see the value in that. because it is really important. it will save lives. social media is of course not wholly and only bad, but it is important the harmful parts of social media are kept in check, otherwise that is what we will only hear about. how many of you use social media? learning about online safety is also of course a job for teachers, parents and the youngest users, some still at primary school. social media makes me feel very happy because many of my friends live very far away. sometimes you could be talking to someone and they say they are some age but they are really not. some people could maybe feel a little bit sad with someone posting something and they could maybe take out their anger on someone online and it could hurt someone else's fillings. i use social media, other members of my family use social media, but certainly with my own children i would be very careful with what they are on and also
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keep a very close eye on what they are looking at and the content, because we don't really fully understand the powers of social media or its reach. the government is planning a social media regulator and a legal duty of care, not popular with the tech companies. but today, one industry body said... for now, for molly and childrenjust like her, ian russell's works goes on. if in any way molly's story has helped and the increased awareness that we have has helped anyone else, she would be very pleased. angus crawford, bbc news. we are nowjoined by the ceo of centre for countering digital hate imran ahmed.
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thank you for coming in. we had a look at the report that was put out? i have. what did you make of it? if it it was a set of very sensible recommendations. perhaps with an active fairness we would go further, we would say that actually some of those social media companies, the way we have behaved is downright immoral. in allowing this kind of hate to fester on their platforms, not just abuse of young ladies hate to fester on their platforms, notjust abuse of young ladies and young people, but also that sea—level hatred that we find in groups and it is time for society to ta ke groups and it is time for society to take action. is that another element of the world of social media? in terms of blocking that type of co nte nt ? terms of blocking that type of content? because i think what the psychiatrists are saying is research into mental health? absolutely. they look not just at a into mental health? absolutely. they look notjust at a mental health of young people but the impact of
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radical material on young people and on society as a whole as well. do you think the report goes far enough? i think it certainly is a good start. what recommends is that we are able to conduct that research that social media companies share the data with independent researchers to find out exactly what scale of effect has been across society. we already know that has been effect across society. we know for example the john hopkins been effect across society. we know for example thejohn hopkins school of public health in a study published last year showed that young people who use social media twice as likely to show internalised 01’ twice as likely to show internalised or externalised mental health problems. as those who don't use it. internalised mean things like depression, externalising means aggression to other people or anti—social behaviour. aggression to other people or anti-social behaviour. obviously there is some data out there already from what you are saying for you to say that we do know that this is
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taking place. what data do you think would really ramp up the research in terms of adding that value? what more do we need to know about? we wa nt to more do we need to know about? we want to be also track notjust the end effects, but we want to be able to look at what is called longitude analysis, as people go a long recital of using social media, how it changes their behaviour over time. having access to their data will give us more insight into what is happening. but here is the thing, the data is great, research is great, we also need a social media companies to show the will to act andi companies to show the will to act and i think it is assigned today, the cynicism of some of their lobbying against this report has shown that the quite often are not just unwilling to act when they do see just unwilling to act when they do see hate, but even with a very modest and very sensible set of recommendations, let's look into this ina recommendations, let's look into this in a bit more detail, even there they are so reluctant to play
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ball. how do you convince them? how do you convince them to have a willing and joining in with this? because a lot of social media apps, we do not pay for them, so the value of that comes from our data, the data is monetised. how do you convince them to hand it over? that is what they are all about, the data. of course, they commercially use the data on a regular basis. and they make vast amount of money, these are some of the worlds biggest companies. and what we have suggested to them is that actually, they want to build sustainable businesses for the long—term, fa wa nt pa re nts businesses for the long—term, fa want parents to feel comfortable giving their kids access to devices that have social media apps on them, we can help them society can help them and organisations like the royal college of psychiatrists but also anti—hate groups like the one that i won, and others who have tried very hard to tell them when there is —— the ones that i run, when there is trolling going on,
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what to do with trolling but also material being spread by hate actors, we have suggested they need to demonstrate the will to act because only by doing so can we allow the online sphere which is a new plane of human existence, populated by human beings, just like the rest of the world, we can make that a safe place for people to share information, form relationships, maintain relationships, maintain relationships and hopefully make the world a better place. thank you very much indeed. pleasure. iran's supreme leader has called for unity within the country, and launched another fierce attack on both the us and european nations. leading friday prayers for the first time in nearly a decade, ayatollah ali khamenei defended the country's armed forces after they admitted shooting down a passenger plane by mistake. he described the crash as tragic but said it should not overshadow the assassination of the country's
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most senior general, qasem soleiman. qasem soleimani. quentin sommerville reports. chanting. it's eight years since ayatollah ali khamenei led friday prayers. his central message hasn't changed much. translation: the evil us government keeps repeating that we stand beside iranian people. you are lying — even if you are standing beside iranian people, it is just so you can stab them with your poison daggers. "death to america, death to england", chanted the crowd. thousands were bussed in from local mosques and given banners to wave. the ayatollah's appearance, and these loyalists, are meant to project strength, at a time of weakness for iran. looking down from above, qasem soleimani — the country's ruthless regional fixer.
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his assassination by the united states has wounded iran. the accidental shooting down of the ukrainian passenger plane with iranians on board brought more trouble. angry crowds defaced the dead general‘s posters. in neighbouring iraq, iran and america continue their battle for influence. when iran and america fight, often it's iraq who bleeds. here in baghdad and across the country, there is a revolt against the government and against iranian influence. tehran has spent decades building up enormous power here. that power is now facing unprecedented pressure. they have been on these streets since october and caused the prime minister to resign and parliament to agree a new electoral roll. but that's not enough. for many, iran and america are no longer welcome here. translation: i send
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a message to us and iran. we wish iraqis will not be either eastern or western. we want iraq to be ruled by iraqis. change was already coming here in iraq, but the killing of qasem soleimani on iraqi soil means it may come sooner. with enough trouble of their own, iraqis are fast losnig patience with america and iran. quentin sommerville, bbc news, baghdad. he's an expert on iranian affairs from the school of history at st. andrew's university and joins me live from edinburgh. thank you forjoining us. why is this speech—making headlines? thank you forjoining us. why is this speech-making headlines? he is providing his view on recent developments. a very momentous start of 2024 iran. general soleimani's
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assassination and then the protests which followed. he was, in a way, providing his official version of events and he was effectively emphasising the assassination of general soleimani as a cowardly and terrorist act but the americans did not choose to provide much focus on the downing of the ukrainian plane but he got a good idea here of what the current thinking of ali khamenei is. how essential was this intervention because we don't hear much from him. i much crisis is therefore him to step up and make a speech? he wanted to emphasise that there is no crisis, because he wa nted there is no crisis, because he wanted to claim that the crowds that we saw for the funeral of qasem soleimani were the real iranians and
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he claimed those who descended into the streets after the missile strike by the revolutionary guard for people to were filled into doing so by media broadcasting from the west, including the persian service on bbc. he wanted to give the idea that it is business as usual, that he is fully in control of the situation and the attempts by the west to create chaos in iran have failed. this was one of the reasons why it was such a choreographed speech today. how likely is it that what he said has calmed things down and that iranians have heard his call for national unity? how would you interpret that? part of the reasons why iranians are protesting, in recent times, not political but economic. two months ago, we had severe rioting in iran, linked to the rise in the price of petrol.
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that was not referred to at all in a speech today. therefore, it needs to be seen, whether or not iran comes to steady the economic shift. ali khamenei today interestingly refer to iran's need to divest from its heavily oil —dependent economy, maybe as a way to improve the economic situation and in a way, bring back more harmony between state and society. thank you very much for that. thank you. downing street has confirmed that eu citizens who fail to apply to remain in britain by next year's deadline will not be automatically deported.
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so far, nearly 2. 5 million people have been told they can live and work in the uk after brexit but hundreds of thousands have yet to apply. the probation officers union has called for a public inquiry into cuts to the service after the inquest of a man murdered by a serial offender. 18—year—old conner marshall was beaten to death in 2015 by david braddon, who was on probation. today at the second inquest into his death the assistant coroner said braddon's case worker was ‘woefully inadequate' and ‘overwhelmed' by her workload. braddon was jailed for life mr marshall's murder. on the 7th of march, conner marshall left the family home, he was due to be back in the family home the following morning for his mother's birthday but at 730 the following morning, it was not conner at the
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door, but the police to tell his mother he had been brutally attacked by david braddon. he had been beaten to death by a serial offender, who was already on parole for drug offences and for beating at police officer. to give you some context, the privation service is privatised in the uk in 2014, a decision which has been reversed just last year, due to much criticism. the company who looked after the probation service in wales had concerns raised about them by the union only recently. david braddon, his probation officer was set in the inquest to have been overwhelmed by the work she had. she is said to have been neutral and the management of her role was woefully mismanaged. following the narrative conclusion today, conner‘s mother gave a statement in which she blamed the private oh privatisation of the probation service for her son's
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death. let's go straight to manchester. there is the podium and we are expecting rebecca long—bailey to speak, to lay out her pitch this evening in manchester. we have heard from a number of mps and speakers in the run—up to her introduction, hopefully hearing from her shortly. earlier today, . .. rebecca long—bailey. applause. how's that for timing? she is just making her way to the stage, the audience standing to welcome her. and to hear her plans and how she is going to reunite the labour party would also take it forward. she is, i think, the last of the candidates to set out their patch. for the leadership of the party. earlier today, we also heard from emily thornberry as well and of course she just about scraped through that
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first stage of the race. let's listen in, here is rebecca long—bailey. we are going to have to think of a new song you know. no pressure. not welcome, everyone. welcome to those who threw everything they had at the last election and are still hurting. welcome to all of those who are still hopeful. welcome to those who just want to hide away. and welcome to those who had enough of morning and want to get out there and organise. thank you for coming tonight, together, we are the labour party. together, we are the greatest force for social change this country has ever known. and together, we will unite, we will rebuild, and we
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will unite, we will rebuild, and we will win. rattez. applause it is more than 30 years ago that as a young girl, i first came it is more than 30 years ago that as a young girl, ifirst came here to the science and industry museum and i remember wondering down into the old victorian sewer and learning about the thousands of lives that the great civil engineering project saved from cholera. and going from room to room was like travelling forward in time. from 18th—century cotton spinning to the victorian stea m cotton spinning to the victorian steam engines, to the birth of flight, steam engines, to the birth of flight, the first computer and space travel. it was like the history of human progress and it only went in one direction. forward. and upwards. i rememberfeeling one direction. forward. and upwards. i remember feeling really one direction. forward. and upwards. i rememberfeeling really proud one direction. forward. and upwards. i remember feeling really proud that it happened here, in the city where i was from. i remember being amazed
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how far we have come injust i was from. i remember being amazed how far we have come in just a few generations. and trying to imagine what the future was going to look like if it carried on at the same right. he could not wait for tomorrow, you wa nted he could not wait for tomorrow, you wanted it today. it was not just about the technology either. the history of salford and manchester was about the chartists, the trade unions, the pankhurst. the history of our city was the history of struggle, of solidarity, a social and economic progress on an unstoppable journey upwards. but now i think these days, that sort of optimism is in short supply. there's an old joke that nostalgia isn't what it used to be and i think you can say the same about the future, sadly. the climate and environmental crisis, the rise of the far right to
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political power and the relentless pressure that austerity places on our public services and social fabric, these are undoubtedly forces that are in our lives and darken our horizons. but the thing is, if you ever have known believed in progress, you cannot ever ever have known believed in progress, you cannot ever know it. you might be fearful, you might be defeated once or twice but you a lwa ys defeated once or twice but you always expect to win in the end. now, yes, millions have taken a knock to their quality—of—life from deindustrialisation and a decade of austerity but i do not think that has dented one bet our shining conviction that our children's lives must always be better than our own. yes, our high streets are struggling but we still think of them with pride. i understand the pride that millions fail and the place that
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they feel home, whether it symbolises the manchester bay, the labour bird or the welsh dragon and we demand a future for our towns and cities that is where the other great past. i will fight for that future, i will past. i will fight for that future, i will fight past. i will fight for that future, i will fight for a new deal that ushers in a new era of prosperity, security and well—being. i will fight for the investment in the low carbon industries of today and tomorrow to secure a livable planet for future generations and bring tomorrow to secure a livable planet forfuture generations and bring new jobs and prosperity to all regions and countries of the united kingdom. i will and countries of the united kingdom. i will fight and countries of the united kingdom. i will fight for world—class public services that secure our fundamental need and free us up as individuals, as families, communities, to pursue the lives we aspire to. i will fight for the rewilding and restoration of our for the rewilding and restoration of our landscapes which will multiply many times over the natural wealth that belongs to us all. and i will
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fight for a democratic economy, for modern democratic public ownership so that we all share in the tremendous wealth that human ingenuity and hard work and guarantee us all. i will fight for all of these things. that is why i am standing to become a labour party leader and the next prime minister of the united kingdom. now, that is a long way from where i came from, albee honest. if someone told me 30 years ago that when i
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first came here, i'd be back in 2020, standing on a podium telling you i would be the leader of the party and the next prime minister, i'd have thought he would have stumbled out of the pub having taking some dubious substances. i grew up in a working—class family in old trafford and i learned my politics sitting at the top of our stairs, listening to my dad talk about pay disputes, the union and redundancies. i learned my politics working in a pawn shop and that was after 18 years of tory rule and you could see what it really means when the government washes its hands of its people, when it talks about living within our means and rather than invest, allows debts on the backs of the purse. i also my politics in may 19—7 when just walking down the street, you could literally see people with spring in
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their step, with help for the future again. when i studied politics at manchester met, it wasn't like getting an instruction manualfor winning power and changing the world. as learning about something distant, something that had always been there and something that was not about to change anytime soon. i might as well have been studying the himalayas by the milky way for all it had to do with me and my life and thatis it had to do with me and my life and that is why i never expected to be here because where i grew up, westminster seemed 1 million miles away from me. the story of the lasky yea rs away from me. the story of the lasky years is that many people instinctively feel there is something wrong with their laws being drafted hundreds of miles away bya being drafted hundreds of miles away by a distant and largely unaccountable bureaucratic in brussels.
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but i will be honest, westminster didn't feel much closer and it still doesn't today that is why i want to shake up the way government works and deliver a clear message to voters. weight will put power back where it belongs, in your hands. so, for starters, i want to sweep away the house of lords. the only unelected second chamber in the whole of europe and i want to replace it with a new elected senate based outside of london. salford, exactly. well, we might have to have a consultation but are put in a good word for salford, don't worry. i
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cannot seem to be biased, can i? they will end the gentleman is club of politics and we will set out plans to go further by devolving power out of westminster to a regional or local level. an elected senate would have a new democratic legitimacy and should have new powers to reflect that. in my view, this should include holding the government to account on the impact of new legislation on our wealth, well—being and our environment. we got a motto and salford, the welfare of the people is the highest law. i wa nt of the people is the highest law. i want the labour party to say that under a labour government, the role of government will be the safety and measurement of its people.
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and of course, we should look at new ways to make our senate more representative with proportional voting systems for elections. it's not just voting systems for elections. it's notjust enough to expect democracy in our politics, we need democracy in our politics, we need democracy in our economy as well. again, if i look at my life, yes, i worked hard, i studied to become a solicitor part time whilst holding down a full—time job. as a working—class woman, i often felt i had to work twice as ha rd often felt i had to work twice as hard as some colleagues to be taken seriously and i still feel like today. yes, i did go on to do very well but a lot of people around me did not. they worked just as hard, when your less capable and of course, we all like to look back on our course, we all like to look back on our lives and are chubby to our success to some unique personal attribute. that is true to some extent but if we are honest, and our
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economy, a lot of it is down to luck. luck other birth, a lucky break at work, a gamble that pays off. that isa work, a gamble that pays off. that is a terrible waste because for eve ryo ne is a terrible waste because for everyone who gets lucky, there's a handful of others whose talent is untapped and his hard work is unrewarded and just think of what we could be, think of how we could live if we unleashed everything that we actually capable of. my kind of socialism is the kind in which we all rise together. my kind of socialism as a britain in which eve ryo ne socialism as a britain in which everyone is free to dream, free to climb and free to succeed. and i'm
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not talking about social mobility for the lucky few, i'm talking about a society in which structural inequality and financial insecurity have gone. that means expanding alternative models of ownership and collective bargaining rights and our economy. that means fighting racism and xenophobia, that means fighting for lg bt xenophobia, that means fighting for lgbt cue plus rights and gender equality. and it means rebalancing our economy so every equality. and it means rebalancing our economy so every town, city and region can thrive again with renewed pride, pride rigid in solidarity, inclusivity and internationalism.
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but of course none of this will happen without a labour government andi happen without a labour government and i know many of you are still hurting and the devastating loss before christmas. the truth is, many didn't trust us, whether it was brexit, tackling anti—semitism, they didn't believe in us enough and we got a lot of work to do to rebuild trust with the british public because it's no good promising the world if people don't trust you with the basics. two went, the labour party does need a new professionalism. it needs a strong presence as a force for good in those communities may need to back, not in five years, but today and tomorrow. we need to look like a government in waiting. we cannot win by throwing away the very things that give power a purpose. the fight
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for a livable climate, for workers' rights, for democratic ownership, these struggles are ultimately indivisible. we cannot sacrifice one in%of indivisible. we cannot sacrifice one in % of another and expect to succeed so we must unite, we must rebuild and when we went, we went for all of us stop that is the labour party i believe in. she is laying out her pitch, we need to regain trust and we need to end the gentleman is club of politics. women have more on this. she was speaking from manchester. more later here on bbc news. we also got news watch coming up shortly. one in seven people are described as
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neuro one in seven people are described as neuro diverse. more and more employers are actually trying to attract people who are euro diverse. gchq has been doing so for more than 20 years and now a major record label has produced a guide book. let's get more on this. they are trying to get these people, they winning? i think the main thing is, organisations do not really understand neuro diversity. it is all around us. one in ten have dyslexia but at our company, we see ona dyslexia but at our company, we see on a daily basis, the misunderstanding, the misconceptions that it misunderstanding, the misconceptions thatitis misunderstanding, the misconceptions that it is not about what you cannot do, it is what you can do in different spiking is. there may be some areas is struggle with but
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other areas, it will go above and beyond and it is this talent organisations are missing out on. there is no doubt that the ability is there, it sounds as if the key to unlocking this is the communication. yes, communication, reasonable adjustment, it definitely takes both sides so an individual looking for inclusive employment needs to understand that managers are not there yet so they have to have that understanding and be able to communicate how their mind works but on the managers inside. what we do is support managers, have them understand those conversations and for the individuals to get across their strengths and interviews. for the individuals to get across their strengths and interviewslj suppose their strengths and interviews.” suppose there's a lot of training involved and once you're in that working environment and once the managers have got that, what about the trickle down to their colleagues because they are going to be in this open working environment, without come at a cost for companies in
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order to incorporate that?m come at a cost for companies in order to incorporate that? it will come at a cost of

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