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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 23, 2020 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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homeownership hello good morning — welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: public transport has been shut down in the chinese city at the centre of the coronavirus in a bid to stop the outbreak. 17 people are known to have died, as the world health organisation meets to decide whether to declare good morning — welcome to breakfast, an international health emergency. with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. public transport has been shutdown in the chinese city at the centre of the coronavirus after years of campaigning, the bereaved mother in a bid to stop the outbreak. of 2—year—old jack wins grieving parents the right to more 17 people are known to have died, time off work. as the world health organisation less stuff, more memories. why four—fifths meets to decide whether to declare of millennials say they value new experiences like an international health emergency. holidays and entertainment after years of campaigning, instead of new clothes, the bereaved mother of 2—year—old jack wins grieving cars and electronics. parents the right to more time off work. heather watson is out of the less stuff, more memories. why four—fifths australian open. beaten by elize of millennials say they value new experiences like holidays and entertainment mertens in a match that took less instead of new clothes, than one hour. we've got a grey day
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cars and electronics. had with a lot of low cloud, dank conditions. the best of the bright manchester united are booed off ts, conditions. the best of the bright ‘s, northeast scotland and north eat after losing to burnley at old trafford for the first time —— north—east england. in the premier league. their manager says it's thursday the 23rd of january. it's not good enough. our top story. good morning. today is another public transport has been shut down in the chinese city of wuhan — cloudy, damp, drizzly day. we got the epicentre of a respiratory virus that's infected at least 500 some missed, we've got some fog, people. particularly some across england and wales and we got some rain in the forecasters well coming in across wu han's population of the north—west of scotland but i'll around 11 million people have more details later in the programme. have been told not to leave the city it's thursday the 23rd of january. without good reason. our top story. public health england says public transport has been shut down precautions are in place to minimise in the chinese city of wuhan — the risk from the coronavirus — the epicentre of a respiratory virus and the world health organisation will resume a meeting later that's infected at least 500 people. wu han‘s population of to consider whether to declare around 11 million people a public health emergency. have been told not to leave the city keith doyle has more. without good reason. public health england says this is a time of year when millions precautions are in place to minimise of people travel for the holiday. the risk from the coronavirus — and the world health organisation transporter shot. the 11 million people who believe there are been will resume a meeting later to consider whether to declare a public health emergency. told not to leave in an effort to keith doyle has more. contain the outbreak of the virus.
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at heathrow last night, a china southern airlines flight there are three flights directly direct from wuhan landed. it's one of three weekly direct between the city in the uk. china southern flight was the last to flights to the uk from the chinese city at the centre of the outbreak. learn. passengers have been subject passengers arriving have been to enhanced monitoring but some who subject to enhanced monitoring, according to the government, arrived last night said they did not notice any cheques. i've been but some who arrived last night said through essentially no screening at all. so there was no screening at they did not notice any checks. i've been through essentially no screening process, at all. so there was no screening at wuhan, and there was no screening wuhan are no screening is i landed. as i've landed. this woman on the same flights at wuhan airport. they took people's temperatures and on the plane, this woman on the same flight said people will facemasks. this man there were checks at wuhan airport. arriving at heathrow showed a she said they took people's leaflet given to passengers temperatures, and on the plane, people wore facemasks. explaining what to do if they feel this man arriving at heathrow showed a leaflet given to passengers unwell. public health england says from public health england the risks to the uk population is explaining what to do low. the world health organization will decide later today if it will if they feel unwell. that's one of the measures introduced at heathrow. planes arriving from the chinese declare an international public health emergency. keith doyle, bbc city are taken to an isolated area of terminal 4. on—board announcements tell people news. later in the programme we will
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to inform crew members if they feel be speaking to a specialist in travel medicine. to tell us what unwell, and that information precautions are being taken to is passed on to public health teams which meet each direct flight. contain the virus. these passengers are the last to arrive from wuhan, parents who lose a child where all public transport, will receive two weeks paid including flights, have bereavement leave under now been stopped. new government rules being outlined today. public health england says the risk the current entitlement to the uk population is low. is three days. it will be known as jack's law, the world health organization in memory ofjack herd, will decide later today if it whose mother lucy has been will declare an international campaigning for reform since her 23—month—old son died in 2010. public health emergency. simon gompertz has this report. baby jack, two weeks short of his second birthday, climbed 4.5—foot wall and tragically keith doyle, bbc news. let's get more on this drowned in a pond on the other side. from our correspondent stephen mcdonnell, who's in beijing. i saw the back door was opened and ijust knew. i called him and he didn't come we have a situation that is being looked at internationally and a huge back, and i sa the pond, city, 11 million people, wuhan, the dog was sat by the pond and ijust knew. effectively in the form of lot down. the family didn't have long enough to grieve so lucy has been pushing for a change. it was very important you could take time off, all across china people are a lot so anything from 24 more mori today than there were two hours to three days, days ago. 48 hours ago we couldn't there was no more than three days
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find somebody who seemed that and any extra time that had worried about it amongst the general to be taken had to be taken as sick leave or holiday public. people are cancelling trips, and obviously the death of anybody lining up to get facemasks, cancelling their own holidays and is not really a holiday. what's really made them concerned such a terrible loss, lucy and other campaigners said, has been the situation in wuhan needs guaranteed time to cope with and talk through. where the government has effectively now there will be a right locked down that city. all trains coming out of wuhan, all flights coming out of wuhan, all flights to bereavement leave for parents coming out of wuhan. there, they've stopped the underground train service. public buses, all public whose children have died under the age of 18, transport shutdown. imagine if you including stillbirths from 24 weeks of pregnancy. it will be a minimum are sick, difficult for you to get of two weeks which you can to the hospital however the separate chunks of a week, taken within a year. mitigating factor there has been the you'll have that right reason there isn't traffic gridlock from the day you start work but after 26 weeks with an employer, necessarily varies because people you will also get up to £148 are staying indoors. they are statutory bereavement pay for every week taken. worried about getting the virus and the business secretary praised the way parties have worked together for a reliable space to grieve. what has global health authorities worried about this is that hundreds there is huge support from colleagues, of thousands of people have already right across the house, left wu ha n. some of whom have had their own of thousands of people have already left wuhan. there is a 5— day really tragic cases of bereavement
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incubation period survey may have of children and of stillbirth. gone through train stations, arrived in other countries. without a many have told their stories very bravely and it has been a fantastic piece temperature. the screening hasn't them up. all the way, they've been of cross—party collaboration. what's been called jack's law, applying from the 6 april, passing on this virus to others and should help 10,000 parents per year. in they only discover they are sick before it's too late. parents who lose a child will receive two weeks paid bereavement leave under new government rules being outlined today. the current entitlement is three days. and we'll speak to jack's mum it will be known as jack's law, lucyjust after eight in memory ofjack herd, o'clock this morning. whose mother lucy has been three people have died after a helicopter fighting campaigning for reform bushfires crashed near sydney. since her 23—month—old son died in 2010. simon gompertz has this report. helicopters were deployed babyjack, to search for the plane, ba by jack, two weeks baby jack, two weeks short of babyjack, two weeks short of his which can carry thousands of litres of water. we're joined now by our sydney second birthday, climb to 4.5— correspondent shaimaa khalil — football and tragically drowned in a shaimaa, what do we know so far? pond on the other side.” football and tragically drowned in a pond on the other side. i saw the we know from the rfs commissioner duck —— back door was opened and i just knew. i called him and he didn't come back and touch draw saw shane fitzsimmons that a huge fireball emerged as that plane the pond, the dog was sat by the crashed into the ground. that large pond and i just water tank was there in the snowy —— the pond, the dog was sat by the pond and ijust knew. the family didn't have long enough to grieve so
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lucy has been pushing for a change. it was very important you could take time off for so anything from 24 snowy monaro area south of canberra, hours to three days, there was no helping to control that emergency more than three days and any extra blaze, lots of smoke and poor time that had to be taken had to be taken as sick leave or holiday and visibility. contact was lost in the obviously the death of anybody is crew on the ground have initially not really a holiday. such a reported it to have crashed. we know that three us crewmembers have died and there are no survivors. police terrible loss, loosing other are still investigating the cause of campaigners said, needs guaranteed that crush the moment and there is time to cope with and talk through. aerial surveillance defined the wreckage. remember actually crashed in an area with an active fire so conditions are very difficult. water now there will be a right to bereavement leave of parents whose bombers, whether it's children have died under the age of conditions are very difficult. water bombers, whether its large planes 18 including stillbirths from 24 weeks of big nancy. it will be a or helicopters, have been crucial in minimum of two weeks which you can separate chunks of a week taken within a year. you'll have that helping firefighters and the new right from the day you start work south wales premier has said this but after 26 weeks with an employer, latest tragic incident is an indicator of how difficult and dangerous conditions are, notjust on the ground for firefighters but you will also get up to £148 in the airas on the ground for firefighters but in the air as well for these crews.
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statutory bereavement paper every thank you. week taken. the business secretary praised the way parties have worked together for a reliable space to grieve. there is huge support from prince charles has arrived in israel to commemorate the 75th colleagues, right across the house, anniversary of the liberation of auschwitz. the service at the holocaust some of whom have had their own remembrance centre will also be really tragic cases of bereavement attended by other world leaders and heads of state, to pay homage of children and of stillbirth. many have told their stories very bravely and it has been a untested piece of our correspondent is in jerusalem cross— party and it has been a untested piece of cross—party collaboration. and it has been a untested piece of for us. barbara, good to see you. cross-party collaboration. what's been called jack's law, applying how significant that we are going to be seeing prince charles on from the sixth of april, should help 10,000 parents per year. international stage addressing this? and we'll speak to jack's mum lucyjust after eight o'clock this morning. it significant and important to him, i think, and for the royal family. it's the highest level royal visit to israel ever and it is the first three people have died after a helicopter fighting visit every state. the queen is the three people have died after a helicopterfighting bushfires crashed near sydney. we're joined now by our sydney correspondent shaimaa khalil — head of state but he is acting on shaimaa, what do we know so far? her behalf stop it something he is it seems to be tragedy upon tragedy keen to participate in. is going to when we are reporting on what's happening with these bushfires. the a speech about the need to combat anti—semitism which is big theme of new south wales premier made that the conference here today. it is point, that this latest tragedy is
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also going to be visiting the assigned, an indicator the dangerous palestinian territories as well and conditions that many of the having a message there about interfaith dialogue, visiting firefighters and crewmembers are working under. we also got a churches and mosques. it's a very big dealfor the israeli government as well because there are some 40 confirmation the three crew members are from the united states because world leaders here, the biggest it was contracted from a company in the us and there were no survivors. international gathering never hosted. at dinner last night for the leaders who come and ceremony here the rfs commissioner shane fitzsimmons says a huge fireball commemorating the victims of the emerged as the plane crashed into the ground. he also said this was an holocaust just what this memorial area just south of canberra where museum does, citing their names and fires have been burning out of pictures and so on but as i said, control and that smoke there was quite heavy with very low visibility focusing on the threat of modern—day and the plane was there. the planes anti—semitism. and the plane was there. the planes and helicopters are crucial in that fight. it is a huge loss obviously nine have died and four are still missing, including a british man who was riding his motorbike of life but of course for the in ibiza, after a powerful storm hit spain's east coast. firefighting efforts as well. again, authorities are looking for a an indicator of how dangerous the british man who disappeared after riding his bike on the island. storm
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firefighting conditions and the conditions in general are as the summer goes gloria is bringing heavy rain and conditions in general are as the summer goes on and as we get more flooding to the south of france. bushfires burning out of control in several areas in new south wales and the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the british—iranian woman victoria as well. thank you very being held in prison in iran, much. prince charles has arrived in israel is due to meet the prime minister, to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the boris johnson for the first time liberation of auschwitz. later. it's his first visit to the country richard ratcliffe, who'll be accompanied by his daughter, gabriella, in an official capacity. has not met with mr. the service at the holocaust johnson since he was foreign remembrance centre will also be secretary and came under fire attended by other world for wrongly suggesting nazanin leaders and heads of state, to pay homage was training journalists at the time to the millions ofjews of her arrest. killed by the nazis. celebrities and models have celebrated the final fashion show of the french designer four people are still missing, including a british man jean—paul gaultier in paris. who was riding his motorbike in ibiza, after a powerful storm hit the designer, who's 67, has retired after a 50—year career. spain's east coast.storm gloria brought with it high winds, his label will continue, but he won't be designing heavy rain, and even snow, the collections anymore. he's probably most famous causing widespread destruction for madonna's "cone bra" corset, and killing nine people. the weather has now moved north, which she wore for her 1990 causing flooding in southern france. freya cole reports. blonde ambition tour. storm gloria arrived with great force — winds of up to 144km/h with waves up to 14m high. he is in good health and everything.
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in a small seaside town it was just so much fun. you saying in catalonia, goodbye to the catwalk. he set himself up. carol is going to bring a thick foam flooded the streets. it was caused by this — howling winds and a powerful surge from the ocean. local authorities say it's the worst sea storm since 2003. us the weather soon. the statutory it's claimed several lives, and there are still people missing. one man is feared to have been swept into this canyon minimum for bereavement so far has on the island of majorca. been three—day. since the death of rescuers are doing all they can her eight—year—old son in 1989, , to locate his body. after four days of relentless rain and wind, a moment of calm has settled across the worst hit areas. it's only now locals can start to assess the widespread destruction. this has been supported by karen translation: it was tremendous. it destroyed the seafront, and look at the result. the worst thing is the disaster it's caused. this was beautiful. forecasters have tracked mcewen. this would have been your seawater 3km inland. swamped the ebro delta, son's birthday, is that right?m it swamped the ebro delta, a vital ecosystem would have been, he would have been full of rice paddies. the storm front headed north—east
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and landed in southern france. 39 today. that must make this day torrential rain there and what's going to happen for has also caused chaos, forcing many people to abandon their homes for safety. only when the water subsides people who may go through what you will they know the true extent went through all those years ago. that makes it all the more special. of gloria's damage. freya cole, bbc news. when it happened to him when he was eight, and you never will feel any the husband of nazanin better. it's mixed with a bit more zaghari—ratcliffe, the british—iranian woman being held in prison in iran, is due to meet the prime minister, boris johnson for the first time potency. can you take us back to later. richard ratcliffe, that time and mark martin was eight yea rs that time and mark martin was eight who'll be accompanied years old. what was that like? my by his daughter, gabriella, has not met with mr. johnson since he was foreign secretary and came under fire for wrongly suggesting nazanin was training journalists at the time life fell off a cliff. it took me a of her arrest. month to go to the shop even. people and richard ratcliffe will be overwhelm you with hugs and love and speaking to us ahead of that meeting thatis overwhelm you with hugs and love and that is really difficult when it's just after half 7:30. someone you don't really know. some celebrities and models have people want to talk about death and celebrated the final fashion show of the french designer you may not want to talk about it jean—paul gaultier in paris. the designer, who's 67, and some people pretend never
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has retired after a 50—year career. happened and then you get offended that they did that. your emotions in his label will continue, but he won't be designing the collections anymore. he's probably most famous the way your mind works is, your for madonna's "cone bra" corset, which she wore for her 1990 world has stopped and why has everybody else's continued? i blonde ambition tour. remember being really miffed, disappointed and upset that the she worried for a 1990 blonde postman was still delivering post so going back to work was just ambition to, madonna. she looked something that would have been fantastic in it. that's what you incomprehensible at the time. you do remember, and the perfume bottles. gradually realise. two weeks is better. but it's still not enough. very nipped in waist. of course i remember it. it's iconic, the blonde we've got to start you need to build ambition tour. but those cones. what on that. i suppose in the way, greek we re ambition tour. but those cones. what were they like? ambition tour. but those cones. what were they like ? they ambition tour. but those cones. what were they like? they were like that. i got were they like? they were like that. and he too had very different times. igota were they like? they were like that. i got a bit of football. the immediate aftermath, that can were they like? they were like that. i got a bit of footballlj were they like? they were like that. i got a bit of football. i don't feel bad about doing those hand movements. there is nothing else you can do. i tell you who might feel come back at you at any time, can't it? it can be a song or a tv bad, that man there, ole gunnar programme or a word that somebody uses. you never know what it is that's going trigger that grief
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solskjaer. but burnley are feeling again. it's always in you. you never fantastic? ole gunnar solskjaer has lose it. it's just lost more than merely games as again. it's always in you. you never lose it. it'sjust something again. it's always in you. you never lose it. it's just something that brings it to the fore. yesterday for manchester united manager than he example, i was working on something has one. there was talk a while ago com pletely example, i was working on something completely unrelated to this and all about his position and how tenable. ofa completely unrelated to this and all of a sudden i felt completely overwhelmed. my body noticed it's been rumbling on. you have to martin's birthday. but my mind look at manchester united, they've didn't know. it's a bit like having made mistakes in the past, changing the flu. you get these really managers. they been criticised since strange thing and you just know sir alex ferguson left. the plan is instinctively that it some kind of anniversary coming up. christmas, they stick with him. that's what we are hearing. the anniversary of martin's death, manchester united were booed his birthday, it happened when my off at old trafford after losing 2—0 at home to burnley last night — youngest son was 18, is that one this superb goal from jay rodriguez sealing their first win there in 58 years. that's back to back person who is missing. when you go back to work initially after that defeats for united now. grief, people are rather trading on eggshells or they are going to be avoiding the subject completely or heather watson is on court in they are going to be otd so every the second round of the australian individual deals with friendly but i open. think most individuals would say she's up against elise three days was ridiculous and that was including the day for the mertens, the 16th seed. funeral. two weeks is better but until you've lost a child, you can't
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and england's netballers still have hopes of reaching put a number on how long should be sunday's nations cup final, thanks to a narrow win over allowed to be at work. having dealt south africa in birmingham. with people similarly who have had a loss in this way, do you think that workplaces go beyond that anyway? do you've always got to have hope. always. you think it's better in practice if here's carol with a look you think it's better in practice if you like? separated out from what at this morning's weather. they are obliged to do? well, yes. good morning everyone. i am well and i hope you are as well. the weather bubbly they do but all workplaces is more of what we had yesterday. have to be comfortable —— for many of us there will be low accountable for people's absence. it cloud, mist and murkiness and has to be a system. i know my drizzle and some mist and fog. husband, for example, he was off for talking of fog, some dense fog this morning over parts of the midlands, a good few months but he had to go east anglia, northern england, to the dock doesn't get sick papers northern ireland and south—west and put the papers in. obviously scotland. so if you travel, bear that in mind. today we still have they knew the reason but he couldn't 90, they knew the reason but he couldn't go, it had to be something to high pressure but it has been register your absence, as duty of squeezed. a weather front across the ca re register your absence, as duty of care to you as an employee apart from anything else. there will be north—west will introduce rain and in the north—west will be for the companies who are better at it. but
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rest of us, not a lot of breeze to still, needs be enshrined in law break up this cloud. the rest of the that it's compulsory if you like. brea ks break up this cloud. the rest of the breaks are likely to be across north—east scotland. for the rest of us north—east scotland. for the rest of us it will be quite a grey day. there will be people watching this today who are still grieving and like you say it does not stop in a temperature wise about where we way. what words do you have for should be at this stage injanuary. those people and the problems they may yet have, even if they suffered so many years ago? i would say to yesterday near aberdeen we hit almost 15 degrees. as we head through the evening and overnight them that there is light at the end of the tunnel. you learn to live guests will getting a lot of cloud with it. i wake up every morning and and where it breaks we will see mist and where it breaks we will see mist and fog forming in the cloud thickenerfor every morning i know how i feel and fog forming in the cloud thickener for drizzle. whether front about that. some days are martin sinks south into southern scotland and northern england, getting into days because i am low and i am low cumbria by the end of the evening. because something has been triggered. you need to be strong and with temperatures like these, no—one you need to remember. whatever faces with temperatures like these, no—one fa ces a ny with temperatures like these, no—one faces any problems of frost. as we head into friday more of the same. processes getting you down, talk to once again cloud around, mist and someone and find a way through it. fog to watch for and drizzly bits remember that life does go on and and pieces. whether front
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your loved ones would want your life fog to watch for and drizzly bits and pieces. whetherfront that fog to watch for and drizzly bits and pieces. whether front that has been sinking south into northern to go on. thank you for speaking to england, northern ireland and us this morning. if you have been scotla nd england, northern ireland and scotland overnight retreats to the north taking cloud and drizzle with affected by any of the issues we it. by the time we moved from friday have just discussed you can find a list of charities that can help on into saturday you can see how the high—pressure slip down towards the the bbc actionline website full stop south—east allowing weather fronts to come in from the north—west and look at the isobars in the north—west. through the he will strengthen. when coming from the south—west will have a better chance coming up now to 17 minutes past on saturday of seeing sunny breaks seven and thank you forjoining us this morning. time to talk to carol and we're not looking at this sky and find out what is up with the that we had yesterday, we will have weather. we are quite grateful that today and tomorrow. a wee bit we're not going through what spain brighter and the cloud will be is going through. storm gloria is higher. temperatures 8— 11 degrees. now in! is going through. storm gloria is now in i believe. it seems a bit more calm and mild over the last day and from saturday into sunday this orso? many of more calm and mild over the last day whether front sinks further south. or so? many of us have seen it will be a breezy day for sunday as the ring goes with it stop so temperatures higher yesterday and in aberdeen it was 14.5dc you do not there goes the rain coming in from expect levels like that at this there goes the rain coming in from the north—west heading down towards stage in january. the north—west heading down towards the south—east and it will remain expect levels like that at this stage injanuary. what we have today quite well in the south—east for isa stage injanuary. what we have today is a lot of cloud, similar to much of the day. behind it, a return yesterday. but it is low cloud, dank to sunshine and showers in the
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sunshine will be wintry on the hills round and some mist and fog. the fog in the north—west with temperatures at the moment is still dense across 7-11. parts of east anglia, the midlands, in the north—west with temperatures 7—11. next week, the forecast is not changed for the beginning of the week. potentially some strong in through the north of england, south—west scotland and northern conditions with strong winds, heavy ireland. so if you are travelling, please bear that in mind. high rain and it will feel colder. so not pressure has dominated our weather particularly good news this morning. this week is still with us and that it is ok. carol, we will look at the is what has effectively squashed the low pressure down towards the paper shortly. if i told you to fat mediterranean. you can see a lot of ladies, what would you think of? —— cloud around, some of it big enough two fat ladies. i was thinking for the drizzle and breezy conditions with some rain across the north—west of scotland. bright skies bingo. in its no longer used for today across north—east scotland and bingo. in its no longer used for bingo they say wills and kate stop i north—east england with temperatures will explain later. down a touch compared to yesterday. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily mail's main story through the evening and overnight is on the chinese virus, once again we hang onto a lot of cloud. wilson drizzle around. where saying questions have been raised we see breaks in the cloud there is over the uk's response, quoting passengers who arrived in london from wuhan who say they had not been subject a chance of seeing mist and fog to any screening. patches forming and whether front in online, the huffington post says wuhan is on "lockdown" and pictures the north of scotland slips down to
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two children from the city wearing compulsory masks. southern scotland, northern england and northern ireland is a fairly the guardian has a photo of two of the world's best known climate wea k and northern ireland is a fairly campaigners, prince charles and greta thunberg, meeting weak there. it will not continue for the first time. the lead story is about further south for tomorrow. we will the allegation that the boss retreat northwards and tomorrow for of amazon, jeff bezos, had his phone hacked many will be another cloudy day. a by saudi arabia's crown prince. grey day and a dank day once again and the mirror leads with tributes to terryjones from his monty python co—star michael palin, with temperatures round about eight who says in spite of his dementia, or nine degrees. by the time we terry showed his typical humour reach saturday things start to change and things start to brighten up change and things start to brighten up stop high pressure pushes away until his final days. ben, do you want to kick us off? an interesting story in the times this morning, looking at the downfall of the not so screeching —— secret agent. and this is of agents posing in the houses that they sell. he is not posing in his house. it basically shows off these posh houses that they sell for £10
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million. but he is ruining the view. and also ruining security, it seems. many clients who choose to buy these properties without them being on the open market. he takes pictures inside before they are sold and in some cases showing off expensive artwork of the layout of the house and they are not happy about that. so this man, has amassed 30,000 followers, he is talking about this and has been forced to quit. he has stepped down. it shows that increasing trend of people portraying a lifestyle that is perhaps not theirs and that one ended badly. i want to show you a next week looks like the temperature story on the back page of the times. will flip—flop between being mild and cold. thank you very much, the cricket petition, which is starting, you might remember there was a photo shoot with all the carol. the time now 720, let's go back to one of our main the city at cricketers and their kit for the 100 the heart of public hills crisis in and on the one they had china has shut down its public transport network to try and prevent the spread of a virus that has advertisements for children's snacks. kp snacks has agreed not to already infected hundreds. let's put logos on children's replica talk about this. the corona violent
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cricket shirts after lots of —— coronavirus was first detected inward hand. that is where the pressure because it was said they majority of cases have detected few we re pressure because it was said they were promoting fatty snacks. on the front of the shirts they had things have been detected now another pack like an advert for all the hoops, cases “— skips, kp nuts, pop chips, and have been detected now another pack cases —— parts of asia. the first us cases —— parts of asia. the first us case has also been confirmed. thank terrell‘s. all of them are absolutely fabulous. we love them. you for talking to us in hong kong but perhaps not the best idea to put at the moment. what preparations are being made over there? many people them on a sports replica kit that is supposed to be promoting healthy are wearing masks on the streets. lifestyle. there was a row about it. couple of months ago the government and they have now backed down. you pitched an anti— mask law because of andl and they have now backed down. you and i were debating sports bars.|j the protest completely unrelated to wa nt to and i were debating sports bars.|j want to show you this. this is from this and now people are out in force the telegraph today where they did wearing masks. they are taking them really and section about women's kit for sport. one story they have done masks off the shelves and people are is the evolution of the sports bra. worried about whether more cases interesting. if you're sports bra is will be detect did in hong kong. and not right you cannot form. if you we understand that wuhan is talk to any female athlete. it is a temporarily shut down with its piece of kit and they talk about the developments in technology to make transport system shutdown. how are the more comfortable and also in people reacting to that? from the
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various contacts my colleague has terms of women's health it is important. a deed as has just made with people including doctors brought out a sports bra for those and medical staff, it seems that who have had mr ms —— mastectomies. there is change coming and better various hospitals are struggling sports bras are coming along. you with the surge of patients that are end up fighting with them in full coming in and seeking treatment. there is a shortage of beds and pulling a muscle for some of them. perhaps kits to test and diagnose and then when you are really sweaty and you try to take them off it just sticks and you're stuck with it who is infected with the current around your shoulders. odd that the virus. and outside the system, the industry has taken so long to catch up. so long. so so long. so here we hills system, with the city shutdown, people have been caught have pictures of footballers in the world cup and at the time they say off guard that the entire city will be shut down and they have not been they were given the wrong sports able to make preparations. the order bra. and it did not help their to shutdown the city was put out at performance. hopefully things are 2am in the morning and people were given until 10am, eight hours later, changing. this is one of those ones, to leave if they wanted to. it is a it is the morning and everyone is fast moving situation.” brewing coffee. scientists are to leave if they wanted to. it is a looking into what makes the perfect fast moving situation. i am sure people will be mindful of the sars pup " looking into what makes the perfect pup “ cup looking into what makes the perfect pup —— cup of coffee. they say if it outbreak in 2003 and have that borne
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is to finely ground than the water can't get through. if it is loosely in mind. a people reacting to this ground as they say so the water has bigger —— so it has no particles. favourably and understanding that perhaps the idea is to prevent a mass outbreak? yes. the 2003 that makes sense. if it is fine it is so compacted the water cannot get outbreak is certainly on the minds through. and it uses less coffee as well. it does make me fancy a cup of of anyone here was old enough to lived through 2003. and one of the coffee. my coffee is lovely this morning. i will flag this up to anyone who is interested. the daily mirror. go. two fat ladies, 88. now biggest differences between now and thenis biggest differences between now and then is the amount of information and the speed at which information is coming. social media, the use of it is called wills and kate. because we chat, in fact it allows information to spread much more it is called wills and kate. because quickly than back into thousand and it rhymes with wills and kate? is that the point was to mark i'm three and whether the chinese government is sharing information trying to work it out? it rhymes, quickly enough and how in a sense doesn't it? it does. anyway you do china, whether they think the chinese government is sharing it. i think... i'm information quickly enough with enough transparency is something we need to watch out for. thank you doesn't it? it does. anyway you do it. ithink... i'm borderline. i'm going to get in trouble for trying
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very much for giving us an inside to use an accent. 52 is brunch for track there from hong kong. let's two now. 78 was heaven's gate and it talk now to doctor richard dawood is now haters gonna hate. all new who specialises in travel medicine full thank you for joining who specialises in travel medicine full thank you forjoining us. can you go through some of the basics modern art stop to fat ladies is the for us? number one, what did we only one i remember stop thank you learn from the sars out break that very much. the time now is 623. the is relevant now? the first thing that emerged from sars was that it weather will be coming up later on this morning. the horrors of the holocaust will be took a long time, as your previous remembered at a ceremony in jerusalem today — ahead of the 75th anniversary interview was saying, it took a long of the liberation of auschwitz. time for everything to emerge. the rena quint was just nine years old in 1945 when she was freed news to emerge about what was going from a concentration camp. on. this has happened much more none of her family survived. speaking to our international quickly this time, perhaps to keep a correspondent orla guerin, rena says she worries the atrocities might be forgotten lid on things, it is harder to keep by future generations. a lid on things. but public hills authorities have been more open this time and it is notjust news about what is going on that has been rena quint had 60 years and four shared, a lot of the inside track, children with her late husband emanuel. this is our family. the technical data, the sequencing of the virus which has enabled a
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much more informed international she is now a proud great—grandmother. a rich life forged from response now that we know so much unimaginable horror. about the virus, there have already and i was lying in a pile of bodies, some dead, some alive. the british came in and they made been test developed that are these huge mass graves available in a number of countries to bury10,000. newsreel: i passed in response to what is going on, through the barrier... that will enable a much better that was april 1945, in bergen—belsen. reaction and much better monitoring rena lived to see the liberation, but her entire family perished of any cases that are imported, for in the holocaust. example. so many countries are alone, aged nine, she was brought looking at procedures they can put in place. can you tell us about the to the united states. procedures here in the uk and how a new home and a new life. successful they might be and what they are? so far there are a limited but, 75 years on, rena says anti—semitism is coming back and the lessons of the number of direct flights from would past must be heeded. hand to the uk. it sounds as though those are being closed down because we have to remember the hatred that people can learn. of the transport van inward hand. it germany was a civilised, cultured, educated group of people. is very difficult because it is not just through direct rights that how can they have committed such people arrive from would hand into horrific, terrible crimes? the uk. it is very hard to develop we have to remember that. and do you feel like it's even more important for you now to keep an effective screening programme for
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telling your story? i do. you ask somebody about auschwitz and they say, "who was he?" incoming travellers, it is a huge how can that be possible that people effort and not always very don't know what auschwitz was? successful in terms of controlling it. but there is a huge amount of but they don't. awareness now at points of entry and so rena takes us to yad vashem. anyone who is symptomatic will be encouraged to identify themselves israel's touchstone of remembrance. and seek help stop so for the vast honouring six million jews majority of cases, more than 80%, they have been people getting thick annihilated by the nazis. in wuhan stop there are only a tiny these were people, each one had number of cases that have gone to a separate personality, other countries and so far there are no examples of secondary but when the last of the survivors transmission in other countries. we are gone, who will be the guardians of memory? do you worry, rena, that when people are reporting today that effectively like you are no longer are reporting today that effectively a shutdown inward hand in terms of here that the world will not remember or will not believe? public transport with people coming i do worry. in and going out but clearly there the world won't remember. was a point in time where it was they don't remember the armenian genocide, they don't remember what happened yesterday perfectly possible that people who in syria and afghanistan. we re perfectly possible that people who were not showing symptoms were they don't remember all the people who are sitting in poverty. leaving the city and presumably that even if i was there, is an area of concern stop yes, it i don't believe it, so how much will people who weren't there?
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is. as i say, the only thing that how can they believe it? can be done about that is anybody in yad vashem's hall of names, images of the dead. who has come from that area who is ill will need to identify themselves young soldiers troop in to share the binding tragedy of the jewish people. and be isolated and seek treatment. the state of israel is now a regional power. for decades, it has occupied palestinian territories. most people who have become ill with but some here will always see their nation through the prism this have needed medical attention of persecution and survival. and will therefore identify themselves. what we don't yet know is how easily the virus spreads from person to person. but there have not been many examples where one case has infected many. i think there is one example i have seen reported in wuhan ina you can understand why rena there is one example i have seen reported in wuhan in a hospital setting were so concerned that people do not supposedly 15 people became infected forget. absolutely. and more from contact with one sick person. but that is really a unique example coverage throughout the morning here on breakfast as we look at those events that happened on this date. and there are other examples not yet time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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other examples reported. i don't good morning from bbc london, think we will see something that will spread hugely from one person i'm victoria hollins. attacks on transport to the next, this isjust something for london staff have risen sharply. needs to be carefully observed and there were more than 600 monitored and reacted to. i don't assaults on tfl workers think this is a cause for shock last year, an increase of almost a quarter over the past three years. 35 incidents involved a knife. horror headlines on newspapers, this the mayor's office said they're is something that needs to be working closely with unions on new plans to protect staff. carefully a nd is something that needs to be carefully and calmly monitored and responded to. the other thing that residents on an estate in south london who've suffered has happened, obviously, is that damp problems for years have won their battle to bring people are being advised to avoid in an independent expert to find all but essential travel to wuhan the best way forward. which is a sensible precaution. people living at kingswood estate in west dulwich were told they'd thank you very much for your time have to pay thousands for cladding this morning. that is doctor richard to be installed onto the building, even though they don't want it. dawood, an expert in travel southwark council has now agreed to hire a surveyor who'll look medicine, talking at different ways to tackle the damp. about corona virus. the city where it was first detected has been shut mps are among those urging the government to scrap down with all public transport smart motorways. garethjohnson, who represents dartford, thinks everyone is at risk stopped and people banned from after a number of deaths on sections leaving the city. but now, find out of road which have already been
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converted to let drivers onto the hard shoulder. what is happening wherever you are waking up this morning. the government says it will good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. attacks on transport introduce a package of measures to for london staff have risen deal with this issue. sharply. there were more than 600 a report has found london's heritage is worth over 10 billion pounds to the uk's economy. assaults on tfl workers heritage sites include the national maritime museum in greenwich, the tower of london last year, an increase of almost and kew gardens. a quarter over the past three years. 35 incidents involved a knife. but historic england, the organisation behind the study, the mayor's office said they're working closely with unions is warning of skill shortages on new plans to protect staff. in the sector and said more people need to be trained in tourism residents on an estate in south and historic building london who've suffered restoration. damp problems for years have won their battle to bring time for a check now on the travel in an independent expert to find situation. good news for the tube so the best way forward. people living at kingswood estate in west dulwich were told they'd far with all lines running well. have to pay thousands for cladding great northern on the trains are to be installed onto the building, running a reduced service in and out even though they don't want it. of moorgate today. some services are also diverted via king's cross. in southwark council has now agreed to hire a surveyor who'll look at different ways southern, closures continue on the black friar road between stamford and pocock. that follows the burst to tackle the damp.
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water main on tuesday and also means that union street and the cut are as part of a special bbc closed. and on the m25, the series we're looking at the everyday changes we can make clockwise entry and exit. see now to tackle climate change. some experts say that making sure your home's energy supplier has what the weather is doing. good green credentials is just one way of helping the planet. we need more renewable energy which means the energy in our houses, the impact we have when we switch on our once againa cup of tea or our cattle, that that once again a misty and murky start to the day with poor visibility for many areas and a good while this has a lower impact than it does at the moment. you can see more on our morning and we will be keeping laser ploughed through the day. downfield reporters attempt to reduce her to things with drizzle falling, a carbon footprint on our programme at similar day to yesterday. we start 630 this evening. time for a check now with five or six celsius, not too on the travel situation. good chilly but the cloud is set to stick on the travel situation. news for the tube so far wi1 around all day and the wind will stay light and we're looking at a top temperature of seven or eight all good news for the tube so far with all lines running a good service. the london overg round all lines running a good service. the london overground has problems at the moment meaning it is degrees. very little change suspended between barking and self overnight tonight, similar to last of 4's of also on the trains night. cloudy misty and murky again following a signal problem, great northern are running a reduced tomorrow and very little difference service in and out of moorgate between the daytime temperature and through today. some so visitors are the nighttime temperature. overnight lows of around five or six greece diverted via king's cross. is. no big changes either on friday northbound traffic on the blackwall
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with the wind staying light and plenty of bowed around, mostly dry tunnel southern approach is pushing by the time we get to saturday the slow from the flyover. and on the high—pressure pulls away so the wind will pick up and by the time we m25 there are anticlockwise delays through junction 17 at maple m25 there are anticlockwise delays throuthunction 17 at maple cross following a hold of traffic to reach sunday the could be rain but a bit of brightness as well. recover vehicles involved in a i will be back with the letters from collision. let's check what the weather is doing now. the bbc london newsroom in 30 minutes. plenty more on our website. once again a misty and murky start to the day with poor visibility for many areas for a good while this morning and we will be keeping layers of cloud through the day. damp feel to things with drizzle see the hello this is breakfast falling, a similar day to yesterday. with naga munchetty we start with five or six celsius, and charlie stayt.. not too chilly, but the cloud is set we'll bring you all the latest news to stick around all day and the wind and sport in a moment, will stay light and we're looking but also on breakfast this morning. at a top temperature of seven or eight degrees. very little change overnight after 10 years of campaigning we'll meet the mother tonight, similar to last night. who's managed to change the law cloudy, misty and murky again to help parents who face the loss tomorrow and very little difference of a child — they'll now get two between the daytime temperature weeks statuatory leave. and the nighttime temperature. the reaction on social media overnight lows of around to plans to build a statue five or six degrees. ofjoseph merrick, the elephant man, no big changes either on friday in his hometown of leicester.
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his biographer says she was shocked with the wind staying light by the amount of negativity. this morning, it's been 100 years since agatha christie published her first novel, and plenty of cloud around, mostly dry. by the time we get to saturday but the power of the who—dunit hasn't faded. we'll speak to rufus sewell, the high—pressure pulls away so the wind will pick up the star of the latest tv adaptation of ‘the pale horse'. and by the time we reach sunday there could be rain but a bit of brightness as well. i will be back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in 30 minutes. plenty more on our website. you hello — this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. city of wuhan in china has sat down its transport system to stop the it's 7:32. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. spread of coronavirus. many of the 1 the city of wuhan in china has shut down its public transport million residents have travelled for system to try to prevent chinese lunar new year. the world the spread of coronavirus. health organization will consider no trains, planes, buses orferry‘s are available to the 11 million declaring a public health emergency. residents, at a time when many travel for so far the virus has killed 17 the chinese lunar new year. people and affected at least 500 the world health organisation will resume a meeting later more. three people have been killed to consider whether to declare a public health emergency. so far the virus has killed 17 people and infected at least 500 more.
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after an aircraft crash south of at least seven preventable baby syd ney after an aircraft crash south of sydney battling the bushfires. it deaths have occurred at east kent nhs foundation trust lost contact. it has been confirmed since 2016, a bbc investigation has the trust has apologised, there are no survivors. once charles admitting it has "not always provided the right standard has arrived in israel to commemorate of care for every woman and baby the 70 with anniversary of the in our hospitals". east kent is one of the largest liberation of auschwitz. it is first hospital trusts in england, with almost 7,000 babies visit to the country in an official capacity. the service of the holocaust memorial centre will be attended by other leaders to pay born there each year. homage to the millions of dues killed by the nazis. movie mogul three people have been killed harvey weinstein has been described after a plane being used to fight asa the bushfires crashed harvey weinstein has been described as a seasoned sexual predator by south of sydney. the aircraft had been deployed to tackle the ongoing prosecutors in new york. he appeared blazes in new south wales. rescue crews and helicopters searched for it in australia's in court accused of rape and sexual alpine region after losing contact. assault against two women. if found it's been confirmed there are no survivors. guilty, he could face the rest of his life behind bars. the trial is prince charles has arrived in israel to commemorate the 75th expected to finish in march. anniversary of the liberation of auschwitz. it's his first visit to the country an nhs hospital trust has apologised for preventable baby in an official capacity. deaths after a bbc investigation the service at the holocaust remembrance centre will also be discoverd at least seven deaths attended by other world leaders and heads of state, to pay homage at the east kent nhs to the millions ofjews foundation trust since 2016. the trust apologised to the parents and said it has "not
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always provided the right standard of care for every woman and baby". killed by the nazis. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. archie powell was born last this april marks 4 years february, a twin brother to evelyn since nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was first detained in iran but the maternity staff failed to for allegedly plotting against the government there, spot that he had group the strip, a and ever since then her husband has been campaigning for her release. this morning potentially serious infection. it richard radcliffe will be meeting boris johnson for the first time took too long to treat him and he since he became prime minister died aged four days. before they as he continues to increase the pressure to free his wife. we re died aged four days. before they we can speak to richard were born, we got a double pram and from westminster now. everything, two of everything and stuff and that he come home and there is only one. archie was born thank you very much for talking to us on the programme again. what time is your meeting? midday. it's a big at this hospital in margate. it's run by the east kent nhs foundation day for us. a very big day for you. trust and their investigation has uncovered at least some preventable deaths in recent years due to maternity problems. there are what are you hoping to be able to questions over three debt from last discuss with borisjohnson? what are you hoping to be able to year including archie powell's. in discuss with boris johnson? partly justified out how things go. we met
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2017, they identified two more him before. he now got more power, deaths, one of which is currently the subject of an inquest and we strong mandate. wanted to find out discover the trust accept two deaths in 2016 were also preventable. becca what his plans were. you will remember him as a promise a couple of years back to leave no stone james proudly displays her personal tribute to her daughter. hallie—rae unturned so partly as to listen and ask him to be brave, i think he died just four days after being born needs to de—escalate things between in 2017. medics didn't realise the the uk and iran. recent times, when baby was in distress and failed to you see the things, with the will deliver her properly. if hallie-rae had been born earlier, she would be nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the rest here today. it makes me feel angry of the british ambassador and that there are so many cases of averages of him being burned. really quite a tense situation and i've been worried that other people will negligence babies are suffering. the trust told us they recognise they been worried that other people will be doing that on your show. we are ata be doing that on your show. we are at a point where the uk does need to make clear steps to de—escalate in are not always provided the same the uk does need to take less get standard of care for every woman and baby in the hospitals and steps to make sure the revolutionary wholeheartedly apologised. michael guard, it's not ok to take people as buchanan, bbc news, margate in kent. leverage. the instinct of the we will speak to michael buchanan a foreign office is to be very bit later. cautious and calm and not too much. in this context, you got to be brave
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we are cheering for burnley, sally. in both a positive way and a —1.” think the last time we spoke to you, unlike manchester united fans. there you had renewed concerns about nazanin's mental health and her we re unlike manchester united fans. there were lots of them and good for emotional health. can you give us an burnley, it's great to see the underdog do well. we do have to talk update on how she is? i spoke to her a bit about ole gunnar solskjaer in the position he's in this morning. yesterday. today's meeting being manchester united manager, who would want that job? well, overshadowed everything. she wanted to wish me luck and find out what being manchester united manager, who would want thatjob? well, quite a few people but the issue is was going on. there is a court case enormous. he's now lost more league happening as well which is today games as manchester united manager yesterday. she was asking about news than he has one. how do does he go in london. the same situation, she remains unable to sleep with panic attacks most nights. she said with this result? the premier league, they are not fighting to win problems before with her neck and the league at the moment but they arm. sometimes around doesn't work are fighting to stay in the top four doubly and she loses grip. that is a which is really important. hugely lot the huge stress and worry that lucrative competition. a lot is riding on this. the fans are not she and the other british iranian ‘s happy. booed off at old trafford. going through. you mentioned the they lost to burnley. it was british ambassador for iran. have burnley's first win at old trafford
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you had any contact with him about since 1962. let's look at his brilliant strike. ole gunnar the situation? he was over in the uk. we met him with otherfamilies. solskjaer has lost more premier league games in his one. the players the same kind of questions. what's going on, how do you see things? if are given every thing they've got. they've done fantastic so far this season but they know today wasn't i'm frank, the consequence of being good enough. i know but i'm the one that's responsible for this and we so soft on nazanin's case now we have a situation where we are have been stretched, really stretched lately. the boys, they involved but we need to be much tougher and i think there does need look mentally tired towards the end. tougher and i think there does need to bea we just tougher and i think there does need to be a cost to inertia. just doing look mentally tired towards the end. wejust didn't look mentally tired towards the end. we just didn't find that creativity that we hoped for. as charlie just nothing, they will get away with that. he was asking how he sees said, huge microphone. things and pressing the ambassador to be brave. you use this word began spurs are now level on points with united after beating bottom side norwich city 2—1. and you would like borisjohnson to son heung min nodded in the winner be. he's been on this programme same with ten minutes to go. it was spurs' first goals and first win in the league since december. situation does need to be they'll be hoping they've turned deescalated, diplomacy is key. i a corner after this result. have to ask you and it's in the norwich are still six points off safety. there was a blow to lester. they lostjamie there was a blow to lester. they lost jamie va rdy there was a blow to lester. they lost jamie vardy in there was a blow to lester. they lostjamie vardy in there when to past, you have been critical of the
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west ham. rendon rogers says they are waiting to find out how long he prime minister ‘s language, the language he's used surrounding will be out for. perez scored twice. nazanin. you said he cemented her they 14—1. place injail. how is the —— they won 4—1. relationship? you haven't seen him celtic still hold the slender lead since 2017 stop i can tell you after over rangers at the top of the scottish premiership. the champions were 3—1winners lunch. look, i think since 2017 stop i can tell you after lunch. look, ithink he is at kilmarnock last night since 2017 stop i can tell you after lunch. look, i think he is right. but their glasgow rivals kept up ends need to be deescalated. my with them with a 1—0 win message to him will be you can't at home to st mirren. celtic are two points clear but rangers still have a game in hand. just wait for things to calm down. it's all happening in australia. two in are volatile and they will get british players left in the singles brought the australian open, both worse unless you do something clear. been playing. it's not gone well for heather watson. john watson. at the yes, i'd been critical in the past. watson, john watson. i thought that not so much his comments but the way was a mistake in my brain. no in which a language was made between relation, i don't think. john watson. heather couldn't keep up nazanin and the debt on the debt was not paid. it's been a long time, with mertens, could she? she will be hasn't it? for you and your daughter bitterly disappointed. she might be ranked higher than herbert it was a gabriella, for nazanin, that your place she beat a few weeks ago. family has been separated. do you heather watson has had to endure a have faith in this prime minister,
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lot of delays. she was meant to be playing her first round in his ability, in his diplomatic lot of delays. she was meant to be playing herfirst round match. that was delayed and then the start of a skills, that perhaps nazanin will be second round match was delayed. freed before the end of her we've had some really crazy wacky weather conditions. it was mud which sentence? he the minister, it's his covered all of the outside courts so responsibility to protect those who they had to push playback for a good three hours. you could see a bit of have and haven't yet been taken. my it. it's this lots it's been mixed job is to keep him focused on what i up it. it's this lots it's been mixed up with the rain that fell and think will solve that and put my covered the outside courts. it's faith in him and say, nazanin has to probably the first time in grand slams history that players been trust you so please go to bat for us. richard, i wish delayed because of mud. who knew? trust you so please go to bat for us. richard, iwish you how bizarre. it will be tough for trust you so please go to bat for us. richard, i wish you well with the meeting. thank you again for a lwa ys the meeting. thank you again for always taking the time to talk to harriet dart later? yes, against us, to bring us up—to—date. we have some success through the meeting and we will talk to you again. simona halep, the wimbledon. she is playing on the show court, rod labour arena playing on the show court, rod labourarena in playing on the show court, rod labour arena in the night session, first up. yes, she will go in as the sally, you will take a straight to australia. why not? we have news underdogs you can probably understand against a player ranked from their overnight. considerably higher. but let's not we started the day with two british women looking to progress to the third round of forget rod labour arena, under the the australian open, but heather watson is out. john watson is in melbourne for us,
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lights, a full house, it's going to bea lights, a full house, it's going to and she just couldn't compete be a very special atmosphere, is very special occasion for harriett with elise mertens could she? dart. —— rod laver. if she gets it means we have one british player less blood. in watson will be eve ryo ne dart. —— rod laver. if she gets everyone going, who knows what she will produce. i love it, a bit of bitterly disappointed against a tennis, a bit of weather. player she the warmup tournament. i england are still in with spoke to herfew a chance of reaching player she the warmup tournament. i spoke to her few moments ago she said she was feeling a little slow. netball‘s nations cup final on sunday, after beat south africa 58—54 in birmingham. they were trailing at half—time and it's worth pointing out, we had some really crazy conditions. we had some one. england now have a winner takes all match against jamaica of that yesterday and brought with one. england now have a winner takes all match againstjamaica on it these really big dust clouds. saturday the right to play new zealand in sunday's final. that dust came down with the rain finally how about this for precision. and coated all of these outside this is england's nick brett courts and a lot of mud and that led in action on monday at the world bowls championship toa courts and a lot of mud and that led to a delayed start once again for heather watson. not that that in great yarmouth. affected the outcome of the match. i've been watching the bowls. did she certainly had to deal with a lot you watch this moment? it was of delays in this first week, brilliant. just watch. going nowhere heather watson and she said the near, he's missed it, hasn't he? outcome hinged on the first set.” just felt a bit off the mark and genius. that is perfection. there
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everything. i felt a second to slow. wasn't timing the ball well. as soon was a little dispute in my house about what was more exciting. the skiing or bowls. i chose to watch asi wasn't timing the ball well. as soon as i lost that game, it was 5— three the bowls. williams. it is fabulous. down. i thought she really raised we don't cover it up on breakfast. the skill involved, it was so nip her level and did really well being ahead in the score. a very deflated and tuck, it's been brilliant. they we nt and tuck, it's been brilliant. they went on to win the match. it is like slow sport. you know these tv and a watson but it's going to be channels where things are slow, tough for harriet dart. she is on court soon? i know, talk about big people watch entire train journeys. it happens very slowly, doesn't it? stages. rod la is going to be out on and actually, in this world where everything is so fast and so quick the main show called here, rod laver and our attention span is so short, arena, and she faces the wimbledon isn't it lovely to watch something quite calm and quite slow and quite sedate. but it's so tense. it's to, simona halep, who is the fourth actually so tense because it's so seed. it doesn't get much bigger than this. a very exciting moment nip and tuck. you think in that situation, not i hope, not a hope of for her. we are pointing out, she is familiar to the big stage. she dispersing those other balls and all ofa played here last year, another star dispersing those other balls and all of a sudden something sneaks in and
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it changes the whole psychology. in this shape of maria sharapova. of a sudden something sneaks in and it changes the whole psychologylj love it changes the whole psychology.” love it, sorry. the bowls over the skiing. it was. how can you say this hopefully that will count for something. when it comes to elite sport, you want to enjoy these is more exciting? i would have said moments because they don't come you are a skiing fan. i do like around all that often and harriet watching it but the bowls one. dart will hope there will be more something like snooker, it's on the occasions she will be playing on green, it suits television. and it's this stage but it is one to be enjoyed, it's one to be savoured and easy to understand. should we go? in front that packed house on rod yes. mike has had a go at it. he labour arena, is the only british player left in the singles. as a wasn't very good. see you later on. special moment. but we don't want to put too much pressure on her for the last few days, shoulders but we will be watching. the east coast of spain has been battered by 90 mph winds, john, it's charlie. how nice for you huge waves and even snow to be there at the australian open. in some areas. all brought to the region iam very to be there at the australian open. i am very jealous. to be there at the australian open. i am veryjealous. am i hearing some singing of some sort? is there a by storm gloria. little choir playing for you?” nine people are known to have died, and more are missing, singing of some sort? is there a little choir playing for you? i tell you something, charlie, certainly including a british man not wimbledon. the sort of serene, who is thought to have been caught in bad weather whilst relaxed, traditional nature we get riding his motorbike in ibiza. at the all england club. this is a little bit more boisterous. it's a let's talk now to joshua james parfitt who is a journalist based
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great atmosphere, it's very relaxed, injavea on the costa blanca. shall we started this british man a lot of lovely bars, there is a lovely setting and when the sun is because i understand his motorcycle has been found but there is still out, people are spilling out. it's a concern to his whereabouts. exactly. festival atmosphere i guess at the good morning. as you mentioned, a australian open so it very much differs from what you would expect it wimbledon. lots of cheering out on the court. a lot of the players british man has been confirmed missing, 25 from the north of the really enjoy that. wimbledon, a lot island. there's been a lot of of the shouting and cheering and the missing people in the emergency umpire steps in to tell people to services are doing a fantasticjob quieten down. some people love the of just sweeping across raucous atmosphere. and one of services are doing a fantasticjob ofjust sweeping across the areas. those, the home favourite, nick the water is starting to subside and find who they can. locate all of kyrgios. what it would mean if an australian can win, with everything the country has gone to a plate these missing people in the costa anti— needs of that atmosphere, he feeds off the cheering to such an blanca. what have you been seeing in extent that he has requested one of the courts where he knows that at terms of weather phenomenon? i've this year is going to be quite special for it. it's a this year is going to be quite specialfor it. it's a unique been speaking to a leading atmosphere. john, great to talk to climatologist here in spain who you. can you imagine if kyrgios did heads up the lab, he's been telling me there is this freak weather that, this year of four years.”
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events that happens in spain, and hate to bring everything back to golf, but i will. whatjohn was basically every autumn, a blast of saying, it's like the ryder cup versus saying, it's like the ryder cup versus the open. the decorum of the cold polar agates isolated at a high altitude and when it meets the open and everyone is very quiet and you go to the ryder cup and mediterranean, it's a peculiar everybody is cheering and the teams western mediterranean phenomenon and suddenly the hot air condenses suddenly the hot air condenses suddenly and the rangers buckets are going, bring it on. the players absolutely love it. down and you can reach up to sort of it was another dismal night for manchester united. booed off at old trafford 400m per litre 400 litres per metre as they lost 2—0 at home to burnley. it was their first win squared, sorry. but what's happening at old trafford since 1962 — this brilliant strike from jay rodriguez sealed it. united manager ole gunnar solskjaer is that traditionally hits in the has now lost more premier league autumn but in the last 12 months, games than he's won since it's hitting easter, it's hit in becoming permanent manager. september when i spoke to bbc as well about the deadly floods that the players are given hit the south. it is in october and every thing they've got. they've done fantastic so far this season but they know today now it's in winter again which is wasn't good enough. quite unprecedented. when you i know but i'm the one that's responsible for this and we have been stretched, really stretched lately. the boys, they look mentally interview the president of spain's tired towards the end. we just didn't find that geological advisor, did you speak about whether this was climate change related. is pushing the creativity that we hoped for.
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climate change angle. he is telling there was a big blow the jetstream has been climate change angle. he is telling for leicester as they lost thejetstream has been changing climate change angle. he is telling the jetstream has been changing and in the arctic region were a lot of the premier league's top scorer jamie vardy to a first half injury the warming is concentrated, so what in their win against west ham. manager brendan rodgers says they're he's saying is instead of the waiting to find out how long he could be out for. jetstrea m they didn't miss him too much, he's saying is instead of the jetstream moving in a linear ayoze perez scoring twice fashion, it's now starting to as they won 4—1. undulate. it's starting to circulate in sort of a strange way and what that means when it circulates, little pockets of polar air keep celtic are still just getting released and sent over the about managing to hold off rangers western european region and these cause when they hit this part where at the top of the scottish premiership. they won 3—1 at kilmarnock last night. i live in the costa blanca and we but rangers beat st mirren 1—nil, so they're two points behind — get this event, we keep getting but they have a game in hand. these torrential rains and like i england's new netball head coach said, over the past 12 months, all jess thirlby said her players showed a "lot of heart" to beat south africa of the storms have been in the nations cup. record—breaking in one way or they were trailing at half—time another so according to him it's very much pushed by warming in the but they came back to control the second half and win 58—54. england now have a winner—takes—all match against jamaica on saturday, artand we for the right to play very much pushed by warming in the art and we are likely to keep seeking more. by its nature, the new zealand in sunday's final. plenty more on our website. gota fria is a phrase that is anyone concerned about jamie vardy, commonplace where you are and among it looks like he held his hamstring people in spain. how prepared are
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the areas that usually hit for the at the club says it is just his destruction it's been met by storm loot. either way it is painful. we gloria. that is what everybody is asking at the moment. farmers have seen the crop completely ruined. a have been talking about storm gloria and the four it has had in spain causing quite a bit of devastation lot of tourist areas, a lot of beachfront houses and so on her been with people missing and some have died as well. carol, you are looking com pletely at this for us this morning. beachfront houses and so on her been completely wrecked by the storm. storm drains aren't big enough. we are talking storm drains. but good morning. we have seen some despite the storms becoming more and torrential rain and heavy snow and a lot of snow in the pyrenees recently more frequent, the infrastructure will have to improve and that's how and strong wind. so rivers have the conversation ended, by saying burst their banks. and a lot of snow the conversation ended, by saying the spanish government this week declared an unprecedented climate emergency which means they are going as well. about a metre of rain, two to try to push through measures to rapidly reduce carbon emissions but at the same time, the infrastructure of snow, two feet of snow and look at the depth of this on top of the desperately needs to change because car here. there is more snow to come where i'm standing now, it's covered and the risk of flooding and the in seaweed as trees fall all around me, businesses have been smashed in, wind will ease so the damaging wind and it's happened again like you around the balearic‘s in the last few days. what will happen today is said, the fourth time in 12 months.
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spain are going to have to do that the low pressure that has something to adapt to this change in brought this weather is going to climate. it's a strong message, joshua, thank you. slowly start to fill. we have high the bbc london newsroom in 30 pressure a cross slowly start to fill. we have high pressure across our shores at the minutes. plenty more on our website. moment and that is keeping things quiet for us but there is a lot of low cloud around, mist and fog and and carol is casting her expert eye murky conditions generally. also over some of those images there. what do you think of it? that storm, some drizzle to boot. you can see quite nicely the pictures here. what is left of it, is here now and it is still packing a punch over watch out for dense fog in northern southern parts of france and northern parts of spain. you heard england, northern ireland, south—west scotland in the midlands. josh talk about torrential rain, if you are travelling, bear that in some parts have had as much as one mind. for most of the uk today will foot of rain and some part have had be like yesterday, cloudy, dank with some drizzle, with a friend coming in across north—west of scotland introducing patchy rain. here too it two feet of snow. that is a huge will be breezy. best of any brightness will be in the north—east amount. what is happening today is of scotla nd brightness will be in the north—east of scotland in the north—east of that we will see more snow and there england. yesterday, temperatures has been a good dump in the pyrenees near aberdeen reached 14.5dc. we already from storm gloria —— storm won't reach those heights today,
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generally where they should be gloria. there is an avalanche between eight and 10 degrees. warning as well for the pyrenees but through the evening and overnight, for the likes of majorca and minorca still a lot of cloud around, still it is improving. it is, and the wind this dank conditions. when the cloud does break you can see mist and fog is easing but there will still be patches forming. whether fronting further rain for a visa and the south into southern scotland and other end of the storm is pushed northern ireland in northern england. it is not going to continue towards the west ringing rain to its journey south tomorrow what it portugal in western spain. this will do is pivot and head back system will fill in the next few days. at home we have high—pressure northwards once again. so once again tomorrow will be a cloudy day with dominating our weather. things are quiet and there is a weather front low cloud, a grey day with drizzle coming in from the north—west around and that patch moving bringing some rain. once again today northwards across scotland. by the it will be mostly cloudy and we are looking at some kind of dank murky time we moved from friday into saturday we start to see things brighton. the high—pressure that has been so dominant pushes towards the brake conditions like we had yesterday. there is also mist and south—east allowing weather fronts fog around this morning, to come in from the north—west and the wind to pick up a particularly particularly across parts of the midlands, wales, east anglia, as we go through the day. saturday northern england, northern ireland has a lot of cloud but this is in south—west scotland. so if you are travelling, remember that. different. this will be high cloud so it will not be the dull grey visibility will be poor in some parts. a lot of cloud and a lot of oppressive cloud we have at the moment. more breaks as well so more
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dampness. some drizzle as well as sunshine for us. we also have a week the rain which is light and patchy coming in from the north—west and breezy across the north—west. introducing some rain and strengthening wind. and sunday? the best chance of seeing sunshine today will be across north—east well, this weather front will push scotla nd today will be across north—east scotland and north—east england. steadily south—east was taking rain with it. cool air follows yesterday near aberdeen we hit 14.5dc. not that warm today. steadily south—east was taking rain with it. cool airfollows behind and those isobars show it to be breezy generally we should be where we are wherever you are. there goes the rain on the weather from washing down towards the south—east where it in january. overnight, a will remain grey. behind it, generally we should be where we are injanuary. overnight, a lot of cloud, still dank conditions and when we see some breaks development sunshine and showers knows will be wintry on the tops of the hills and we are likely to see mist and fog forming and the weather front sinks these are the temperatures. just to give you a heads up on what out bringing patchy rain across potentially will be happening to us southern scotland, northern england next week in the early part of next and ireland. tomorrow that will week. you could see some stormy conditions, strong wind, heavy rain revert back northwards and tomorrow, and turning cold but the cold will again, another day that will be grey not last. there will be a little bit and cloudy with drizzly bits here of flip—flopping temperatures. and cloudy with drizzly bits here and there. similar to yesterday, it is not whether for flip—flops, similarto and there. similar to yesterday, similar to yes and there. similar to yesterday, similarto yes —— and there. similar to yesterday, similar to yes —— today. probably a however. definitely not. nobody change by saturday at last. as you go into saturday the high—pressure likes chilly toes. we're talking eases to the near continent and
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pushes south—east woods and then about gifts. people are not giving another weather front comes in with another weather front comes in with a bit more on the way of isobars. wind will strengthen through the presents, stuff, nice jumper course of the day. during the course although there is nothing wrong with that or a of saturday there will still be although there is nothing wrong with that ora pairof although there is nothing wrong with cloud around but it will not be the that or a pair of socks. it is low cloud that we see at the moment. it will be higher. brighter and the experiences, is that the idea? less stuff more memories is the tagline. cloud will break a little more as the idea of doing something well because of the breeze. so we interesting rather than accumulating stuff you may have a lot of. new will see a few more sunny spells figures supporting that this morning around and the rain coming in with suggesting that two—thirds of people would now rather spend their money strengthening wind across the north—west. that leads us into on an experience rather than stuff. sunday and that weather front will for young people in particular that rises to about eight from ten. there sink steadily south—east woods. a has been a fall in spending on windy day on sunday and it will things like toys and clothes and remain dull at times in the south—eastern corner. he comes the gadgets and big rises in spending on rain from the weather front. behind cinema, eating and drinking out. in it we return to sunshine and showers. some will be wintry in the top of the hills in the north—west the range of what you can do when you go out now is increasing. we had and it will also feel cooler for a look at what was most of us. just a heads up on what on offer in manchester. instead of is happening, we could be in for another unwanted gift, choosing an stormy conditions ourselves. we have experience to buy for friends and family used to mean something like been warned. thank you, carol. this. maybe a refined afternoon tea.
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ora spa this. maybe a refined afternoon tea. talking birthdays now, when is your or a spa treatment. but among young birthday, ben? june? no, august. i people in particular it is more and more likely to be something like this. solving puzzles in an escape am next then! i want something exciting, something you have thought about. this sums it up well. things room, competitive social darts or even letting out a bit of steam to have all things to do? it is hard thanks to something called a temper to have all things to do? it is hard tank. it is like an adult's to buy gifts for people. it doesn't need to be personalised, we don't playground. you have playgrounds have to talk specifically about that full kids, this is one for an adult full if it is my birthday we personalise it. and it is so hard to to have a tantrum in. new figures suggest nearly four and five purchase stuff for people. what you get them? you may have had for gift millennial‘s, those born between 1981 and 1996 prefer to spend their batches previously but there is a money on experiences rather than purchasing something. we did this sense that it is hard to buy things so maybe we have hit peak stuff. the today because it is my birthday. i did not want a gift, idea that we do have everything we today because it is my birthday. i did not wanta gift, i today because it is my birthday. i did not want a gift, i wanted to make sure we would remember the need and trying to buy for someone experience rather than just have who has everything is hard. new clothes or money or something. this is more memorable. half of young figures this morning suggest that people say they spend more making two—thirds of people would rather spend disposable muggy on memories than ever before.”
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experiences rather than stuff. those people say they spend more making experiences rather than stuff. those experiences can include everything. memories than ever before. i prefer to exclusively give experience gifts. they've got everything, they hotair experiences can include everything. hot air ballooning, night out of the cinema, a nice dinner somewhere. if don't need anything else. the next time you send a gift to friends or you look at millennial‘s, young family, it may just people, those born between 1981 in 1996, that increases to about eight time you send a gift to friends or family, it mayjust worth be may just be worth considering extra in ten. a significant proportion of options to ensure they have a younger people prefer experiences smashing time. so satisfying. with over stuff. half of young people say they now spend more muggy making me now i have the cons that meant memories than they do accumulating stuff. there are a lot of reasons cofounders of bongos bingo. good for that we will get to that in a morning to you both. you have made second. but it is also supported by figures from barclaycard. there has ringo which traditionally would been a big decrease in stuff so appeal to a certain demographic, you made it fun for the young. how? you things like toys and clothes, that is declining and an increase in summed it up we add different things like cinnamon ticket and that elements. bingo was a good game but sort of stuff. so there has been a it can be a bit stale it can be a bit boring sometimes so it is all real shift in what we spend, particularly among young people. we about putting creativity in their went to speak to a few who have been preferring to spend muggy on adding things like music and dance office and a bit of a rave element experiences rather than accumulating more clutter for the houses. it is
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to and that seemed to work. and that is what appeals to young people. like an adult playground. you've got figures today suggested is about experiences. less about buying more playgrounds for kids, this is a playgrounds for kids, this is a playground for an adult to have a tantrum in. i did notjust want to things. who are your customers and why do they tell you they like stuff have a gift, i wanted to make sure like this? roughly about 8096 we have a gift, i wanted to make sure we rememberthe have a gift, i wanted to make sure we remember the experience rather thanjust have we remember the experience rather than just have clothes we remember the experience rather thanjust have clothes or muggy or something. it is more memorable.” why do they tell you they like stuff like this? roughly about 80% female, like this? roughly about 8096 female, actually, but the one surprising thing we found is that the age try to give experiences to my ranges from 18 to 92. people bring friends and family. they have everything, they don't need anything three generations of their family, else. don't need anything else. and their mum and then and stop so it is thatis else. don't need anything else. and that is the point of this. so what are the reasons? one of the biggest quite surprising for us, really, it is notjust quite surprising for us, really, it is not just millennial's. things is homeownership. among younger people is less than half quite surprising for us, really, it is notjust millennial's. and that idea that an experience is about that of older people. so what you creating memories isn't it? you may find is that people may be a bit think you can only experience it more nomadic, they move around a little more, they are not in a house once, you go in, finite amount of time that you pay a lot of money for for five, little more, they are not in a house forfive, ten, 15 years, so you do wa nt less and it ends. but you find that those forfive, ten, 15 years, so you do want less clutter forfive, ten, 15 years, so you do wa nt less clutter a nd forfive, ten, 15 years, so you do want less clutter and less stuff stop on the other hand, with an memories are important? we social experience you can only really media and stuff, people are saving experience you can only really experience it once temperatures may those memories when they go out and
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bea experience it once temperatures may be a good thing and a bad thing. a they want to share on instagram and facebook and it is about they have the potential to lock that in on jumper, phone, some new gadgets you social media. i do think they use can use it many times if you do something once, i suppose, yes, the emotional —— social media benefit goes away. or it makes it differently because it is not more special. exactly. and that is actually that social. so they see things online that their friends or the point. see need to make an effort to enjoy because you are doing it once those memories will people they follow are going to and come with you. what would you buy they think wow, i'm here at home watching this, perhaps i should go for charlie, a man with experience? out and have an experience. like a maybe something like a skydive.” fear of missing out? this thank you never particularly wanted to skydive for explaining. so talk about the but it is kind of you to offer.“ someone brought you one would you? cost. it is not cheap but i suppose if you are looking at the big in all honesty, i would take a step picture, many young people further. you get to a point when frankly you do not want anything. struggling to enter the housing market and they do not want to there you go. just putting that one accumulate lots of love. maybe those out there. somebody out there will experiences are relatively cheap compare to purchasing a house? there understand. it's not have got is some apathy regarding buying a everything it'sjust... but this is the point. rather than getting house and starting a family and that kind of thing. people know that that something it may be likes people
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spending time with you. and that is is not necessarily going to happen the point. and experiences about for a while so the disposable income is freed up a little more than doing something with someone so you wanting to just have a real—life experience. that is good news for you and i know the business has been have a shared memory. so you and ben growing. what are you seeing in could go for a skydive. or we could terms of consumers wanting from you. not. you could just wish a happy it isjust something more. people birthday, say it, lovely. there we go. the little things. little now, they do not settle for the things. that is what counts. thank norm. they see so much online and you very much, ben. see what people are doing and they no longerjust want to go to the pub tributes continue to be paid to the comic actor terryjones, and sit there, they don't want to go who has died at the age of 77 toa and sit there, they don't want to go after contracting a rare form to a club. people expect more from a of dementia. sir michael palin described his monty python co—star night out, they expect more and as "one of the funniest writer—performers of his generation" there is so much more demand so you and it's not difficult to understand why. need to be creative and you need to these are just a few of his give that to people. how hard is it for you to stay across those most iconic moments. changing trends? i imagine people are quite fickle. you have two keep flying circus theme plays changing what you offer, how do you do that? to be honest, because john hello, mother. don't you hello has no attention span it helps mother me. who are those people out because he will not stick with the
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exact same format. people know that every time they come they will have there? what have you been up to, my some solid foundations of the event lad? i think they must have popped by. popped by?! swung by more like. but it will change week after week. different prizes, differentjokes, different music. it is not about you're from scotland. now, mist yon current trends it is about things like 90s parties and people look at that sort of nostalgia and that is another thing that is really smith... perhaps you would like to popular. it is so interesting to say good evening together. we can't speak to you about that and clearly how the trend is changing. great to see you both and good luck. there get the fire brigade, mervyn, will the boys brigade do? all the guests you have it. we spend more on experiences it seems. a lot of criticism from maybe the older are divided into two teams, a and b. generation that millennial's may be spending money on disposable things and bare are divided into two teams, a and b. and b are the winners. you can make with a lot of posh coffee and that it more complicated if you want to. sort of stuff but it may be more structural. if you are unable to get on the housing ladder you may as mrs rogers? no. i must be in the wrong house! now stop following my well live for the moment rather than buying stuff. what about prospect. not about philosophy at all. thank son. you should be ashamed of you, ben. time now for the time now yourselves. the messiah! show was
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the messiah! you listen here. he is to get the news, travel and weather where you are. where you are. —— not a bad philosophy at all stop. not the messiah. he is a very naughty boy. now go away. who are you? i naughty boy. now go away. who are you? lam naughty boy. now go away. who are you? i am his mother, naughty boy. now go away. who are you? lam his mother, that's naughty boy. now go away. who are good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. you? i am his mother, that's who! attacks on transport for london staff have risen sharply. there were more than 600 assaults terryjones there. that comedy is on tfl workers last year, an increase of almost a quarter over timeless, isn't it? i love that the past three years. 35 incidents involved a knife. scene from the life of brian. a the mayor's office said they're working closely with unions on new plans to protect staff. classic line that makes me laugh every time i hear it. it put a big residents on an estate in south london who've suffered damp problems for years have smile on my face and he will be won their battle to bring in an independent expert to find fondly remembered. coming up to the best way forward. people living at kingswood estate seven o'clock and in the next hour in west dulwich were told they'd we will hear from the husband of a have to pay thousands for cladding to be installed onto the building, even though they don't want it. woman held in iranian prison. his southwark council has now agreed to hire a surveyor who'll look at different ways wife has been detained in a rainy and prison since 2016. time now for to tackle the damp. the news, travel and weather where you are. as part of a special bbc series we're looking
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at the everyday changes we can make good morning from bbc london, to tackle climate change. i'm victoria hollins. attacks on transport some experts say that making for london staff have risen sure your home's energy supplier has sharply. good green credentials is just one there were more than 600 assaults on tfl workers way of helping the planet. last year, an increase of almost we need more renewable energy a quarter over the past three years. which means the energy in our houses, the impact we have 35 incidents involved a knife. when we switch on our cup of tea the mayor's office said they're working closely with unions or our cattle, that that has a lower on new plans to protect staff. residents on an estate in south impact than it does at the moment. london who've suffered damp problems for years have won their battle to bring in an independent expert to find you can see more on our reporter's attempt to reduce her carbon the best way forward. footprint on our programme people living at kingswood estate at 6.30 this evening. time for a check now in west dulwich were told they'd have to pay thousands for cladding on the travel situation. to be installed onto the building, even though they don't want it. still good on the tubes this morning southwark council has now agreed with all lines running well but the to hire a surveyor who'll look at different ways overground is still part suspended. severe delays on the rest of the to tackle the damp. line. following signal problems, mps are among those urging great northern are running a reduced service in and out of moorgate the government to scrap today. some services are diverted vikings ross. on the roads in the smart motorways. garethjohnson, who represents dartford, thinks everyone is at risk chiswick high road remains down to after a number of deaths on sections one lane in both directions on the of road which have already been north side of kew bridge for ongoing
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converted to let drivers onto the hard shoulder. the government says it will introduce a package of measures superhighways. there are ongoing to deal with this issue. a report has found london's heritage delays over the kew bridge and on is worth over 10 billion pounds to the uk's economy. the m25, anticlockwise to let —— heritage sites include the national maritime museum in greenwich, the tower of london and kew gardens. but historic england, delete through —— anticlockwise the organisation behind the study, delays through the junction. is warning of skill shortages in the sector and said more people once again a misty and murky start to the day with poor visibility need to be trained in tourism and historic building for many areas for a good while this restoration. morning and we will be keeping layers of cloud through the day. damp feel to things with drizzle falling, a similar day to yesterday. time for a check now we start with five or six celsius, on the travel situation. not too chilly, but the cloud is set good news for the tube so far to stick around all day and the wind with all lines running well. great northern on the trains will stay light and we're looking are running a reduced service at a top temperature in and out of moorgate today. of seven or eight degrees. very little change overnight tonight, similar to last night. cloudy, misty and murky again tomorrow and very little difference between the daytime temperature and the nighttime temperature. some services are also overnight lows of around diverted via king's cross. in southern, closures five or six degrees. continue on the the southern approach to the no big changes either on friday with the wind staying light and plenty of cloud
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around, mostly dry. blackwall is slow and on the m25 by the time we get to saturday there are anticlockwise delays the high—pressure pulls away heading off to junction so the wind will pick up there are anticlockwise delays heading off tojunction 22. let's and by the time we reach sunday have a look at the weather. there could be rain but a bit of brightness as well. i will be back with the latest once again a misty and murky start from the bbc london newsroom in 30 minutes. plenty more on our website. to the day with poor visibility layers of cloud through the day. downfield to things with drizzle falling, a similar day to yesterday. we start with five or six celsius, not too chilly but the cloud is set to stick around all day and the wind will stay light and we're looking at a top temperature of seven or eight degrees. very little change overnight tonight, similar to last night. cloudy misty and murky again tomorrow and very little difference between the daytime temperature and the nighttime temperature. overnight lows of around five or six degrees. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty no big changes either on friday and charlie stayt. with the wind staying light our headlines today. public transport has been shut down and plenty of cloud in the chinese city at the centre around, mostly dry of the coronavirus in a bid by the time we get to saturday to stop the outbreak.
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the high—pressure pulls away 17 people are known to have died, so the wind will pick as the world health organization meets to decide whether to declare up and by the time we an international health emergency. reach sunday there could be rain but a bit of brightness as well. after years of campaigning, the bereaved mother of two—year—old jack wins grieving parents the right i will be back with the latest to more time off work. from the bbc london newsroom in 30 minutes. 01:00:17,088 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 plenty more on our website. less stuff, more memories. from letting off steam in rage rooms to a night at the darts — four fifths of millennials say they'd pay for new experiences over clothes, cars and tech. heather watson is out of the australian open. she was beaten by elise mertens in the second round in a match that took less than an hour. it's another cloudy day, a dull day with drizzle, damp conditions, rain across the north—west of scotland but brighter skies will be in the north—east of scotland and north—east of scotland and north—east england. more later in the programme. it's thursday the 23rd of january. our top story.
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public transport has been shut down in the chinese city of wuhan — the epicentre of a respiratory virus that's infected at least 500 people. wuhan's population of around 11 million people have been told not to leave the city without good reason. the world health organization is considering whether to declare a public health emergency. let's get more on this from our correspondent stephen mcdonnell, who's in beijing. we are getting a sense of how seriously this is being treated and we have a city of 11 million people effectively in lockdown. yes, first i should give you the updated figures we've just received. 25 dead and 616 infected. the world health organization has welcomed the decision by the chinese authorities to shut down transport, leaving wuhan and also inside the city, so there are no trains or planes leaving wuhan. within that city of 11 million people there are no
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underground train systems, no public buses, ferries, no public transport at all and they have also passed a special regulation requiring anybody going into a public space to wear a face mask, so without a mask, you cannot enter a restaurant or a hotel lobby or even a hairdresser. the government is taking this very seriously and it has, well, made most people in china realise all of a sudden how serious this could become. part of the problem is that sure, they are trying to isolate that huge city stopping people from leaving there, but already hundreds of thousands of people will have left wu ha n of thousands of people will have left wuhan and this virus has a five—day incubation period. imagine you could leave wuhan, go to another city in china overseas not realise you are sick, pass all the screening points and you are passing on the virus as you go without realising and by the time you get sick, it is too late. the moment, thank you very
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much and just confirm the latest information therefrom the city of wuhan, 25 people confirmed dead and the authorities in china saying that over 600 people are infected, so 25 dead, the updated figures and more than 600 people infected. here, public health england says precautions are in place to minimise the risk from the coronavirus. keith doyle has more. at heathrow last night, a china southern airlines flight direct from wuhan landed. it's one of three weekly direct flights to the uk from the chinese city at the centre of the outbreak. passengers arriving have been subject to enhanced monitoring, according to the government, but some who arrived last night said they did not notice any checks. i've been through essentially no screening process, at all. so there was no screening at wuhan, and there was no screening as i've landed. this woman on the same flight said there were checks at wuhan airport.
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she said they took people's temperatures, and on the plane, people wore facemasks. this man arriving at heathrow showed a leaflet given to passengers from public health england explaining what to do if they feel unwell. that's one of the measures introduced at heathrow. planes arriving from the chinese city are taken to an isolated area of terminal 4. on—board announcements tell people to inform crew members if they feel unwell, and that information is passed on to public health teams which meet each direct flight. these passengers are the last to arrive from wuhan, where all public transport, including flights, have now been stopped. public health england says the risk to the uk population is low. the world health organization will decide later today if it will declare an international public health emergency. keith doyle, bbc news. the amount of paid leave parents get if they lose a child
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is being increased from three days to a fortnight. the legislation, which will come into force in april, will be known as jack's law in memory ofjack herd, who died just before his second birthday. the change will help an estimated 10,000 parents a year. earlier, we spoke to labour mp carolyn harris. she has supported the rights of bereaved parents in the commons since the death of her eight—year—old son in 1989. today would have been his 39th birthday. every individual deals with it differently, but i think most individuals would say that three days was ridiculous, and that was including the day for the funeral. two weeks is better, but until you've lost a child, nobody can put an actual number on how long you should be allowed to be away from work. and we'll speak to jack's mother lucy in a few minutes. she was talking to us on the what would have been the 39th birthday of her son, martin. you saw would have been the 39th birthday of her son, martin. you sanack‘s picture early and we will speak to
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lucy and a few moments. three people have died after an aircraft being used to fight bushfires in australia crashed near sydney. helicopters were deployed to search for the plane, which can carry thousands of litres of water. we're joined now by our sydney correspondent shaimaa khalil. shaimaa, what do we know so far? we spoke earlier, and it seems to be one tragedy on top of another, on top of another and itjust one tragedy on top of another, on top of another and it just feels, and we've spoken to people who say it feels relentless. and imagine this, this was a ball of fire, as that plane, the large water bomber crashed into the ground, crashing into an active fire zone. this is the large hercules air tanker and it was there to fight a blaze that was already burning out of control, very heavy smoke, limited visibility. communications were lost with the plane and then the local ground crew reported that it crashed after it fell off the radar in the area of
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southern new south wales, just south of the capital. we now know that the three crewmembers from the us have died and that there are no survivors. we know that police are currently investigating the cause of that plane crash and also there is airso that plane crash and also there is air so valence trying to find the wreckage. it has —— surveillance. it's going to be very tricky to find the wreckage because it has crashed into a live fire. planes and helicopters have been crucial in this catastrophic fire season. the premier said that this latest tragic incident is an indicator that the fire season is fire —— far from over and the danger looms large for people on the ground and in the sky. thank you very much for that. later this morning prince charles will use a speech at a holocaust remembrance ceremony to condemn intolerance and violence. the prince of wales will attend the service in israel alongside other heads of state. it's ahead of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of auschwitz next week. our correspondent barbara plett—usher is injerusalem for us this morning.
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good morning to you. tell us about the significance of the events today. it significant for the prints, first of all, because it is the highest level visit by a member of the royal family to israel and the palestinian territories. the queen has never made an official visit here and he has been asked to represent britain and speak at the holocaust memorial ceremony and he is one of 40 world leaders who have come for the event, so it's very big on one of the largest international gatherings in israel ever and israelis had been hoping, alongside the commemoration of the holocaust, to also have a united call to combat modern—day anti—semitism and that has been overshadowed a bit by a division between poland and russia over different interpretations, nationalist interpretations of the second world war and the polish president is not allowed to speak.
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when the leaders gather for the ceremony there will be some sombre commemorations to honour the dead and also to preserve the memory and history so it does not happen again. barbara, thank you. the movie—mogul harvey weinstein has been described as a ‘seasoned sexual predator‘ by prosecutors in the opening statements of his trial in new york. the 67—year—old appeared in court, accused of rape and sexual assault against two women. if found guilty, the former hollywood producer could face the rest of his life behind bars. the trial is expected to finish in march. nine people have died and four more are missing after days of high winds, heavy rain, and even snow on the east coast of spain. authorities in ibiza are looking for a british man who disappeared while out riding his motorbike on the north of the island. storm gloria is now moving across the pyrenees, bringing heavy rain and flooding to the south of france. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the british—iranian mother serving
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five years in prison in iran for spying, is due to meet borisjohnson later to discuss efforts to secure her release. it'll be the first time richard ratcliffe's met the prime minister since 2017 when, as foreign secretary, he wrongly suggested that mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was training journalists at the time of her arrest. speaking on breakfast earlier mr ratcliffe had this message for the mrjohnson. he's the prime minister, it's his responsibility to protect all of us and to protect those who are held, like nazanin, and those who haven't yet been taken. myjob is to keep him focused on what i think would solve that and to put my faith in him and to say, listen, you know, nazanin has to trust you, so, please, deliver for us. the time is 8:11am. carroll will have the whether with us and we're looking at what is happening in spain, but it's also becoming mild in the uk so she will have that in
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or six minutes. from april, parents who lose a child will be entitled to at least two weeks off work. many companies already offer more than that — but until now, the statutory minimum has been just three days. jack's law will give parents the longest legal entitlement in the world and is named afterjack herd, who died when he was almost two years old. his mum lucy has been campaigning for reform since 2010. she joins us now alongside kate mccarthy, a business owner who champions compassion in the workplace. good morning. lucy, first of all, this must mean a lot to you given your loss. it is bittersweet, really. it is unbelievable. i was more shocked that they decided to call it jack's law. more shocked that they decided to call itjack‘s law. that more shocked that they decided to call it jack's law. that was the icing on the cake. i spoke to andrea leadsom in the corridor and i cried. in the corridor of the commons? no
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in the corridor of an event a few days ago. and she told me and asked how i felt about it, and i cried, she cried, everybody else cried and i was not expecting it whatsoever. tell us a little bit about jack. he was magical. i love talking about jack, my eyes light up. and you smile really widely as well. he was that little boy you would see going up that little boy you would see going up and down the shopping aisle saying hello until somebody said hello to him. he blew kisses to the world, so it didn't matter where he was, and he almost sensitive people we re was, and he almost sensitive people were feeling sad and he would blow them a kiss, to a homeless man on them a kiss, to a homeless man on the street, it didn't matter where it was. he had a lot of love and energy and a lot of happiness. he is sorely missed and i miss him every day. it's lovely to hear you talk that way about such a tragic event. help us with a little bit of that time after your loss, because this is what this story is about, giving
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people a bit more time and on the face of it some people would say, two weeks? in some ways it's a ridiculous idea to put a timeframe on how much time you need to recover. what was your experience? griefjust recover. what was your experience? grief just doesn't recover. what was your experience? griefjust doesn't end like that. it goes on for many, many years and at the time, nearly ten years ago, when i discovered there was no law to say employers had to give you time off, i was shocked and i spoke to friends and family to find out whether they had a bereavement policy in their workplace and everybody came back saying they didn't have one or that bereavement policy said they could have three days off but there is actually no law, so if an employer turned round and said you could not have time off, there wasn't a law in the land to protect you. so you went from being somebody who worked every day to a grieving parent to a campaign. i had worked in it before jack was born and i wasn't working at that point and i'd never been a
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campaigner in my life, so i remember having a conversation with my mp and isaidi having a conversation with my mp and i said i wanted to create legislation and i think he looks at me and thought, ok. and then i said, how do i do it? and he said you need to create a petition and i thought, 0k, to create a petition and i thought, ok, we can do this and nearly ten yea rs ok, we can do this and nearly ten years ago the only petitions available were on the government website for legislation so i remember creating this petition and thinking, ok, how can i get this message out and there were a sort of 100 people on social media and that was it, so it wasjust a 100 people on social media and that was it, so it was just a catalyst from there. and kate, what has resulted is jack's law, and as charlie said, you cannot put a time on grief, but you can put the onus on grief, but you can put the onus on employers to be far more compassionate and considerate. absolutely. i was quite surprised when we started talking about it that it wasn't already there so as an employer, for me, it was a given.
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you look after employees when they're a difficult time and for me, losing a child has got to be the worst. you know, it is everybody's nightmare and whether it is a child ora parent ora nightmare and whether it is a child or a parent or a grandparent, nightmare and whether it is a child ora parent ora grandparent, for some people grief is all consuming, and that's at a time when you really need to step up as a business leader and look after your people. what have you had to do in terms of being a business owner in terms of support for people who work with or for you? for me, whatever somebody is going through, it could be a miscarriage, stillbirth, it could be premature babies that we had last year, and thatis babies that we had last year, and that is doing whatever that individual needs you to do and sometimes it is about stepping up and taking the lead in that because when someone is going through a difficult time in their life they can't necessarily think about what they need and they don't necessarily know, and financially, that's the la st know, and financially, that's the last thing people are thinking about. it's only when they think about. it's only when they think
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about paying their bills is the same time as coping with something horrific that they realise that they are not going to get paid and nobody needs that added stress. for me it's not about immediate, it support afterwards whether it's counselling or therapy and afterwards whether it's counselling ortherapyandl afterwards whether it's counselling or therapy and i was talking to lucy before, and the cards that lucy does that you put a card on your desk and you say i'm really struggling and i will take some time away and i read about it last night. can you explain that? how does it work? it was my daughter and she said there was nothing worse than being in school and explaining why you had to leave the room because grief can hit you like a the room because grief can hit you likea tsunami the room because grief can hit you like a tsunami and i developed a just a moment card because sometimes you need to take a moment and i'm hoping that employees might like to do that. you just put a card on your desk. you literally don't want to say it out loud? human resources should have given you this card and you can leave it on your desk and then your colleagues know that the reason you have gone off to the
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toilet or took a few moments for space, itjust gives you that element... you have obvious he had those moments where you been in one place doing one thing and it changes and a second. exactly, it does. grief hits you when you least expect it. you could be standing in the middle of a shopping centre, sitting at work, you could be sat doing something and all of a sudden, out of nowhere you have this overwhelming sense of sadness. carolyn harris was talking to us earlier, the mp, about an hour ago, she was talking about how people react to people who are grieving and i suppose that is the flip side of it. this is about educating employers and putting the onus on them to be compassionate but it's also trying to i don't know, help people who are awkward around people who are grieving and do not know what to say, do you gush, or act as
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if nothing happens because you think they want to be normal. it's education in the workplace when someone is going through something and actually, those cards are great but it would also be educating people about how people react when they do that because they may want space rather than somebody rushing after them. and it needs to be led by them. it's very individual. no one can say i went through this and this is howl one can say i went through this and this is how i felt all this happened to me. it's very much how that individual wants and how it works and it's about sitting down and talking to them and renewing that. that one to one that should be standard in businesses where you have got somebody you can go to. it might not be your line manager, mental health first aiders is something that being introduced in businesses. it is worth coming back to where we started. jack's law exists now. you must, every time you think it, it exists. so many doors we re think it, it exists. so many doors were shut me on the journey in so many turned round to me and said it
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would never happen, and every door, i kept knocking, it has to happen, it has to happen. and i think the determination that i had within me, and almost feeling like jack was walking alongside this journey with me come on, mum, keep going and all i wanted was to create a positive andi i wanted was to create a positive and i had to create something positive in his memory, so this is jack's legacy and the thing is, i couldn't have done this alone. this was with everybody. everybody that signed the petition, everybody i spoke to, all those people who turned round and spoke to the media, sharing my story with the world. and it isa sharing my story with the world. and it is a team effort. it is all team jack. there are going to be many people who are pleased you kicked the door down. well done. thank you. good to see you this morning. we should just say... if you've been affected by any of the issues we've just been
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talking about you can find a list of charities that can help on the bbc action line website at www. bbc.co.uk/actionline. lucy is sitting here pulling faces like, didi lucy is sitting here pulling faces like, did i do ok? you did ok. jack's law? you have done brilliantly! here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, everyone. this morning isa good morning, everyone. this morning is a fairly cloudy, murky start to the day, a weather watcher is a picture from denbighshire shows us that there is some sunshine in the forecast but first thing this morning, if you are travelling there is dense fog across parts of the midlands, east anglia and also into northern england, northern ireland and south—west scotland, so poor visibility and take it nice and easy, please. these are some places i've mentioned in high pressure is very much with us but we also have a weather front coming in across the north—west of scotland and that is
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introducing patchy rain and it will be breezy at later in the day as well. so, first thing this morning, a lot of cloud and it's very similar to yesterday, low cloud, dampness, grey, drizzly and we have patchy, light rain coming in across the north—west where we have blustery winds. across the north—east of scotla nd winds. across the north—east of scotland and england we have sunshine and temperatures between nine and 11 degrees. as we head through the evening and overnight, the weather front sinks south across scotla nd the weather front sinks south across scotland and into northern england and northern ireland, still a lot of cloud around, still some mist and fog and through tomorrow we will find this weather front will start to retreat more, so tomorrow will be another grey day, cloudy one with mist and fog, drizzle, you get the picture with the rain pushing north across scotland. it's not really until we get out of friday and into saturday that the high pressure ekes away to the near continent and things change. we also have a weather front coming in across the
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north west and a look at the isobars tells you the wind will strengthen through the day. on saturday will be fairly cloudy but it will be higher cloud than we have so it will be brighter, plus, the wind will break some holes in the cloud and some of us will see some sunshine and we still do have a weather front coming in across the north—west of scotland which will introduce rain, preceded by showers and a strengthening wind. as for sunday, the weather front continues to trundle steadily south during the course of sunday and behind it we see a return to sunshine and showers, and some of those will be wintry in the hills because it will turn cooler but there is some sunshine in the forecast somewhere this weekend. well that's accurate, isn't it? there will be some sunshine somewhere? well, it is true, that is the forecast. as the gallery takes the forecast. as the gallery takes the mickey out of me, it's easy for you to say, because it's not easy for me to say, so i will stop winding you up. i will get back in your box. get back in your box.
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charlie, sought her out, for goodness' sake. fat chance. when joseph merrick‘s biographer announced she'd like to build a statue of ‘the elephant man' in his home town of leicester she never expected the amount of negative feedback she received — especially as he was the first person to raise awareness of people with visible differences. 130 years on from joseph's death, the charity, changing faces, has found that more than a quarter of people with a disfigurement have been a victim of hate crime. joining us now isjo mungovian, joseph's biographer, and actor adam pearson, who's supporting the changing faces campaign. good morning to you. so, jo, tell me, we are talking about the negative reaction on social media, such as? such as one comment, and this was the comment that really got me. leicester is ugly enough as it is without a statue of him. that was
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the comment that really got to me. i can ignore a lot of social media, because you can block people, but to see that in our local paper. it was printed? it was printed in our local paper. i wouldn't say it hurt, but it really upset me to think so many could say that. this is one of the things about social media, or media anyway, often you get loads of really positive comments and then you just get a couple and those are the ones that really hurt and sting. where the majority positive? the majority of comments have been really positive and if somebody puts ina really positive and if somebody puts in a negative comment you will find inafew in a negative comment you will find in a few seconds somebody will bite back and explain aboutjoseph. in a few seconds somebody will bite back and explain about joseph.” suppose the problem is that there is still that attitude out there. there is, and! still that attitude out there. there is, and i was so shocked. in this day and age how we can sit there and call somebody a freak of nature. adam, give us a take on what you
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think is happening.” adam, give us a take on what you think is happening. i think the leicester mercury was wrong to print that letter. because they highlighted a negative. yes, and it seems to be disfigurement is the only way you can print that type of thing. it had been a statue of a black campaigner or a gay campaigner ora black campaigner or a gay campaigner or a transgender campaigner and that letter had been written, i sincerely doubt they would have printed it. what about your experience? jo was saying how it played out, but what is your experience of the attitude to disfigurement? mine plays very much in the changes faces campaign and there is a powerful video of me and there is a powerful video of me and other media ambassadors reading our actual things people have said to us online. nothing in the video was made up. it's all real experience. we are playing it now, just so you know and i've not seen it, but i'm shocked by some of the comments i'm reading. 2596 of people
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who have experienced a crime in the real world or online have had an experience of abuse or bad experiences online and those are different things. i am under no delusion that not everything bad that happens or is said to me is a hate crime. if my mum says the hairy scruffy, good point, well—made, but that's different from what happening here. we are talking about social media and the reaction. when you think summary has a visible difference, do you think people feel more empowered or inclined to say something to their faces, in more empowered or inclined to say something to theirfaces, in person, whereas when you refer to racism or other forms of bigotry, people now know that it's unacceptable in society, they almost shove it onto social media to hide behind the keyboard. i think you somehow lose your anonymity. there are two ways
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to lose anonymity which is to have a facial disfigurement or be famous, soi facial disfigurement or be famous, so i have screwed myself on both accounts here. but it becomes a lot easier on my —— online, because it's instantaneous and there is no reaction. the normal rules don't apply to online. if you want to insult me across social media instead of coming up the fortitude to actually say to me and watch my soul died behind my eyes, then you feel guilt and its diminishing thing in modern society. whereas now you can type it, send it out and it's like a victimless crime. so people say it less to your face than they used to? absolutely. and people are starting to say less online than they used to because i'm a big fan of screenshot and giving it a witty comeback or people are bad at hiding their tracks. take us back to the beginning of the story of a statue. what is going to happen? as in am i
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going to keep on? it's going to happen? it will happen. the sculptor has agreed to do it and he has done a few around the country but he did the statue of alice hawking is in leicester and he's really keen to do it and he wants to carry on and... what has the council said? the council are backing it and are quite happy. we have to fund it, i know that. so you are raising money for that? i'm raising money for the statue but the council are happy to facilitate it. i've spoken to the deputy mayor, and he's fine. can i just asked, adam, inevitably on these things, as we alluded to earlier, you concentrate on the negatives in these things. have you had some positive experiences and encounters with people that made you think that things are changing and there is a different feeling? completely and you can get bowed down by the negativity but even since this morning with the campaign the feedback has been amazing and i've already said can you come and
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speak to young people in california and what have you, so the people that get it, get it, and the people that get it, get it, and the people that don't probably never will and i'm less focused on them and more focused on the people that lie in the middle. and the only way to eliminate any kind of prejudice or anxiety or bigotry... this is worklife from bbc news, with ben bland and karin giannone. a city in lockdown — china cuts transport links to wuhan as it tries to halt the spread of a deadly virus. live from london, that's our top story on thursday, 23rd january. wuhan is a major business hub and home to 11 million people and the virus that started
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there is spreading fear around the world as a growing number of airlines cancel flights. also in the programme...
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