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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 18, 2020 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 6. contenders in the race to replace jeremy corbyn as labour leader call for unity, as they take part in the first hustings of the contest, answering questions from party members in liverpool. the chancellor, sajid javid, says there will be no alignment for businesses with eu regulations after brexit. business representatives warn food prices could rise and jobs may be affected as a result. heavy rain and thunderstorms dampen bushfires in eastern australia, but bring flooding to some areas. and england's cricketers tighten their grip against south africa on the third day of the third test in port elizabeth.
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the five mps who want to replace jeremy corbyn as labour leader have been taking questions from party members in liverpool. the candidates called for unity within the party, despite jostling for position over a number of issues. here, each candidate set out how they would take on borisjohnson, beginning with emily thornberry. has shadowed borisjohnson for two yea rs has shadowed borisjohnson for two years when he was foreign secretary and during those two years i was told to tour with him and frankly he did not like it. that way i used to ta ke did not like it. that way i used to take him on what i am a girly swot, iamon take him on what i am a girly swot, i am on top of the detail, i would quote things, he would look confused. i would say, i am sorry,
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thatis confused. i would say, i am sorry, that is what you said. you don't remember. we need to hold him to account, he is a liar, he is callous, he doesn't care, he plays at politics, he plays at people's lights, he needs to be held to account and frankly i think he has a woman problem, he certainly has a problem with me, and during the two yea rs i problem with me, and during the two years i shadowed him, eventually the papers came out and agreed with me that he was the single worst foreign secretary this country has ever seen andi secretary this country has ever seen and i was part of exposing that.” and i was part of exposing thati think and i was part of exposing that.” think labour needs to elect someone who can speak for both the north, south east and west of this country. and where they come from a secretary to where they come from. i have been in parliament for ten years, i have seen off lots of opposite numbers and three prime ministers. but i know because i was elected in 2010 that the minute the next leader of the labour party is announced, those tv cameras will turn and face the other way. the luxuries of a hung parliament are behind us. between 2010 and 2015 we could not get a
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hearing. the next leader has to go out into the country, waves and for this movement to create real change oi'i this movement to create real change on the ground. that is what i have always done. it takes a team and a movement. we have to unite our party oi’ movement. we have to unite our party or we will not wind. we have to be an effective opposition we want when and we mean need to forge a path to victory, that is what we have to do and you're going to make a decision about this. i think i have the experience and skills and determination to do that. i have led an organisation, i know how to make decisions. i think i have an ability to bring people together in a stronger fighting force and i have the utter determination that we have to win the next general election. we haven't just lost one to win the next general election. we haven'tjust lost one election, we haven'tjust lost one election, we have lost four. and you don't achieve anything in opposition. we have to win the next general election and we need to have that uppermost in our mind as we go forward from here. i have lived through the 40 years of deindustrialisation that we have
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seen and that child from old trafford who watched her family struggle is angry. her life was nearly shattered and now she is here to shatter the tory majority. and we do that through our movement, we do that to our community and we do that through ambition of principles and aspirational socialist governments that will drive through democratic reform, democratise our economy, make sure that we have an economy that shares out and breeches and make sure that prosperity reaches every corner of the community that we choose to represent.” every corner of the community that we choose to represent. i think have managed to take on borisjohnson from the backbenches on a number of occasions. so would be more than capable of doing it from the front and what i think about some of the things that have been said about how we have taken on boris and used details and our leadership is that borisjohnson has a majority of 80 so borisjohnson has a majority of 80 soiam borisjohnson has a majority of 80 so i am not entirely sure how successful we have been so far in doing that. we have got to start
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talking to people's hearts and speaking ina talking to people's hearts and speaking in a message and language that people can hear and receive because that is what borisjohnson does. make brexit happen. we have got to be really careful when we think that we can have an intellectual argument when talking about bells, not nhs waiting times, this is a fight of our lives and we are not even in the terrain. we have to do something different and something bold. boris johnson to do something different and something bold. borisjohnson would be terrified to face me. earlier i spoke to the former political secretary to tony blair and commentatorjohn mcternan. we saw that quite a few people have the capability to cover the labour party. and move the labour party into the centre ground, the direction it needs to go to be electable. i think for me, the person who shown this week on andrew
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neil and today was lisa nandy. not many people have no better in the labour party —— outside of the labour party —— outside of the labour party. keir starmer is the frontrunner and he is an experienced parliamentarian, a senior shadow minister and experienced in public life performing that came across strongly. emily thornberry has got great character and great possession when she speaks and jess phillips as jess phillips, everyone knows what you get with her. the person who has lagged behind is rebecca long—bailey who was thought to be the favourite ina way who was thought to be the favourite in a way because she is the most corbynite and continuity candidate but i think it comes out the party don't really want continuity carbon, they want a chance of winning the next election. you will correct me if i'm wrong, but i'm sure you said that if rebecca long—bailey was picked, it would see the demise of the party, is that right?” picked, it would see the demise of the party, is that right? i think if rebecca long—bailey is a leader it is game over and the maze will break
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up is game over and the maze will break up do something else with our lives. because the party went less with ed miliband and lost an election, went for the left was jeremy corbyn miliband and lost an election, went for the left wasjeremy corbyn and lost a n for the left wasjeremy corbyn and lost an election, went even further left with a 2019 manifesto and lost disaster catchment disastrously, worst results since 1935. if you go for rebecca long—bailey, it is more oi’ for rebecca long—bailey, it is more or less, more left, more left. five defeats in a row would be the consequence and it would be a harsh defeat because voters may be looking to change their mind about boris johnson but you get rebecca long—bailey there is no chance of change and they will say labour has rejected them. you mention they all showed some potential, the ability to be leader. if you had been in that audience, today, what question would you have asked that would have allowed you to distinguish the true leader? i would have said what went wrong in the last election. and what did jeremy do wrong? because i think people do need to be honest with the
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party that is one of the themes lisa has brought up time and again has been ethel labour party doesn't change, we're going to die. the chief constable of northamptonshire police has demanded an urgent meeting with the commander of the us base, where the woman wanted over the death of harry dunn was stationed, after video emerged of another incident involving a car being driven nearby on the wrong wide of the road. this video of the near—miss incident near raf croughton, emerged as police revealed details of a third incident, in which a police vehicle was struck by a car being driven on the wrong side of the road in october. scientists say the number of people infected by the new respiratory virus that's emerged in the chinese city of wuhan is likely to be far higher than official figures suggest. there are more than 60 laboratory confirmed cases of the virus,
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which is related to sars, but experts in london estimate the true number is closer to 1700. the alarm has prompted screening at airports across asia and in the us. gareth barlow reports. this is wuhan, the chinese city where the mystery virus was first identified. an outbreak that has since turned deadly. scores of infections have been confirmed but now a team at imperial college in london estimates the true figure is around 1700 cases. while the outbreak is centred in china, there have been two cases in thailand and one injapan. we are not able to prohibit people from travelling so what we can do is detecting and bring any suspected to receive treatment from our service facility.
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airports in asia and the united states have begun screening travellers arriving from wuhan. the uk team behind the study said that, while they're concerned, it was too early to be alarmist. the virus is similar to sars, which killed almost 800 people and infected over 8000 in 2002. it looks like the virus is closely related to sars, which emerged previously. since sars emerged, people have been developing vaccines and drugs to see if they work against sars. the problem is this virus is different. we do not know yet if those drugs and those vaccines work. chinese scientists says there has been no cases of the virus spreading between humans and that it came about from infected animals at a seafood and wildlife markets. but the team at imperial college argues the possibility of substantial human—to—human tranmission should be considered more seriously. identifying how the virus
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is spread will be crucial to understanding its threat and how best to react. gareth barlow, bbc news.
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good evening. the five mps competing to replace jeremy corbyn as labour leader have been taking questions from party members in liverpool. it's the first of a series of public events around the country, which will culminate in a new leader being elected at the start of april. here's our political correspondent chris mason with the latest. you can hear clapping and see smiles but make no mistake about labour is a party wounded and hurting, crushed
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at last month was my collection, its fourth defeat in a row, little wonder one of the candidates to replacejeremy wonder one of the candidates to replace jeremy corbyn wonder one of the candidates to replacejeremy corbyn said... wonder one of the candidates to replace jeremy corbyn said... being leader of the labour party when you are in opposition that is the worst job in the world, that is what you are applying for. nevertheless, emily thornberry wants the job because... i'm the only one who has gone toe to toe with borisjohnson for two years at the dispatch box, i got under his skin and i got to what he was, which is a reckless lying charlatan. a claim that downing street would dispute. they all underlined the importance of stamping out anti—semitism in the party and another recurring theme was to stop falling out with each other in public. the whole of the party wa nts other in public. the whole of the party wants to be united, they want to come together so we had to enter factionalism, stop asking the question which bit of the party are you from, and start saying, what are you from, and start saying, what are you saying? keir starmer and is seen as one of the favourites to win over
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labour members but plenty of those who signed up to labour in the last few years did because they loved jeremy corbyn. it looks like keir starmer‘s big rival in this race is the candidate whose politics is closest to jeremy corbyn‘s. the candidate whose politics is closest to jeremy corbyn's. how do we show people that everything we believe in in this room is sensible, credible, and will transform our economy, because what we are talking about is being done in other european countries and they are not calling it far left or crazy? jess phillips is a long—standing critic ofjeremy corbyn by contrast in her tea m ofjeremy corbyn by contrast in her team recognise she is the best communicator in the party. here she is on boris johnson. it is notjust in my childhood that this man affected my life, my son literally cannot go to school five days a week and my brother is on universal credit, we need someone who can stand up and in borisjohnson's
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face. labour has never had a female leader, a point not lost on lisa nadi. we have changed the man on the top and hope it will change our problems, but it won't. defeated in scotla nd problems, but it won't. defeated in scotland and beaten back in the north, wales, the midlands, we have to go out and emotionally reconnect and show we have as much riding on this as the people we once represented. there are plenty more questions and plenty more answers before today's hustings wrapped up, and there is plenty more to come. this contest will rumble on until april. chris mason, bbc news. businesses are warning of price rises, after the chancellor sajid javid said there'd be no alignment with eu regulations after brexit. in an interview with the financial times, mrjavid said some firms would lose out, but added that they'd had three years to prepare for changes. our business correspondent katy austin reports.
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many uk—based business who make everyday products trade with eu countries. the food and drink, chemicals, medicines, vehicles, and aerospace sectors have been vocal about their desire to remain in step with the bloc‘s regulations after brexit, to keep their industries competitive. but in his interview with the financial times, the chancellor said... what sajid javid has said here is not entirely new, borisjohnson's government since the autumn has indicated it will not seek to remain aligned with eu rules after brexit, but what is more new is the chancellor getting a message to businesses that they need to accept that and they need to prepare. while acknowledging that some industries might
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benefit from brexit, the food and drink federation said the government must agree a deal that doesn't add trade barriers. a massive amount of our members and our workers are dependent on sales to the eu and we need the minimum possible friction in those sales, and that is the test, it seems to me, for the government going forward. the eu wants the government to stay closely aligned when it comes to regulations and to keep a level playing field on the environment, competition and labour standards. the chancellor has not specified which rules he wants to depart from. his message is that there are opportunities for the taking. businesses want convincing that they will be in a position to grasp them. katy austin, bbc news. security forces in lebanon have again clashed with demonstrators in the capital, beirut. they fired tear gas at protesters who were throwing stones and fireworks in the largely deserted streets.
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protests began in october because of delays in forming a new government. the demonstrators accuse lebanon's politicians of corruption and incompetence. british scientists say the scale of a mystery virus in china may be greater than acknowledged. 50 people have allegedly been affected but scientists say the true number could be in the hundreds. public risk to the uk is judged be in the hundreds. public risk to the uk isjudged to be very low. a law has been passed banning pub crawls and happy hours in parts of spain, restrictions apply to the tourist hotspots of ibc and minorco, —— i beazer and lorca. more extreme weather has hit south—east australia, but this time its heavy rain and thunderstorms which have caused flash floods. wildfires have been raging in the country since september, killing at least 28 people,
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destroying thousands of homes, and scorching millions of acres of land. sangita myska reports. look at what's coming in the park — a wall of water. as flood water cascades into the australian reptile park in new south wales, there are challenges for humans and animals alike. the storms, described as a one in a hundred—year event, have turned roads into rivers and lead to power cuts across the region. meanwhile, this river is typical of many, scores of fish have suffocated after ash from the bushfires that have raged across the country washed into it, contaminating it, starving wildlife of oxygen. elsewhere, residents report experiencing three times the average amount of rainfall in just one night. it's still pouring, we've had seven and a half inches
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here since about two o'clock this morning. these storms have not been enough to extinguish the almost 100 bushfires still raging here. the forecasters say there's more heavy rain ahead, creating yet another shift in this country of extremes. sangita myska, bbc news. cricket, and it's been a good day for the england bowler dom bess in the third test match against south africa at port elizabeth. he took the first five wickets, as the home side struggled — chasing england's first innings score of 499. patrick gearey reports. every morning at every ground england play at, theirfans sing jerusalem, in hope, not always in confidence, but this time there was belief. here's why. .. commentator: it's a top catch! dean elgar expertly caught by ollie pope off the bowling of dom bess. pope's skill could only be fully appreciated on the replay. even by those with the best view.
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south africa's captain faf du plessis was next to fail the bess test, again caught by pope. england's spinner was only brought on this tour because of sickness in the camp, yet when he removed van der dussen, he had taken all five south african wickets. england still nearly 400 runs ahead. only the weather gave south africa sanctuary, rain ruining the afternoon session. it was still murky when they returned. perhaps the reason for this strange incident. ben stokes dropping a catch. where was the kryptonite? not long later, cape back on, he was bowling, and dismissing nortje, who had been sent in last night to block. his concentration finally broken. but it was the man stokes had missed who had become the problem. quinton de kock made his way to 50, this would be his lucky day. having been dropped by england's best fielder once already, it happened again, and, unbelievably, again.
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stokes stunned, the batsmen survived. with the forecast iffy and time getting shorter, england are now up against the weather and de kock. patrick gearey, bbc news. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late news at 22:10. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are.
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hello. this is bbc news. let's return now to one of our main stories. businesses are warning of price rises, after the chancellor sajid javid said there'd be no alignment with eu regulations after brexit. in an interview with the financial times, mrjavid said some firms would lose out, but added that they'd had three years to prepare for changes. one of the businesses to warn the government about the threat of rising prices after brexit is the food and drink federation.
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the group's ceo, ian wright told me why his members were worried about the chancellor's proposals. he said we would not be in the single market, we would not be in the customs union. we know that, we know that is the government's position and they are perfectly entitled to take that course of action. what we don't know is where the divergence will be. it is not like we are going to suddenly rewrite the entire rule book. we are going to diverge from the eu as we leave the european union on the 31st of december. so, what we don't know is where the individual elements of that divergence will come. from your business point of view, what are the alignment rules that are most pertinent for success? for the few food and drink, industry which exports 20% for the food and drink, industry which exports 20% of its production to the eu, so a massive percent of our workers are dependent on sales to the eu,
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we need the minimum possible friction in those sales. that is the test, it seems to me, for the government going forward. in the negotiations on the european free trade deal, and on those with america and australia and new zealand that are going on. incidentally, we strongly support this. we want free trade with the eu and america, new zealand, japan and canada. their test for the government is minimum possible friction. if they can meet that test, then we will be very very happy. what are your suggestions then? you have been saying you are willing to work with the government. what, to you, would be the best way to meet in the middle? it is our duty to work with the government, i think, on behalf of our members. we want the minimum number of sanitary checks, so checks on animal health, plant health, that are consistent with the highest possible
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standards of food safety. we want minimum amount of paperwork. all of that should be possible to be negotiated in a very detailed and comprehensive and, as the prime minister says, ambitious free trade deal. with america and if possible those other countries. that is down to the negotiators, and i have a lot of confidence. if it is michael gove who is leading those negotiations, i have a lot of confidence and members have a lot of confidence in their government's ability to do that, but that will be the test of them, and if they fail to meet that test, there will be consequences for manufacturing jobs, notjust in food and drink but in the other industries mentioned. you mentioned the checks there where you said it would work. can it really be done? well, we have it at the moment and it works perfectly well. and it works in other free trade deals that have been done in other countries. the key thing here is
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the balance between speed... and everybody wants certainty, i understand that, the speed of the negotiation and the detail of the negotiation. and that is wrapped up in this use of the word comprehensive. so, can you have a comprehensive free trade deal and an ambitious one? i think you can, but it will be a big test and it is down to the government to deliver this. and us and the other industrial groups to advise them and we stand ready to do that from now, from monday morning if that is what they want us to do. time for a look at the weather with stav da naos. hello there. away from northern scotland it was a glorious start the weekend, albeit cold. if you like this kind of thing, part two is also looking sunny after a cold and frosty start. a bit of mist and fog around. high
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pressures replace low pressure which has brought us all the wit and 20 weather over recent days. it is going to be a cold night, temperatures falling away sharply already. a hard—fought sort of time, evenin already. a hard—fought sort of time, even in towns and cities around freezing or below. a bit more cloud and breeze, just a few showers clipping eastern portions of east anglia and into the south—east. high pressure with us on sunday, you will notice more isobars and wet fronts flirting with the north—west corner of the country. this will bring more of the country. this will bring more ofa of the country. this will bring more of a breeze to north—west scotland with thicker cloud at times. perhaps even rain for the northern ireland. temperatures here nine or 10 degrees, less cold. elsewhere after a cold and frosty start, plenty of sunshine. temperatures between seven and nine. high pressure with us as we head onto the start of next week, a lwa ys we head onto the start of next week, always more weather fronts and more isobars across the north of the uk.
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it means monday morning starts off cold and frosty in the south, less cold and frosty in the south, less cold in the north because there will be that breeze and a bit more cloud around. essentially for monday, finer dry for most of us. best of the sunshine through central and southern parts of the uk. better century for northern ireland and eastern scotland. temperatures around 10 degrees, a cold day for the south. sunshine to compensate. su btle the south. sunshine to compensate. subtle changes as we head through monday night into tuesday, this week whether front topples round and sinks south across the country. could introduce arthur a band of cloud with drizzle. as it pushes south. looks like plenty of cloud here. sunshine makes a return behind it across parts of scotland. it will bea it across parts of scotland. it will be a cooler day here, temperatures eight or 9 degrees and 6—8 further south. to get the theme, high—pressure keeping things fine and dry largely as we head through the rest of the week. variable
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cloud, bit of sunshine, will be called.

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