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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 6, 2020 10:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it's friday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm joanna gosling and we're live from new broadcasting house this coronavirus patient who was on board the diamond princess cruise ship has exclusively told this programme he and his family have been receiving death threats because of his diagnosis. and as graphic as can be in terms of threatening our lives, getting very graphic about the kind of deaths we would have, making threats on our grandkids. it runs the gamut. there are crises out there and we are now dealing with them. meanwhile, this programme has found that online sellers are hiking up the price of hand gel to as much as £150 per bottle. a woman who was kidnapped
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alongside the daughter of the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed al—maktoum — tells this programme she hopes details revealed in court about the abduction will help in her campaign to free her friend. i'm very, very pleased that the reporting restrictions were finally lifted. and now the whole world knows the news about latifah and shamsa having been kidnapped by their father, the ruler shamsa having been kidnapped by theirfather, the ruler of dubai, are no longer allegations but this is official now. and the nspcc says the number of calls to their helpline about children who've witnessed serious domestic abuse has risen by almost a quarter in the past year. we speak to the centre helping children affected. i worked once with a little boy who used to sleep in his shoes every night and that was because he was so used to him and his mum having to run in the middle of the night. so when he first came to the centre, his coat and his shoes would stay on and when we got to about week six he
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felt comfortable enough to take off his shoes. hi and welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. are you stockpiling stuff amid coronavirus fears? the prime minister's told us not to do it, but shelves are still emptying fast of certain things — pasta, loo paper and hand sanitizer in particular. some sellers are being accused of profiteering with stocks low of hand sanitizer — what do you think about that? what would you be prepared to pay for it right now? use the hashtag victoria live. email victoria@bbc.co.uk ; text 61124 — it'll cost the standard network rate. first, annita has the news. thank you, joanna and good morning everyone. the health secretary, matt hancock, says the government is working with supermarkets to ensure that people staying
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at home because of coronavirus can be supplied with food. so far, 116 people in the uk have been confirmed to have the virus and yesterday the first death was reported an elderly woman at a hospital at reading in berkshire. there is absolutely no need for individuals to go around buying more than they need and in fact, look, pa rt than they need and in fact, look, part of the response to this has to be us coming together. more than 140 british nationals are stranded on board a cruise ship anchored off san francisco after some passengers developed flu—like symptons. testing kits have been flown by helicopter to the grand princess after a man in his 70s, who'd taken an earlier cruise on the ship, died from coronavirus. an nhs trust at the centre of an inquiry into preventable baby deaths is to repay almost a million pounds that it received in 2018 for providing good maternity care. shrewsbury and telford nhs trust was paid the moneyjust weeks before inspectors rated its maternity services as inadequate. more than 900 families have contacted the inquiry to report concerns.
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scotland's loganair has said it will take on 16 of flybe‘s domestic routes following the collapse of the airline. flybe went into administration on thursday after a bid forfresh financial support failed. the government says it's working to save more routes. borisjohnson is facing a rebellion by senior conservative backbenchers angered by the government's decision to allow the chinese firm, huawei, a limited role in building the uk's 5g networks. the mp5, who believe the company spys for the chinese state, will try to amend a parliamentary bill next week to phase out huawei's involvement within two years. the firm has denied that it's controlled by beijing. the nspcc is warning there's less help available for domestic abuse survivors although the number of children experiencing domestic abuse may be on the rise. the children's charity has told this programme that the number of calls to their helpline about children who've witnessed serious domestic abuse has risen by almost a quarter in the past year — that's 1300 more calls.
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the duke and duchess of sussex have taken part in one of their last official engagements together before they quit royal life later this month. the couple attended an awards ceremony to celebrate the achievements of sick and injured service personnel. it was harry and meghan‘s first appearance together in the uk since announcing they would step down as senior royals injanuary. that's a summary of the news. joanna, back to you. thank you. a man who was on board the diamond princess and has been diagnosed with coronavirus has exclusively told this programme he and his family have been recieving death threats. it comes as more than 140 britons are stranded on another cruise ship called the grand princess, off the coast of san fransico. testing kits have been flown by helicopter to the ship after a man in his 70s, who had been on the ship, died of the virus and several people on board fell ill. and in a new development, the american government has said it
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does not have enough test kits. more than 92,000 cases of the virus have now been confirmed globally. here, the figure stands at 116, with person has died — an older patient with existing health conditions. let's now hear the story of one man who's survived coronavirus. carl goldman and his wife teri were on board the cruise ship the diamond princess in japan last month. he has been in quarantine for around 30 days and has been talking to our reporter anna collinson from a secure unit in nebraska. he told us he and his wife have been shunned since going public. he started by telling us he began to feel unwell during his flight back to the us. i went on to america, i was feeling fine. went to sleep for a couple of hours and woke up with a very high fever. 0ver hours and woke up with a very high fever. over 103 fahrenheit. hours and woke up with a very high fever. 0ver103 fahrenheit. and so they moved me over to the bio containment area but it was that a spike happening very, very quickly
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that seems to be the common denominator for that seems to be the common denominatorfor nine out that seems to be the common denominator for nine out of ten people who get this. what's weird about the virus is unlike a cold, the fever and a dry cough where the only symptoms that i had. it was totally mild, not like a regular cold where you sneeze, sniffle, sore throat, none of that. i didn't even get body aches, i did not get chills and heavy sweating when i had my high fever. i've had bronchitis which was probably the worst i've been, that was eight in a 1—10 scale, this would be two. if i were not contagious i would have been back at work within 48 hours. you've 110w back at work within 48 hours. you've now been in quarantine for around 30 days. what has that been like? man, it's terrible because i tested positive again last night, that means i've got to start all over
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again, tomorrow will be the next timei again, tomorrow will be the next time i can get a test, then i will have to test —3 days in a row. i've beenin have to test —3 days in a row. i've been in quarantine here in nebraska since february 17. that's a long time. ten days spent in the bio containment unit, very high level of care. and now the last day since last wednesday, i've been here in the lower level. i keep myself busy, and the local radio station, 24/7 news site out there, i'm working on my laptop from early in the morning until about three, four, 5pm, served three meals a day, doctors coming to check on me. nurses coming to take samples, we have to take our temperature officially with the nurse in here twice a day. and of course i have nurse in here twice a day. and of course i have access nurse in here twice a day. and of course i have access to the television as well, i get to keep up with the news. do you think there is stigma attached to having the
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coronavirus? one of the things that's happened because we've been so that's happened because we've been so public about this as we are getting a bunch of threats, some people are freaking out, my wife came home, they are saying don't come see me for a month. the per kid who watched our dog went back to his job and got fired that day because he'd been in contact with my wife. there's a lot of unnecessary hysteria out here and ijust would urge everybody to chill a bit, use some common sense and if we are let loose, we are no longer contagious. cani loose, we are no longer contagious. can i have an idea of what those threats say? i don't even want to get into them, there is graphic as they can be in terms of threatening oui’ they can be in terms of threatening our lives, we are getting they are getting very graphic about the kind of threats, making threats on our grandkids, it runs the gamut. there are max three out there and we are 110w are max three out there and we are now dealing with them. —— there are
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crazies out there. now with reports of products like hand sanitisers running low on supermarket shelves — some of us are going online to buy the items — only to find them for sale at inflated prices. yesterday the competition and markets authority announced it will consider taking direct enforcement action against any companies who are "charging excessive prices or making misleading claims about the efficacy of protective equipment."‘ 0ur reporter michael cowan has been looking into this and is here now. some of you getting in touch. barry an e—mail says my wife and i did a tour of pharmacist yesterday to get hand wash, my wife and stepson have severe immune deficiencies, both advised for years to avoid people with viruses. i have a diseased lung and also susceptible to picking up viral infections. because of panic buying we've not been able to get hold of one bottle of cleanser and would ask those that are buying and selling these products to think about people who genuinely need them and emptying shelves. it's discriminating against those that it
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the most. john text says has a name and spoken to the banks about what they're doing to try and prevent the spread of coronavirus via use of their atm machines? my own bank has no antibacterial hand cleanser and i've not seen any evidence of regular cleaning of the screens. surely it's up to play their part and protect their customers? it's got us all thinking, hasn't it come about what we are touching on what might be honoured. hence the desire for everyone to try and get hold of antibacterial washers. now, our reporter michael is here. 0nline, some of the prices are so inflated because you just can't get it anywhere else. amazon have said they've removed a large number of listings from third—party sellers. 0ne listings from third—party sellers. one of the said? amazon have removed 1 million product listings from what they say it makes suspect are misleading claims about the coronavirus. a huge number coupled with that, they've also taken down tens of thousands of listings for so—called price gouging, but that means is when you jack the price up
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for a product in a way that is considered exploitative. this all follows on from an announcement by the advertising standards agency earlier this week are found against two companies who had made adverts for facemasks that they claimed would help prevent catching the coronavirus. 0bviously that is not true. the advice from health officials is that if you were a face mask and you have the coronavirus, it might stop you from spreading it further but if you don't have a facemask, it's unlikely to help you stop catching it. tell us about the prices being charged online for some of these products. some of these are going for extortionate amounts online. yesterday we spent the day looking at the cost of antibacterial gels online. this product came up a lot, it's a product called hospital grade. 600 millilitres. at the outset of this it's important to point out the brand are not selling this online, nor are amazon, third—party sellers using that
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platform. it's individuals or companies going onto amazon to sell this product. this, normally, when it's not out of stock in a well—known pharmacy costs £3.49, as well—known pharmacy costs £3.49, as we can see. 0n amazon we found this product yesterday going for £149, 99 p. and another one £129 for a bottle. we found a double pack, slightly cheaper if you do it cost per bottle. £249 for two bottle and remember this is a product that cost £3.49 normally. crazy, do you know if people are buying it at that price? we can't tell but it's there, for these incredibly hiked up prices and some of the other hand gel products we found, they were all coming from uk sellers. and they we re coming from uk sellers. and they were also lots of people selling them from china and from italy, interestingly, two of the places worst affected by this outbreak. in terms of the uk sellers we contacted
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all of them yesterday, all the ones you just saw. as soon as we contacted them and all of those listings were either taken down or the price was significantly reduced. we asked all of them for a response as to why they were doing it, we only got one from a company called quality at better value. they said we are buying this at a higher price from their suppliers to fulfil market demand, they said we know this used to be cheap but suddenly the price went up in the market so clearly what they are saying is the suppliers are putting the price up, they are just responding to that online. what about the efficacy a nyway of online. what about the efficacy anyway of handle, with the advice? health officials say and jill is effective provided it contains alcohol and if you want to kill 99.9% of germs which is what you need, you need to make sure that the gels you buy contain at least 70% alcohol. it's very important to check, if you can even get these products, but the alcohol content is but health officials say still the best way to protect ourselves is by
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washing your hands with warm, soapy water for 20 seconds or the amount of time it takes to sing happy birthday twice. we are all getting sick of happy birthday! we are. it's obviously the subject everyone talking about, loads of comments from you. carol says people scaremongering, as long as you have access to washing facilities just keep washing your hands. sanitiser will not stop you getting the virus. yes, it will help orjust act sensibly. steve says i did not panic buy but have increased weekly shopping obtained and dried goods and cereals etc since i saw the upper getting out of control in mid—january. just in case there would be panic buying. i stopped a few weeks ago. one text that says i paid £13 for alcoholic gel on amazon, i'm afraid that's reasonable as ebay has a higher price. thank you for those, keep them coming in. coming up in the programme. we are live on lesbos, the greek island, thousands of migrants stranded after turkey opened its borders to
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refugees desperate to reach europe. yesterday we heard astonishing detailfrom the high court, which found that the ruler of dubai, sheikh mohammed al—maktoum, abducted two of his daughters, and subjected his estranged wife to a campaign of intimidation. a series ofjudgments were released after the court overruled the sheikh‘s efforts to keep the findings secret. it also found that he "continues to maintain a regime whereby both these two young women are deprived of their liberty". in a moment we'll hear from tina jauhianen who was kidnapped alongside one of those women, princess latifa. but first 0ur security correspondent frank gardner is here. extra great detail coming through the family court hearings. what does it say about what's been going on about what's been going on? -- extraordinary detail. it stands up to the allegations that have been
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circulating for quite some time, actually fairly well reported by a number of media outlets that these princesses had been abducted but this is the first time that britainpos macro high court has actually stood of these allegations and said yes, they have foundation, in other words they have found for the former wife, princess hiya of jordan, they found on her side. in the first case princess shamsa, was abducted in broad daylight from cambridge in 2000 after trying to escape from the family estate in surrey. according to her account, she was injected with a sedative and then there is no question about this, she was put on a helicopter, flown to northern france and put on a dubai diplomatic plane and flown back to the country and she's hardly been seen since. the second princess tried twice to escape, she was imprisoned for three years, she is
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given a very graphic testimony on video which the court has stood up, talking about her misuse, torture, being beaten up by the sheik ‘s agents and it's taken princess hiya quite some time to believe her husband could have done this. when she found out, unfortunately for her to coincide with and finding out that she was having an adulterous affair so he was pretty angry. she is the sixth and youngest of his various wives. and she started to get intimidating threats so she fled last year in april with her children to britain. she's been sitting in court, i've been three feet away from her, this is a frightened woman. she is very frightened that sheikh mohammed al—maktoum will try and abduct her children. he hasn't appeared in court. thejudge ruled that he had not been open and honest with the court in his account of what had happened to the two princess, his two daughters by another marriage who he has
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abducted. he went to great lengths to keep this secret, huge fortune spent on lawyers. what is it?i million spent on lawyers. i see, the amount lawyers. now it's out there, what happens? well, it certainly doesn't do the image of dubai any good but it will be reported in the gulf at all. it is hardly any reporting there, its state—controlled media or state influence media, no one is going to publicly talk about this in dubai, that's for sure. there are questions to be asked i think, of britainpos macro foreign office and how it didn't help the cambridge police investigate back in 2000. there was a detective chief inspector who made an application to go to dubai to visit and question princess shamsa about what had happened to her and at the time the foreign secretary
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was robin cook, he got caught engaged in the story after which no help was forthcoming and in other at the time is accused of not, essentially helping to muzzle this story or the early part of it. in the long term, i don't think it's going to make a lot of difference, you've been to dubai, i used to live there, it's a global success, that place. and sheikh mohammed al—maktoum for all his faults, is viewed in dubai as the father of the nation, enormously popular. incredibly successful business, holiday, vacationing and technological area. it has caused and shown a bit of an unpleasant light on what is going on there, after a while it will be business as usual. the statements that have come from him have basically said this is a private family matter. need to respect the privacy of the children. he is in complete denial about it. he is in complete denial about it. he doesn't deny that he brought these women back to dubai. but he
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says essentially they were being rescued, one of them has psychological problems, complicating the matter is that when princess latifah escaped from dubai two years ago she was helped by a former french spy who it appears, was trying to extort money from her. now, that doesn't change the fact that she was trying genuinely to escape from her family. that she was trying genuinely to escape from herfamily. and her friend, you will hear from escape from herfamily. and her friend, you will hearfrom her shortly, knows this story far better than i do and she got to know the princess over a period of time. there is no question, thejudge said, she wanted to leave the family and she tried in a genuine bid to escape and she did not want to go back to dubai and to that family. what would you expect to happen now? because these women have not been seenin because these women have not been seen in public for a very long time, latifah had last seen in december 2018. would you expect to be an attempt for them to —— for there to
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be more transparency? human rights organisations and there is a campaign group called free latifah have been pushing for this were some time, ithink have been pushing for this were some time, i think they are going to raise the matter with the un. the problem is, i've lived in the middle east for years, the gulf, when they wa nt to east for years, the gulf, when they want to pull down the shutters they are want to pull down the shutters they a re pretty want to pull down the shutters they are pretty good at it, theyjust say, there is nothing to see here, go away. you know, we respect human rights, we follow the rule of law, this is a private matter, there is nothing to see here, move along. that will be the official attitude. i cannot see britainpos macro government which has very close relations with the uae and dubai, it's a very popular place for british residents, people have property there, close strategic, defence and security and intelligence relationships between the british government and the government there, i can see that this will be exposed any further. does he still travel here? it is, he
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comes to race meetings, he didn't appear in court because he said as i had state it will not be appropriate for him to do that, that wasn't viewed very well by the judge and judges. he has been photographed with the queen. it wasn't that long ago, two years ago they were both, him and princess to back three were photographed at a race meeting. will it change? he's a massive investor in horse racing, the whole global horse racing, equestrian industry. he is the founder and owner of godolphin stable, hugely successful global brand. he owns property in suffolk and in surrey and in scotland. he is worth billions. this is what really frightens her. which is what really frightens her. which is here is a man with limitless, bottomless pockets. but he can hire whoever he wants to do whatever he wa nts whoever he wants to do whatever he wants and that's why she's exposed this story. there is a paradox here, joanna. if you look at sheikh mohammed al—maktoum and crown prince mohammed al—maktoum and crown prince mohammed bin salman of saudi arabia,
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these are people who western governments fell in love with in the sense they are on paper, enlightened, open—minded, liberal, western thinking progressive leaders and rulers who are trying to take the country is forward and if you go to dubai it's an incredible place. likewise, saudi arabia is advancing but behind the walls, it's the same old patriarchal autocracy. thank you, frank. i've been speaking to david haigh, a human rights lawyer who runs the freelatifa campaign, and to tiina jauhianen, princess latifa's best friend, who tried to help her escape and was also captured and imprisoned. she'd been fighting to prove. i'm very, very pleased with the news. i'm happy that the reporting restrictions were finally lifted. and the whole world is now hearing
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the news that sheikh mohammed al—maktoum did indeed kidnap two of his daughters, latifah and shamsa and this is not official and no longer an allegation. and of course this is something that you saw up close yourself because you were on the boat with latifah in 2018. when she tried to escape dubai, you were there. exactly. she was taken back. what was that like? 0bviously, that night when it all happened was terrifying. it's probably one of the scariest experiences i've ever had. the boat was stormed by indian commandos who had machine guns. they we re commandos who had machine guns. they were threatening to shoot us. it was extremely, extremely scary and obviously, afterwards, latifah was dragged away, kicking and screaming. her pleas for asylum were ignored. and after that, myself and the rest of the crew were kidnapped as well.
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since then sheikh mohammed al—maktoum has said actually what happened there was that she was effectively being rescued and taken home. what did she say to you at that time when you were on the boat together? when she was taken? what we re together? when she was taken? what were her words about what was going on? no, she was actually repeating that she is seeking political asylum. and they were ignoring her. 0bviously her last words were, you know, don't take me back, you know, rather, it should be here. she would rather, it should be here. she would rather have been shot there then go back? that must have been so distressing. yes, extremely, yes. have you had any contact with her at all since she went back? no, no, the last time i've seen her was on the boat. and if you hadn't have been there and been able to leave and tell the story, do you think would
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even know what had happened? probably not. i assume dubai would have managed to cover this all up. they have tried very hard so far. they have tried very hard so far. they have tried very hard so far. they have issued different kinds of state m e nts they have issued different kinds of statements saying that latifah is happy with her family at home. and yes, they tried to cover it up. but it's no longer possible, after this ruling has, you know, was made public. give been a powerful witness, have you ever been afraid for your own safety because of that? no, no, not really. i mean, ifeel like after it all became public, you know, it gives me some form of protection. david, what happens now with this ruling? it's very powerful but it's a civil court. it is, i think it's a landmark ruling and there's lots of avenues in which we
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can pursue it now. one of the first ones we are already pursuing is about three or four weeks ago tina andl about three or four weeks ago tina and i were in the united nations, we we re and i were in the united nations, we were attending the working group enforcing voluntary disappearances. they've been investigating the disappearance of latifah for nearly two years. this will be very, very useful for them because this shows that the highest family court judge in england has made a decision that latifah and her sister were kidnapped and were effectively forcefully disappeared and this enables the un to come to a conclusion on their investigation. we sent the judgment to them yesterday and that's obviously a very powerful conclusion if they can come to that. of course, at the end of the day, he is a dictator in a country that is not a democracy and so, ultimately, only he can let latifah go. and only he can let shamsa go but we are looking to the international community and obviously the authorities in the uk when we look at what happened with shamsa and her kidnapping to take action. and as you say, it comes
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down to whether he would agree to it 01’ down to whether he would agree to it or not. but there is now this huge amount of scrutiny and pressure. what are your desktops?” amount of scrutiny and pressure. what are your desktops? i mean our best hopes, as they only as they always have been, relying on diplomacy and and the media in dubai isa diplomacy and and the media in dubai is a state relies an awful lot on the british tourists, western pounds, british money, it's unthinkable to think a ruler of that country can do what he has now been found to have done, kidnapping his daughters, abusing his wives, breaking laws in england and still we can have them as an ally so we now need to look towards our government, to the foreign secretary, the home secretary, to look at what they can do in terms of putting pressure on the uae and we can look, as well, the un and every single person as an individual, do
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they want to start considering boycotting the emirates until latifah and her sister shamsa are set free? could he face criminal charges? i think that should certainly be looked at. what you've got is a judgment that confirms that in 2000, he was involved in procuring the kidnap of shamsa from the streets of the uk. that is a confirmed judgment now, it's essentially a finding of fact in these judgments by the highest family courtjudge. these judgments by the highest family court judge. and these judgments by the highest family courtjudge. and it also infers that there was some form of a cover—up by robin cook and in the foreign office. that's very, very serious and that needs investigation. tina and i at last year we re investigation. tina and i at last year were assisting the cambridgeshire police, trying to reopen investigations into the kidnap of shamsa from the streets of cambridge by using latifah 's evidence, tina has also seen shamsa in dubai, that's something we are looking at but again that's
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something we will now be addressing and sending these judgments, i'm sure they already have them but we will be reaching out to cambridge police again. he has obviously, an estate in surrey and its front that the state shamsa actually escaped in 2000 but was picked up quickly and a couple of months later in cambridge. would he still come here? would he be able to come up without risking facing charges potentially? we are looking out that the now, because in terms of immigration, is hea because in terms of immigration, is he a fit and proper person to be coming to this country? if an average individual had been found by average individual had been found by a leading judge in a court in england to have kidnapped two of his daughters and abused his wives, and to have used intimidation and ignored laws, would he passed the immigration laws to be allowed into the country? highly unlikely. and therefore if that is the case for a normal individual, why should we be allowing a ruler on the same basis to come to this country? questions
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now need to be asked. tina, in december 2018, latifa was actually seenin december 2018, latifa was actually seen in public. it was a meeting with mary robinson, the former un commissionerfor with mary robinson, the former un commissioner for human rights. with mary robinson, the former un commissionerfor human rights. it was a meeting actually arranged by haya. since then, she's not been seen. do you have any idea as to how she might be, where she might be, how she is living, anything at all? obviously the judgment itself gives us obviously the judgment itself gives us clues that she is effectively held against her will. i hope that she would have some access to the current news, because that would give her some hope, you know, to keep fighting and not give up. and the two sisters, they are sisters from the same mother, sheikh mohammed bin rashid al—maktoum has had several wives, other sisters close ? had several wives, other sisters close? shamsa was living in the same
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house, and she used to be very close to latifa. and shamsa, you met her ona to latifa. and shamsa, you met her on a couple of occasions? yes. did you know at that time that she was being held against her will, effectively? no, i didn't know, i realised that she looked a bit shaken and unwell and she was avoiding eye contact. it was only after latifa told me what had happened to shamsa. and princess haya, it emerged in the hearings that have gone on in the family courts in this country, because of course this is why this has come to the fall, because she came to this country to seek divorce from the sheikh and to maintain custody of the children, that she has with him in this country, she said that for some time, she actually believed the line from dubai that it was about protecting the girls, and that they we re protecting the girls, and that they were therefore their own protection. so, the fact that you had met shamsa
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and didn't realise what was going on, how much of a change do you think it will be that nowadays is out there in such a way that it is clear that they are not there of their own volition? yeah, i believe there is no doubt anymore. obviously, i assumed that haya hadn't met shamsa and latifa, until after the kidnapping. i believed that only by visiting latifa, she found out the truth, and after talking to her. this has been going on for you for two years. callum has this dominated your life effectively since then, knowing what had happened to your friend? it definitely has, but at the moment i feel positive, i feel like this is a step towards latifa being free i
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hope that the ruling will help with united nations moving forward, putting more pressure on dubai ruler to release his daughters. will you stop fighting until she's freed, do you believe she will be free one day? i believe she will be free, and obviously myself and david have no plans of stopping the campaign that happens. thank you very much, tina and david, thank you. that was tina jauhianen, a friend of princess latifa, in a statement issued after thejudgment was latifa, in a statement issued after the judgment was published, latifa, in a statement issued after thejudgment was published, sheikh mohammed said... this case contains highly personal matters relating to our children. the appeal was made to protect the best interests and welfare of the children. the outcome does not protect my children from media attention in the way that other children in family proceedings in the uk are protected. as ahead of government i was not able to participate in the court's
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fact—finding process. this has resulted in the release of a ‘fact—finding' judgment which inevitably only tells one side of the story. dozens of airline routes which connect the uk's regions could be left without services after the collapse of flybe. scotland's loganair has committed to maintaining 16 routes, but many smaller airports still face gaping holes in their schedules. flybe was europe's largest regional operator, and went into administration early on thursday, after a bid for fresh financial support failed. but the impact of the collapse will go well beyond the thousands of flybe employees, with unions warning another 2,000 jobs could be affected for those who work in airports and connected industries. mark kermeen has been with flybe as a senior cabin crew memberfor 11 years, and craig comrie is an operations controller for the ground handling company swissport. jonathan hinkle says the chief executive of loganair, that airline which has now opened a special recruitment line for former flybe
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employees and is planning to salvage services on 16 flybe's 120 employees and is planning to salvage services on 16 flybe's120 routes. mark, you have been working for them for 11 years, how did you find out that it was going like this? that today was completely weird, just a normal day, and in the afternoon i saw on twitter, things weren't looking great, i got home a few hours later, teatime, news that it was given one week, and then an hour or so it was, you know, only days, and by then, it was that night, and so yeah, it happened very, very quickly, out of the blue. yeah, just completely... very, very quickly, it happened. and what happens financially for you ? are happened. and what happens financially for you? are you due a payslip, if so, will you get it, what happens? payday would have been
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the 20th of this month. and so you won't obviously get that? pension, what happens with all of these things, do you know? pension, i believe, we are waiting for the pension company to get in touch with us. idid pension company to get in touch with us. i did dial into a conference call yesterday but the day before, i didn't sleep at all, the night before, so, everything is still quite blurry. but yeah, that pension should be ok. obviously, it must be so stressful for you and everyone in your position, when you're expecting that you're going to get paid and you're not going to, what will you do, how are you going to manage financially? so, like the rest of my colleagues, with signed on the jobseeker‘s allowance, getting all that sorted either yesterday or today, got an appointment at the jobcentre on monday morning, which i
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am going to do. and thenjust try and look for something as soon as possible. loganair are recruiting, they are putting out a number, we will put out the number in a moment, let's talk to jonathan hinkles, will put out the number in a moment, let's talk tojonathan hinkles, who joins us from loganair now. tell us what you're doing to step into the breach. well, we announced yesterday that we will be starting routes from edinburgh, glasgow and newcastle to southampton, and a number of the other flybe services such as aberdeen to manchester, aberdeen to birmingham, in totalaround aberdeen to manchester, aberdeen to birmingham, in total around 16 routes that were previously flown by flybe will be operated by loganair. the big issue this week has clearly been stories from people like mark and on behalf of all of us at loganair, with every sympathy. i've beenin loganair, with every sympathy. i've been in that position twice in my own career, i know exactly how it feels, and putting things in place now, we are trying to help a number of flybe people get new roles within loganair, we will be recruiting
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around 100 pilots, cabin crew and engineers to help us as we gear up to take on a small selection of the routes previously flown by flybe. mark, you look quite emotional while listening to him talking, might you be able to go there and get a job? yeah, possibly, i'm not ruling anything out. yesterday i was thinking, that's it, i'm hanging up my wings, i am not going to fly anymore, i'm walking away. but i think that was just a knee—jerk reaction, so today i am going sit down after that and refresh up my cv and see what opportunities. ideally i would like to stay here in manchester, but you know, beggars can't be choosers. craig, what about you, you work for the ground handling company swissport, obviously there is going to be a knock—on effect to others involved, what will be the impact for you and your company? festival i would just like to send my super these to the
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employees of flybe. —— first of all. notjust flybe, employees of flybe. —— first of all. not just flybe, but employees of flybe. —— first of all. notjust flybe, but all across employees of flybe. —— first of all. not just flybe, but all across the industry. it is like a domino effect, you've got handlers, caterers, fillers, cleaners, every community in and around airports will be affected by any airline collapse, and certainly, it has a knock—on effect for the families and communities around the individual regionalised airports. jonathan, is this going to be viable for you, because, this comes also at a time of difficulty for all airlines with companies warning of an impact on their profits because of coronavirus, are you going to be able to manage this expansion? well, what we've decided to do in loganair is to focus on a relatively small number, focusing on our heartland in
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scotland, and flights into the likes of south, exeter, manchesterand birmingham, predominantly cross—border routes but also flying from newcastle. we have taken that decision on a very cautious basis, that we believe that those routes will work. flybe clearly flew a lot of services into london, for example, and into europe, there was we won't be taking on. and actually, our evaluation is that the routes that we've chosen are the right ones for us, the ones that we believe can work. i'm sure over the coming days you will see other airlines doing that. in terms ofjob opportunities and in terms of supporting ground handling agents and airport staff, i think there will be a short, sharp decline in terms of the number of services, but over the next 3—6 months, the vast majority of those services previously provided by flybe will come back in some shape orform. but flybe will come back in some shape or form. but loganair, flybe will come back in some shape orform. but loganair, the 16 routes we announced yesterday are already on sale, we start flying them as early as a week on monday, and that
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is the start of the process to rebuild uk network and keep uk collectivity moving. i know, mark, you've got personal interest in the importance of collectivity because you are actually originally from the isle of man. that's right. -- connectivity. these flights are vital for connectivity. these flights are vitalfor some connectivity. these flights are vital for some communities, aren't they? absolutely. the isle of man, they? absolutely. the isle of man, the channel islands, belfast, newquay, even, you can'tjust... especially the channel islands, the isle of man and belfast, you can't just hop on the train or drive, it is either a sea voyage in the middle of winter, in storm ciara or something, or you fly. and so, it is going to have a massive impact on getting to and from places like the isle of man et cetera. and the channel islands. jonathan, there was
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discussion when the problems were first emerging at flybe, well, they have been emerging for some time, but basically back injanuary when it was becoming clear that flybe was reaching a critical point, conversations around the government easing off on the duty will form flybe because domestic airlines basically have a double whammy on air passenger duty because of taking off and landing in this country, is this something that you will be taking up and looking at and trying to put pressure on the government? well, we've already made our representations clear to the government as to what we think needs to change to stop these repeated airline failure is happening, but from loganair's point of view, we're content that the routes that we are taking on we will be able to stain, evenif taking on we will be able to stain, even if nothing changes from the government. what we can't do is take ona government. what we can't do is take on a group of routes and then immediately say, terribly sorry, we can't make this work because of government policy. it would be the equivalent of buying a house next to an airport and then complaining
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about aircraft noise. we know what the playing field is. if that playing field improves, it can only help the industry as a whole, and we would very much like to see that happen. so, what measures would you like to see, in? well, first and foremost, ending the double taxation domestic flights. it is absolutely crazy that for a flight, for example, between aberdeen and belfast, you pay £26 in uk passenger duty, but for a flight from gatwick to majorca, you pay £13 on a return trip. so, ending that double taxation on domestics really is an important plank in making sure that the uk stays connected. i think there will be a counterargument to that from the environmental lobby, andl that from the environmental lobby, and i fully understand that, but if you look at the domestic routes we fly, for example, if you fly between edinburgh and the orkney islands, and it would be the same for anything that crosses water, the carbon emissions from getting on a plane are seven to eight times less
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thanif plane are seven to eight times less than if you actually take your car and get on a ferry, because the level of emissions from the ferries are significantly higher than aviation. so, particularly for ireland routes, whether they be in scotland, the isle of man, belfast, the channel islands, that is the least environmentally friendly way to fly and we should have a tax syste m to fly and we should have a tax system which reflects that. thank you all very much indeed forjoining us. mark, wishing you all the very best with your next steps. the nspcc has exclusively told this programme that the number of calls to their helpline about children who've witnessed a quarter in the past year, serious domestic abuse has risen by almost a quarter in the past year, that's 1300 more calls. they say the new domestic abuse bill introduced in parliament this week fails to properly support children as victims. josh parry has spent the last month at one of the few specialist uk this is nicky and her daughter imogen.
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imogen was one of around 250,000 children the government you are living with domestic abuse in england, and it had a big impact. says are living with domestic abuse in england, and it had a big impact. from having a sweet kind of a personality, shejust got a bit rebellious, and she was traumatised. now, the nspcc is warning there is less help available for domestic abuse survivors like nicky and imogen, although the number of children experiencing domestic abuse may be on the rise. this sort of thing happens downstairs... the children's charity has exclusively told this programme that the number of calls to their helpline about children who've witnessed serious domestic abuse has risen by almost a quarter in the past year. nicky lived in an abusive relationship, and has agreed to share her and imogen's story with us. i felt like a possession. there was financial restrictions. i couldn't go and have coffee with friends. you've got to remember, i came from south africa so i was completely isolated, i knew nobody here. and i found that over the time, i actually felt like my personality was just being stamped out and i just became
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quiet and withdrawn. but it was only when her husband robert became ill and had to move out of the family home that nique realised the impact it was having on their daughter. robert got stage 4 brain cancer, he became very, very depressed and, you know, sometimes very belligerent. when i did see the difference in imogen, it really was a big impact on the way i looked at things. she didn't need to have to live with that. so, yeah, she has had a tough little life. put your hands up if you noticed when mum and dad lived together, that there would be lots of angry words, they would be shouting, they'd both look sad, put your hands up for me high so i can see... we've been given access to leapfrog, a therapy programme helping both mums and children including nique and imogen. leapfrog is one of only two centres of its kind in the uk helping
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parents and children recover. why is it so important that the mums and the children go through this therapy together? when the mums come to us, they're dealing with their children's difficult behaviours, but also, they're at a very low point in their lives. so, then, to be able to help their children and put their family back together, they need the support as well, so, we look at lots of different things, how domestic abuse has affected them as a woman, but also as a mum, and how it may have affected their relationship with their children. what kind of things do children tell you, what do you hear in these groups? i worked once with a little boy who used to sleep in his shoes every night, and that was because he was so used to him and his mum having to run in the middle of the night. so, when he first came to leapfrog, his coat and his shoes would stay on. and when we got to about week six, he felt comfortable enough to take his shoes off, and then his mum said he was also sleeping at night without his shoes on, and for me, that was a big achievement for him. the nspcc have exclusively given us figures from their helpline.
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they show the number of calls about children who witnessed serious forms of domestic abuse has risen by about 25% in the past year. more than half of the calls were referred to local authorities for help, but there is currently no legal requirement for councils to step in. massive weight off their little shoulders... the domestic abuse bill introduced to parliament this week is set to change that. it will mean local councils have to provide support by providing refuge places for children and their parents also affected by domestic abuse. but it's been met with criticism from some children's charities who say it doesn't explicitly recognise children as victims, and help doesn't apply to those remaining in the family home. we are calling for the government to introduce a statutory duty to provide community—based services across the country, to ensure that children have the right kind of support available to help them recover from this kind of abuse. we contacted the home office to ask whether they will be considering how the new bill could better protect children who witness domestic abuse. a spokesperson said that they fully recognised the devastating impact
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domestic abuse has on children, and that children will benefit from a number of measures included in the domestic abuse bill. they've also appointed a domestic abuse commissioner to look at how they can better protect children affected by domestic abuse. you may have noticed them doing things like shouting at each other... so, whether the government will commit to making programmes like this more available remains to be seen. but the difference it can make to the lives of parents and children is clear. "my mum doesn't cry as much," that's a big one for the children. they're used to seeing mum cry a lot. that's one thing that they do notice, isn't it? and our actionline website is bbc.co.uk/actionline. if you need help, there are loads of organisations listed there who can do that.
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some more comments from you on coronavirus. this one says... my wife received terrible abuse when people heard she was not at home. this one says... went shopping yesterday, i was accused of stockpiling when i bought a large pack of loo roll. i would just like to say, she says, i had one liberal left in my house! and i bought the offer which the supermarket was selling out, which we always buy to save money! stockpile vigilantes need to get a grip! this one says... due to ill—health, i normally get a supermarket delivery on sunday morning. this week they are fully booked until next tuesday teatime. they have sold out of toilet roll, dettol and wipes. this one says... i am not buying hand sanitiser, i already had a brexit box of basic food items that i added to every week last year. this one says... supermarkets should be taking responsibility and limiting the
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amount of product you can buy so that everyone has a chance to obtain essentials, in other words, two packs of loo roll, two packs of pasta. over 700 migrants have arrived on the greek island of lesbos in less than a week, since turkey opened its borders to refugees desperate to reach europe. there has been local hostility towards the new arrivals, with greek coastguards firing rubber bullets into air to try to stop them landing. thousands of migrants and refugees are already on the island, many living in squalid, overcrowded camps. last night 42 people arrived on one boat, mainly women and children, the first boatload for several days. let's talk to our correspondent jean mackenzie on lesbos. what's the situation there this morning? these are the people who arrived last night, 42 of them, the youngest is just last night, 42 of them, the youngest isjust under a last night, 42 of them, the youngest is just under a year older, about a dozen children. they came across on a boat, the first arrival for a few days, but they have had to sleep out here overnight, they haven't been
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taken to the main camp because it is so overcrowded. the main cap on this island was meant for 3000 migrants and refugees, there are now 20,000 on this island, so they have been kept here for now, it is not clear how long they are going to stay here for. —— the main camp. they are putting up a tent over there for them to sleep in so it looks like they could be here for a couple more nights. i mentioned briefly what the coast guard are doing to try to deter people from arriving, tell us more about that? yeah, the reaction of greece over the last week has been to secure its borders, saying that it really does not want people arriving. we have seen videos in recent days of the coastguard shooting into the water, into the outcome driving right up beside these rubber dinghies to try and destabilise them, and that is exact to what we have heard from these people who arrived overnight, that they had the same reaction from the coastguard, that they did come right up coastguard, that they did come right up to the boat and several temps we re up to the boat and several temps were made to try to destabilise the boat, the coastguard was shouting at them to go back, but they manage to
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get to the shore of them eventually. we can hear from willie from uganda, she will describe it in more detail. they had ropes, they wanted to rope the driver, and we were trying to show them that we have children. they should stop. but they wouldn't. and i was carrying one baby. i think he got here, they hooked him. what was it like, were you scared? ya, i was it like, were you scared? ya, i was scared, was it like, were you scared? ya, i was scared , everyone was it like, were you scared? ya, i was scared, everyone was scared, the kids were crying, some men work ryan, and some guys. everyone was scared. what will happen to these people arriving there? we just don't
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know, joanna, because the greek authorities are still deciding what to do with the people who have come here in recent days. there's 750 that have arrived since turkey decided to open its border. most of them have been taken down to the port and put on a navy ship and we think they are going to be taken to a detention centre which the greek authorities are preparing on the mainland. but we are not sure what will happen to these people. they could welljoin them. the greek authorities have suspended all asylu m authorities have suspended all asylum procedures for a month so they want be processing these claims, so they could very well be taken over to the mainland and then tried to be deported back to their home countries. but we are still expecting more people to arrive. just over there, that is turkey, it is literally a few miles away. although the greek authorities are doing their best to deter people from coming, they have been arriving on this island for many, many years and it is unlikely that this is going to stop. how do the locals react and what impact is it having on this island? we've seen in the
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past few days that this really is an island which is at breaking point. the 20,000 migrants here isjust proving too many. there have been quite a lot of hostilities, quite a lot of anger from local people, who feel that greece, and this island in particular, has borne the brunt of the migrant crisis. and we've seen in recent days aid workers being attacked, migrants themselves. the aid workers in particular have received a lot of hostility because people on this island seem to feel that it people on this island seem to feel thatitis people on this island seem to feel that it is the aid workers who are supporting them and encouraging them to come. there is a belief among a small group of people that if they can get the aid workers to leave, then people might stop coming to this island. thank you very much. just time for a few more of your comments on coronavirus and stockpiling. this one says... my daughter sent for one sanitiser at £22, tracked it, it was on its way, thenit £22, tracked it, it was on its way, then it was redirected back to the seller. then it had gone up to £55.
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ipaid it seller. then it had gone up to £55. i paid it because i have homecare 24/7 for my husband and 177. trying to look after myself, as i don't wa nt to look after myself, as i don't want it. this one says... my opinion of people who are exploiting others by overpricing goods such as hand sanitiser online is that these individuals have no morals and are very selfish and have thought of no one but themselves. this one says... i went to my local store yesterday and people were going crazy, toilet roll flying off the shelves as well as dettol and sprays, like there was no tomorrow. thank you for your company, have a good afternoon. good morning. if you've been out and about already, you will know that there is lots of sunshine across the uk at the moment and it is feeling quite pleasant in that march sunshine, which is getting quite strong now. a little bit of cloud across western areas of scotland,
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wales and the south—west of england, showers will continue into the afternoon. but those will be isolated later on with some sunny spells. best of the sunshine, central and eastern areas. we have got some light winds, temperatures getting to about 7—10dc. out of the wind, it is feeling quite pleasant. tonight, it could turn quite chilly, but elsewhere we have got more cloud moving in. temperatures generally coming up overnight tonight. much milder, compared to last night. on saturday, rain affecting northern and western areas. rain spreading eastward overnight saturday until sunday.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's11am and these are the main stories this morning... as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the uk rises to 116, supermarket bosses say they are baffled by the health secretary's suggestion that the government is working with food retailers to ensure supplies are uninterrupted. there is absolutely no need for individuals to go around buying more than they need. and in fact, part of the response of this has to be us coming together. more than 140 british nationals are among 3,500 passengers stranded on a cruise ship off san francisco, which is not being allowed to dock in the city after some passengers developed flu—like symptons. the best friend of dubai's princess latifa says she is pleased that

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