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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 23, 2020 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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further steps according to how many people are frankly unwilling to follow that advice. doctors and our collea g u es follow that advice. doctors and our colleagues in belfast put their own message on social media. we are frightened, help us, please state home. it's a frightened, help us, please state home. it‘s a pre— frightened, help us, please state home. it's a pre— echoed by doctors across the nhs. we have neverfaced across the nhs. we have neverfaced a situation like this before. this is an unprecedented public health crisis. we also know that if you as the public play your role in helping good morning, welcome your nhs, will be better at dealing to breakfast with dan walker with this crisis. to try to stop and louise minchin. our headlines today: "stay at home." that's the message as the prime minister threatens people gathering, more high street further measures to limit people's movements. take my advice seriously. stores are closing. by the end of follow it the crucial. today, mcdonald's is to shut all of its more than 1000 restaurants
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across the uk. the past few days, thousands of people ignored social distancing advice over the weekend it's been selling takeaway food as crowds flocked to parks and beaches. only. but now it says for the safety as the coronavirus crisis continues, of its customers and its staff, that the health secretary promises more protective mr stop as well. from today, all equipment for nhs staff. in the uk's broadband network cope with increased demand from home schools are also closed but the networking and homeschooling. i will children of key workers including be considering capacity. the medical staff will still be able to international olympic committee is attend. and help those staff do considering postponing tokyo 2020. their work safely, the nhs in england has bought 1 it has set a deadline of four weeks from now to set a decision. today it their work safely, the nhs in england has bought1 million more facemasks following criticism from some doctors that they are being will be dry and sunny. the exception treated as cannon fodder. simon to that will be the north—east of jones, bbc news. our political correspondent scotland. you will have persistent chris masonjoins us rain and stronger winds. i will have from his home in london. chris, what further measures the details coming up. might we see this week? we saw those pictures of many people ignoring social distancing advice on the government is talking about perhaps a different measures. there it's monday the 23rd of march, our top story: the prime minister says tougher is real frustration within government about this. they talked restrictions are likely unless more about this idea of social people start following the official advice on social distancing. his warning came after a weekend distancing. tourist honeypots. up which saw some parks and beauty spots overwhelmed by visitors. coronavirus has now killed 281 people in the uk.
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simonjones reports. snowden, for instance, the government is keen to try and avoid at the weekend, many people having to do the next thing. but the flocked to the seaside — some streets were packed, parks were busy too. 00:02:10,360 --> 2147483051:37:49,896 prompting this warning 2147483051:37:49,896 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 from the prime minister. prime minister, boris johnson yesterday pointedly balked at the idea that the police might have to be involved in some sort of curfew, some sort of lockdown we have to get permission to leave our houses. as 1 million miles away from that politically but he's seen the pictures as we have and he is concerned about the escalation, the acceleration in the rate of infections as a result. the tricky thing is that people were told on friday, you can't go to the gym or the pub or the theatre but go out in fresh air, go out and get fresh air and if lots of people individually ta ke and if lots of people individually take that decision and end up somewhere collectively popular, it's pretty tricky. absolutely and we will talk to the health secretary a bit later. let's also talk about supplies get into the nhs and what changes have there been. we know if are getting through. there is real
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frustration. you hear regularly from people on the front line of the nhs about inadequate ppe. having to resort to getting it from builders, merchants or supplies they wouldn't normally have to rely on. matt hancock says he is doing everything absolutely. that's an absolutely crucial concern. the clinicians are reaching the point. but those of us working from home or self isolating, hope you're making your own contribution. because of the lag in the infection rate of a couple of weeks, what we are seeing now in the day—to—day updated numbers is effectively the infection rate. that curiosity we all wrestled with, comparing the news. thank you chris.
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we will be speaking to matt hancock at 7:30am. if you have any questions, send them to us and we will get to as many as we can. also speaking to a gp at 8:10am and an expert on how diseases spread. any questions, go to the website. and you can send them to on social media, so help for. train companies across the uk will operate a reduced service from today. it comes after the government issued guidelines warning against all but essential travel. the department of transport says core services in england will still run, to allow vital goods to be moved around the country. similar measures have been agreed by the authorities in scotland, wales and northern ireland. among those responding to the government's call for businesses to support the nhs area number of high—tech engineering firms
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from the world of motorsport. theo leggett reports. prodrive made its name building racing and rally cars and that is still the core of its business but now this oxfordshire firm wants to do something very different. it says it can help fight the coronavirus epidemic by building ventilators for the nhs. what we are very good at at everyone, and the motorsport injury two industry as a whole uk, turning around projects very fast. we have got great engineers and technicians and we can turn our hand outside of welding racing cars into almost anything and actually ventilators seems to be something we believe we could help with. the government has been scouring the country to find businesses with the facilities and expertise to build a vital medical equipment and fast. experts believe the nhs simply won't have enough ventilators to meet demand at the height of the epidemic. health secretary matt hancock
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has urged many factors to help where they can. prodrive says the people and equipment here are ideally placed to help out. is a clean room because it is a positive pressure environment and we have got sticky mats outside of the isolated doors to pick up contaminants. and around us, we also have our own manufacturing facilities in terms of fabricating, welding, 3d printing, harness assembly, et cetera. as well as our own on—site design teams as well. and it isn'tjust prodrive — this part of the west midlands is full of high—tech engineering companies, mainly focused on motorsport. they're used to acting quickly, designing things, building them on site and they reckon those skills can be really useful in the current crisis. with motorsport events cancelled due to the coronavirus outbreak, companies like this one have 20 of spare capacity. and they say they're willing to go full speed ahead to ensure the nhs has the equipment it needs. theo leggett, bbc news.
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lots of to discuss this morning. thanks for being with us. it's a strange day many households. homeschooling taking place in the first time today, possibly for quite a long time. sally is with us on the sofa, on the other end. hi, sally! i know we are a long way away but it's nice to see you both. what was your weekend like? quiet. i did quite a lot of walking with the dog. weekend like? quiet. i did quite a lot of walking with the dogm weekend like? quiet. i did quite a lot of walking with the dog. it was too busy. the parks were packed. and i was too busy. the parks were packed. and iwasa too busy. the parks were packed. and i was a bit antisocial and kept crossing the road to avoid people but that's what we've got to do. crossing the road to avoid people but that's what we've got to doll wonder but that's what we've got to do.” wonder if that will change. there is not sport to bring you but there is sports news. the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe has admitted for the first time that this summer's olympic games could be postponed. for weeks, japanese officials have
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said the games will go ahead as planned, but the ioc say they'll be looking at a number of options over the next four weeks. overnight, canada became the first major country to withdraw from the games, while the australian team say it's clear the games can't go ahead. they've told their athletes to prepare for a 2021 olympics. there was some live sporting action yesterday as the ulster national went ahead behind closed doors. the race was won by the 33—1 outsider space cadet, a special moment for amateur jockey ben harvey. and after the manchester marathon was postponed, former england and leeds rhinos captain kevin sinfield decided to complete his own solo marathon yesterday — running in support of ex—teammate rob burrow, who has motor neurone disease.
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imagine doing a marathon on your own. an incredibly fast time as well. it's like this. good on him. well done to him. we will speak to him later. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, everyone. this morning, the weather is not that the many parts of the country. if you like it dry and sunny. the minibus, we're looking at that scenario. in the north—west, it starts to slide south but that will be as a weak feature. looking at chilly nights which means frost, it's a cold start of the day. i pressure dominating the weather across central europe but we are under the influence of it. except for in the north—west where we do have a weather front reducing some persistent rain and also here we are looking at stronger
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winds across northern and north—western scotland. moving away from that, it's dry and bright and cold and sunny. this weather front could well bring rain at times and across parts of north—west northern ireland. you'll see on the east of northern ireland, eastern parts of scotland, prior to conditions. northern ireland, eastern parts of scotland, priorto conditions. gusty winds in the north—west, not as breezy as it was over the weekend elsewhere. it still is coming from a chilly direction. if you are in it, it will feel cold. do this evening and overnight, ensconced across the north—west of the uk. elsewhere, drier conditions. low cloud coming across devon and cornwall. across northern ireland and scotland. it's going to be a cold night across england and wales. the risk of first frosts again. tuesday, a lot of dry
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weather for england and wales, sunshine easier times. perhaps not quite as windy as it's meant to be today. a lot of cloud around this weather front. temperatures in today. a lot of cloud around this weatherfront. temperatures in the sunshine could get up to 16, possibly 17 degrees. then overnight, tuesday into wednesday, still the rest of the rest of the southern areas, this weather front is going to be on the move. cool and frosty for england and wales, to start with, some sunshine. you can see cloud coming in. a weekly feature, bringing a bank of cloud with it. also to northern ireland. drier and brighter across the north—west of scotland. a yellow weather warning out for this rain. it starts at 1800 today and runs through to midday on wednesday and by then, we could have had as much as 100 millimetres. is
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this weather front since the start bumping into high—pressure, and the other thing is, it's going to turn a lot cooler behind it. the milder yellows squeezed out. a colder direction for us. the weather remained settled this week. introducing a bit more cloud. a lot of dry weather but cooler by the weekend. let's take a look at today's papers. all of them focus on the prime minister's warning of strict new coronavirus measures if people don't start listening to advice to stay at home as much as possible. the mail says that thousands of people flouted government advice this weekend, by visiting beaches, parks and beauty spots. "madness" is the front—page headline on the daily mirror, which pictures crowds at bournemouth beach. the sun has this photograph of people gathering at clapham common, with the prime minister's stark warning: "stay home
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or face lockdown". and the times claims the uk is considering the introduction of travel bans and curfews to control the coronavirus outbreak. it also has a photograph of two children talking through a window to their grandparents in self—isolation. quite a bit of that going on on mother's day as well. a strange mother's day as well. a strange mother's day as well. a strange mother's day when most people... couldn't see their mothers. this is from the inside of the the son. —— sun. victoria beckham with her mum was not ryan thomas. they're newborn. there you go. lots of people talking through windows, through the computer. we all had to find our way around it yesterday.
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let us hope that next year's mother's day is a little bit better. that is all we have to do, focus on the future. the times had a big story about how football might come back and at what time —— at what point might the premier league return. they have done a follow—up on this theory that is being floated at the moment that actually, matches could start being played on the first ofjune, could start being played on the first of june, thursday could start being played on the first ofjune, thursday the first of june played every day for a really intense period. also some suggestion that your team might not necessarily play at their home ground. wouldn't that be incredible if there were a series of premier league catches in a blast through june. series of premier league catches in a blast throuthune. if series of premier league catches in a blast through june. if that was possible. it would only happen if the situation with coronavirus got to the point where they could spare ambulances and security staff so it is very, you know, it is not definite. wouldn't it be an incredible mood boosterfor all
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definite. wouldn't it be an incredible mood booster for all of us incredible mood booster for all of us to be able to watch a little bit of football every day and wouldn't be brilliant if they put it on the tv for free? we're getting so many questions over social distancing. lots of people are getting in touch that they can't believe what they saw over the weekend. selena said they were thousands —— hundreds if not thousands of people. car parks we re not thousands of people. car parks were full with walkers. why, why are people not taking this seriously? we are getting lots of messages even from australia. jane from australia ona from australia. jane from australia on a so—called holiday. they are stuck, singapore shut its airport. they don't know how long. they haven't got the money to buy a new ticket. they have run out of medicine for her husband and in a very isolated position because they can't get any information. it is
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scary. people are wondering if the guidance is clear enough. the reason people are getting into queues at the shops, they are worried. some people are worried about their families and that is why they feel the need to queue up at the shops. if the messaging was clearer, it wouldn't happen. we have seen that all over the uk. millions of people followed the official social distancing advice over the weekend but if you saw the pictures of crowded parks, supermarkets and beauty spots, you'll know that plenty didn't. that prompted the prime minister, borisjohnson, to warn of potentially tougher measures at his daily press briefing yesterday. we now have to take special steps to protect the particularly vulnerable. you remember that i said the moment would come when we needed to shield those with serious conditions. there
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are probably about one and a half million in all but this shielding would do more than any other single measure that we are setting out to save life and that is what we want to do. i want to say a bit more about how we interact outdoors. and of course we want, of course i do, people to be able to go to the parks and open spaces and to enjoy themselves. it is crucial for health, for mental and physical well—being, but please follow the advice and don't think that fresh air in itself automatically provides some immunity. you have to stay two metres apart. you have to follow the social distancing advice. take this advice seriously. follow it. because it is absolutely crucial. and as i
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have said throughout this process we will keep the implementation of these measures under constant review and yes, of course, we will bring forward further measures if we think thatis forward further measures if we think that is necessary. the nhs has identified over 1.5 million people in england who face the highest risk of being hospitalised at a virus. the nhs will be contacted —— contacting these people in the coming days, urging them to stay—at—home for a period of at least 12 weeks. this will require a major effort in a very short period of time. medicines will be delivered by community pharmacists. groceries and essential household items will be delivered by local councils and food distributors working with supermarkets to ensure that nobody
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needs to worry about getting the food and essential items that they will need. we need to remember our neighbours when we shop. we need to pick up the phone for a chat with loved ones. we need to displace —— display small acts of kindness, and compassion. while we are asking these individuals to be isolated very firmly, many have very complex conditions or they would not be in this group and ijust want to assure them that the normal services which they have, will continue and on an individual basis, they will either receive care at home through more virtual means where it is appropriate or arrangements will be made to bring them into safety, clinical areas where they will be managed so they should not worry that they care will continue. -- their care. we will let you know
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what happens a bit later on. there are still no drugs that can kill covid—19 or vaccines to protect against it. but how far are we from developing them? breakfast‘s tim muffett visited a coronavirus testing lab to find out more. in this quarantine unit in east london, a doctor monitors people infected with a respiratory virus. they have got the virus through choice — they are paid volunteers on whom vaccines and drugs are being tested. the plan is for other volunteers here to soon be given a mild strain of coronavirus. we will take healthy volunteers and we will inoculate them with a version of the human coronavirus, follow their disease time course and then return them to healthy. it is known as a controlled human infection model. it will deepen scientific understanding of the virus. volunteers will be paid around £3000 and will have to stay in a room like this for two weeks. so this is the room
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where our volunteers will be staying. this isn't a big room, how hard do some people find it to stay in a room this size for two weeks? for some people i would say it is challenging, hence we do a really watertight screening process to make sure that they are suitable. it is important to stress that volunteers here will not be infected with covid—19, the disease caused by a specific strain of the coronavirus. they will be given a much weaker strain with mild symptoms, but scientists here believe it will still provide crucial information. it helps fast track the development of antivirals and vaccines, so it speeds up the habit of understanding if that potential product is going to be valuable or not. the vaccine seems to be the only answer to this global crisis. the search for one has united the world's scientific community. it is a race against the virus, not against each other, and there is a huge effort to produce new vaccines against this disease. and we are seeing a whole number of
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different platforms that have been in development over several years suddenly coming to fruition and being tested in clinical trials. at porton down research centre in wiltshire, vaccine trials on animals are due to start this week. initial safety trials in humans are expected to begin next month at oxford university. it is an urgent challenge on which so many lives depend. tim coming up on breakfast this morning: the green goddess, diana moran, is back with another gentle workout to start your week — and you can do it from the comfort of your armchair. that's in around 20 minutes.write strap in mixed case, we will hear from her in about 20
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minutes. loads to come. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. bbc london and bbc southeast are joining forces today. a man from sussex appeared in court with making face —— fake coronavirus test kits. 59—year—old flank —— frank ludlow was arrested on friday after 60 also covid—19 test kits were seized by police in america. the city of london police has this warning. lot of people feeling vulnerable. a lot of people feeling vulnerable. a lot of people being contained in
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their homes and online and order these. they are being exploited by criminals. really think before you agree to do something. companies across the london and south—east have been moving to a revised timetable today to manage and protect services for key workers. the reduced provision will include services to suit people who need to travel at peak times as well as those on early and late shifts. southern south—eastern, thameslink gatwick will all see changes to their schedules. people will be asked to only make essential journeys. vandals damaged six ambulances in kent over the weekend. the vehicles were deliberately targeted on saturday night at the south—east coast ambulances make ready centre. anyone with information is being asked to contact kent police. some of london's parks will be closed today with to help with social distancing. it follows scenes like this on sunday.
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the police closed roads and stopped cars in and around richmond park the royal parks will close kiosks and cafes, calling social distancing "absolutely crucial". meanwhile, the national trust might need to close their car parks. over the weekend, people flocked to the south coast. and a wildlife park near sevenoaks forced to close because of coronavirus is asking people to donate cash to help feed their animals. the centre rely on fruit and veg but are struggling to keep hold of leftovers from supermarkets because of increased demand. they crowdfunding page is raising money for the 70 different species they care for. now the weather. another chilly start across london and the south—east. we have a dry
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and the south—east. we have a dry and sunny day ahead of us. good spells of sunshine right from the start of things was up like yesterday, still have a keen breeze in from the south—east that is tempering the feel of things. on the thermometer, we are into low double figures. it will feel quite cool. high pressure is in control of our weather. al fairweather friend for the coming days so we have a dry, u nsettled the coming days so we have a dry, unsettled outlook throughout the week. it is not until thursday night week. it is not until thursday night we will see a bit of patchy rain. you can get regular updates and advice by tuning into your local bbc radio station. more from me in half—an—hour. bye for now. sorry hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: it's the start
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of a very different school week for millions of children today. we'll be getting some tips on how to educate youngsters at home — and we'll be live at a school which is opening for the children of key workers. they're on the frontline of the fight against coronavirus but nhs workers haven't lost their sense of humour. they've been dancing on the wards and posting the videos online. we've selected a few of our favourites for you to enjoy. also this morning: some of those nhs staff may be staying in hotels owned by gary neville and ryan giggs. the former manchester united stars will be live on breakfast to talk about their decision to team up against covid—19. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the prime minister borisjohnson says "tougher" restrictions are likely unless more people start following the official advice on social distancing to help curb the coronavirus pandemic.
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his warning came after a weekend which saw some parks, beauty spots and beaches packed with visitors. 281 people are now known to have died from the virus in the uk. nhs workers have been doing their bit to spread the "stay at home" message. it was a point made very powerfully by one team of respiratory specialists from belfast. iam nick i am nick from the belfast medical team. we are the greatest medical crisis of our lifetime. stayed home. iam crisis of our lifetime. stayed home. i am angela, one of the medical co nsulta nts. i am angela, one of the medical consultants. this is a crucial time, this is not a rehearsal. you will only have one chance at this. stay at home. i am clear, i am a respiratory nurse. you can play your pa rt respiratory nurse. you can play your part to enable us to play ours.
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please, stay at home. i'm julian, respiratory consultant. we all have a choice. if you choose to stay at home, you will save lives. please, stay—at—home. home, you will save lives. please, stay-at-home. i'm susan. iam home, you will save lives. please, stay-at-home. i'm susan. i am a respiratory consultant and i've been a doctorfor 35 years. we respiratory consultant and i've been a doctor for 35 years. we are facing oui’ a doctor for 35 years. we are facing our greatest challenge and we are frightened. help us. please stay at home. i frightened. help us. please stay at home. lam frightened. help us. please stay at home. i am siobhan, frightened. help us. please stay at home. lam siobhan, i frightened. help us. please stay at home. i am siobhan, i am a respiratory physiotherapist. i know where my kids are. where are your kids? keep them at home, stay—at—home. kids? keep them at home, stay-at-home. i am a respiratory nurse. doctors and nurses have died. we need to stay healthy so we can help you. you can help save lives.
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stayed home. iam help you. you can help save lives. stayed home. i am anne—marie, respiratory nurse consultant. thousands of people could die here. help us reduce that number, play your part, save a life, stay—at—home. your part, save a life, stay-at-home. my name is thelma. i ama stay-at-home. my name is thelma. i am a respiratory consultant. you've heard my colleagues. this is a crisis. please stay—at—home, we beg you. so it's really clear, that message. and we will be talking about that with matt hancock a little bit later. if you see the pictures over the weekend, 70 people going to teachers, going to beauty spots. also shopping as well and clearly not two metres away from each other. lots of things to talk about this morning. at ten past eight, will be
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joined by gp and somebody who is an expert in the spread of diseases. if you got any questions,, wannabe topics today, education. without having to do the school run, how are you going to be teaching them. so much to think about this morning. special programming throughout the day across the bbc. something else which is going to be on the bbc later on this year. the olympics. we don't know if it could be moved to somewhere else in the calendar. we had the japanese prime minister said would not be cancelled. overnight we had that first shiny chink of movement. the japanese prime minister
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shinzo abe has admitted for the first time that this summer's olympics could be postponed. overnight canada became the first major country to withdraw from the games, while the australian team has said it was "clear" the event could not go ahead, telling its athletes to prepare for a 2021 games. we can talk now to our tokyo correspondent rupett wingfield hayes thank you forjoining us, rupert. just tell me, what exactly has shinzo abe said? this is changing fast, as expect. last week we were thinking an announcement would have to come fairly soon. an ioc meeting on sunday. they spoke to prime minister shinzo abe overnight. the first time, he has acknowledged the postponement is on the cards. he has said if the olympics cannot be held injuly said if the olympics cannot be held in july safely for the athletes, safely for the spectators, a postponement may have to be considered. however, he and the ioc are both saying they will take four
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weeks to make a decision about when it could be postponed or moved to. and with her from the head it could be postponed or moved to. and with herfrom the head of it could be postponed or moved to. and with her from the head of the japanese olympic committee just in the last few minutes, giving a press conference, saying they need that time to go through all of the potential different choices. do they postpone a month, a few months or do they postpone a whole year? i have to say a whole year is considered to be, they are going to take this time to discuss that. australia, canada, very explicitly, it's not sending a tea m very explicitly, it's not sending a team to japan if it goes ahead in july. i understand other countries are also considering making similar announcements, possibly new zealand will follow. this is putting more pressure, parting the pressure on the japanese government and the ioc not to take four weeks but to make a decision rather more quick leave.
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not to take four weeks but to make a decision rather more quick leavem you talk to anybody i imagine anywhere else in the world, certainly a pizza been preparing for these games, there is a real sense they don't want these olympics to go ahead. what is the mood like there. it's absolutely the same here. a poll of the japanese people said 69% wa nted poll of the japanese people said 69% wanted to be postponed. they don't wa nt wanted to be postponed. they don't want it cancelled completely so postponement is the thing. i spoke to an athlete training, a surfer training for the olympics here last week and she said very much the same, the olympics is a dream for all the buzz. we want that dream to ta ke all the buzz. we want that dream to take place in an atmosphere. postponement is probably the best thing to do. that is one of the things we perhaps haven't talked too much. i was
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thinking about them this morning. it's so difficult. at think about, you've been training for this one thing, this massive event in your life, yes. and now they can't train on the way they want to. dean ashley smith tweeted, if we continue to train, we are putting ourselves at risk. we can't wait another four weeks. we will see what happens. the dubai world cup, one of the world's richest races has been postponed. there was some live action yesterday as the ulster national went ahead. the race was won by space cadet, a great moment forjockey ben harvey, behind closed doors as well. the coronavirus has resulted in many sporting events being postponed but that hasn't stopped kevin's infield from doing a special challenge. he
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completed a solo marathon yesterday and support of ex— team—mate rob burrow who has motor neuron disease. he had been due to run the manchester marathon before it was cancelled because of the virus. he actually was running. and anyone who knows that part of the world, it is hilly. it was a personal best. was aiming for3.5 hours. hilly. it was a personal best. was aiming for 3.5 hours. in the mental focus you need, i imagine. no crowds, you are on your own. nhs staff are getting very little downtime at the moment — so you'd forgive them for wanting to put their feet up. instead, a lot of them have been using their few spare moments to spread some much—needed fun via social media. take a look.
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stay—at—home, stay—at—home. when you're out, make it two metres or more. please stay safe and your family too. keep covid at bay. we
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are all relying on you. we can speak now to drjamie parker, who was singing at the end of that montage. hejoins us from nottingham. i believe you are cringing listening to yourself. it's a song in a very powerful message. it's been watched by thousands of people. it's been a surreal weekend. absolutely bonkers. it's a very important message which we certainly have already seen nurses and doctors and medical staff in belfast preaching that same message, stay—at—home. do you think, is it getting through?” message, stay—at—home. do you think, is it getting through? i think it definitely needs to. whether it is not, not too sure. when i went out early on saturday, to what i thought was an open space, with my three children, it was a national trust
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property and by the time we were leaving, there were trafficjams and people walking on the paths and i think it's that idea that while it may not seem, if you are within two metres, you can spread it, and if we stayed home now, it will be two weeks down the line that we save lives. your wife is a paediatric doctor, you're a gp. the pair of you are fully immersed in the medical profession. in terms of the challenges ahead, what you anticipating? what is going to be the real challenge? i think we've beenin the real challenge? i think we've been in the preparation phase. com pletely been in the preparation phase. completely changed how we work as gps, appearing to be flexible, to ta ke gps, appearing to be flexible, to take on an extra workload from hospitals, and extra workload from sick people in the community, and
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extra workload for staff, we might be working different places. i know people in the hospital are truly worried about this. they will manage everything, with people's help. i've spoken to anaesthetists respiratory doctors, paediatricians. it's really important to listen. i think you've got three children? is it nine, eight and four? that's exactly right. how do they feel that so many people are watching their dad's adaptation of a frozen song? very excited but my young one informed me this morning that i am boring. which isa this morning that i am boring. which is a low blow. we're going to be speaking to the health secretary, matt hancock at 45 minutes. it would be great to know what your thoughts are. what you want to ask the health secretary. what are your big
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concerns? i think at the moment, plans are changing all the time. i know people are working really hard to produce plans and communicate those. co—ordinated response from us all. we are all ready to help. whatever it takes, the government says, it's so important that we are all in it together. just to know that we've got the support, the positive thoughts of everyone. and really keeping us working as one big team. helping people understand the advice. not scaring them. we will get through this but it's really important that the people listen and help in the best ways they can. have you and your wife both got enough of
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the personal protective equipment? i would say that we have got protective equipped winter. it will change. as a gp, i've been seeing people in the car park. especially with respiratory conditions. making it more tricky. more defined places, put in place. as to where patients are going to be seen, how they are going to be seen. i think that issue, i hope it will be sorted. how issue, i hope it will be sorted. how is yourfamily issue, i hope it will be sorted. how is your family coping with these changes? my wife was working over
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the weekend. i have three kids as well. it has been absolutely exhausting that i haven't got much sleep and it has been busy but to be honest, the kids yesterday have been great. they adapted well. there were a few more fights than perhaps they would have been otherwise what i think it would be a very difficult time for people and i think part of the problem is getting outside, it is really key for people, especially forfamilies with is really key for people, especially for families with young children and how to do that safely i think is going to be the challenge. thank you very much. we wish you all the best with your three kids going off to school. a lot of people facing the education challenge. it is jamie proctor, the man behind the stay—at—home challenge. proctor, the man behind the stay-at-home challenge. that really cheered me up. i don't know why cheered me up. i don't know why cheered me up but it was such a clear message in such a simple and brilliant way. sometimes the simplest things work. we are talking
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about the impact on the nhs, social distancing, people, whether or not people will be listening to advice. carol! we will talk to you in a minute. i was also going to say, lots of people will be preparing for their first day at at home school so why don't you tell us how you are doing that as well. you would be very keen if you are starting school already. you might be getting ready! what is the weather? well done for standing still and looking magnificent in the background there. thank you, dan, good morning, everybody. the weather will be actually quite settled. lots of dry and sunny weather. however, we do have a weather front in the south—west and that will produce rain and also windy across scotland and northern ireland. that weather front will sink slowly southward, weakening all the time and also looking everywhere. also across england and wales. you can see that
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we have got these weather front across the north—west and that is what is producing the rain and also windy conditions across scotland and northern ireland. you can also see there is a lot of dry weather around. some low cloud around parts of devon and cornwall and that should break up. the breeze is not as strong weekend. you can see where the strongest winds are across the north—west of scotland. temperatures up. if you are able to go out, it will feel a bit on the nippy side. through this evening and overnight, still a lot of clear skies around so the temperature will follow in quite quickly. also looking at a bit more cloud across scotland and northern ireland. low cloud across devon and cornwall will also help maintain the temperature level but for england and wales, while we still have the clear skies, it will be another cold and frosty one. temperatures could easily fall as low as —2. a fair bit
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of sunshine across england and wales. weather front still producing the rain. temperature wise tomorrow, somewhere in england could see 16 or even 17 degrees. from tuesday into wednesday, our weather front slowly sta rts wednesday, our weather front slowly starts to sink southwards but it is bumping into this high—pressure so it is going to weaken and by that i mean it will produce some patchy light rain as it sinks south. there it goes, moving out of the north—west of scotland, heading across central scotland and northern ireland with cloudy skies behind it and still sunshine ahead of it. you could see 16. the met office has enforced a yellow weather warning. it starts at 1800 today and lasts until midnight on wednesday. some parts of the north—west scotland could have as much as a hundred
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millimetres of rain and possibly even a bit more. the other thing is this front seat ad sink southwards, cooler air this front seat ad sink southwards, coolerair in this front seat ad sink southwards, cooler air in behind the top although fairly settled, it is going to turn that bit colder. thanks, carol. with many more people working from home it's more important than ever to stay connected online. but can the uk's broadband network cope with the increased demand of home working and home schooling? nina is looking at this today. for social distancing purposes, she's just outside the studio. is just not possible for all of us to work from home as we well know that if the advice to be taken really seriously from government to work from home if you can absolutely, there will be some people firing up their laptops this morning while the kids are streaming some telemetry. they will be doing
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their homework online later. loads of families worrying about what that does to their broadband capacity including danielle. that she is a marketing manager based in derby. her broadband is patchy at the best of times and now her son's at home doing his homework she is worried about the impact that will have. how challenging it will be using software. the challenge as well is also going to be with the young child as well home with me, whether that will be using distraction tack six of youtuber and netflix and also a lot of the home learning packages that he has come home with are actually online —based as well. it is quite tempting to be pyjama based for the foreseeable but i am trying to keepa for the foreseeable but i am trying to keep a bit of routine and structure. so that we can crack on as usual, really. good on you,
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danielle. i would as usual, really. good on you, danielle. iwould be as usual, really. good on you, danielle. i would be getting into that pyjama temptation. we have been in contact with internet providers. bt has told us that they have seen a surge of up to 60% of daytime use but that is only about the same as the evening peak so they are ready to cope with that. it is notjust capacity but also the apps themselves. mark zuckerberg, the sheep executive of facebook —— chief executive. they have had a doubling of calls over what's up and facebook message. the big question of course is whether or not, when consumers use broadband more intensively, virgin says they will be fine. talktalk says they manage peaks. an open reach can and say they do have
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the infrastructure to cope. good news there was of it is possible that the spike will come later in italy and spain which are further ahead in the curve and they have been total lockdowns. they have experienced problems. spaniards are using 40% more data during the day according to telefonica and netflix has responded already to this pressure. they say they are reducing the quality of video over the next 30 days and they say that will save them about a quarter in reduction in their data usage. the other thing that will affect how much data you will have on your home is of —— of course the type of package that you have and according to ofcom, only 3% has ultrafast broadband. about half of households have superfast broadband. it roughly allows for one person streaming ultra hd video and that means the rest of us are on what ofcom call decent broadband. 2%
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of households don't have that at all. the other question is whether or not this will impact costs. some encouraging measures is being introduced to adopt bt says they will remove broadband plan so every customer has unlimited data. talktalk says they already have an unlimited data packages and vodafone says they will enable all mobile customers to access nhs uk online website for free. customers to access nhs uk online website forfree. some helpful customers to access nhs uk online website for free. some helpful moods and some comfort in the fact that some providers will be able to cope. i want to bring you up to speed with a couple of other stories this morning was not 11 or 12 days ago we talked about those loans from high street banks up to £5 million for small businesses. they go live today. contact your high—street. you can apply online or over the phone and just to let you know, after last week's incredibly generous update from the chancellor whose concern around the 5 million or so self employed people, whether they will be any stress special measures introduced for them, at the moment they are relying on benefits, reports in the coming times this
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morning that there may be rats coming for the self—employed. we will up that you when we get more. if you were watching breakfast last week you'll know we've enlisted diana moran, better known as "the green goddess", to help us all stay active — even those who are stuck indoors. here she is to kick—start your week with another gentle routine. good morning, everybody. i hope you're all keeping fit. keeping fit and carrying on. that is what we have got to do. as you can see, i am ina new have got to do. as you can see, i am in a new set morning that i have come out of the bedroom and i have come out of the bedroom and i have come down into my conservatory where ican come down into my conservatory where i can see a bit more sunshine and colour which helps us on our way, doesn't it? so let's begin by stretching out our bodies and warming up. so up to the ceiling
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stop in my instance, it is up to the sky this time which is a delight. nice, comfortable chair and here i go. stretching away, warming my body up. that is it. a few more of those as if you are climbing a rope. and then let's stop and let us stretch out the side of your body. that is it. nice stretch for five seconds. and back and over to the other side and stretch out. that is giving us good preparation for the day. now, my props today, i have two water bottles. you could have two cans of beer, as long as you don't drink them. or perhaps a couple of bags of sugar. now, iamjust them. or perhaps a couple of bags of sugar. now, i am just going to use these as weights and i am going to work my arms. so sit up nice and tall and just takes them to the chest and out. working the upper underarm.
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chest and out. working the upper under arm. under the shoulders. that is good. another few of those, excellent. now, bring the water bottles, or the weight, to your shoulders and just take it up and out. and to the front. let's do that again, i bet you have forgotten. up, out to the sides and to the front. laughs. a few more of those, up, out, to the front, last one, up, out, and to the front. now, this is a little, special little exercise for us ladies to strengthen up the top of our arms and to perhaps stop some of that saggy underarm. so take your arm back and then keep in your upper arm your arm back and then keep in your upperarm in your arm back and then keep in your upper arm in that same position. take your lower arm back and just
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twist your hand round as you're doing it. another one, that you are. and then of course you will have two change around and do it on the other side as well. and then let's just finally stretch out our chest, put your hands behind you take a nice deep breath, setting up nice and tall, push out your chest, pull your shoulders back and stretch. inhales and exhales. inhales and exhales deeply. keep fit and carry on. you have got to love her. just to keep everything calm and carry on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where
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you are. good morning. bbc london and bbc south east today are joining forces at breakfast to keep you up to date with the latest across our region. a man from sussex has appeared in court accused with making fake coronavirus testing kits and trying to send them across the world. 59—year—old frank ludlow was arrested at a post office near his home on friday after sixty so—called covid—19 test kits were seized by police in america. the city of london police has this warning. a lot of people are feeling vulnerable. a lot of people that will be contained in their homes. a lot of people will be online and order these from opportunists to be exploited are criminals. really do think before you agree to do something. trains across london and the south east have announced they'll be moving to a revised timetable today — to manage and protect services for key workers.
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the reduced provision will include services to suit people who need to travel at peak times as well as those on early and late shifts. southern, southeastern, thameslink, great northern and the gatwick express will all see changes to their schedules. people are being asked to follow government advice and only make essentialjourneys. bosses at south—east coast ambulances say it is extremely disappointing that six of their vehicles were deliberately damaged in credit —— kent over the weekend. they were damaged at kent overnight and anyone with information has been asked to contact kent police. some of london's parks will be closed from today to help with social distancing. it follows scenes like this on sunday, with the police closing roads and stopping cars in and around richmond park. the royal parks will also be closing kiosks and cafes, calling social distancing "absolutely crucial". meanwhile, the national trust says it may now have to close its car parks at open spaces like ditchling beacon and birling gap in sussex. over the weekend people flocked
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to the south coast at whitstable, camber sands and brighton pier. a wildlife park near sevenoaks — forced to close because of coronavirus — is asking people to donate cash to help feed their animals. hemsley conservation centre rely on donated fruit and vegetables but are struggling to get hold of leftovers from supermarkets because of increased demand. their crowdfunding page is raising money for the seventy different species they care for. time to check the weather now with sara thornton. another chilly start across london and the south—east. a across london and the south—east. bit cooler than with a bit cooler than yesterday even with cabbages below freezing inland. —— temperatures. we have a dry and sunny day ahead of us. good spells of sunshine right from the start of things. like yesterday, still have a keen breeze in from the south—east that is tempering the feel of things. on the thermometer, we are into low double figures. 12, possible 13 celsius. it will feel quite cool.
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high pressure is in control of our weather. our fairweather friend for the coming days so we have a dry, unsettled outlook throughout the week. it is not until thursday night we will see a bit of patchy rain. for the latest developments on coronavirus symptoms. including how to reduce your risk for those with underlying health conditions, visit the bbc news website or the app. i will be back soon. see you then. shape good morning — welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. the headlines: stay at home. the message is the prime minister threatens further limits to movement. take this advice seriously. follow it, because it absolutely crucial. thousands of people ignored social distancing advice over the weekend.
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as the coronavirus crisis continues, the health secretary promises more protective equipment for nhs staff. can the uk's broadband network cope with increased demand from home networking and homeschooling. rotation of the i will be considering capacity. there are many teachers making safe plans for the minority who will. it's never been more important to stay connected. can the uk's broadband network cope with the increased demand of home working and home schooling? i'll be considering capacity. the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe has admitted for the first time that this summer's olympic games could be postponed. for weeks, japanese officials have said the games will go ahead as planned, but the ioc say they'll be looking at a number of options over the next four weeks. today we are looking at a lot of dry weather after a chilly start with their bit of sunshine exception of across the north—west, persistent rain and windy conditions but i will have more at 7:12am.
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it's monday the 23rd of march, our top story. the prime minister says "tougher" restrictions are likely unless more people start following the official advice on social distancing. his warning came after a weekend which saw some parks and beauty spots overwhelmed by visitors. coronavirus has now killed 281 people in the uk. simonjones reports. at the weekend, many people flocked to the seaside — some streets were packed, parks were busy too. prompting this warning from the prime minister. don't think that fresh air in itself automatically provides some immunity. even if you think you are personally invulnerable, there are plenty of people that you can infect and whose lives will then be put at risk. on a visit to deliver protective equipment destined for frontline nhs staff, the health secretary said the public must play its part
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in stopping the health service becoming overwhelmed by practising social distancing. our overall objective is to protect life. unless there is a good reason not to, you should stay at home. going outside for exercise, i can understand. if you do, stay more than two metres away from other people because this is how the virus spreads, through people interacting. the advice is incredibly clear. we're also clear in that we may have to take further steps if necessary according to how many people are able and, frankly, willing to follow that advice. doctors and their colleagues in belfast put their own message on social media. we're frightened. help us, please stay at home. it's a plea echoed by doctors across the nhs. we have never faced a situation like this before. this is an unprecedented public health crisis. we also know that if you, the public, play your role in helping your nhs, we will be better at dealing with this crisis.
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to try and stop people gathering, more high—street stores are closing. by the end of today, mcdonald's is to close all of its more than a thousand restaurant across the uk. for the past few days, it's been serving takeaway food only but now it says for the safety of its customers and staff, that must also stop. from today, all schools are also closed. but the children of key workers, including medical staff, will still be able to attend. to help those staff do their work safely, the nhs in england has bought a million more facemasks following criticism from some doctors that they are being treated as cannon fodder. simon jones, bbc news. the bbc‘s deputy political editor norman smith joins us now from westminster. norman, what further measures might we see this week? what are these further meshes that
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we might see? we don't know is the short answer but if we look to the rest of the europe, we might get an idea. the prime minister has said is going to make a decision, whether people are observing the social distancing but things like other restrictions could come into place. everything we've learned about this crisis as we do tend to follow what is rolled out in the rest of europe increasingly likely. added to which the facts on the ground are changing if you like already. parks, some local authorities, they are already closing down, some of the gardens and parks, it's already happening. are the areas we are likely to see developments. we are told there is going to be a dramatic improvement in delivery to hospitals because clearly there's been a problem with many medics unhappy have not had sufficient supplies. also unhappy at the quality of many of the masks and
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gallons they've been given. matt hancock has said he's going to get on of that quickly. we may see further help the self—employed. they are the ones who seem to have fallen through the safety net the chancellor did last week. the chancellor did last week. the chancellor said if your business in trouble, you can get £94 a week but there were no measures to safeguard their businesses. the last thing we are seeing is that during trials, that pretty much going to be scrapped —— jury trials. you can't socially distancing the jury box. it seems they will be postponed. we will speak to you later on. we got 70 questions. do keep on sending other ones. we are talking to him at 730.
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germany has ordered people not to meet in groups of more than two people. and last night it was confirmed that the german chancellor, angela merkel, is in self—isolation after meeting a doctor who later tested positive for coronavirus. let's get the picture from across europe from gavin lee, who is in brussels. gavin, what other measures are in place? bring us up—to—date with what is the latest. overall across europe, 160,000 cases. 600 people have died, the biggest number seems to be two weeks ahead of the uk. italy, or its two weeks today since the lockdown started. there are 60,000 cases there, 5500 people died, 1000 of those this weekend. in lombardi, the worst hit area, complete lockdown. exercise is completely banned. the
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french and the greek ‘s, the leaders there, both countries have said they are unhappy with the way citizens are unhappy with the way citizens are taking this advice. in greece, the closed hotels, spain as well. the spanish have opened a new hospital in madrid, one of the biggest hospitals in europe. it was a conference centre to deal with more than 25,000 cases there. they also said one in ten of those with coronavirus health workers in spain. quite odd sci—fi scenes. as well as ca rs quite odd sci—fi scenes. as well as cars with sirens and music, we are seeing drones in parks. keeping this message. it changes all the time to thank you. the health secretary is on the way in 20 minutes' time.
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we'll spend as much time with him as we need to. and that 8:10pm —— eight 10am we will be joined by gp and disease experts so if you have questions for those two. send them through. just send in your questions to that a lot of you are. and we're talking a lot about social distancing. we are two metres apart. i'm trying to get a tape measure. richard osborn said he is exactly two metres. i'm imagining richard lying down on the sofa between us. what a thought. try and get that out of your head. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it was a lovely weekend. the next few days the many parts of the uk is going to be dry. sunshine by david chilly nights and frost. the exception to that is across the
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north—west we do have a weather front. it's already producing some rain. you can see cloud had that. there is not much change really, persistent rate across north—west scotland. a lot of dry weather. maximum temperatures, 7—14. let's focus more on that rain. the met office has a yellow weather warning in force. it starts at 1800 to martin goes on until wednesday lunchtime. you could see as much as 100 millimetres of rain. eastern scotland, east of northern ireland, largely dry with sunshine and for england and wales, dry with some sunshine stop these the strongest across the north and west. a windy day for scotland. but it's also going to be a windy night. you hang
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onto that rain. temperatures will fall away. it's going to be a cold night with some frost. temperatures in parts of england and wales could fall as low as —2. as we head on through tuesday, hanging on to this the front. still producing some rain. still quite windy as well. things remain fairly quiet. a fair bit of sunshine. that sunshine will be hazy. tomorrow, we could hit 16 degrees. carol, thank you. this is bbc breakfast. it's monday morning but most children are staying at home today because of the coronavirus. some will be going to school — but only if their parents are key workers — and they won't be doing the usual lessons. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at halewood academy in merseyside to see how teachers there are preparing. morning, jayne.
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there are not many people at the moment, a couple of cleaners. brandishing some antibacterial wipes and bottles. all quiet here at the moment. on any normal day, this would have been the scene of about 1000 children coming in about one hours time. they are getting ready, coming infora hours time. they are getting ready, coming in for a normal school day at halewood academy in merseyside but these aren't normal times. instead of 1000, they are expecting a roundabout maybe 50 children. all of that could change this morning. let's meet gary evans, the head teacher at halewood academy. thanks are meeting us at a safe distance. what is the message you've been sending out to parents last week and over the weekend? the main message would be that school is closed. the pa rents were would be that school is closed. the parents were key workers. if there are no other alternatives in terms
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of childcare, school is open for those students. students were in a vulnerable group. the main message is, if it's at all possible, don't send your child. you want to kind of tell pa rents send your child. you want to kind of tell parents that this is a plan b, really, not a plan a, isn't it? even the national association of head teachers has said to businesses, please put profit before people. what key workers do you have and how they greeting this? one of the problems we had on friday were to identify who were key workers. we think over 100 r. and the majority of those working in the nhs and various different sectors. a lot work in supermarkets, delivery
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drivers, logistics. so we are aware of who they are now and it is of his lead today, we just don't know how many will send their children in. lead today, we just don't know how many will send their children inm won't be a normal school day going forward was not what will it look like and how will you keep people safe ? like and how will you keep people safe? it is a unique day in british educational history. we just don't know who is going to come in. we will keep the students safe and the staff to do —— by doing social distancing, like we are now and as the morning progresses, we will see how many students coming in and then the plans will change accordingly. the number one priority is keeping eve ryo ne the number one priority is keeping everyone safe, obviously, otherwise it defeats the whole object of it. thank you very much for letting us in this morning. that is the message. it depends on social distancing so the message is, unless you absolutely cannot find alternative arrangements, please don't send your children into school today. thank you very much and pass on our thanks to the school.
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let's speak now to a parent who is choosing to educate her children at home even though — as a care worker — she could send them into school. katie agutter is in oxfordshire. you were a key worker but you have chosen to educate your children at home. i work part-time. at the moment i am not required to work any extra hours so i don't need to use that service. there are other people who do have to go into work and i don't want to take my children out ifi don't want to take my children out if i don't need to. so tell us, how many children you have and how have you planned for today.” many children you have and how have you planned for today. i have five children and i spent the end of last week just putting children and i spent the end of last weekjust putting together what i could. notebooks, pens, anything. i borrowed easels from a local preschool are just things like that. things like that and keep them occupied. katie, i can see you are incredibly organised. it looks like
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a classroom at home. is that what you have done? that is what we have done. our dining area is now dining in the evening, classroom during the day. so, ithink in the evening, classroom during the day. so, i think it makes it more exciting for the children and it gives them more of a focus because it is not like home if it is a classroom. i like the way you have school values as well. did you all agree on them? how did you come around to them? we did, three of my children did yesterday. a lot of them are their key values from school anyway and we thought we needed rules as well because it would just be chaos stop if we had some basic ground rules, i think we can get through this ok. tell us about the rules. what are they? our rules are... i'm going to have to turn around and check. we have do not talk over each other, listen, be ready, help each other, stay on task, no gadgets and have fun. some
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good rules there. and are they up ready? what time does the school day started in your house? it is meant to start at nine o'clock but it looks like we may bring it forward earlier tomorrow to eight o'clock because they are already up and dressed up stairs ready to go. how do you feel about being their main educator at the moment?” do you feel about being their main educator at the moment? i guess it is distracting and exciting at the moment but as the weeks go on, i think the pressure is going to start to build. we are really lucky we have had a lot of different things from school, they have put things on their website and sent work packs home because i wouldn't know what i needed to educate my children in specifically without the school support. so that is going to make a massive difference. good luck, good luck with the school day. i hope it goes well and thank you very much indeed forjoining us. one of many
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thousands of parents who will be dealing with the same thing. are some very dealing with the same thing. are some very handy rules as well. if you're about to spend the day home schooling your children, then help is at hand. education coach natalie costa joins us from her home in bedfordshire. listening into our previous guest as well. thank you for spending time with us today. i am sure they will bea with us today. i am sure they will be a lot of parents watching this morning taking on a brand—new role. what are your basic pieces of advice for pa rents what are your basic pieces of advice for parents who will be entering this kind of childcare issue for the next few weeks ahead. my my first initial thought is to stop and breathe. in the last couple of weeks, especially the last week, there has been so much change and i have seen parents has sent me m essa g es have seen parents has sent me messages saying they feel panicked, overwhelmed, school are doing a phenomenaljob in terms of sending information but i would say let us look at exploring what are some nourishing activities that children
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and the family can do. it is just going to bring us back to the present moment and give us this sense of calm. whether it is going for walks or drawing or colouring m, for walks or drawing or colouring in, doing things that are at live, don't worry so much right now that your timetable has to start monday morning. iam your timetable has to start monday morning. i am all for routines. i am a former primary school teacher so i know what routines are. but have a chat with the family and the children around the school values and what a day would look like, what activities they can implement. also say that if your child, there is obviously a lot to manage as well because some parents are going to have to obviously be working from home and if you only have one screen you might need to bring in other children who also need to use the screen. other activities you could use in terms of baking or even
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grocery shopping, that can lead into an activity itself in terms of sorting things into shapes and sizes and getting the older ones are bringing in multiplication and division. just recognising that there are many —— many valuable experiences in day—to—day tasks as well. a bit of practical mass goes a long way at times like this. people will be seeing those points —— posts from parents who might fill other pa rent from parents who might fill other parent —— might make other parents feel lacking, all these colourful and detailed timetables will stop it is hard to see those and feel a bit inadequate yourself if you do not have everything planned out but that is not the case, is it? absolutely not and it will look different for every family. i think just not and it will look different for every family. i thinkjust take the pressure off. if the coloured coded timetables work, absolutely go for that but for now, we have been through so much and i think it is just about coming back to that space and feeling calm and feeling safe. a
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lot of children i am working with are not feeling safe, they are feeling scared and worried and i think it is come back to a space of calm and then explore what will a timetable look like for my family? and it is ok if my friends to posit timetables look different to mind. —— mine. my message to parents is please relax. one day it could have just been play outside and build my case but you are able to keep them alive and still do your work, that isa alive and still do your work, that is a success because we have never faced situations like this before. we are all trying to muddle through. another thing i wanted to say is shift the focus. there is so much around the terrible things that are happening and absolutely, we need to know what is happening in the world but let us bring in some perhaps family values, what was something that happened today that was funny, or what am that happened today that was funny, orwhatami that happened today that was funny, or what am i gratefulfor today?
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shifting focus and not getting into that competitive nest or worrying what other parents are doing to stop also, as a former primary school teacher, i was a year1 teacher for a very long time so the transition into year1 took a term so recognising that we are transitioning from school into working from home so it is going to ta ke working from home so it is going to take some time. don't worry if you don't follow the colour—coded timetable yet it looks different to everybody else. thank you very much natalie costa. i think we might try a little journal in our house. a little what are we doing today, kind of thing. you are not trying to replicate school, just do your best. we had from one mother saying how much information the school had sent to them as well so i am sure there will be lots of information coming from schools and lots of homework being set by them as well. do keep
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in touch with us and tell us how you are approaching the school day. all of our social lives have taken a hit in the last few days and that's particularly upsetting for young children who have had their birthday parties cancelled. but one party organiser who dresses up as a disney princess is using technology to keep the magic alive. david sillito reports. social distancing. a life indoors. it's not much fun, especially if you are three. if there is germs all around, you can't go outside so we have to stay indoors. are you ready, everyone? # do you want to build a snowman... # come on let's go and play... but one thing hasn't been cancelled. jessica kingsley is today elsa from frozen, and she has found a way to give little harry his birthday party on time. —— online.
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harry started asking me in december to have a frozen party and we were looking forward to it, counting down the days since february. so the fact that we managed to have one was just unbelievable. # let it go, let it go... # i am one with the wind and sky... for many children who are now in isolation, this is one solution for some frazzled families. but there is another issue here — work. oh, wow, hans, you have a lovely voice! because sitting alongside her is josh, who is today playing prince hans. this is all useful work at a difficult moment. all actors are now in the same boat. artists, musicians, anyone in the arts and media, they can't be out there standing on a stage and performing. so there has got to be some way i can still get the magic of our parties and our characters across to the kids. meanwhile, forjessica, this experiment with a virtual birthday party
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seemed to be working. show me yourfaces! # do you want to build a snowman... so how did that feel? really weird but really lovely. because remember, i could still give the children magic, and that is what it was about. because it is their special day, and... this crazy pandemic shouldn't take it away from them. # do you want to build a snowman...# i can still see their eyes on me and enjoying it, and that was amazing. what is really striking is the creativity that so many people are having and we all have to be really creative about how we go about things. lots of people think i have
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an emergency chocolate bar in here. i haven't, ok? it is a pocket square! i tell you what, i haven't, ok? it is a pocket square! itell you what, everybody at home, if he had, i would have had it already. thank you to everybody who has made us a giggle with that this morning. i am moving further away from you, day by day, aren't i? we have the health secretary coming up we have the health secretary coming up in the next few minutes or so. see you shortly. good morning. bbc london and bbc south east today are joining forces at breakfast to keep you up to date with the latest across the region. police are warning people to be vigilant after a man from sussex appeared in court charged with making fake coronavirus testing kits. 60 so—called covid 19 test kits were seized by police in america — after 59 year old frank ludlow was arrested at a post office near his home on friday. the city of london police
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has this warning. a lot of people feeling vulnerable. a lot of people that will be contained in their homes. a lot of people will be online and order these opportunies to be exploited are criminals. so really do think before you agree to do something. rail companies across london and the south east have announced they'll be moving to a revised timetable today — to manage and protect services for key workers. the reduced provision will include services to suit people who need to travel at peak times as well as those on early and late shifts. southern, southeastern, thameslink, great northern and the gatwick express will all see changes to their schedules. people are being asked to follow government advice and only make essentialjourneys. there's also a reduced service running on the london underground — with some stations shut and no waterloo and city service. health chiefs say they're extremely disappointed after vandals
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damaged six ambulances in kent over the weekend. the vehicles were deliberately targetted on saturday night at south east coast ambulance's make ready centre in thanet. anyone with information is being asked to contact kent police. some of london's parks will be closed from today to help with social distancing. it's after busy scenes on sunday, with the police closing roads and stopping cars in and around richmond park. the royal parks will also be closing kiosks and cafes. meanwhile, the national trust says it may now have to close its car parks at open spaces like ditchling beacon and birling gap in sussex. over the weekend people flocked to the south coast at whitstable, camber sands and brighton pier. plenty of sunshine around to start — let's get the weather now with sara thornton. wright morning to you. —— good morning to you. another chilly start across london and the south—east. a bit cooler than yesterday
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even with temperatures below freezing inland. we have a dry and sunny day ahead of us. good spells of sunshine right from the start of things. like yesterday, though, still have a keen breeze in from the south—east that is tempering the feel of things. on the thermometer, we're into low double figures. 12, possible 13 celsius. but it will feel quite cool. high pressure is in control of our weather. our fairweather friend for the coming days so we have a dry, unsettled outlook throughout the week. it's not until thursday night we will see a bit of patchy rain. and you can keep up to date on your local bbc radio station — which will also be providing some positive news with our make a difference campaign. every quater past and every quarter to — they'll be telling good news stories of those helping keep the most vulnerable and isolated in our communities going. and you can let us know about anything going on in your area by getting in touch with your local radio station. that's it from me for now. i will be backjust before eight o'clock. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin.
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the prime minister borisjohnson says the government is "actively considering" tougher measures to enforce social distancing guidelines. let's see if we can find out what that means with the health secretary matt hancock, who joins us from westminster. it's a very busy time for you. and ask a question. you've seen pictures of the weekend. go to snowdonia. what do you make of those pictures? people have to stay two metres apart and stay of the door possible. these m essa g es and stay of the door possible. these messages are really clear. and they really matter because that's how we save lives. as health secretary, i'm totally focused on protecting life in this epidemic is this virus spreads. we've taken some quite serious actions like have never been seenin
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serious actions like have never been seen in peacetime before. shutting the pubs of the bars and restaurants in the police have the power to enforce that now. we have course stand ready to take more action if we need to stop the spread of the virus and people just need to know that if you go within two metres of somebody who isn't in your household and you don't live with, than the chance of passing on the virus means it will pass on to other people and keep going and we've seen with this virus —— virus, it spreads so easily and other countries in europe where they didn't take these crack ends quite so early, gotten very serious. 0f quite so early, gotten very serious. of course we are prepared to do what it takes on this afternoon i'm taking a bill through the house of commons to give ours extra powers to be able to do the sorts of things. i don't want to do it or curtail people's liberties but all about
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saving life and protecting people from this really horrific virus.” wa nt from this really horrific virus.” want details in the act on the extra powers. why is it that people are ignoring what seems to be your clear advice. we've communicated it as clearly as they possibly can. there are adverts on radio, tv, all the newspapers and from the prime minister, the chief medical officer down, we've been incredibly clear about what people need to do, not only to keep themselves safe and that's important, but to keep others safe. and that's to stay more than two peters —— two metres, more than six foot apart, from those in your household. these measures have had a massive effect on this country. not the sort of thing anybody would have wa nted the sort of thing anybody would have wanted to see. the quicker we can
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stop the spread, the quicker we can get out of this. so it really is incredibly unfair of people to go and socialise in the way that we've seen because by helping to spread the virus, they slow down our ability to stop it and that then means that all these measures are going to have to be in place for longer. to put it another way, if you follow the rules, you are helping the country to get through this as quickly as possible. i think you can properly tell, ifeel very strongly about this and we are absolutely prepared to take further steps we need to. could you answer this question from lindy? i appreciate you addressing some of them. what will the government do to prevent people flocking to holiday areas, putting their minimal nhs under pressure. a hospital in cornwall is under pressure with a few residents. can't cope. what do
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you say? people should not take unnecessary journeys. you say? people should not take unnecessaryjourneys. no you say? people should not take unnecessary journeys. no unnecessary travel. i don't regard going to your holiday home is a necessaryjourney. people should stay put and stay at home and that is how to save lives. it also matters for this reason. you are not only protecting yourself and others, you're protecting the nhs. there is 1.4 million people who work in the nhs and they are going into work despite the fact that there are people with the virus in hospital putting themselves at risk. it's my job to help to keep them safe and to get them the protective equipment they need which we are working incredibly hard on. but if you are going out and socialising when you don't need to and taking unnecessary journeys, putting people in the nhs, you're putting them at risk as well. so stop and if you don't stop, we're going to have to take more measures.
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so what might those measures be. the prime minister said yesterday, we will consider options and decisions on that have not been taken but i think we already shown that we are willing to do things that we don't wa nt to willing to do things that we don't want to do but we may have to do. like last week, when we said that the pubs, people shouldn't go to pubs and clubs and restaurants and a couple of days later, it was clear some people were doing that so we closed them and gave them the power to shut them down with an unlimited fine if they stay open. i'm using that as an example because you know, i think with demonstrated that we are willing to take the action that is necessary to stop the spread of this virus. sorry to interrupt you. you may not be able to give me details but there are talks of lockdown. are you considering cu rfews, lockdown. are you considering curfews, curtailing lockdown. are you considering cu rfews, curtailing people lockdown. are you considering curfews, curtailing people being able to go to pubs? what kind of
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thing are you looking it? nothing is off the table and i don't want to prejudge, the discussions we had today to make a decision on those things. it's a decision for the prime minister. i advised him as health secretary what i think needs to happen. i'm really clear that people need to stay more than two metres apart. we've got to see that happen. because that's the only way to protect. you're talking about more enforcement. we are taking the powers to be able to do more of that enforcement. yes. the prime minister will make clear what steps, what we need to take that we are absolutely prepared to, if we must. i think people understand that. people are worried. people working in the nhs
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are worried. they want to see everybody hollowing the rules so that fewer cases get into the nhs and we protect our nhs and they are totally right to feel that way. part of myjob is to protect them and everybody wants to see us get through this as quickly as possible in the way to do that is to follow the rules and if that requires us to bring in more stringent enforcement than we've already got, we are absolutely open to that. one of the things we are beginning to see, some parks being closed. do you think thatis parks being closed. do you think that is the right thing to do? going outside isn't of itself dangerous. the problem is going within two metres of other people. packed parks where everybody is packed in our problem. the rules, as i said, i really clear, don't go within two
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metres of people that if we are seeing people do that, and of course we're going to have to take further action. i can't say anymore the detail because these are discussions that are ongoing and we are considering it. but what i've tried to say is that we are absolutely prepared to. i know you will have seen these comments. some of them feel like cannon fodder, doctors and health workers are lambs to the slaughter. these are worrying times for everybody. we know that some of them have been infected. what are you doing to protect them?” them have been infected. what are you doing to protect them? i want to say very clearly to everybody who works in the nhs and social care that we are doing everything we can to support you and protect you. we've got your back. i know there have been concerns about protective equipped wind, masks, for instance. we've shipped millions of masks over
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the weekend and been working day and night to get those masks out. i want to know if there is anybody who hasn't got a supply or more accurately has used up their supply that we can get the next set out. in fa ct, that we can get the next set out. in fact, we brought in the military to help us to do that as effectively as possible. and i. nothing to protect those who are working in the nhs. that is my responsibility. responsibility of every single person watching us today is to do their bit by staying indoors unless absolutely necessary and by staying more than two metres away from people who aren't in their household. that is yourjob, to keep the nhs safe. i'm going to play were clip i hope you can hearfrom a doctor called alex who has concerns. we need to see a rapid and comprehensive rollout of testing in every single community. so that we can focus on isolation and public
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health, precautionary measures, particularly at the moment there are lots of my colleagues were taking time to self isolate when they're probably not got coronavirus and they badly need the test so they can come back to work safely and join the effort to beat this pandemic. many doctors and health workers have been making that point about testing. when we get to a position where you will be testing them? as soon as possible. alex is completely right. having doctors, paramedics, nurses and others in the nhs at home because they are self isolating, following the rules as everybody should, we need to get them back to work as quickly as possible so we are rapidly expanding testing, within buying testing kits to make sure we have as much as possible, but there is a big demand on testing because also, if you test properly
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patients in hospitals, you can treat them better and save lives. so we need tests to make sure we can treat patients who are very sick and protect other patients in hospitals by separating the people who have coronavirus. and we need the tests that nhs staff and then for other key workers. syria expanding the number of tests as fast as possible andi number of tests as fast as possible and i hope to say why that in the next couple of days. been out there buying testing kits. in the last few days, a new type of test has been invented so it doesn't go to the lab and could be done on site, which is and could be done on site, which is an improvement. we need innovative resources of the nation, working 24-72 resources of the nation, working 24—72 improved testing. resources of the nation, working 24-72 improved testing. thank you. let's talk about protective equipped into. some doctors have been saying for some time they don't feel safe
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at work and for some people, this is too late. every hospital has had a delivery of protective equipped. the challenge is, obviously the amount they are using has shot up. we need to get the distribution getting to every hospital, and making sure they got those masks. so i hear you. if you don't have a mask, with now got a hotline set up so that you can say, we know whether shortages are and we brought in the military to help with the logistics of getting masks out to everybody who needs them. this is incredibly important to protect our nhs staff and social ca re to protect our nhs staff and social care staff who need the masks as well. there is a huge logistical operation because of the nature, the scale of the nhs and the sheer quantity of masks that are rightly being used, its a massive effort.
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we wa nt being used, its a massive effort. we want to know, if you haven't got the protective equipment or are about to run out, we want to hear from you. other people are getting in touch with us and thank you for people sending in questions and concerns. there are teachers. steve says, whereas the safety advice for teachers and education staff and our personal detective equipped wind. cathy says, by head teacher, about open my school or 50 key workers and children and we have no hand sanitiser, are we going to be given any. what are you doing? this is a whole new world. many parents are teaching their children at school but what about teachers concerned about these? it is really important that the schools stay open for the children of key workers. the most important message, absolutely, is if you don't have to take your child to school, evenif
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have to take your child to school, even if you are a key worker, if there are other arrangements you can make and you should not take your child to school. but of course, we have still got to ensure that our critical workers and the nhs and elsewhere, can work during this because the last thing we want to do is diminish the number of people who are in hospitals and the nhs supporting people. that is happening. on the hand sanitiser point. the single most important point. the single most important point for washing your hands is soap. yes, we will try to get hand sanitiser available to you but the number one thing that people should use is a soap. and on the point about protective equipment, again, it comes down to distance. they will be far, farfewer it comes down to distance. they will be far, far fewer children it comes down to distance. they will be far, farfewer children in schools so they should be, as much as is possible, and i have small children so i know this is a challenge, they should be kept more than two metres apart. it is the best way to stop the spread of this
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virus, whether it is a school or any other place. and we know that nhs staff are under pressure for lots —— in lots and lots of places. will you make parking free? there are complications because you have to make sure that patients are able to park but there is something, if we can find park but there is something, if we canfind a park but there is something, if we can find a way to do it, i would love to. matt hancock, health secretary, as ever, thank you very much for your time here on brea kfast. much for your time here on breakfast. a good quarter of an hour of questions to the health secretary there. i don't know why people are not following the social distancing. stay—at—home, he says, if you follow your rules, you are helping your country. look at what is an necessary journey. country. look at what is an necessaryjourney. strict measures might be wrought in if theyjudge it to be necessary and rapidly expanding testing —— brought in. they are trying to make sure they have as many as possible. they are
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hoping to be able to say more on that in the next couple of days. also on the parking point. so much to emerge. allan as ever, we are a little bit further away than we are used to being a nice gap in the middle for carol. imight a nice gap in the middle for carol. i might have a little table, i might bring again tomorrow. —— bring it in. i am much further away, i am in london! this week's weather is fairly settled for most of us but we do have a weather front. this lovely picture this morning is from the highlands. you can see that claudia is starting to build and that is because we have a weather front not too far away across north—west scotla nd too far away across north—west scotland which is introducing thicker cloud and some rain and that will be with us for much of the week, slowly slipping south but we are also looking at chilly nights. high pressure still hanging on
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through england and wales, eastern scotla nd through england and wales, eastern scotland and eastern parts of northern ireland. here we will see the driest and the sunniest conditions. this is the weather front producing the rain in the north—west and that will be with us for much of the week. the rain in north—west scotland is heavy and persistent and some of it time is getting across northern ireland but mostly into the north—west. just seeing a bit more cloud building ahead of it. it will be winding across scotland and northern ireland. these circles indicate the sustained wind speeds so it is not going to be as windy as it was over the weekend across england and wales but it will be still breezy. the temperatures at rest will get up to around 13 or 14 but cooler down the north sea coastline. through this evening and overnight, we hang on to clear skies, especially across england, wales, southern scotland was up here is where we will see the lowest temperatures. meanwhile, weather fronts are still with us across the north and the west and
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that means temperatures will not fall away as low as they are going to elsewhere but we are also expecting low cloud coming in across devon and cornwall so that will help maintain your temperature levels, too. to be could fall as low as —2. where we have the weather front for northern ireland and the rest of scotland, once again, we're looking ata scotland, once again, we're looking at a fairly cloudy picture with that rain coming in and persistent rain at that. in the sunshine, temperatures get up to 16 and possibly 17 degrees. on tuesday into wednesday, our weather front parts its descent south —— southwards. it will bump into that area of high pressure. we start off on a cold note on wednesday for england, wales, frost around, but a lot of sunshine and as the weather front sinks south as a weather feature, it will have some patchy rain on it. drying up behind it in north—west scotla nd drying up behind it in north—west scotland but worth mentoring —— it
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is going to midday on wednesday. parts of the north—west could have had as much as 100 millimetres of rainfall. we're looking at highs of 15, 16, possibly even 17. that is the last day of the really mild because look at the mild weather resented by the yellow is squeezed away and the colder loo returns as we see a return to more northerly winds. the weather front is slipping south ringing its cloud and patchy rain. not much more on it. see how the temperature has slipped —— weatherfront. we have more space to see you now, carol so it is perfect. thank you for that, carol. more people have been heeding the government's call to work from home. but will the uk's broadband network be able to cope? nina has been finding out — and for social distancing purposes, she's just outside the studio.
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lovely to see you, nonetheless.” lovely to see you, nonetheless. i am not taking it personally, it is the guidelines. lots of people are working from home at the moment and rightly so. it is really important that if you can work from home, you do so in order to minimise the spread of the virus. it is not personable —— possible for everyone but there was a moment when i thought, my goodness, what if there was a surge in broadband use, the telly goes down, the kids are at home and people are firing up the la pto ps to home and people are firing up the laptops to work from home, it is a worry. we spoke to danielle who runs a marketing company and her broadband is not brilliant at the best of times and now her son is at home, she is worried like a lot of it -- home, she is worried like a lot of it--a home, she is worried like a lot of it —— a lot of us are. how challenging it will be using software. the challenge as well is also going to be with the young
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child as well home with me, whether that will be using distraction tactics of youtuber and netflix and also a lot of the home learning packages that he has come home with are actually online—based as well. it is quite tempting to be pyjama based for the foreseeable but no, i am trying to keep a bit of routine and structure. just so that we can crack on as usual, really. just embrace the pyjamas, danielle. bt told us that since tuesday they have seen a surge in daytime traffic of up to 60% but they say that is only about the same as the evening peak. virgin say they have had a similar search and it is notjust a capacity that is being stretched, it is the acts themselves. mark zuckerberg, the chief executive of facebook said on wednesday they were feeling surges including a doubling of calls over what's up on facebook messenger. —— whatsapp. the big question is whether or not providers
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can cope so we had been in touch with them was appear is what they have told us, virgin said its network is built to withstand evening peaks when the —— customers use broadband most intensively so they say they are ready for bigger surges during the day. talk talk say there davis regularly experience peaks there davis regularly experience pea ks and they there davis regularly experience peaks and they are confident and openreach connected to all homes and businesses say they have the infrastructure to cope. it is possible that this bike will come later. we are behind the curb that italy and spain are seeing. —— spike. telefonica, the spanish provider, so they have seen spike of 40% increased use of data. netflix have responded by reducing the quality of the european streaming and they say that is saving them about 25% use of data. another thing that will restrict how much internet you can use and the quality of it will be the sort of access that you have. according to ofcom, about 3% of people in britain have what is called ultrafast broadband allowing
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multiple streaming and ultrahigh definition. half of households have a superfast broadband which allows for one person to do some streaming and a bit of hd but that means the rest of us are what are on what is called decent broadband so that means you can web browse, stream music and have high definition video calls and that 2% of households who don't even have that. we have asked providers about whether all of this extra internet use will add two extra internet use will add two extra costs —— lead to extra costs. bt said they will remove broadband so every customer has unlimited data. talktalk says they already have packages in place and vodafone say they will make sure that all of their mobile customers will not have to pay with any of their day to use if use —— uk online website. some really helpful moves there. just to let you know, we talked a couple of weeks ago about those loans of up to £5 million that is nurses can access
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the buy high street banks that will be interest—free for a whole year. those loans go live today so contact some of the hydrogen —— high street retailers. there are reports in the newspapers this morning at the chancellor is considering extra measures for the 5 million also self—employed people in the country. many of hume felt left out of the in credit —— incredibly generous package that was announced on friday. —— many of whom.” package that was announced on friday. -- many of whom. i am sure lots of you will be tuned in. we are a lwa ys lots of you will be tuned in. we are always analysing it. we are here with you throughout. we will be speaking to ryan giggs and darren neville. they own a couple of hotels in manchester and they are doing what quite a few people are trying to do to help the nhs. if you are an nhs worker, you can stay in their hotel for free
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during the crisis so good to speak to them and do but terence from christmas? we are talking to him as well. he is self isolating, social distancing. he won't be here! no, he is self isolating somewhere! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, here are the top stories in london and the south east this morning. a man from sussex has appeared in court accused of making fake coronavirus test kits and trying to send them across the world. 59—year—old frank ludlow was arrested at a post office near his home on friday after 60 so—called covid—19 treatment kits were seized by police in the us. the city of london police has this warning. a lot of people feeling vulnerable. a lot of people that will be contained in their homes. a lot of people will be online
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and order these opportunies to be exploited are criminals. so really do think before you agree to do something. trains across london and the south east will be running to a revised timetable from today — to manage and protect services for key workers. the new schedule will include services to suit people who need to travel at peak times as well as those on early and late shifts. southern, southeastern, thameslink, great northern and the gatwick express will all see changes. people are being asked to follow government advice and only make essentialjourneys. there is reduced service running in the underground. bosses at south east coast ambulance say it's extremely disappointing that six of their front line vehicles were deliberately damaged in kent over the weekend. the vehicles were targetted on saturday night at the make ready centre in thanet. anyone with information is being asked to contact kent police. a number of parks in london will be closed from today to help
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with social distancing. it follows scenes like this on sunday, with the police closing roads and stopping cars in and around richmond park. the royal parks will also be closing kiosks and cafes. meanwhile, the national trust says it may now have to close its car parks at open spaces like ditchling beacon and birling gap in sussex. over the weekend people flocked to the south coast at whitstable, camber sands and brighton pier. a wildlife park near sevenoaks — forced to close because of coronavirus — is asking for donations of cash to help feed their animals. hemsley conservation centre rely on donated fruit and vegetables but are struggling to get hold of leftovers from supermarkets because of increased demand. their crowdfunding page is raising money for the seventy different types of animal they care for. a fairly bright and sunny start —
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let's get the full forecast now with sara thornton. good morning to you. another chilly start across london and the south—east. a bit cooler than yesterday even with temperatures below freezing inland. we have a dry and sunny day ahead of us. good spells of sunshine right from the start of things. like yesterday, though, still have a keen breeze in from the south—east that is tempering the feel of things. on the thermometer, we're into low double figures. 12, possible 13 celsius. but it will feel quite cool. high pressure is in control of our weather. our fairweather friend for the coming days so we have a dry, unsettled outlook throughout the week. it's not until thursday night we will see a bit of patchy rain. and for the latest developments on the coronavirus outbreak, including symptoms, how to reduce your risk and advice for those with underlying health conditions, visit the bbc website or the bbc news app. there's also more on facebook and twitter. i'll be back in half an hour, see you then. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today... "stay at home."
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that's the message as the prime minister threatens further measures to limit people's movements. take this advice seriously. follow it. because it's absolutely crucial. thousands of people ignored social distancing advice over the weekend, as crowds flocked to parks and beaches. as the coronavirus crisis continues, the health secretary promises more protective equipment for nhs staff. day one of school closures for most but not all children, we are in one school getting ready to keep the children of key walkers back workers safe. —— key workers. it's never been more important to stay connected. can the uk's broadband network cope with the increased demand of home working and home schooling? i'll be considering capacity. the japanese prime minister has admitted for the first time that this summer's olympic games could be postponed.
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for weeks, japanese officials have said the games will go ahead as planned, but the ioc has set a deadline of four weeks to make a decision. good morning, it is a frosty start was about this but are dry and a sunny one as well. the exception to thatis sunny one as well. the exception to that is across the north—west of scotland, where there is a more cloud and heavier rain coming our way, and windier too. all of the details coming up. it's monday the 23rd of march, our top story. the prime minister says "tougher" restrictions are likely unless more people start following the official advice on social distancing. his warning came after a weekend which saw some parks and beauty spots overwhelmed by visitors. coronavirus has now killed 281 people in the uk. simonjones reports. at the weekend, many people flocked to the seaside — some streets were packed, parks were busy too. prompting this warning from the prime minister. don't think that fresh air in itself automatically
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provides some immunity. even if you think you are personally invulnerable, there are plenty of people that you can infect and whose lives will then be put at risk. on a visit to deliver protective equipment destined for frontline nhs staff, the health secretary said the public must play its part in stopping the health service becoming overwhelmed by practising social distancing. our overall objective is to protect life. unless there is a good reason not to, you should stay at home. going outside for exercise, ican understand. if you do, stay more than two metres away from other people because this is how the virus spreads, through people interacting. the advice is incredibly clear. we're also clear that we may have to take further steps if necessary according to how many people are able and, frankly, willing to follow that advice. doctors and their colleagues
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in belfast put their own message on social media. we're frightened. help us, please stay at home. it's a plea echoed by doctors across the nhs. we have never faced a situation like this before. this is an unprecedented public health crisis. we also know that if you, the public, play your role in helping your nhs, we will be better at dealing with this crisis. to try and stop people gathering, more high—street stores are closing. by the end of today, mcdonald's is to close all of its more than 1,000 restaurant across the uk. for the past few days, it's been serving takeaway food only but now it says, for the safety of its customers and staff, that must also stop. from today, all schools are also closed. but the children of key workers, including medical staff, will still be able to attend. to help those staff do their work safely, the nhs in england has
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bought a million more facemasks following criticism from some doctors that they are being treated as cannon fodder. simon jones, bbc news. the bbc‘s deputy political editor norman smith joins us now from westminster. i know you were listening closely to the health secretary, what did you make of what he had to say? what was the most important thing? well, two things, and restrictive measures and testing. on the former, all the signs are we are moving towards more restrictions, maybe even a total lockdown and although the prime minister yesterday held back from that, he also said he's going to ta ke that, he also said he's going to take a look at it over the next 24 hours and if people aren't observing social distancing, yes, we will have to go down a similar route and the story of this crisis has been that we have pretty much followed what has been rolled out across the rest of europe, added to which it seems to me the facts on the ground are changing. we are seeing some local
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authorities, some parks, organisations like the national trust, already closing down their venues, playgrounds, gardens, that sort of thing and listening to mr hancock this morning, he seemed to me to be echoing the much tougher line we heard, from example, from the mayor of london sadiq khan over the mayor of london sadiq khan over the weekend, saying, in effect, u nless the weekend, saying, in effect, unless you have a very, very good reason, stay home. have a listen to what he said. people have got to stay two metres apart and people should stay home if at all possible. and that these messages are really clear and they really matter, because that is how we save lives. of course, we are prepared to do what it takes and this afternoon, i am taking a bill through the house of commons to give us extra powers to be able to do these sorts of things. i don't want to do it, i don't want to curtail people's liberties in this way but it's all about saving life and protecting people from this really horrific virus. on testing, ithought
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people from this really horrific virus. on testing, i thought there was better news from the health secretary. he suggested that, within days, there would be a test which medical staff could use on—site, in other words in hospitals, because one of the problems at the moment is they have to send off for the tests to be completed, which can take two or three days, which means patients are stuck in hospital for longer, clogging up space, taking longer to ascertain whether they have actually got coronavirus. in terms of the number of test, they are trying to mmp number of test, they are trying to ramp them up but, of course, demand is increasing exponentially and we are, if you like, having to compete against other countries who are also trying to get testing kits. on ppe, the protective equipment, a promise from the health secretary to dramatically increase the of kit available. the difficulty seems to be distribution. the kit is in the country but it is getting into hospitals. mr hancock saying, look, we are going to get the army involved to ensure the kit actually
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does get to front—line staff. involved to ensure the kit actually does get to front-line staff. thank you for going through all of that with us, norman smith. train companies across the uk will operate a reduced service from today. it comes after the government issued guidelines warning against all but essential travel. the department for transport has also agreed to suspend normal franchise agreements for the next six months — meaning the government will take revenues but also cover losses. the japanese prime minister shinzo abe has said for the first time that the tokyo olympic games may need to be postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic. the games are due to start onjuly 24th and both the japanese and olympic authorities have been sticking by that. but shinzo abe has now said that while cancelling the games is not an option, a delay could be on the cards if the games can't be held in their complete form. so, it is eight minutes past eight. we have our help panel coming your way shortly, so many questions to
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run through. we have a gp and someone who is an expert in the spread of diseases. right now, we will hear from carol and find out what is happening with the morning's weather. good morning. it is a cold start to the day. as you can see from the picture behind me, frosty for some of us and we have clear skies and, for many others this week, we will have clearer skies, fair bit of sunshine with the exception across the north where we have a weather front producing some rain but clear skies by day and by night means a chilly night. a lot of dry weather to start the day across much of the uk but there are areas of cloud, sunshine will be hazy and the low cloud and cornwall breaking up and we see this rain coming in across the north west, heavy and persistent across north—west scotland and, at times, we see some rain coming in across north—western parts of northern ireland. eastern parts of northern ireland. eastern parts of northern ireland, eastern and southern scotland hanging on to some sunshine, as indeed is the bulk of england and wales. temperatures between seven and 14, windy in the
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north, not as breezy as it was in the weekend in the south but, even so, if you are exposed to it, it will feel a bit on chilly side. in the black circles, the gust of wind strength. you can see what i mean. in that reign, it is not going to feel particularly pleasant. moved to the east of scotland, the east of northern ireland, dry and bright conditions. gusty winds across the north of england but a lot of sunshine, sunshine as we can further south, albeit hazy with the high cloud around. through this evening and overnight, this weatherfront more or less stays where it is, it still is going to be windy in the north, clear skies as we come south means the temperature will fall away quite quickly and in some parts of england and wales, we could see temperatures fall as low as —2, so expect a frosty first thing tomorrow. we pick up this weather front tomorrow, it still is very much in the same areas, still windy in the north, still wet here, heavy and persistent rain, dry and bright with some sunshine as we come further south. thank you, see you a
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further south. thank you, see you a little further south. thank you, see you a little bit later. follow the rules voluntarily, or face tougher measures. that was the message on social distancing from the prime minister boris johnson yesterday. and also the health secretary this morning on breakfast. let's just remind ourselves of the official advice. we should remain at least two metres apart to keep safe. public transport should be avoided, unless it's essential. those who can, should work from home. and employers should encourage it. don't attend public or family gatherings — whether large or small. and we shouldn't go to a gp surgery in person. instead, we're being asked to use the phone or online services to make first contact with our doctors. nhs workers have also been doing their bit to spread the "stay at home" message. it was a point made very powerfully by one team of respiratory specialists from belfast. i'm nick and we are the belfast respiratory team. we are now in the greatest medical crisis of our lifetime. stay at home. i'm angela, one of the respiratory consultants.
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this is the crucial time. this is not a rehearsal. you will only have one chance at this. stay at home. i'm claire. i'm a respiratory nurse. you can play your part to enable us to play ours. please stay at home. i'mjulian, a respiratory consultant. we all have a choice. if you choose to stay at home, you will save lives. please, stay at home. i'm susie. i'm a respiratory consultant and i've been a doctor for 35 years. we are facing our greatest challenge and we are frightened. help us. please stay at home. i'm siobhan, i'm a respiratory physiotherapist. i know where my kids are.
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where are your kids? keep them at home, stay at home. i'm roisin, a respiratory nurse. doctors and nurses have died. we need to stay healthy, so we can help you. you can help save our lives. stay at home. i'm anne—marie, a respiratory nurse consultant. thousands of people could die here. help us reduce that number, play your part, save a life. stay at home. my name is thelma. i am a respiratory consultant. you've heard my colleagues. this is a crisis. please stay at home, we beg you. very powerful message, isn't it?
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over the weekend, italy enforced even tighter restrictions on the movement of people outside their homes, including the banning of outdoor exercise. silvia bignamini is the director of a hospital in bergamo, near milan. shejoins us now from her home in monza. thank you very much for speaking to us live on breakfast this morning. asi us live on breakfast this morning. as i understand it, you have had the virus yourself so can i ask how you are now? good morning. i feel better now, although i am still positive after 15 days, but pneumonia, fever and cough are almost gone, so i feel much better but the virus takes time to leave your body and so to have a negative result of the test, so i am still isolated at home, trying to work with my colleagues and coordinate, assist them as much as possible and give my messages, like
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to you, to other countries, too maybe help you, since you are in a different phase and you are not yet in an explosion, as we are in bergamo province especially, which has the highest cases of coronavirus in italy, my country. give us an idea, because it is really interesting to see somebody who is seeing a few weeks down the line, what sort of thing are using in the hospital where you are currently advising and speaking to fellow staff members? first of all, i really want to acknowledge the work of my health colleagues, the doctors, nurses, all the health workers. in my hospital, san francesco, i think you say san francisco, like the pope, all hospitals in all other cities, i think they are really doing all great work. in bergamo now all the
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hospitals, coronavirus hospitals. only people with coronavirus are admitted. we have around 60 people with coronavirus in my hospital. we play a role because each one has to play a role because each one has to play a role in this battle. our role, we are a private nonprofit institution, it's a religious one. our role is to take care of the people that are transferred from the big public hospitals. so after intensive care units, these people feel better, they come to us, we don't have intensive care but we created a sub—intensive care unit so we can take care of them. and the big hospitals with intensive care units, they can admit other people that are more seriously ill and they need intensive care or other kind of
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respiratory support. it is an important role that each piece of the system can play. public, private, whatever. to be able to fight this virus and to treat the people, take care of them. sylvia, we seem to be a couple of weeks behind in terms of the measures we are seeing from our government at the moment so can you give us an idea of the very strict lockdown measures we've seen in place in italy? do you think they have made a difference in the way they have been enforced, now we are seeing a slight reduction in the number of cases, currently, eventually, in italy? it's too early to say that there is a reduction. ithink. i'm optimistic, in general, i am an optimistic, in general, i am an optimistic person. i believe the measures of the lockdown that started on the 11th of march. so in a few days, it will be two weeks
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from the lockdown. and i believe we will see some results of these, some reduction, although in some cities like bergamot, the virus was already all over the province. before the lockdown. so maybe, we will delay to see a reduction in cases in some provinces like bergamot. i have information from colleagues in other cities that were affected weeks before us, that they still have cases after 30 days. so we don't expect a sudden reduction. but for sure, i don't expect cases to arise much more than now, than they are now. as i told you, the system took some time to be organised in this way. now the referral system is working quite well and this is also helping in being able to assist the people in the level of care they
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need. you see, we transformed all doctors, beside the specialisation, orthopaedic, surgeon, whatever the specialism is, they are all treating and taking care of coronavirus people so basically those with respiratory symptoms. they were trained, they worked side by side with colleagues that are expert in this. and they learnt and transformed the clinical practice very quickly and now the system is quite ready to take care of the situation. sylvia, really interesting to hear from you this morning. health director in monza, working in bergamo. 20% of health workers in towns like bergamot had tested positive covid—19. sylvia is currently at home, she was saying she needs to get two negative tests before she can return to work as a really interesting to see where
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italy is, two weeks ahead of the situation we currently are seeing in the uk. let's talk about what's going on here. we'rejoined now by dr zoe norris, who is a gp in east yorkshire. and dr adam kucharski from the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine. thank you both very much forjoining us, lots to get through. doctor zoe, turning to you first, we know letters are going to be sent out to one and a half million people considered to be most at risk and they are going to have to remain at home for at least the next 12 weeks. what kind of things with they have to receive one of these letters? we are looking particularly at patients who are immunocompromised, whose immune system isn't working for some reason. that might be because they have a particular sort of cancer, certain types of leukaemia and blood cancers. it might be because of medication that they'd been given by us so that could be patients who are actively undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy at the moment. or who are taking a variety of medicines to suppress other conditions. so there
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will be more detail in there. what i would say is a lot of these patients are probably already aware that they fall into this group because they are cancelled quite carefully when they start these treatments but if you receive one of those letters please, please, please take it seriously. what does it mean for people who live with them as well? should they be extra careful? absolutely. these patients are particularly high risk, we would strongly suggest anyone sharing a household with these patients also isolate themselves because the risk of picking something up if you go out to the shops and bringing it back into the household environment is still very high. my advice would be if you are living with someone, the whole house should be as a letter. we are having a little bit of trouble with the line, we will try and secure that. adam, you have written a book on the rules of contagion, why things spread and why they stop, so many questions this
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morning asking for practical advice, paul says during a pandemic is outdoor exercise like a game of golf, considered acceptable? eileen asking about going to an allotment with her children. and her daughters, as long as people stay apart? making sure two metres remains? things like golf, going to an allotment, are they acceptable at the moment? i think at the moment going outside and getting exercise is absolutely fine but i think the key thing is to metres. we saw at the weekend lots of people getting much closer and in larger groups and that's really where the risk of transmission happens so if people follow the guidance, sticking to that distance and, this can be done safely. but i think people have to be paying attention to who they are interacting with. can i also pick up a question with you as well? this is from derek. i expect lots of people will be in a similar position or they will be shortly. i think about covid—19, i want to get back to
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work, self isolated for seven days, how do i know, really know that i am safe ? how do i know, really know that i am safe? what do you think? we are getting more tests in the pipeline so people will be able to be confident about whether or not they've been infected but the moment we are in a situation where we don't have sufficient testing capacity for everyone have sufficient testing capacity for everyone to know so obviously lots of people at the moment who have symptoms but it's not totally clear. i think even if you think you might have had it in the past follow the guidance and regardless, people should be staying at home as much as possible. let's go back to you, zoe. we are talking to lots of people, medics, those who work in the health profession, who are i think frustrated by some of the things they've seen over the weekend. do you think, is there a more effective way of getting the message through and do you think that the conversations that you having, people understand the need to self—isolate if it got symptoms or maintain that social distance? no, i don't think they are understanding
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and another worrying trend we are seeing is people lying when they contact the nhs. in order to get a face—to—face assessment and that unnecessarily exposes both the treating doctors and nurses but also other patients who may well be very high risk. so i really would love to see a strengthening of the message from the government. i think we do need to ramp things up. i think we need to ramp things up. i think we need to ramp things up. i think we need to be much, much clearer with people. about the social contact. very difficult to see someone and stay two metres away. we don't naturally do that. and even things like protected shopping times for the elderly and nhs staff, people are becoming crowded in those environments. and i think we do need to strengthen it. i'm aware matt hancock offered earlier if there we re hancock offered earlier if there were doctors who were concerned about pp to get in touch, on behalf of all general practice can i please say we are concerned about our pp. cani say we are concerned about our pp. can i clarify, you had people,
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ringing up, lying about symptoms so they can see you, face—to—face? ringing up, lying about symptoms so they can see you, face-to-face? yes, patients who either don't think it's covered, a lot of that, we are getting, its just a covered, a lot of that, we are getting, it'sjust a cold, flu, definitely not to run it may well be. and then answering questions in a way that we would think they may be higher risk, that we may need to assess them for admission and that obviously involves a face—to—face contact which we are really trying to avoid unless it's absolutely essential and then when patients do arrive and our challenge, actually they've lied about her symptoms to be seen and that really is so unhelpful. really worrying to hear. adam, you talk about why things spread and why they stop. we know the government is indicating it is considering very seriously stricter measures. what might make it stop? really, we've got to see a dramatic reduction in interaction, in wuhan in china for example, before the messages came in, people had 15 contacts a day, after the measures cayman people had two contacts a day
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on average, huge reduction in interactions and we are seeing in italy, although it is the early stages, there is this decline. a couple of weeks ago each person was probably giving the infection to a couple of others if they were infected and now it's declining to really have that value. it's not just a case of meeting one or two fewer people every day. we need a massive reduction in our interactions to bring this under control. can i ask you as well, these seem like slightly trivial things but people can still be in pain. paul is asking about a dental appointment could she be worried about that? people asking about getting their hair cut. i know in the grand scheme of things those aren't particularly important but what about things like that when you would need to be near to someone?” think in the moment we are entering the crucial phase of the epidemic, we are seeing case numbers grow. certainly in london, very large numbers of cases now, in the coming weeks. if you can, delay things are possible and avoid those interactions, that's going to be key. yesterday we put out some new
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forecasts, i see you s, the demand of those is going to be increasing over the next few weeks or any decision you make now could potentially show up with people in a couple of weeks. so we can quickly, rob has been in touch and asks if symptoms of no taste and smell is a symptoms of no taste and smell is a symptom of covid—19? he says he hasn't been able to smell or taste anything, there's been some things written about that so what do you think? there have been, yes, in reputable scientific panels, so as clinicians we are aware of that and we are looking for that. ok, rob, i think you've answered his question. thanks built so much. really good to talk and thank you to all of you who have been sending in your questions. spot on. thank you. that interesting point so he makes about some people ringing up, not telling the truth to try and get a face—to—face, not only putting them in danger but the doctors as well, staff trying their best to do the job they need to. i can hardly see the clock from where
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iam. it's can hardly see the clock from where i am. it's a 20 7am. you need your own clock over there! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, good morning, bbc london and bbc studies tojoining hello, good morning, bbc london and bbc studies to joining forces at the moment to keep you up—to—date with the latest across the region. police are warning people to be extra careful after a man from sussex appeared in court charged with making vague coronavirus testing kits. 16 so—called covid—19 test kits. 16 so—called covid—19 test kits were seized by police in america after 59—year—old frank ludlow was arrested at a post office near his home on friday. rail companies across london and the south—east have announced you'll be moving to a revised timetable today. to manage and protect services for key workers. the reduced provision will include services to suit people who need to travel at peak times as well as those on early and late shifts. southern, southeast,
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thameslink and the gatwick express are among those same changes. there's also a reduced service running on the london underground with some stations shut and no waterloo & city service. health chiefs say they are extremely disappointed after vandals damaged six ambulances in kent over the weekend. the vehicles were deliberately targeted on saturday night at south east coast ambulance is make ready centre in thanet. anyone with information should contact kent police. some of london's parks will be closed from today to help with social distancing. it's after busy scenes on sunday with the police closing roads and stopping cars in and around richmond park. the royal parks will also be closing their kiosks and cabbies. meanwhile, the national trust says it may now have to close its car parks and open spaces like birling gap in sussex. over the weekend people flocked to the south coast at whitstable, camber sands and brighton pier. let's check the weather. here's sara
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thornton. good morning to you. another chilly start across london and the south—east. a bit cooler than yesterday even with temperatures below freezing inland. we have a dry and sunny day ahead of us. good spells of sunshine right from the start of things. like yesterday, though, still have a keen breeze in from the south—east that is tempering the feel of things. on the thermometer, we're into low double figures. 12, possible 13 celsius. but it will feel quite cool. high pressure is in control of our weather. our fairweather friend for the coming days so we have a dry, unsettled outlook throughout the week. it's not until thursday night we will see a bit of patchy rain. you can keep up—to—date by tuning into your local radio station, whether that's bbc sussex and bbc surrey comet bbc london or bbc radio kent. steve will be taking your calls from ten i am. thank you and good morning. we will talk about social distancing, we seen the pictures in the billiton. full of the papers this morning and on
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social media is well over the weekend. are we taking the measures to keep our selves and members of ourfamily to keep our selves and members of our family seriously enough? is it time for the softly softly approach to go from government and tougher measures to be brought in? what are you doing to protect yourself, your family and your friends? what do you think when you saw people out and about of the weekend? the number is on screen. we are on at 10am. thank you, that's it from us for now. more on the lunchtime news. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it is monday morning, we are here until nine o'clock for you this morning. let's bring you up—to—date with some of the top stories. the prime minister borisjohnson says "tougher" restrictions are likely unless more people start following the official advice on social distancing to help curb the coronavirus pandemic. his warning came after a weekend which saw some parks and beauty spots packed with visitors. 281 people are now known to have
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died from the virus in the uk. earlier, the health secretary matt hancock told breakfast he was committed to protecting frontline staff. i want to say very clearly to everybody who works in the nhs and in social care that we are doing everything we can to support you and to protect you. we've got your back. and i know there have been concerns about protective equipment, about masks, for instance. we've shipped millions of masked regulate masks over the weekend, we've been working day and night to get those masks out —— we've shipped millions of masks. and i want to know if there is anybody who hasn't got a supply, or more accurately has used up their supply, more accurately has used up their supply, so we can get the next set out. that was about an hour ago. costa coffee is the latest business to announce that it is shutting stores from today because of coronavirus. nina's got more on this — and also how the virus is impacting rail companies.
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for social distancing purposes, she's just outside the studio. a good distance away. yes, it is not personal! costa coffee, the latest retailer to announce it will close its doors from this evening because of fears around social distancing but they say they will still provide hospital in —— copies in hospital and free copies for nhs staff. they follow mcdonald's restaurants, who decided to close their doors from 7pm this evening and on saturday, pret a manger was another that close their doors because of fear around social distancing. as rail timetables are reduced, the government has decided they will suspend all rail franchise contracts for six months. that effectively means the government will be taking over the running of the trains and, with that, taking the big financial hit of dramatically reduced passenger numbers. the department of transport says essential routes for key workers will be maintained and
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that anybody who has bought a season ticket and is being asked to stay at home will be fully refunded. and those £5 million loans from the government for small businesses are available today via high street banks. thank you. sally is here... well, she is over there. sorry, my knees are in that short. we are learning to navigate the sofa. i have decided i need a few things, i have decided i need a few things, i have assigned myself a little table. ican get table. i can get you one. covered in the same red? it just needs covered in the same red? itjust needs to go vaguely. do you want to some sort of floral arrangement? no, ijust arrangement? no, i just want arrangement? no, ijust want my cup of tea. may be a plant. every little helps. well, in this doom and gloom time, shall we talk about something a little more positive. former footballers gary neville and ryan giggs were already pretty popular with one half of manchester. now they will be popular with the other
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half and the rest of the country after opening their two hotels in the city for free to nhs workers as they deal with the coronavirus crisis. gary and ryanjoin us now on bbc breakfast to tell us more, thanks both very much indeed for talking to us this morning. if i could come to you, ryan, what is the situation with the hotels and what is it you are offering? at the moment, we have about 20 nhs staff at hotel football, and the same at the stock exchange, but we expect them both to be full in the next ten or 15 days and we are offering nhs staff to stay, they stay for around ten days, so there is turnover, free of charge. it is difficult at the moment, gauging how our staff are, keeping our staff obviously say found at the nhs workers safe as
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well, so we are doing our best but, at the moment, that is where we are at. 20 at one hotel, 15 at the other but we expect them both to be full over the next week or ten days. gary, can you tell us where did this idea come from? what is the inspiration behind it? about three weeks ago, we started planning what weeks ago, we started planning what we will do with the hotels because one of our shareholders, peter lynn, is from singapore and he and his team were feeding into is how they had dealt with things quickly and decisively over there, over in singapore and how they were beating this virus, and we obviously cover three weeks ago in england, i don't think we had quite seen the danger, so we we re think we had quite seen the danger, so we were getting the intelligence, we we re so we were getting the intelligence, we were speaking to ryan's mum, who used to work in the nhs for many years and she was speaking to many nurses and we were years and she was speaking to many nurses and we were doing their own business planning about keeping our guests and staff are safe and also
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understanding the economic impact on our own business, first and foremost, and our staff and team over the next six months and then decided, through the intelligence we had from singapore and from ryan's mum, started to speak together about how we would potentially become useful to the wider community and particularly the nhs, knowing they would have too isolated from family members that were showing symptoms. so we started quickly and decisively, we could see what was coming andl decisively, we could see what was coming and i think it was probably a week or so ago and now we decided we would open our hotels to medical professionals and nhs staff as they we re professionals and nhs staff as they were needed and, like ryan said, we have got 35 staying in our hotels already and we expected to be up to about 170 by end of the week. gary, it is down here, can i ask you how it works? do nhs workers have to contact the hotel first, do they pop down? how do you practically get to stay in the hotel? believe it or
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not, it is through group whatsapp. the manchester university health service foundation trust have got a contact point and any nhs worker who needs accommodation, whether it be at two o'clock in the morning or whether it be ten o'clock in the morning, it doesn't really matter, they contact a number and that numberthen they contact a number and that number then goes through to our staff on the desk at hotel football and that memberof staff on the desk at hotel football and that member of the nhs will then be given access into the building and givena be given access into the building and given a room and as ryan said, it would normally be ten days they would stay with us. we have 35 checked and who have been staying with us for three days. ryan, i know the announcements from a few days ago, but we are waiting for a bit more clarification but, certainly, the hospitality industry has been hit incredibly hard. what can you do to try and protect your businesses over the next six months? well, as
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gary said, we acted quite quickly regarding protecting our staff and, by the way, the staff who come into the hotels, it is voluntarily, we are not forcing the staff to come m, are not forcing the staff to come in, it is up to them. obviously, they can be complications, well, not complications, but with the virus, you have to be careful, so they volunteer to come in but i think obviously we have had the help of the government over the last few days, which has helped and helped the hospitality business but, you are right, it is going to be a long fight regarding the hospitality business. like i say, we have had to help from the government but we are trying to help our staff keep busy. again, they volunteer to come in, they don't have to come in and we will just have they don't have to come in and we willjust have to see where we are inafew willjust have to see where we are in a few months' time. the landscape is changing so quickly but hopefully
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we can get rid of this virus sooner rather than later. gary, back to you, finally, how much are you missing football? i am missing it a lot. it isn't that important at this moment in time but you do recognise how much football impacts people's lives, how much sport impacts people's lives and the relief and hope and joy it gives them during the week and at weekends and i think no one will ever complain about foot ball no one will ever complain about football being on again, i don't think, because i think everyone wanted to return, as they do normal life, but at this time there are greater priorities. gary neville, ryan giggs, thank you both very, very much indeed. hopefully we have given nhs workers certainly in manchester a little bit of information about how they could be helped there. and on the bbc news website, and lots of us are looking for better news, aren't we? nice things to think about, there are stories running there all day about news
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stories. it is good to talk about something positive, someone taking positive action and helping. loads of messages today, lots of people talking about social distancing, people getting in contact concerned about lack of online delivery slots from supermarkets. thank you for your messages. people talking about protective gear for those who work in education. we were mentioning to one of our experts earlier about hairdressers, diy, people going to the dentist or opticians, those sorts of questions people are asking this morning. continue to ask them through the week, because we will be there. now, it is monday morning. most children are staying at home today because of the coronavirus. but some will be going to school if they are the children of key workers, but what will they be doing? brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin he's in merseyside. good morning.
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good morning, there have been absolute scenes today, it is fair to say! one child, lewis, came through the door with his mother and you with a first in, one of only four kids to come into school today. how are you feeling? ok. because your mum is doing a very importantjob, keeping us all fared. hello, sharon. you have taken this decision, one of the key front line workers out there doing an important job the key front line workers out there doing an importantjob so you are allowed to bring lewis in. it wasn't an easy decision, was it? no, certainly not. you don't have any other care? no, and his dad is a key worker as well. you are both in the food distribution system. so how do you feel today, bringing him in? food distribution system. so how do you feeltoday, bringing him in?” think i feel more secure that he is allowed to come to school, and art are stuck in the house. i wouldn't leave him on his own anyway, so
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obviously as they need as much staff as they can so i am pleased lewis can come to school. social distancing is so important, isn't it? all of the teachers behind us are doing this. gary is the head teacher... bell. that is it, the school day has started, lewis, go to lessons! gary, there were 100 parents on the list he could send their kids and, 50 indicated they might end only four have arrived. it is a really strange feeling. we will see how the day progresses, there may be more stu d e nts progresses, there may be more students who can come in later in the morning but people like sharon are doing a fantasticjob, they need to be out there and that is why the schools are open for those students are parents who are key workers. the issue for us is knowing, with days to go, how many will come each day.
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i'm sure it will fluctuate each day but we will make a decision on staffing levels for today and other days and then we just carry on being open for those students who need to be here. i spoke to two of the cleaning staff and they say they are continuously looping around the school, making sure everything is clea n, school, making sure everything is clean, going down the handrails. how difficult is it going to be, making sure that everybody stays safe? the clea ners sure that everybody stays safe? the cleaners are doing a greatjob and that has just got to carry on forever, really. we are asking stu d e nts to forever, really. we are asking students to come in, if they come m, students to come in, if they come in, to wash their hands. the staff are keeping a safe distance apart, we will do the same with the stu d e nts we will do the same with the students and it is about maintaining that hygiene level throughout. thank you very much, keep up the good work, and you, sharon. the message from the school and very many schools is, yes, if you are a key worker, you are allowed to send your kids in but only really if you don't have any other arrangements. back to you. thank you very much
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indeed and it is really... you know, just seeing all those teachers, we are in such a change to place, aren't we? they are doing absolutely the right thing, keeping a part how they should be. we try our best to try and give you an idea of what is happening out there, that is a school up and running that lots of parents getting ready to educate their children at home. what i mean starting school? you have 15 minutes! are still plenty on the way. we are speaking to terence, who helped out at christmas and we have a green goddess back for an exercise regime. and the weather, carol has the details. you, that's it from us for now. more on the lunchtime news. goodbye. good morning everyone. this week, for many of us, things looking settled., sunshine, for many of us, things looking settled. , sunshine, hazy for many of us, things looking settled., sunshine, hazy at times. but rain will come, heavy and persistent at times. this high pressure still clinging onto the
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weather. in the north—west, we have this weather front producing rain, look at the isobars over scotland and northern ireland, you are in for and northern ireland, you are in for a windy day, not as windy as it was further south at the weekend. but nonetheless, the wind coming from a chilly direction, it will feel cool if you are in it. lots of dry weather, sunshine. sunshine in the east of northern ireland but in the west, we've got a thick cloud and splashes of rain and the heavier rain in north—west scotland. these white circles tell you the sustained wind speeds, the gusts will be higher. temperatures ranging 7—14d. as we head through this evening and overnight temperature falling away quickly under clear skies. we are looking at a frosty night. across scotla nd looking at a frosty night. across scotland and northern ireland were cloud and some rain, that will help keep temperature at levels up. also looking at low cloud getting in at times across devon and cornwall, that will help your temperatures. we could see temperatures as —2 in parts of england, wrap up warmly tomorrow morning despite the fact
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there will be a fair bit of sunshine around. still in the north and west we have all this cloud, some rain and persistent rain across north—west scotland. still windy here as well. temperatures ranging eight in lyric to around 16 in liverpool, wouldn't be surprised if we saw something just a little bit higher, especially on wednesday. tuesday into wednesday this weather front starts moving slowly south, high pressure clinging on in the south, as that front bums into high pressure it will weaken, not going to be much more than a band of cloud and patchy rain. dryer across north—west scotland but by then you could have seen as much as 100 millimetres of rain. ahead of this weather front are still a lot of sunshine, hazy at times, i cloud coming and going. i is potentially up coming and going. i is potentially up to 16 or17 coming and going. i is potentially up to 16 or 17 degrees. that's the last day of those temperature levels for a while, look how the yellows squeeze away and are replaced by blues as all of us return to more of
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a northerly wind flow. colder direction for us. as we head through the rest of the week still fairly settled conditions. don't forget this weather front coming south will introduce more cloud and possibly some patchy rain. nothing too heavy but by the end of the week note how the temperatures slip away, back down to eight and 9 degrees. going to get colder, carol, thank you for all the details. it's 8:48am. if you watched breakfast in the run—up to christmas last year, you'll almost certainly remember terrence. he won our hearts — and millions more — when he spoke about his efforts to beat his own loneliness and to help others to do the same. you may recall that we spent a very moving night with him at a john barrowman concert in sheffield. and some college students went to visit him with a christmas tree. and they sang outside as well. like a lot of people of his age, terrence is now self—isolating. but we wanted to see
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how he was getting on, so let's say hello to him now at his home in oldham. thank you so much for spending some time with this, how is self isolation going? this is my first week. i started self isolating last monday. and are not managing very well. unfortunately i can't go and see my friend nancy but i'm ringing the home every week and asking to be remembered to her because i don't wa nt remembered to her because i don't want her to think i'd forgotten her, i haven't. and people will remember, nancy is in her 905. i haven't. and people will remember, nancy is in her 90s. she is 91, she'll be 91, she was 91 in february. and you've been looking after her, spending some time with her and meeting her every week and that was really important part of your life, wasn't it, seeing her? yes, it was, but i'm ringing the home every week. just to say i send
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my love and obviously, because of the situation that we are in at the moment, i won't be able to visitor but i haven't forgotten her. i am going to centre some cards, just to let her know that i'm thinking of her at this time. i know you've seen an awful lot in your lifetime and we spoke a lot about that in the time we spend with you. can you recall anything anywhere near what you are going through at the moment and many other people are going through? no, i haven't experienced anything like this. for instance, i was born in the world. i was born in 1941. my mother had three of us during the war, she had my sister in 1940. me 13 months after, in 41 and my sibling in 43. my mother struggled. but my mother always said to me keep a roof over your head and keep your larder. that's something that i have
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always, always done. that is now paying dividends because i'm well stocked up. because i've done that all my life. i'm doing all my cooking as usual. i am spending time in the house because i'm going through a lot of paperwork and keeping myself busy. this may have to carry on for many, many months yet. for all we know. to carry on for many, many months yet. forall we know. ithink to carry on for many, many months yet. for all we know. ithink the annoying part of all of this, you know, people think this is a game and it's not. this is for real. and people have got to start taking notice. they must do as they have been asked and that is to self—isolate. that is the only way that things are going to calm down. and i don't understand all this buying of food. it's ridiculous, what's the matter with people? you'd know there's a lot of people out there that can't even get the shops.
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age uk and oldham are doing a wonderful, wonderfuljob. have you got someone doing that for you or are you able to do that yourself? for my shopping? at the moment i don't need anything, i have plenty of stuff in but arrangements have been made by age uk that should i need anything, they will get the shopping to me. now, all they need to do is if and when i need it, i'm not going to ask until i need it, they will put it on the doorstep and i will simply pick it up from there. i don't know if you know but oldham have just started this last two weeks, the people that worked in charity shops and the people like myself that did home visiting, we've now signed up and we are going to make phone calls to people that are totally isolated, through no fault of their own. sol totally isolated, through no fault of their own. so i probably will be ringing three or four people in the
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week, just to see they are ok and they've got somebody to talk to. and just see how they are. and then i just see how they are. and then i just feel i'm doing my bit. it's been so brilliant to speak to you, thank you so much. glad to see you are ok and you are well stocked as your mother told you! see you again soon and take care. very nice speaking to you. and you take care. there are still no drugs that can kill covid—19. but how far are we from developing them? breakfast‘s tim muffett visited a coronavirus testing lab to find out more. in this quarantine unit in east london, a doctor monitors people infected with a respiratory virus. they have got the virus through choice — they are paid volunteers on whom vaccines and drugs are being tested. the plan is for other volunteers here to soon be given a mild strain of coronavirus. we will take healthy volunteers and we will inoculate them with a version of the human coronavirus,
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follow their disease time course and then return them to healthy. it is known as a controlled human infection model. it will deepen scientific understanding of the virus. volunteers will be paid around £3000 and will have to stay in a room like this for two weeks. so this is the room where our volunteers will be staying. this isn't a big room, how hard do some people find it to stay in a room this size for two weeks? for some people i would say it is challenging, hence we do a really watertight screening process to make sure that they are suitable. it is important to stress that volunteers here will not be infected with covid—19, the disease caused by a specific strain of the coronavirus. they will be given a much weaker strain with mild symptoms, but scientists here believe it will still provide crucial information. it helps fast track the development of antivirals and vaccines, so it speeds up the habit of understanding if that
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potential product is going to be valuable or not. the vaccine seems to be the only answer to this global crisis. the search for one has united the world's scientific community. it is a race against the virus, not against each other, and there is a huge effort to produce new vaccines against this disease. and we are seeing a whole number of different platforms that have been in development over several years suddenly coming to fruition and being tested in clinical trials. at porton down research centre in wiltshire, vaccine trials on animals are due to start this week. initial safety trials in humans are expected to begin next month at oxford university. it is an urgent challenge on which so many lives depend. though it could to them. if you were watching us last week you will know we have now enlisted diana moran,
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otherwise known as the green goddess to help us stay active. she is back to help us stay active. she is back to kick—start our week with another gentle routine. have a look. good morning, everybody. i hope you're all keeping fit. keeping fit and carrying on. that's what we've gotta do. as you can see, i'm in a new set morning. i've come out of the bedroom and i've come down into my conservatory where i can see a bit more sunshine and colour which helps us on our way, doesn't it? so let's begin by stretching out our bodies and warming up. so up to the ceiling, well, in my instance, it's up to the sky this time, which is a delight! nice, comfortable chair, and here i go. stretching away, warming my body up. that's it, a few more of those, as if you're climbing a rope. and then let's stop and let's stretch out the side of your body. that's it. nice stretch for five seconds.
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and back and over to the other side and stretch out. that's given us good preparation for the day. now, my props today, i have two water bottles. you could have two cans of beer, as long as you don't drink them. or perhaps a couple of bags of sugar. now, i'm just going to use these as weights and i'm going to work my arms. so sit up nice and tall and just take them to the chest and out, working the upper under arm, and the shoulders, that's good. another few of those, excellent. now, bring the water bottles, or the weight, to your shoulders and just take it up and out. and to the front. let's do that again, i bet you've forgotten. up! laughs.
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out to the sides and to the front. a few more of those, up, out, to the front, last one, up, out, and to the front. now, this is a little, special little exercise for us ladies to strengthen up the top of our arms and to perhaps stop some of that saggy underarm. so take your arm back and then keep in your upper arm in that same position. take your lower arm back and just twist your hand round as you're doing it. another one, there you are. and then of course you will have to change around and do it on the other side as well. and then let's just finally stretch out our chest, put your hands behind you...
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inhales deeply. ..take a nice deep breath, sitting up nice and tall, push out your chest, pull your shoulders back, and stretch. inhales and exhales deeply. keep fit and carry on. she is good, isn't she? she certainly is. we will be back here from 6am tomorrow. good morning.
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hello, good morning. how are you? it's 9am on monday morning, this is bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire with the latest on coronavirus and here to help guide you through. the headlines... the health secretary promises more protective equipment for nhs staff —
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the army will help distribute it. there is a huge
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