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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 29, 2020 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live, it's11am, and these are the main stories this morning: british citizens flown from wuhan in china will be put into quarantine for two weeks when they return to the uk as a precaution against the spread of the coronavirus. it comes as british airways suspends all but essential flights to and from mainland china following advice from the foreign office. after years of delays and cancellations, a decision is expected over the future of the northern railfranchise. it's late every day. half of them don't turn up. some days you just can't get on and it's shocking. and, like, when it comes to summer, people are fainting on the trains as well because it's so overcrowded and hot.
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a bbc investigation finds more than 4,000 seriously ill pateints in england are waiting more than an hourforan ambulance each week. and coming up — as we learn of scientists‘ fears of a glacier melting in the antarctic, we look at what it takes to do research in such a hostile and remote place. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. the british government has said it will put all citizens returning from the hubei province of china into quarantine for a fortnight, as a precaution against the spread of the coronavirus. british airways has suspended all direct flights to and from mainland china because of the outbreak. it comes after the foreign office here advised against all but essential travel to the country. meanwhile, australian scientists
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have recreated the new coronovirus in a melbourne laboratory and say it is a significant breakthrough in the quest for a vaccine. let's have a look at some of the other latest developments... the coronavirus death toll has risen to 132, with all those deaths recorded in china. the number of individuals suspected of being infected around the world now stands atjust under 6000. the number of countries the virus is now confirmed in has risen to 16. the british government is one of many with plans to repatriate citizens. 300 brits will be evacuated from hubei province and, as earlier mentioned, will be put in quarantine. there had been criticism of the fact that they would not be put in quarantine. japan, the united states and a host of other eu countries have similar plans to bring their citizens home. australia, meanwhile, will quarantine 600 of its citizens returning from the region on christmas island —
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1,200 miles off the mainlandand, 1,200 miles off the mainland. and, as well as ba, many of the world's biggest airlines including united, of china. let's talk to our medical correspondent fergus walsh. it is quite surprising that the uk government has decided to do this because it is in stark contrast with what happened to more than 11100 people who flew in from wuhan in the past two weeks before the city was effectively sealed off and flights we re effectively sealed off and flights were cancelled. those people, nine out of ten of whom haven't been traced, have been asked to isolate themselves at home and not go out, not mix, not go to work. but now this flight not mix, not go to work. but now this flight of some 200 people that we are hearing they will be quarantined. we do not know we are,
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perhaps a military base. and it begs the question, unless they are all isolated from each other for those two weeks, if they are allowed to mix freely, and after nine days one of them falls ill with the virus, you would then have to reset the clock for another two weeks. so it would be a minimum of two weeks. right, so, what do you think has led to this change? as you say, 11100 people have come back and it is unclear people have come back and it is u nclear exactly people have come back and it is unclear exactly where they are. people have come back and it is unclear exactly where they arem isa unclear exactly where they arem is a judgment call and it is to do with how this virus appears to be getting more transmissible. if you look at the situation in hubei province, it is spreading much faster than it was a few weeks ago. the cases coming to hospital, and we're getting a big sharp in patients going to intensive care and in deaths. so it is a risk
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assessment which is different to what it was a couple of weeks ago. australia, for example, they are putting citizens coming back on christmas island. we don't necessarily have a spare island that we can put people on. injapan, people are being repatriated there and my understanding is they are all being taken to hospital and being tested and if they appear to be well, they are being asked to go home and quarantine themselves. so, different countries are taking different countries are taking different approaches. and obviously all of these measures make it all sound quite scary. how much is now known about this virus and how worried should we be?|j known about this virus and how worried should we be? i still think that we don't need to worry very much in this country, because if you think about it, seasonal flu kills between one third of a million and 600,000 people globally every year.
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now, it is worrying because this is a new virus, so we don't have immunity to it. so, if it does end up immunity to it. so, if it does end up spreading globally, there would bea up spreading globally, there would be a large number of deaths. but so far, although it is spreading widely in china, we've only had, i think, for instances of person—to—person transmission outside of china. now, what we need to see is sustained transmission beyond china before we are risking getting into a pandemic. but the vast majority of people seem to be getting, or the majority, seem to be getting, or the majority, seem to be getting mild symptoms. and incredibly quickly, scientists in australia have managed to replicate the coronavirus any laboratory. how significant a grateful could that be? well, it is credit to the chinese after they try to cover up soui’s chinese after they try to cover up sours 18 years ago and made things much worse. they shared the genetic
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sequence much worse. they shared the genetic sequence of the virus within a few days and it has allowed teams in australia and also in the us and the uk to start work on potential treatments and vaccines. but any vaccine is not going to come in time for the first wave of this, and i think it is the next two weeks that are going to be crucial. i think two weeks today we will have a much clearer idea ofjust how potentially global this virus will go. and just going back to that point about those 1400, who came back to this country over the past two weeks. you said that the risk assessment has changed, hence the decision not to quarantine anyone else coming into the country. what is being done to make sure that they are all kept proper tabs on them? well, they haven't been able to keep proper ta bs haven't been able to keep proper tabs on them. my understanding is that the vast majority of them, the government does not know where they
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are. so, this relies, and in effect, every winter and every season where you have viral or bacterial infection, it relies on people being public spirited and having a sense of community spirit and not coming into work when they are infectious, and so it is relying on people's good sense and being good minded, but if you do not know where these people are, there is not much you can do about it. standing on the trip this morning, seeing someone sniffling all over the place, it makes you paranoid. and i am recovering as well but i am not infectious! we are getting a line from the health secretary matt hancock, saying we are trying hard to get british nationals back from wuhan. anyone who returns from wuhan will safely be isolated for 14 days
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with all necessary medical attention. as you said, fergus, we await the details of where that quarantine will be and how it will be set up. thank you. a decision on the future of the north of england's biggest rail operator northern is expected to be made today. the government could nationalise the network after it's struggled to provide a reliable service for passengers. tim muffett reports. delays, overcrowding and cancellations. it is a joke. northern is one of the biggest rail franchises in britain. but it's been in trouble for some time. chanting: no more northern! this lack of service is not acceptable. this is the 0748 service to leeds. it is unreliable. it is late every day. half of them don't turn up. sometimes you can't get on and it is shocking. in summer, some people are fainting on the trains because it is
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so overcrowded and hot. this line is on one of the worst performing parts of the northern network. almost two—thirds of services run late according to the most recent statistics. earlier this month, the transport secretary warned northern its service was unacceptable and that it could lose its franchise. a further announcement on northern‘s future is believed to be imminent. the trains are frequently late and overcrowded, there are cancellations at the last minute, they need improvement. it is poor, it is. will anybody else do any better? god knows. the franchise covers a huge commuter network from the midlands to northumberland, from lancashire to east yorkshire. more than 100 million journeys were made last year. northern says many of its problems have been beyond its control, such as delays to the electrification of track. but a new timetable introduction in may 2018 went badly. since december of that year, only around a half of northern trains arrived on time.
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ijust fine i work from home, just to avoid the commute. for many commuters, changes to the way these trains are run can't come soon enough. joining me now for more on that story about northern rail is independent rail consultant iryna terlecky. thank you forjoining us. what are your thoughts? would it be the right thing to take northern rail back into public ownership?” thing to take northern rail back into public ownership? i think that is probably where we are heading, given all of the messages that have been coming out from the government. and it may be the right thing to do. but i think the important thing is that whatever happens, there aren't going to be any improvements in the short term. and how bad has the franchise been? i think the franchise been? i think the franchise has been beset by a range of problems. northern have said that a lot of them are out of their control, and that is certainly true
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with infrastructure, infrastructure improvements being delayed, but they have also had a series of quite damaging strikes, and they are new rolling stock is being delivered late. there are huge problems of capacity right across the north, so almost whatever northern does, in the absence of significant investment in the north, anyone would struggle to run a reliable service of the kind that passengers wa nt to service of the kind that passengers want to see. so, how are we taking it back into public ownership actually change anything? well, i think it is important to note that arriva, who run the franchise, are actually running out of money. they are under contractual obligations to
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the government for a certain amount of subsidy. they have been using their own money to in effect, prop up their own money to in effect, prop up the franchise financially, and they will run out of money. so, the franchise is financially unsustainable. i understand that, but in terms of use are seeing an improvement, what will change?” think it is very difficult to say that anything will change in the short term, and it may well be that evenif short term, and it may well be that even if the franchise is taken into public ownership in the short term there will continue to be problems. some of those problems will be alleviated when the new fleet is in place, but as i said before, the north needs significant infrastructure investment to give passengers the frequent and reliable service that they want. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. we
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are expecting that decision a little later. we will also speak to somebody who refused to come back from wuhan because of the lack of quarantine in this country. we will speak to him again shortly. right now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. goodbye. well, back to the coronavirus. .. kharn lambert is a pe teacher trapped in wuhan with his grandma who was visiting him. he did not want to return to the uk because of the lack of quarantine in this country. his grandmother is coming back. we have since heard that the health secretary has ordered quarantine to be put into place. so, thank you forjoining us again. what is your reaction to that news? well, you know, i am happy that they have been listening and put that in place. you know, first and foremost, we do not want to put the uk public at risk. if this makes
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it safer for those, i think that is what is necessary. will you now come back? that is a good question. it is late here, 7:15pm. i think it would be too late for me, but that is a consequence of the government releasing tested information, rather than concrete information at the time difference that we have between here and the uk. how difficult has it been for you to get information? very difficult. i mean, i cannot understand why it has been so difficult when, you know, other countries like the us have had co nsta nt countries like the us have had constant and continual access to information from their government, and so that is something that the government must answer to later down the line. this has been a decision ofa the line. this has been a decision of a change in strategy here just in the last 30 minutes or so, so i assume you will not have had time to
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filter that food. what will you do tomorrow when you wake up to work out what the plan might be? well, as isaid,| out what the plan might be? well, as i said, i will try to call the embassy now, but even if i call them and they allow me to get on the flight, it is and they allow me to get on the flight, it is probably too late for me to make other plans in terms of what i will do here. i have a dog. now i have to try to find somewhere for that dog to go because we cannot bring pets home. so, these tentative plans that the government released this morning were put across to us when we called the embassy... they have far—reaching consequences. when we called the embassy... they have far-reaching consequences. why did you feel so strongly about not coming back when quarantine was not in place? i mention this morning about these things, and it wasn't the fact that i had a problem in self isolation, it was the problem in the transport between the airport and the self isolation point. if we say that we have the screening things and tests in place at wuhan airport, heathrow airport, i don't
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know, but this virus can live nu for up know, but this virus can live nu for up to 14 days without any symptoms. so, if we get tested at the airport and do not show any symptoms, they will just letters out and do not show any symptoms, they willjust letters out into the public. my issue was that how do we get from the airport to the self isolation point without infecting hundreds of people when we come into contact with them? are you worried that the longer you remain in wuhan the more risky you have of being exposed to the virus?” the more risky you have of being exposed to the virus? i am not worried, i am exposed to the virus? i am not worried, iam keeping myself exposed to the virus? i am not worried, i am keeping myself in the house as much as i can. i have only been out twice in the last ten or 11 days, just to get some essential supplies. so my biggest worry was my grandmother, because of her copd. my biggest concern was getting her out because it would be betterfor biggest concern was getting her out because it would be better for her to be in the uk if she needs medical treatment, rather than in china. so thatis treatment, rather than in china. so that is a problem with her lungs. if she only flight back to the uk?”
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haven't had any e—mails to confirm, but i have had it on good authority from the embassy that she will be on that flight. they have contacted me about making arrangements to get her to the airport because of her condition, and the assistance you require is at the airport in terms of wheelchair access and helping with bags and stuff. that is pretty much confirmation for me but i am waiting for the e—mail. much confirmation for me but i am waiting for the e-mail. presumably that flight will be the first flight that flight will be the first flight that will see everyone on it put into quarantine. we do not yet know any of the details of it.” into quarantine. we do not yet know any of the details of it. i would presume so. the flight is coming from the epicentre. it says a lot. and it says a lot when ba have cancelled all of the flights for the foreseeable future. that tells you about the seriousness of this and thatis about the seriousness of this and that is why i made that decision that is why i made that decision that i was not coming home, because it is serious and we do not want to put everyone else's health at risk. what is it like in wuhan? you said
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you have only been out twice in the past 11 days or so. it is very eerie. many people are staying indoors and only going out when they have to. in the evening, i am looking out at the window at the moment and normally you would see vibrant lights on the buildings, light shows. wuhan has a lot of light shows. wuhan has a lot of light shows. wuhan has a lot of light shows across the city. and all of the lights are switched off on the buildings during this outbreak. so it the buildings during this outbreak. so it is the buildings during this outbreak. so it is really the buildings during this outbreak. so it is really eerie the buildings during this outbreak. so it is really eerie and the buildings during this outbreak. so it is really eerie and unusual. earlier, when you were talking before this announcement, you suggested that perhaps an air base might bea suggested that perhaps an air base might be a good place for people to be quarantined and you said it had happened before. how do you feel about that, that you suggested it before the government announced that? to me, that is common sense. it is not about... i do not know anything better than the government, but it is common sense to me. you isolate people coming from the epicentre of such a situation any place that is away from the general
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population. carol lambert, thank you very much. thank you. --karl. the public inquiry into the 2017 grenfell tower fire which killed seventy two people has been told that witnesses involved in designing and choosing materials for the building have asked for their evidence not to be used for any prosecution. victims of the disaster are likely to strongly oppose the move. the chairman of the proceedings, sir martin moore—bick, says he is surprised because up until now the contractors had given their fullest cooperation within the inquiry. in central london. it was an unexpected start to the inquiry this morning. we are hearing opening statements, but as you said, some unexpected news, the chair of the inquiry said that last night, he received communications from lawyers representing several of the key witnesses, and they want to claim privilege against
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self—incrimination. he mentioned a few of them by name. the man who designed the cladding system, the building contractors and kensington and chelsea, the management organisation, amongst others. he said it cost him a little surprise, because up until that point there had been full cooperation with the inquiry. the first phase of the inquiry. the first phase of the inquiry finished last year. what they are asking for is an application being made to the attorney general, geoffrey cox, for immunity for witnesses, so that nothing they say here will be held against them in any future prosecution. that application will be heard tomorrow afternoon. they sent a letter, so from their legal teams to the inquiry, stating that this is a common application which has been used in other inquiries, including the stephen lawrence inquiry, the bloody sunday inquiry and library grow. it mentions the ongoing police investigation and the fa ct ongoing police investigation and the fact that if no such unity is provided, prior to answering any
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question, the answer to which might incriminate the witness, each witness will have to be publicly advised that they do not have to a nswer advised that they do not have to answer the question asked, if that a nswer answer the question asked, if that answer might incriminate them. and they go on to say how this potentially might impede the work of the inquiry. now, when the inquiry chair brought this up this morning there were groans heard from inside there were groans heard from inside the inquiry room. there are bereavement families and survivors and they want to get to the truth of what happened, and they will be worried that this might impede that. we know within the next hour their lawyer, michael manse road, is due to give their response to this application and the application will be heard tomorrow afternoon. thank you very much. —— michael mansfield. a bbc investigation has found that every week thousands of emergency calls are taking ambulance crews over an hour to reach. the delays affect one in 16 calls in england for conditions such as strokes, heart attacks and fits and are putting lives
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at risk, experts say. we've been speaking to mark mitchell whose partner collapsed and died before an ambulance arrived an hour after he called 999. he told us it has left him wondering whether the delays cost derrin his life. nobody will ever know whether an ambulance arriving eight minutes, 18 minutes or 38 minutes later if he would still have been alive, but the fa ct we would still have been alive, but the fact we do not know the answer to that doesn't mean there should not be accountability somewhere to say, when we do not meet these targets, people die. we've been speaking to siva anandaciva who is the chief analyst at the think tank the king's fund. he says that while hitting targets has been a priority in the past, nhs trusts are struggling to continue to meet them. there was absolutely a stigma over whether you are hitting the target or not and by how much you are missing it. and over time almost every service... it was a point winter were no a&e department met its targets. the front line leaders
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we have spoken to have said it has become increasing hard to keep people motivated to hit our target, and it is not through the lack of trying, it is because you do not have the staff of the resources you need to meet these targets. so it really does leave you trapped in some ways. you are trapped in a vicious cycle. the stars came out for the national television awards in london last night with mrs brown's boys beating fleabag to the comedy prize, whilejesy nelson, peaky blinders and sir michael palin also collected awards. and some familiar winners were back on stage — ant and dec were crowned best presenters for the 19th year in a row, as voted by audiences around the uk. despite the iconic duo not hosting their own show, saturday night takeaway, in 2019, ant and dec still proved to be the crowd favourites. we had our chat, as we normally do, about this being the year we don't win it, and we were like, look, it's been a great run, we are very lucky to do what we do. and then you go and do this again! thank you. cheering. we are more grateful and more
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humble as the years go on. more humble as the years go on! 19 yea rs, more humble as the years go on! 19 years, that is incredible. call in, you were present at that. yes, when i spoke to them backstage, they genuinely still seemed to be honoured and thrilled to have won it, i think particularly because of the hard couple of years and mcpartland has had, his arrest for drink—driving, it was so well publicised. and as you can hear, when i spoke to them, they seemed really chuffed. it is getting silly, unbelievable. quite mind blowing, i have to be honest. i said it earlier, every year the palms get sweaty, the heart rate goes up. you feel like you are going to vomit. the nerves every year and get more and more, and then when they open that envelope and say your name, it isa that envelope and say your name, it is a huge relief, and you feel so grateful to everybody to have
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actually ta ken the grateful to everybody to have actually taken the time to vote for you. you are more grateful now, as you. you are more grateful now, as you get older, the more grateful you are to get these awards, because it is voted for by the viewers, because we have been around for so long, we are still up there, they are still voting for us, we are very thankful. you have got through some difficult yea rs you have got through some difficult years as well. yes, and they have stuck with us and we will be eternally grateful for that.” remember them years ago in biker grow. -- grow. he has so many trophies he has had to build a second trophy cabinet! jesse nelson won the award for best factual programme, our documentary about cyber bullying. i'm just so, so grateful that such a positive — such a negative experience in my life turned into such a positive one and that's all thanks to you guys.
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thank you so much. cheering and applause. it isa it is a really impressive documentary. yes, all about how cyber rain affected her so badly when little mix won the x factor in 2011. the documentary was how she went online so these horrendous comments on how it affected her mental health. she examined how this has been playing out across society. i think it is the most viewed bbc three programme of all time on the iplayer. that is the impact it has had. afterward she told me about the response that she has had four members of the public to the programme. so many positive, like, messages and so many parents and teachers saying they've played it in their schools and they wanted to make it part of the curriculum, which isjust incredible and i never expected that either. i think the nicest thing is, yeah, when parents come and say how much it's helped their son or their daughter and, yeah, it's just amazing. i don't think anyone realises how much this is actually affecting people. people say comments online to joke around with their friends or do it to get a reaction.
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i don't think anyone actually realises what it's doing to people's mental health and that's why it was so important for me to make this documentary to really make people aware, and i feel like it's done that so i'm just really happy. that was a great award. sir michael palin also received a special recognition award, and used the platform to pay tribute to "someone who taught me more about television than anyone else" — his fellow monty python star terry most of all, to the man without whom i might not have been here tonight at all. my dear friend of 60 years, terryjones. thank you. cheering. terryjones who sadly died very recently. what were the other highlights? there were many repeated winners.
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peaky blinders was amongst the winners. emmerdale winning the best serial drama, which means the best soap opera for the fourth year in a row. and strictly come dancing winning for the fifth year in a row. it seems like the national tv awards, the viewers find a programme that they like and theyjust keep voting for it again and again, year after year after year. indeed, thank you very much, colin. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon. thank you, we have some sunshine across england and wales, the cloud is increasing. it is looking fine in cambridge, just some high—level cloud in the sky. the secker cloud is further north in that is where we have outbreaks of rain moving through the north and northern ireland and into scotland. snow over the highlands, showers for the far north of scotland and the rain could be heavy in central and southern areas of scotland. some rain moving into north—west england, some showers for wales but for most it will be largely dry. and fairly
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mild, temperatures higher than yesterday, eight, 11 or 12 celsius. except for the far north of scotland where it is remaining chilly. some mist and fog for tomorrow morning. and a mile start, certainly compared to recent warnings. frost free, ice free start to thursday, which will be milder, temperatures rising over the next few days however. rain across scotland and the south. murky conditions, but look at the temperatures, 11, up to 14 celsius. goodbye for now.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines. british citizens flown from wuhan in china will be put into quarantine for two weeks when they return to the uk as a precaution against the spread of the coronavirus. this comes as british airways suspends all but essential flights
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to and from mainland china following advice from the foreign office. after years of delays and cancellations, a decision is expected over the future of the northern railfranchise. a bbc investigation finds more than 4,000 seriously ill patients in england are waiting more than an hourforan ambulance each week. and coming up... as we learn of scientists‘ fears of a glacier melting in the antarctic we look at what it takes to do research in such a hostile and remote place. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. cheshire police are investigating after the home of manchester united's executive vice—chairman ed woodward was attacked by a group chanting that he was "going to die". they confirmed they were called to deal with an incident of "criminal damage" involving a "large group" at the property.
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woodward and his family were not there at the time. they say they'll be working to identify those involved. the club said there was no excuse for the behaviour and anyone found to have committed an offence would be banned for life. woodward has been the target of growing supporter discontent at united in recent weeks. they're 5th in the premier league, 33 points behind the leaders liverpool, with many fans blaming woodward. united are playing tonight against manchester city, for a place in the league cup final. waiting for them are aston villa, who beat leicester 3—2 with a very late winner. penalties were looming but trezeguet scored in the 93rd minute to take them through. villa were last in the final 10 years ago, when they lost to manchester united. let's start in melbourne, where world number one rafael nadal has a battle on his hands if he wants to take the last of the semifinal places
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at the australian open — he's up against dominic thiem. we can talk tojohn watson now/ we could see an upset on the cards up we could see an upset on the cards up against dominic thiem of austria hoping to take the semifinal spot. it has been all dominic thiem, he played the best tennis. nadal had a break in the first set, thiem took it on the tie—break and much the same set in the second. the world number one got a break in the second only for thiem to hit back once again and sealed it on a tie—break once again. it is currently going with server in the third at the moment. we know this was a very close encounter when they last played each other on the hard court at the us for years ago. rafa nadal came up on top then. very different potentially today with dominic thiem looking to face alexander zverev
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today, he came through his match today, he came through his match today against stan wawrinka. up an impressive performance for zverev who has been criticised for failing to produce his best performances at the grand slams, long touted to challenge the big three, never been pasta grandson before but he is into his first semifinal. an impressive performance against stan wawrinka, zverev promising to donate all of his winners check to the bushfire relief effort. £2 million on top of the £25,000 he has already raised through those matches he has won already. in the women's draw, it was co mforta ble already. in the women's draw, it was comfortable for simona halep of romania. the wimbledon champion, came through her match against kontaveit in straight sets looking cool and composed, you fancy on the
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basis of this performance at this late stage in the tournament at the quarterfinal stage, you wonder whether we could be looking at the women's champion this year. she goes on to face garbine muguruza in the semifinal, referee: who came into struggling with a bit of illness, has put in some performances of her own. knocking out two top ten players in the process. this one deducted to be at lot closer against pavlyuchenkova, it was muguruza who went through in straight sets to com plete went through in straight sets to complete that final and we will see ash barty in action tomorrow in what is women's semifinal day tomorrow. rugby league player keegan hirst has been talking to us about israel folau's return to the game. folau was sacked last year by australian rugby union, for making homophobic comments on social media but he's now
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signed for the french super league club catalan dragons. hirst, the first british player to come out, said he was deeply disappointed. the line is crossed when people use religious beliefs or political ideologies or whatever to justify any kind of prejudice, and the thing that is disappointing about it is if what he had said had been about race or another religion, then this would not even be being discussed, but it seems like homophobia is a lesser prejudice and all prejudices should be treated equally as intolerable. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. as we've been hearing, british citizens flown from wuhan in china will be put into quarantine for two weeks when they return to the uk as a precaution against the spread of the coronavirus. the move comes as the death toll from the virus has risen to 132,
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with all those deaths recorded in china. the number of individuals suspected of being infected around the world now stands atjust under 6000 and the number of countries 0ur correspondent in shanghai, robin brant, sent this update about the situation in china itself. the efforts to stop the spread and develop some kind of vaccination is now an international effort. as you say, the russians are involved in that, the world health organization as well. we have heard about the developments in that lab in australia. so, it truly is an international effort. but at the same time, we have an international reaction, where countries are taking their people out from wuhan. you have detailed that in that report earlier. we have companies like british airways who are now suspending with immediate effect flights in and out of this country. i suspect we're going to see a bit of a domino effect of that. you know, the future... well, we have heard president xijinping describe this as a devil, using those words, yesterday. at the same time, he was saying he believed his government had been open and transparent. i think there are some people who would call that into question,
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because we have had senior communist party officials in wuhan, the epicentre city, already admitting they didn't do enough early on in terms of divulging information. but those at the very top, this country's national health commission, the organisation charged with trying to lead the effort to stop the spread, are optimistic. we heard yesterday from one official saying that he believes the peak could be in ten days' time. now, obviously, everyone, including people here, really wish that is the case. there is international opinion, though, that i have to say, does not concur with that. there was talk from some officials in hong kong in the last few days about it peaking come april. so, look, you've got two very different views of what might happen in the weeks or maybe months ahead. meanwhile australia is taking stringent measures, even as its scientists say they've managed to recreate the virus in a lab there. 0ur correspondent in sydney is shaimaa khalil. they say this could be a game—changerfor two main things. one, which is crucial in the current
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circumstances with people potentially coming back is early diagnosis. essentially being able to detect the virus when a person is not showing symptoms. so, in the incubation period. this is going to be crucial. now we are hearing people are coming back, people who have come back who haven't shown symptoms on arrival, even when they are checked, and then they show symptoms later on. so, it is going to help with that. the other thing the researchers in that special lab in melbourne said is that it's going to help them test the effectiveness of any potential vaccine. so, essentially, with that copied material, with that regrown virus in the lab, you can try any potential vaccine and see if it works or not. timing—wise, they have not given us a timeframe. it is still going to take a while to see how effective these things can be. but they did say they are going to share this with the who in the hope that they are going to reach or at least try and reach a potential vaccine in the coming days and weeks. yesterday, we heard about the giant glacier in the middle
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of the west antarctic ice sheet that scientists fear could be facing catastrophic collapse. as part of the bbc‘s our planet matters series, our chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt has been travelling with a team of scientists, who are part of a $50 million joint us—uk project which involves the biggest and most complex scientific field survey in antarctic history. but what does it take to do science in a place as hostile and remote as antarctica? antarctica is the stormiest continent on earth, and west antarctica is the most remote and stormy part of it all. so, we've been out here for like, i don't know, an hour and a half, and this is the result, and it gives you an idea of why it is so difficult to operate here. all the planes are grounded. they are saying we won't fly anywhere for at least three days. this is what happened next. got to get in. so we just got in from filming, and this is the result. check the snotsicles on this.
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i know — disgusting. but it does show why doing scientific research here is so challenging. it has taken years of preparation to get the scientists out here. last year, two ice—strengthened british ships brought hundreds of tonnes of fuel and cargo to a remote ice shelf. then a team of specialist snow vehicles dragged it 1,000 miles over the ice, across some of the toughest terrain and toughest weather imaginable, and all at a maximum speed ofjust 10 mph. six people can't do a huge amount, but we just truck six people can do a huge amount, but we just truck along, day through day. nobody really knows where we are, and then we suddenlyjust turn up, delivering a bounty. the us provided air muscle, flying in the scientists and their equipment, and ferrying everything down to the camps at the front of the glacier. then the really hard work began, digging snow, and lots of it.
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the scientists need ten tonnes of the stuff to fill this, a water container the size of a small swimming pool. this will be the most southerly jacuzzi in the world. a bank of boilers heats the water to just below boiling point. it is sprayed onto the ice to melt a hole almost half a mile down, to where the ocean water meets the glacier. only now can the scientists deploy their instruments. the whole of this region is below sea level, which is why the so—called doomsday glacier is so vulnerable. the water can just keep on melting it. only by taking measurements here can we hope to get accurate predictions of how sea level is going to rise in future, even if it means arousing the curiosity of some of the creatures that live here. this year's work has confirmed the scientists' fears. warm sea is melting the ice of west
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antarctica increasingly rapidly, raising sea levels worldwide. the challenge now is for the rest of us — reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and preparing for the rising oceans we will face in the decades to come. justin rowlatt, bbc news. well for more on the thwaites glacier, i'm joined now by our chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt, who'sjust returned from antarctica. your snot is the talk of the town.” thought that really communicated just how extreme and environment it is. it is very vivid, possibly too vivid for some viewers but it is a really extreme environment, a really ha rd really extreme environment, a really hard place to work. a really hard place to do science. as you saw in the film we made, you need to take tonnes of equipment to these places and literally it is the most remote place on earth. before we arrived, only four people had been there before. and they needed huge
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infrastructure to get us and that equipment you see in the film there. to do this research. and unless you get that equipping to the front, you don't understand the processes that are trying to transform the glacier and what that means for the rest of the world. the melting of that glacier will affect all of us in the sense that sea level rise affects communities in virtually every country on earth and will change weather patterns. it is transformational. and it is observing rather than being able to do anything to actually change? absolutely right. we are 1 degrees above preindustrial temperatures. science says that in the system there is already some more temperature increase. what is actually happening is the glacier is changing weather systems so more water is coming ashore, not warming on tactical. if you see that process happening now, it is unlikely even with the best efforts of the world that we will see about reversal of that. the point the scientists make, we need to arm ourselves with the information about what is going to
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happen so that communities in the world can decide what they want to do about it. and invest appropriate amounts of money until this year was high enough to defend cities and that anything. but in that sense it is pessimistic. but as an environment correspond and i am keen to say these are opportunities for us to use our initiative as a species to kind of tackle these problems and find ways to deal with it. whilst the big message is a little bit pessimistic and think there is an opportunity here, armed with the data, the science, to look at how we can restructure our society. in terms of iglesia melting timeframe, the potential impact, what is next? it is glacier, we're talking the decades, possibly centuries, but we're talking abut a lot of sea—level rise. the western and vulnerable bits of west antarctica are about 3.5 sea—level rise. that the moment we're seeing three millimetres year. if the process accelerates as a scientist fear it might, it could mean that
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even within, by 2100 we would see significantly higher siege. by which they mean nearly 30 or 40 centimetres high, does not sound like much but if you look at the statistics for a city like london, half a metre of sea rise means the storm that comes once every thousand yea rs co m es storm that comes once every thousand yea rs comes once storm that comes once every thousand years comes once every hundred yea rs. if years comes once every hundred years. if you see a metre, it comes every ten years. that gives an idea of how much you need to increase sea defences just for a metre of sea—level rise. so it is slow, it'll ta ke sea—level rise. so it is slow, it'll take a long while, but if you think about the scope of the history of societies, 100 years is not long and these are big changes. the biggest changes of sea levels in our communities will have for thousands of years. thank you. (pres)in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... british citizens flown from wuhan in china will be put into quarantine for two weeks when they return to the uk
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as a precaution against the spread of the coronavirus. this comes as british airways suspends all but essential flights to and from mainland china following advice from the foreign office. after years of delays and cancellations, a decision is expected over the future of the northern railfranchise. here is your business news. as we've been hearing british airways is suspending all direct flights to and from mainland china. 0ther multinational chains such as starbucks, mcdonalds and toyota have also announced in the past 24 hours that they are pulling back their operations within china. 0vo energy is to pay £8.9 million pounds for overcharging customers after more than 500,000 received energy bills that were inaccurate. apple reported a record—setting quarter late last night. it said sales in the last three months of 2019 rose 8% to £70.5 billion while net
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profits increased 11% to reach £17 billion. so 0vo energy has been forced to pay nearly £9 million after it overcharged customers. than 500,000customers. the firm agreed a settlement package with energy watchdog 0fgem to dodge a fine. the money will be paid to vulnerable customers rather than the treasury. despite knowing about the issues, 0vo, which bought sse's retail business last year, did not tell 0fgem. in a statement, the company said "0vo energy holds itself to high standards, but we have not always got it right." joining us now is richard neudegg, head of regulation at uswitch. more than 500,000 customers receiving the wrong bill, some not
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getting one at all, another customer telling me he was overcharged by four point £5,000. what went wrong? this is all linked to a problem with the itc system at 0vo energy happen using. it is very disappointing to see 500,000 customers of 0vo energy we charge the wrong amount but even more customers than those that had the problem with the charging did not receive annual statements, did not receive annual statements, did not receive annual statements, did not receive that really important information that helps people figure out whether they are on the right deal or whether they should move around so it is something that is important to sort out. there was an itu glitch, also the apparently underestimated the fuel usage over winter of 2017. but it is the follow—up actions that have caused alarm, isn't it? upon realising they had made a mistake they did not tell ofjim about it and also they made this bizarre decision to not refund customers overcharged by less than 10% so again, what happened there?”
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think this is what makes it, why we have seen such significant action from 0fgem. mistakes sometimes happen, itv systems sometimes go wrong but the measure of the company is how you sort this out and how you treat customers when that happens so the expectation should be the problems are sorted out as soon as possible. in a regulated sector like this, you should be open and transparent with the likes of 0fgem and flagged that there is a problem. that did not happen and i think that is why we have seen such significant action, even though the problems have now been sorted out. this is not acceptable, as it? they are no longer the start—up destructor it was ten years ago. it is now the uk largest independent supplier so how cancer and largest independent supplier so how cancerand —— largest independent supplier so how cancer and —— how concerned should customers be? the problems should be sorted out but if any individual customers are concerned , sorted out but if any individual customers are concerned, they can make a formal complaint and if
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you're not happy, escalating to the financial ombudsman. 0vo energy has nojoined the big boys club financial ombudsman. 0vo energy has no joined the big boys club with the acquisition of sse domestic business and has been known for decent customer service so it is important it shows it is taking this seriously and as it grows again, it make sure it puts customer service at the forefront of what it is doing. many thanks richard. british airways is suspending travel to china. 0ther multinational chains such as starbucks, mcdonalds and toyota have also announced in the past 24 hours that they are pulling back their operations within china. we spoke to travel expert simon earlier. last night the foreign
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0ffice suddenly warned against travel to mainland china, this does not affect hong kong. at that point, british airways decided it would suspend flight so the flights went out normally to beijing's, to shanghai yesterday, they are now on their way back. the flight from beijing due anything a clock at heathrow this afternoon. the flight from shanghai slightly behind it. both over siberia at the moment. they will have all the normal passengers who have booked on those flights but will also crucially have the crew who flew out yesterday. and everybody else who was booked on flights for tomorrow onwards from beijing's and shanghai will now be trying to find alternative routes. it's very stressful time because the foreign office has just said we were against all but essential travel there. my understanding is that british airways will probably take people out via hong kong, there are
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still flights operating from beijing and shanghai to hong kong and they will just travel back and shanghai to hong kong and they willjust travel back on normal british airways flights, it is also possible they will be going the south korea or tokyo injapan. uk shares continued their rebound today, albeit in subdued trading, after a steep sell—off earlier this week on rising fears over the potential impact from the coronavirus. the ftse 250 of midcaps also climbed 0.2% on wednesday. both british benchmark indexes have shed more than 2% since last week. that's all the business news. the european parliament is set to approve the terms of the uk's departure from the european union in a historic vote later. the 751 representatives in brussels are expected overwhelmingly to back ratification of the withdrawal agreement, paving the way for the uk to leave with a deal in place on friday. as meps from the uk arrived in the chamber this morning,
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they were greeted with this message... "it's not goodbye, it's au revoir." the sign was put up by the s&d, a coalition of socialist parties. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in the house of parliament — norman what are we expecting now the weather. some sunshine over england and wales, but rain has moved on further north. you can see this massive cloud pushing in from the atlantic into the uk, for the time being, some sunny spells towards the south and east of england and wales. certainly in cornwall some sunshine, high—level cloud starting to move in. we can see that rain as it moves into scotland, northern ireland, there will be some snow for higher ground, staying largely dry further
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south and east across england and wales. let's look more closely at 3pm this afternoon. you can see a bit of snow for the higher ground of the highlands, for not looking at some sunny spells, quite chilly, temperatures five or 6 degrees. not quite as cold elsewhere for scotland and northern ireland but heavy burst of rain to come throughout the afternoon including parts of cumbria, lancashire and a few showers moving into wales. generally though, dry and bite the further south and east you are, temperatures ten or 11 degrees, not as cold as it was yesterday. still some rain tonight, particularly across cotton, heavier moving further north, elsewhere a lot of cloud developing, mist and fog, some drizzle in places. but not as cold as previous nights. in fact, frost free, ice free, to take centre we have got mild aircoming in free, to take centre we have got mild air coming in from the south—west, look at the yellows and oranges across the uk. a few areas of low pressure, daisy—chain by
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those fronts sustain quite u nsettled. those fronts sustain quite unsettled. during thursday, heavy rain across thursday, moving north, strong wind here as well. elsewhere, a bit of rain in the morning across other areas, lots of cloud, i bet misty and foggy first thing in the morning, we keep the cloud into the afternoon, a few bright spells that look at the temperatures, on the rise. 11—14. quite mild for the time of year. as we go into friday, here is the next area of low pressure moving in, bringing further aerobics of rain throughout the day, that rain quite heavy in the morning across north and west parts, gradually moving towards the south—east of england. quite patchy in that rain later in the afternoon. some clear skies across southern scotland, north—east of scotland, further heavy showers moving in to the west of scotland. quite wet for many of us throughout the day on friday. again, first approaches 12-14d. it friday. again, first approaches 12—14d. it will start to turn milder as we go into the end of the week, losing the frost and icy stretches but it comes with a lot of cloud and
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some rain at times. goodbye. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in the house of parliament — norman what are we expecting mrjohnson to be quizzed on this lunchtime? i wonder if the visit of mike pompeo might focus the minds of a number of mps. we in the commons, dominic raab getting a bit of a hard time from a number of tory mps over the controversial decision on huawei. it will be interesting to see whether any of those mps today choose to raise it at pm cues with the prime minister himself. 0n the labour side, maybejeremy corbyn will raise the middle east peace deal which president trump unveiled yesterday with benjamin neta nyahu. president trump unveiled yesterday with benjamin netanyahu. i see on twitter mr corbett has been very critical of that. we make it —— jeremy corbyn software get questions around that. meanwhile we are waiting to see if there is some sort of statement on northern rail. a lot
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of statement on northern rail. a lot of expectation around it and the possibility of northern rail effectively being ta ken possibility of northern rail effectively being taken back into a form of public ownership. so far we have had nothing but as i say, i think the view is there will be some sort of statement later today on that. and i guess we have to prepare ourselves for another prime minister is questions with questions moving through very short and sharp, starting on time and finishing on time because it is a different sort of prime minister is questions with the new speaker compared tojohn bercow who used to allow pm to go on and on. lindsay hoyle very different approach, making sure it starts and finishes pretty much on time and actually getting through most of the questions. that seems to be the way he likes it. to make sure everyone gets their question but it is a different sort of prime minister's questions and a truncated one in the sense that it is only half—an—hour. some people like it, some people don't but that is petty much the way
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it has. i guess we have to get used to it. it is so different from those days when brexit was dominating, this is the week we will formally leave the eu but borisjohnson now starting prime minister is questions. i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others and in addition to my duties i will have monday was holocaust memorial day when we remember those who suffered under nazi persecution. during this dark time, britain stood out as a beacon of hope, and 10,000 jewish children came here with the transport. when his government rejected the amendment on unaccompanied child refugees, breton's beacon them to. while the prime minister now devolve powers over immigration to holyrood to allow scotland to be the beacon of
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hope? mr speaker, ithink allow scotland to be the beacon of hope? mr speaker, i think she does a disservice to this country's reputation, because we have not only taken 41,000 children, unaccompanied children, since 2010, but i think this whole country can be very proud of everything that we continue to do to commemorate the holocaust and what took place then. bill wagons. i know that my right on the friend would never put our country addressed. —— a bill wiggin. ialso know that he was born in america, so what plan does he have to convince the uk sector of state that the huawei deal is safe, not only for our constituents but also our allies? i thank my right honourable friend and he raises a most important point. i know it is of concern to members across the house. and i want to ensure the house in the country that i think it is absolutely vital that people in this country do have access to the best technology available, but we also do
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absolutely nothing to imperil our relationship with the us, do anything to compromise our national security infrastructure or do anything to imperil our extremely valuable corporation with five eyes security partners. the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. i am sure the whole house will want to send our thoughts to the families and friends of the royal marine soldier who sadly died ina training royal marine soldier who sadly died in a training incident earlier this week. if you forgive me, mr speaker, can we take a minute to pay tribute to nicholas parsons who passed away this week and thanked him for his work in broadcasting? this friday, the uk will be leaving the european union. the actions we take over the months and years ahead will shape our future role within the international community for generations to come. britain's role
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in the world will face one of its most important test later this year, when cop 26 meets in glasgow to discuss the need for drastic action to tackle the climate emergency. given the scale of the crisis, does the prime minister think that we as a country should be financing billions of pounds on oil and gas projects around the world? mr speaker, let me firstly say in deference, in memory of nicholas parsons, i think we should avoid hesitation, deviation or repetition in this house, and i can answer very clearly by saying, i do think it is important that the uk continues to campaign against hydrocarbon emissions as we do of all kinds, as we do, and he will notice that we have decided to ban all support for extraction of coal around the world, and that is a massive step forward by this country. mr speaker, the report from the bbc and other
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investigations revealed that a government agency has helped to finance oil and gas projects which will limit 69 million tonnes of carbon each year, nearly a sixth of the total emissions from this country alone. the effect of climate change has been felt in this country with flooding in yorkshire and the midlands, and of course with the wildfires in australia. despite pledging to reach net zero emissions by 2015, on current track, the government will only meet its target by 2099. can we afford to wait another 79 years before we reach net to zero in this country? —— 2050. another 79 years before we reach net to zero in this country? -- 2050. mr speaker, this country has doubled its spending on climate change to £11.6 billion and i am not surprised, because he is so pessimistic, do not forget, mr speaker, that this country has reduced co2 emissions already by 42% on 1990 levels, whilst the economy,
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under this conservative government, has grown by 73%. that is a record, we can do both. the prime minister has voted against every proposal to ta ke has voted against every proposal to take action on climate change until he became prime minister. i hope for the sake of our future, he changes his mind before cop 26 in glasgow. and speaking of failing to take a global leader in climate change, the us secretary of state visits later today. president trump's latest middle east peace plan is not a peace plan, it will annexed palestinian territory, locked in illegal israeli colonisation, tra nsfer illegal israeli colonisation, transfer palestinian citizens of israel and to deny palestinian people their fundamental rights. when the government meets with the us secretary of state later, will he make it clear that the british government will stand for a genuine, internationally backed peace plan, rather than this stuff proposed by donald trump yesterday? mr speaker,
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let us be clear, this is a problem that has bedevilled the world for decades and the middle east in particular. no peace plan is perfect but this has the merritt of a two state solution, it has a two state solution. it would ensure that jerusalem is both the capital of visual and of the palestinian people, and i would urge him, rather than being so characteristically negative to reach out to his friend, my friends and the palestinian authority, to mr bass, of whom i have the highest respect, and i would urge him to engage in this initiative, to get talking rather than to lead a political vacuum. with the greatest of respect, i have the greatest respect of the palestinian authority and met them many times. mr speaker, this is a serious issue, and i think that the prime minister should acknowledge that the plan of president trump will not bring any move towards
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peace and will have no support from any palestinian anywhere in the world and maybe, this would be a good opportunity for the british government to say, frankly and kindly to the us, on this, you are wrong. there needs to be a two state solution with international support. a kind of test of this country for the future has to be how we work to end conflict abroad. the saudi arabian led intervention in yemen has led to the needless deaths of innocent men, women and children, yet this government has broken the ban on saudi arabian arms sales three times while donald trump has vetoed a ban on arms exports three times. will the prime minister confirm that he will respect his own ban and will, when he meets the us later today, ask them to stop selling arms to saudi arabia while they continue the bombardment of the people of yemen? as he knows, the saudi led operation in yemen is supported by the un, a un mandate to
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restore the government of yemen and its vital and he is correct that the crisis in yemen continues but what he should rather do is support the activities of the british un negotiating, martin griffiths, who is doing a fantasticjob in trying to bring the sides together and to get a peaceful solution yet by the people of yemen. of course they're trying to bring about a peace process that it's not helped when one country supplies arms to saudi arabia, which has led to the deaths of 100,000 people in yemen last year alone. according to human rights watch, saudi authorities have stepped up their arbitrary arrest trials, convictions and killings of peaceful dissidents and activists including a large—scale crackdown on the women's rights movement. when the women's rights movement. when the prime minister heads to riyadh for the g20 this year, will he make it clear that any future trade arrangement with saudi arabia will be dependent on an improvement of
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their human rights laws and their human rights record, particular in respect of women in that country?m won't have escaped the attention of the house that the right honourable gentleman is a supporter and defender of the iranian regime in tehran, who have grossly exacerbated the tensions in yemen by sending missiles to attack the civilian population of saudi arabia, and of course we raise human rights in saudi arabia and the foreign secretary raised the women's rights in saudi arabia only today and we will do that ever more vigorously and energetically as we pursue our policy of a global britain doing free trade deals around the world, which will give us a leveraged to make these points —— the leverage to make these points —— the leverage to make these points —— the leverage to make these points. mr speaker, i condemn human rights abuses in every country in the world, including iran, russia and anywhere else where they are committed. my question was,
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what is being done to ensure our future trade deals are dependent on good human rights in the countries that we deal with? nine women are in saudi prison is at the present time merely for standing up for equal rights for women and four of them have received electric shock treatment during interrogation. is that the kind of human rights we tolerate? i sincerely hope not. britain is at a crossroads. we are leaving the eu and britain's place in the world will change. the question is, what direction it ta kes. question is, what direction it takes. the signs are that this government is prepared to sacrifice our country's interests and values for short—term political advantage and a sell—out trade deal with donald trump. as foreign secretary, he embarrassed this country and as prime minister he shows every sign of being prepared to sell it off. when will the prime minister except that the only chance of a truly international is to britain is to work with our global partners, to
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tackle climate catastrophe, expand trade, fight human rights abuses and promote peace. mr speaker, the difference between this government and the way it treats international affairs and the labour party under the present leadership can be summarised as follows. this is a leader of the labour party who has consistently stood up notjust leader of the labour party who has consistently stood up not just for tehran but for vladimir putin when he poisoned innocent people on the streets of this country. he has said he would scrap the armed services of the united kingdom. he would end our nuclear deterrent and he would abolish nato. mr speaker, this is a government that is leading the world in tackling abuses in sticking up for human rights, in championing the struggle against climate change, and in leading the fight that every single girl in the world should have
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access to 12 years of quality education. that is what global britain under this government is delivering. he would isolate this country, he would deprive us of our most crucial allies. we are going to ta ke most crucial allies. we are going to take this country forward, outwards, into the world and, mr speaker, in case i forgot to mention it, we are going to deliver on our promises and ta ke going to deliver on our promises and take us out of the european union despite everything that he and all the parties opposite tried to do this friday. this conservative government has an incredible opportunity with our prime minister's vision to deliver change by driving forward the levelling up of parts of the country which have lagged behind london. will the prime minister confirm that beautiful hastings and rye will not be overlooked in the process of levelling up and that the necessary investment will be made in our transport infrastructure, education and health to unleash our bags of
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talent and potential? yes, i can confirm the infrastructure revolution will of course penetrate all the way to hastings and rye and across the whole country and there will be an additional £100 million for the redevelopment of the conquest hospital and eastbourne district hospital which i know will be of benefit to her constituents. scotland, of course, is being dragged out of the european union against our will and we hope our european friends will leave a light on for scotland. mr speaker, during the eu referendum, the chancellor for the duchy of lancaster said that when it comes to immigration it would be for the people of scotland to decide. mr speaker, on monday, the scottish government published its plans for a scottish beazer. doing just what the right honourable member promised, that scotland should be able to do —— scottish visa. before the ink was dry, the
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proposals were rejected without consideration. since the prime minister would never reject a proposal before reading it, can he tell the house on what points he disagrees with model three, and if it helps, mr speaker, it was outlined on page 20 of the proposal. well, mr speaker, i have every sympathy with the industries and businesses of scotland that need to allow workers to come freely for agricultural workers that we have doubled and that is very, very important and doubled and that is very, very importantandi doubled and that is very, very important and i thank the lobbying representations i have had from conservative colleagues in scotland on that point. i think the idea of having a scottish only visa with a boarder at berwick and an inspection post, i think this is absolutely fanciful, and whatever they might be on page 20 of his document, i doubt if he explains who is going to pay for it, mr speaker. mr speaker,
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nobody is suggesting such a thing that just confirms the nobody is suggesting such a thing thatjust confirms the prime minister doesn't have a clue. unlike the prime minister, experts backed the prime minister, experts backed the scottish government's proposals. the scottish trades union congress support them. the federation of small business supports them. the scottish council for development and industry support them. even the mac report commissioned by his own government has highlighted the additional migration routes as a means of increasing population growth. the scottish government's proposals will boost scotland's population, grow our economy and protect public services. the uk government's policies threaten to plunge our working age population into decline. mr speaker, we were told we would have the most powerful devolved parliament in the world. we we re devolved parliament in the world. we were told we would be an equal partner in the family of nations. will the prime minister now read the scottish government proposal, listen to the evidence and deliver a
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tailored migration policy for scotland? we will have a points—based system that will deliver the immigration to this whole country. and may i say the way it boosts the population of scotla nd the way it boosts the population of scotland is not to have scottish government that taxes the population of scotla nd government that taxes the population of scotland and fails to deliver results. it may interest you to know that the snp have not had a debate in the parliament on education for two years, what are they debating today, whether or not to fly the eu flag! they should get on with a day job, mr speaker! andy jenkins. thank you, mr speaker. up in yorkshire, in your conservative brexit heartlands, we are celebrating is leaving the eu on friday with a big brexit party. i
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wish to congratulate the prime minister and achieving leaving the eu when so many deemed it impossible. does he agree with me that this is an opportunity for a new chapter in our great country when we will finally control our laws, bodies and money and become a truly global trading nation? laws, bodies and money and become a truly globaltrading nation? mr speaker, i do join truly globaltrading nation? mr speaker, i dojoin her in her celebrations. i'm sorry i can't be there personally, i wish everybody in molly a very enjoyable big brexit party! sexual exploitation doesn't end when you turn 18. indeed, it is the main driver of modern slavery and trafficking of women in this country so with the prime minister join other countries around the world by bringing in legislation to end demand, making it illegal to buy sexual consent? well, mr speaker, i am certainly happy to look at the proposals she wishes to bring forward to the house. does the prime
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minister agree we need to increase capacity in our railways in and between the north, the midlands, the south and scotland and unless we wa nt south and scotland and unless we want decades of disruption, the only way to do this is through the midlands engine rail, northern powerhouse rail and hs2. midlands engine rail, northern powerhouse rail and h52. mr speaker, ican powerhouse rail and h52. mr speaker, i can tell my honourable friend we are not only building in northern powerhouse rail and investing in the midlands rail hub, but we are looking into whether and how to proceed with hs2. and the house can expect an announcement very shortly. thank you, mr speaker. this prime minister has shown no respect for scotland. in fact, will he listen to the scottish food and drink sector,
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who currently employ 40,000 eu nationals? we have 46,000 drills needing filled by 2030. the figures are clear. immigration is an urgent priority for scotland, so when it will this prime minister except scotla nd will this prime minister except scotland must have the power to tailor its own immigration policy and ensure we have the powers to do so? mr speaker, i have the utmost and highest respect for the people of scotland, i have less respect for the snp government of scotland, which is currently, because of its failures come producing less growth than any other part of the uk. can i start by congratulating the prime minister and ensuring that this is the final prime minister's questions asa the final prime minister's questions as a member of the european union. i know that he shares my concern about the loss of biodiversity around the world. i have seen it first—hand how is possible to turn a pommel plantation into a fast recovering
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ra i nfo rest plantation into a fast recovering rainforest for wildlife. can i ask him to ensure where we are doing good work in ensuring the restoration of the environment to the country, we step up the work we do to step up biodiversity and help tackle climate change in doing so? he raises an exceptionally important point and that is why it is vital that we have a direct link between the chinese crop summit on biodiversity and our cop26 summit on climate change. the prime minister talks about avoiding hesitation, repetition and deviation, but would he agree as well we should avoid hiccup —— hypocrisy? because we won't be taken seriously on climate leadership as long as we are powering taxpayers' money into projects overseas emitting huge amounts of carbon. it is notjust the export finance, it is also the fa ct the export finance, it is also the fact that at the africa summit last week, 2 billion was going to be piled into more oil and gas. will he join me and the environmental audit
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committee in agreeing that from the end of 2021, they should be no uk money going into fossil fuels overseas, money going into fossil fuels overseas , yes money going into fossil fuels overseas, yes or no? or i can say is we have doubled spending on tackling climate change, 11.6 billion. no, not another penny will go into digging up coaland not another penny will go into digging up coal and we will do everything we can to help the rest of the world to achieve the incredible record of the uk government in reducing co2 emissions, that is our ambition. thank you, mr speaker. this sunday is world wetlands day and i have the superb w is world wetlands day and i have the supeer —— is world wetlands day and i have the superb w —— w wt headquarters in my constituency. what will the environment bill do for wetlands and wildlife and will he visit our famous, flamboyant flamingos? mr speaker, i look forward to seeing herfamous, speaker, i look forward to seeing her famous, flamboyant flamingos at the earliest opportunity. i can tell her our environment plan does place
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biodiversity frameworks on a statutory footing, whether or not that includes mr speaker flamingos, i don't know! p and o ferries in hull are flying filipino workers over to work far below the minimum wage. they are expected to work 12 hour shifts, seven days a week for six months at a time. and the disaster which claimed the lives of 193 passengers and crew was caused by seafarer fatigue. will he agree to meet a cross—party group of mps to meet a cross—party group of mps to discuss this issue and try to put this issue to bed once and for all and, indeed, to protect british seafa rer and, indeed, to protect british seafarerjobs? can i say to the honourable gentleman he is absolutely right to raise this and it isa absolutely right to raise this and it is a serious issue. i have been told working pattern meets the
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requirements of international maritime conventions but, plainly, there are concerns we have for all there are concerns we have for all the reasons he mentions. the shortest answer i can give is i know my right and buff in the transport secretary will be only too happy to meet him and others concerned. this week in my constituency of warrington south, the much anticipated chapel had medical centre opened, improving gp access for residents. will the prime minister confirmed this government because my intention is to recruit, train and deploy more doctors so we can increase the number of appointments for people in warrington and across the uk? yes, mr speaker, i confirm that we will not only deliver more doctors, 6,000 more gps, although as i think you may recall, we have also pledged to deliver 40 new hospitals and 50,000 more nurses. this is the party of delivery and decision and democracy and we get on with the job. the prime minister will be aware that we
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have been pressing for some time for a pension for innocent victims of violence in northern ireland. can he update the house on the progress made so far and give an absolute assurance that those in receipt of such a pension are innocent victims and it will not include those perpetrators who were injured by their own actions? mr speaker, we have every sympathy for innocent victims of violence in northern ireland and we have been consistently clear that the principal that those who have sustained injuries, it must have happened through no fault of their own, that principle will be sustained throughout the negotiations. the prime minister will know that the future of that programme is a £312 million investment in upgrading and modernising hospital services in shropshire. telford council, a medically illiterate organisation, has prevented these changes over the last six years, undermining the 300
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local doctors and surgeons who believe it is essential for patient safety. what the prime minister intervene to help us break this deadlock, otherwise, patient safety will be put at risk at the royal shrewsbury hospital?” will be put at risk at the royal shrewsbury hospital? i thank my honourable friend for raising the issue and i can tell him we are indeed getting on with thatjob and my right honourable friend the secretary of state for health says that he will personally intervene to ensure that that is done. thank you, mr speaker, the mac report does not go far enough. given that around half of scottish employers and less on the proposed threshold, that raises to 90% in the vital care sector. does the prime minister agree that protecting scotland ‘s ca re agree that protecting scotland ‘s care sector with a tailored migration system is more important than his ideological obsession of cutting immigration? mr speaker, i
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think howe should be clear that we do not wish in any way to deprive any part of the uk of the labour it needs —— i think the house should be clear. but we have special provisions to ensure that scotland is properly catered for and we have doubled the seasonal agricultural workers scheme. but we will respond in due course to the stipulations of the migration advisory committee.” know my right honourable friend is very fond of the north east of scotland, having visited twice in the last year! will he commit here today to delivering the long—awaited oil and gas sector deal so we can work with that industry as it transitions to net zero and make aberdeen notjust the oil and gas capital of europe, the energy capital of europe, the energy capital of europe, the energy capital of the world ? capital of europe, the energy capital of the world? yes, mr speaker, not only that, we can do it in sucha speaker, not only that, we can do it in such a way as to continue this country's reduction hydrocarbon emissions. mr speaker, the shortage
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of gps has reached crisis point and in his answer to the honourable gentleman, the prime minister did nothing to allay the fears and concerns of patients who are waiting weeks to see a gp now. people in training is all very well, but what is he going to do now to make sure patients can access gps? well, she is right to raise the point, but the number of gps is already going up and as! number of gps is already going up and as i havejust number of gps is already going up and as i have just told the house, we are recruiting 6,000 more. thank you, mr speaker. yesterday's announcement that the contract is not been placed with hitachi rail in my constituency is in my view inappropriate and takes no account of the so —— socioeconomic benefits would uk business. i hope to see a positive decision on hs2 to reconnect north with london and i would ask the prime minister to ensure uk based businesses like
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hitachi see investment probably recognised in the procurement process. mr speaker, my honourable friend has personally raised the issue with me before and i am sure his constituents will congratulate him and sticking up for their interests in the way that he does. i can tell him that there will be a decision on hs2 very shortly, if he could just contain his impatience a little bit longer. yesterday's erasmus plus programme report showed edinburgh university is the top uk institution for sending students on the scheme. we used to have 4970 across the uk. educational benefits are across the uk. educational benefits a re clearly across the uk. educational benefits are clearly endless. will the prime minister now prioritise talks on the uk's continued participation so we don't face any delay in joining the next cycle from 2021? mr speaker, nothing in the withdrawal from the
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eu can stop uk students from being able to pursue their hopes, their dreams around the entire european union and we will ensure that that is the case. this week sees the start of the second phase of the g re nfell start of the second phase of the grenfell inquiry, will my right honourable friend agree with me that our thoughts are with those affected and what we want from the inquiry is the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, as to what happens. yes, mr speaker, ithink most people would agree that martin moore—bick was pretty unflinching in the first section of his report and i have no doubt he will be equally unsparing in the next. thank you, mr speaker, prime minister, is the bbc a mortal enemy of the conservative party or a cherished petition institution that will be funded by
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the licence fee? well, mr speaker, i can certainly say it is a cherished british institution are not a mortal enemy of the conservative party. epsom and st helier nhs trust is receiving £500 million thanks to this conservative government, will he agree with me that this is excellent news for warrington patients and encourage constituents to get involved in the consultation on where the new hospital should go? i thank ithank him i thank him for speaking up and drawing attention to the nhs which is increasing under the government and for which we have legislated, not for this year or next year but for every year of the parliament. the special school in last week the recent desperately needed school improvements was turned down by the government. and well the prime minister review the funding formula for both capital and revenues so the
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same schools are not disadvantaged because they have fewer pupils. mr speaker, the honourable gentleman makes an important point that we are increasing funding for send schools by hundred and 70 million and making sure there are more send schools but i'd be happy to look at the kc races. “ i'd be happy to look at the kc races. -- the kc races. half the aduu races. -- the kc races. half the adult population in cornwall and half of children have not seen an nhs dentist in the last year, so will my friend of penzance in cornwall meet with me to see how we can resolve this inequality?” cornwall meet with me to see how we can resolve this inequality? i am very happy to meet my honourable friend any time. is the prime minister aware that the international strand of glasgow's fantastic celtic connections festival being scaled back by 20% because of what was described as the hassle and stress of sorting visas
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for overseas artist. what is the prime minster‘s message to artists that want to come here but are put off by complicated and extortion application process that signals that they are not welcome? as he knows, this government has already institution new measures to make sure people of talent can come without let or hindrance, and i am surprised that the director of the festival that he refers to is encountering difficulties. if he really has a problem, may i direct him to my right honourable friend the home secretary. given the prime minister's proven track record in overcoming procrastination and dither and delay, will he repeat that success and do as my other friends have asked and get hs2 done to secure jobs across the country, including nantwich?” to secure jobs across the country, including nantwich? ijust want to secure jobs across the country, including nantwich? i just want to reassure all my honourable friends and anybody of whatever persuasion
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they may be about hs2 across the chamber that there will be an announcement and a decision very shortly. i hope the prime minister has the humility to recognise that not everybody will be celebrating on friday night. we have been promised that leaving the eu will bring power closer to the people, give us a greater say in our communities. instead, there are many people who feel that they have so far been ignored and disempowered. will he demonstrate his willingness to listen to all voices by meeting our leader and myself to discuss how wales will earn the tools to forge a better future? mr speaker, i share her general sentiment that it is time for the whole country to come together but i think that wales did vote to leave the eu from memory, andi vote to leave the eu from memory, and i think it is time that we regard this as a beginning. this is curtain up on a fantastic future for our country and that is the frame of mind that i respectfully suggest to
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the right honourable lady and others in which they should approach it.” have a short statement to make... prime list is i am mindful that the frank advice must be protected confidentially. i have written to the clerk of the house to establish a new procedure, modelled on power of accounting officers to seek ministerial direction. the procedure will apply, if i take a decision speaker which the clerk of the house considers compromises substantial breach of the standing orders or a departure from long established conventions, without appropriate authorisation by the house itself. in sucha authorisation by the house itself. in such a case, the clerk of the house will be empowered to place a
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statement of his views in the library and! statement of his views in the library and i will always make the house aware that this is being done. lam house aware that this is being done. i am placing a copy of my letter in the clerk of the house in the library. that is the end of prime minister questions and that statement at the end of it. norman, the statement got quite a big reaction, can you expect what that was about? another symbolic break with the john what that was about? another symbolic break with thejohn bercow era. i think what lindsay hoyle was sitting out there is that if he makes a decision which is unprecedented, has never been done before and watch the clerk, the senior clerk in the commons thinks is wrong or questionable, then the clerk can say so. he can issue a written statement to express and outline his concerns. that eludes back to some of the decisions taken
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byjohn bercow in relation to brexit, some of the contentious decisions he took about what was admissible, whether certain pieces of amendments could be tabled, caused a lot of anger on tory benches. lindsay hoyle signalling in effect i won't go down that route and if necessary, the senior clerk in the house of commons can call me out and we are getting a pretty clear signalfrom out and we are getting a pretty clear signal from lindsay hoyle that he will do things differently. we have seen that with these very punctual, to the point, prime minister questions done and dusted on time. seeing it also in the manner much more reticent, lindsay hoyle does not intervene in the same very assertive wayjohn bercow did and we are seeing it now in the way he is saying, look, i will listen to what the clerks are saying and if they are not happy, then they are free to say so publicly. on one or
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other subject before we let you go, northern rail, the future of the franchise, we think there will be statement soon in the commons, what is your understanding of when things might be known? you make no more than these. i was under the impression that there would not be a statement in the commons. that was the earlier indication i was given. we were promised a written statement to my knowledge that has not given yet. whatever means the government chooses to make its announcements, there is expected to be a big decision taken on northern rail today, we are expecting that, in effect back into public ownership with the department for transport, in—house officials taking over the running. how they will make a decision, we will have to hold on a bit longer to find out. thank you norman. the the british government has said it the will put all citizens returning
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from the hubei province of china in to quarantine for a fortnight, as a precaution against the spread of the coronavirus. british airways has suspended all direct flights to and from mainland china because of the outbreak. it comes after the foreign office here advised against all but essential travel to the country. our health correspondent fergus walsh says the decision by the government to quarantine people flying in from wuhan is confusing. more than 1400 people, who flew in from wuhan in the past two weeks before the city was effectively sealed off and flights were cancelled, those people, nine out of ten of whom haven't been traced, have been asked to isolate themselves at home and not go out, not mix, not go to work. but now this flight, of something like 200 people, we are hearing they will be quarantined. we do not know where, perhaps a military base. and it begs the question,
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unless they are all isolated from each other for those two weeks, if they are allowed to mix freely, and after nine days one of them falls ill with the virus, you would then have to reset the clock for another two weeks. yes, exactly. so it would be a minimum of two weeks. right, so, what do you think has led to this change? as you say, 1400 people have come back and it is unclear exactly where they are. it is a judgment call and it is to do with how this virus appears to be getting more transmissible. if you look at the situation in hubei province, it is spreading much faster than it was a few weeks ago — the cases coming to hospital — and we're getting a big sharp increase in patients going to intensive care and in deaths. so it is a risk assessment which is different to what it was a couple of weeks ago. australia, for example,
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they are putting citizens coming back on christmas island. we don't necessarily have a spare island that we can put people on. injapan, people are being repatriated there, and my understanding is they are all being taken to hospital and being tested, and if they appear to be well, they are being asked to go home and quarantine themselves. so, different countries are taking different approaches. and obviously all of these measures make it all sound quite scary. how much is now known about this virus and how worried should we be? i still think that we don't need to worry very much in this country, because if you think about it, seasonal flu kills between a third of a million and 600,000 people globally every year. now, it is worrying because this is a new virus, so we don't have immunity to it.
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so, if it does end up spreading globally, there would be a large number of deaths. but so far, although it is spreading widely in china, we've only had, i think, four instances of person—to—person transmission outside of china. now, what we need to see is sustained transmission beyond china before we are risking getting into a pandemic. now with all the business news. the business news. as we've been hearing, british airways is suspending all direct flights to and from mainland china. other multinational chains such as starbucks, mcdonalds and toyota have also announced in the past 24 hours that they are pulling back their operations within china.
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ovo energy is to pay £8.9 million pounds for overcharging customers after more than half a million received energy bills that were inaccurate. uk house prices rose at their fastest annual rate for 14 months, with an increase of1.9% injanuary. that's according to the nationwide. some credit a release of pent—up demand following the clear general election result last year. let's now talk about apple, because the tech giant has posted a blockbuster set of results for the last three months of last year. it said sales in the last three months of 2019 rose 8% to £70.5 billion while net profits increased 11% to reach £17 billion. joining us now is james wise, partner, balderton. rise partner, balderton. and rise of apple. is it all down rise and rise of apple. is it all down to the iphone? this phenomenal?
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yes, it is quite incredible outcome for the world's largest company to grow sales even more. the iphone 11 and 11 pro came under a lot of criticism for being too expensive with not quite enough new features to get people interested, but as these sales show, they are growing in every geography and there is no 1.5 billion iphone users, it is the real driver of the compa ny‘s success. that is what tim cook, apple boss has credited much of the success two. defying that criticism, people wincing at the cost of the phone, pointing to the changing charging points, all of which irritate but don't stop people buying them. wearable technology was also a big hit? as well as the iphone, the peripheries around it, things like the apple watch which seem to have huge hit over christmas as well as the airports, the new hide phones from apple have flown off shelves and i think —— here pod. it shows the amount of love people
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have for this hardware, playing at a premium just for the iphone but the things around it which enhance the user experience again, particularly with the watch, many people out there did not think it would do well at all. they could not see the point of it. they thought it was adjunct to the thing? got a lot of criticism, it came out a few years ago and said this is for runners in from san francisco to track the heartbeat. in reality, ithink from san francisco to track the heartbeat. in reality, i think it hasn't seen as a really useful way for people who are on the move people doing different activities to still interact with the screen. i think it is part of a broader strategy from apple, do notjust at the iphone as a main interface but look at the other ways people use their products, through your years with the headphones, through your lesson heartbeat through the watch or through the smart speaker which is also showing relatively strong sales. briefly, what if anything do you think can stop the rise and rise of apple? it does not seem to be price so so chinese competitors do not seem to be a major threat. what
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is? quite an incredible range of strength they have. there have been areas of concern in the past. one is their supply chain, the call yesterday pointed out that corona virus may have an impact on the supply chain as well as sales, trying that has nothing to do with brexit. this is a long—term issue that has plagued this country for decades but it has more to do with the fact that we are one of the most centralised countries in the whole of europe. decisions are taken along way away from their children and ordinary lives. the amulet attack and this is to make decision making must closer to make decision making must closer to people, whether in the community. that will require a huge push in this country and that'll be a right now. i agree with both but i think clearly, the economic crash at the end of the last decade, the expenses
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scandal and then the hung parliament, mixed with brexit and people feeling that we were not carrying through an outcome of a referendum that when a certain way. i think all of those, clearly big issues, but there has also been a loss of trust in the institutions thatis loss of trust in the institutions that is for our democracy. british citizens flown from wuhan in china will be put into quarantine for two weeks when they return to the uk as a precaution against the spread of the coronavirus. this comes as british airways suspends all but essential flights to and from mainland china following advice from the foreign office. after years of delays and cancellations, a decision is expected over the future of the northern railfranchise.
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a bbc investigation has found that every week thousands of emergency calls are taking ambulance crews over an hour to reach. the delays affect one in 16 calls in england for conditions such as strokes, heart attacks and fits. experts say it's putting lives at risk. we've speaking to siva anandaciva who is the chief analyst at the think tank the king's fund. he says that while hitting targets has been a priority in the past, nhs trusts are struggling to continue to meet them. there was absolutely a stigma over whether you were hitting the target or not and by how much you were missing it. and over time, almost every ambulance service... there was a point this winter where no a&e department met the national standard for how long patients should wait. and the front—line leaders we talked to say it becomes increasingly hard to keep people motivated to hit that target, and it's not for the lack of trying,
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it's because you haven't got the staff, you haven't got the resources you need to meet these targets. so it really does leave you trapped, in some ways, in a vicious cycle. the european parliament is set to approve the terms of the uk's departure from the european union in an historic vote later. the 751 representatives in brussels are expected overwhelmingly to back ratification of the withdrawal agreement, paving the way for the uk to leave with a deal in place on friday. as meps from the uk arrived in the chamber this morning, they were greeted with this message... "it's not goodbye, it's au revoir." the sign was put up by the s&d, a coalition of socialist parties. many of them are already clearing their offices and packing to leave, as adam fleming reports. the work goes on in the european parliament, as thrilling as ever, but look at those empty seats. the brits are checking out already. i never really unpacked, because i never knew if we were leaving or staying or what we were doing. dr david bull is brexiting from an office, a job, a lifestyle.
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this is the piece de resistance, my brexit hat. into the box. look back six months ago, we thought this was really a lost because because there was an extension, another extension, we thought there would be another one and then things have finally come to fruition and if you think what we've really achieved, its extraordinary and i know we are leaving because they've changed the date on my badge. have they, what does it say? it used to say until 2024. brexit will mean changes here in the european parliament. some of the empty british seats have been saved up for new countries thatjoin. 27 of them are being reallocated to existing member states, and they will go to people elected in the european parliament elections last may, who have been waiting months and months and months for the brits to finally leave. what's that? this, we bought it at the beginning, but it stopped over a year ago, so it's been in a box.
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metaphor! as the clock ticks on the next phase of negotiations, labour mep says we will have to pay more attention to this place when we are out than we did when we were in. we've totally underestimated the power of this parliament. unfortunately, that is to our cost. we are going to learn the hard way. because we still have to pay attention to what happens here? because either way, we move from being a rule maker to a rule taker. companies in the uk who want to trade with our biggest neighbour will be complying with the rules made in this house. they will probably be spending a lot of money on trying to lobby those rules from outside. so how will the momentous moment be marked? it's a specially designed football scarf i had made. others have organised farewell events. i've heard rumours of bagpipes. but the rest of the eu is keeping it low—key. not even a little whisky at midnight on the 31st?
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you mean to celebrate? to mark it. i don't belong to the people who celebrate sad things. i celebrate things that cheer me up and this is not going to cheer me up. i wonder what i'll be doing on february ist and i think it is the morning after the night before that we will be aware it's happened and how we move on. and everyone wants to know what will happen to the british flag that flutters outside. it will be lowered on brexit night and put into a museum. the uk... history. adam fleming, bbc news, brussels. and later this afternoon we'll be answering your questions on brexit. today we'll be focussing on the subject of immigration so do send in your questions. you can tweet via the hashtag...
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mike pompeo has been talking about a living while we are limited 35% of the peripheral network, something the peripheral network, something the usa has made very clear did not wa nt the usa has made very clear did not want while we involved in the 5g network here. can see mike pompeo arriving for a visit. —— huawei. he said that is a chance to look at it again and implement it, we will make sure he said, it passes across a network we have confidence. we should have our systems with western rules and american information should only pass across the trusted network. the stars came out for the national television awards in london last night with mrs brown's boys beating fleabag to the comedy prize, whilejesy nelson, peaky blinders and sir michael palin also collected awards. and some familiar winners were back on stage — ant and dec were crowned best presenters for the 19th year in a row, as voted by audiences across the uk.
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our arts correspomdent colin paterson was at the awards last night and said the duo's gratitude was genuine and heartfelt. 19 years. i looked, they first won in 2001, that was for their saturday morning pop show. when i spoke to them backstage, they genuinely still seem to be honoured and thrilled to have won, particularly because of the hard couple of years and has had. his arrest for drink—driving was so well—publicised and they seemed really chuffed. it's getting silly. it's unbelievable. it's quite mind—blowing, i have to be honest. i said it earlier — every year the palms get sweatier, the heart rate goes up a little bit more, you feel like you're going to vomit just that little bit more intensely. the nerves every year get more and more and then when they open
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that envelope and say your name, it's a huge relief. and then you just feel so grateful to everybody to have actually taken the time to vote for you. you are more grateful now — as you get older, the more grateful you are to get these awards because it's voted for by the viewers. because we've been around for so long and, you know, we're still up there, they're still voting for us, we're very thankful. got through a couple of difficult years, as well. yeah, we have! we've had ups and downs and they've stuck with us. you know, our viewers have stuck with us and they're still voting for us, and for that we will be eternally grateful. i interviewed them years ago. deck has said he had to build a second trophy cabinet in his living room. best award for factual programme went to someone famous for her music but less known in tv terms, and emotionaljesy nelson won the award for best factual programme for odd one out, her documentary about cyber bullying.
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so many positive, like, messages and so many parents and teachers saying they've played it in their schools and they wanted to make it part of the curriculum, which isjust incredible and i never expected that either. it isa it is a really impressive documentary, isn't it? all about how cyber bullying affected her so badly when little mix one the x factor. she examined how her mental health related to society. i think it is the most viewed bbc three programme of all time on iplayer. afterwards, she told me about the response she has had four members of the public. so many positive, like, messages and so many parents and teachers saying they've played it in their schools and they wanted to make it part of the curriculum, which isjust incredible and i never expected that either. i think the nicest thing is, yeah, when parents come and say how much it's helped their son or their daughter and, yeah, it's just amazing. i don't think anyone realises how much this is actually affecting people. people say comments online to joke around with their friends or do
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it to get a reaction. i don't think anyone actually realises what it's doing to people's mental health and that's why it was so important for me to make this documentary to really make people aware, and i feel like it's done that so i'm just really happy. a great award. michael palin also received special recognition award, and used to pay tribute to someone he said taught me more about television than anyone else. his fellow m o nty television than anyone else. his fellow monty python terryjones. most of all, to the man without whom i might not have been here tonight at all. my dear friend of 60 years, terryjones. thank you. cheering. terryjones who sadly died just very recently. what were the other highlights of the evening? peaky blinders was a double winner, it won best drama, cillian murphy one four
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best drama, cillian murphy one four best drama, cillian murphy one four best drama performance. this morning for the tenth year in a role. emmerdale for best soap. in strictly come dancing winning for the fifth yearin come dancing winning for the fifth year ina come dancing winning for the fifth year in a row as well. it seems to be the national television awards, the viewers find a programme they like and keep voting for it again, year after year. peter is here with the 1pm news, first a weather update. we know the first half of the week has been unusually chilly this winter. a lovely sunrise but a frost for many of us, all about to change. we are about to bring in milderair change. we are about to bring in milder air from change. we are about to bring in milder airfrom quite a long way south and west of the uk. you can see the change here, very visually. the warmer colours arriving as temperatures leap back above average. but plenty of weather fronts around, low pressure, it will be wet at times, often quite windy.
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there are still some sunny spells this afternoon across the eastern side of england, some heavy rain across southern and western parts of scotla nd across southern and western parts of scotland and parts of northern ireland, northern england, outbreaks of rain developing in north wales as well. the far north of scotland still with brightness around and a few showers, not as windy as further southin few showers, not as windy as further south in scotland. you can see some outbreaks of heavy rain here. brushing parts of northern ireland and especially north and west, turning wetter through the afternoon across cumbria, outbreaks of rain for the pennines into snowdonia. one or two developing into the south—west but a large part of england will be staying dry. more cloud than we have had so far today. tonight, abet of rain, northern england, most of it will be scotland and spreading north, some low cloud, misty and murky damp drizzly weather heading towards parts of this with south—west england and south wales. temperatures well above freezing for most of us overnight. that will feel different in the morning but it will
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look different, plenty of cloud around, someone still in scotland, a lot of cloud elsewhere. more especially toward south wales and southern england where it is misty, low cloud, poor visibility at times. during thursday, scotland, temperatures, look at the temperatures, look at the temperature transformation, into double figures, just about the across—the—board. looking double figures, just about the across—the—boa rd. looking at double figures, just about the across—the—board. looking at the big picture, enter milder air but there is still weather fronts close by. we start with rain on friday, into the north and west, that feeds further south and east during the day. blustery across the uk, widely at times, the chance of seeing gusts, 40-50 mph. where times, the chance of seeing gusts, 40—50 mph. where that rain clears the the further showers, look how mild it is going to be.
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britons returning to the uk from the chinese city worst hit by the coronavirus outbreak are to be quarantined for two weeks. it comes as british airways announces its suspending flights to and from mainland china — the government plans to evacuate 200 british citizens tomorrow. over 130 people have now died from the virus in china — one briton who's there says he would willingly be quarantined. we don't want to put the uk public at any risk and, you know, if this makes it safer for those, then that's what's necessary. as the government steps up its efforts, we'll be asking what precautions people should be taking here. also this lunchtime...

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