Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 24, 2020 6:00am-9:01am BST

6:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and nina warhurst. our headlines today. the prime minister urges parents to send their children back to school — saying it's far more damaging for their development and health to be kept at home. we'll be speaking to schools minister nick gibb and england's deputy chief medical officer this morning. in northern ireland, many children will return to class today for the first time since the lockdown was imposed. the man who killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand in march last year arrives in court to be sentenced for the worst terror attack in the country's history. as the government's eat out to help
6:01 am
out scheme enters its first marker last week, should it be extended? out scheme enters its first marker last week, should it be extended7m is needed to extend business for thousands of bars, pubs and restau ra nts. bayern munich are champions of europe for a sixth time. victory over paris st—germain sees them become the first side to win the champions league without losing a single game. paralympic champion hannah cockroft tells sally about her fears over whether disability sport will recover from the coronavirus pandemic. showery rain moving west to east in wales and southern england which we re wales and southern england which were clear and then most will have a dry day with a few showers. tonight and tomorrow we see a return to wet and tomorrow we see a return to wet and very windy conditions. i'll have all the details later in the programme. it's monday 24th august. our top story. borisjohnson has issued a direct appeal to parents to send their children back to school when they reopen. he says the risk of catching coronavirus in school is "very
6:02 am
small" but that the life chances of a generation of pupils are at stake if they don't go back. our political correspondent, nick eardley, joins us from westminster. nick, how significant is this? morning. it's a big deal. the government will talk a lot this week about trying to make sure that all pupils are back in school when schools start to open up again next week. over the weekend we had the chief medical officer saying that the chances of pupils getting coronavirus and becoming really ill are extremely low and today there is more of a political argument from the prime minister, as well, making that direct appeal to parents to be ready to send kids back to school next week. let me show you what the prime minister says this morning.
6:03 am
imean, i mean, it's an argument that the government has been making for a number of weeks now. as i say, i think they will really ramp it up this week. the head of skills —— ahead of schools reopening. some of the unions are still saying there needs to be more detail on what teachers are supposed to do if there is an outbreak, watch the procedures are going to be in schools. but borisjohnson has are going to be in schools. but boris johnson has made are going to be in schools. but borisjohnson has made this absolutely a big priority for him and his government and the big task now for them is going to be making sure that they deliver on the planet next week. many thanks. -- deliver on the plan.
6:04 am
meanwhile in northern ireland, many children will be returning to school today for the first time since lockdown. the term is beginning for just three year groups, but all pupils will be allowed back in classes by the end of the month. our ireland correspondent chris page is at a secondary school in county armagh. what sort of safety measures has the school introduced? yeah, well, pupils arriving here at a college in lurgan will certainly notice differences. when they walk into the fire you have hand sanitising station, reminders of how to wash your hands —— walked into the fia derry entrance. social distancing notices to remind people to get derry stay two metres apart. iamjoined by to get derry stay two metres apart. i am joined by the principal, fiona. thank you for getting up early on what will be a very busy day for you. what are you doing here at saint ronanto you. what are you doing here at saint rona nto keep you. what are you doing here at saint ronanto keep everybody safe? we have made a lot of plans over the la st we have made a lot of plans over the last weeks and months. we are looking forward to welcoming our
6:05 am
young people back to school. they have been out of formal education since march so a lot of and safety planning has gone on behind the scenes. the guidance has changed. numerous times over the last number of weeks. we have adapted our plans in line with the guidance. health and safety is our priority and getting our children back into face—to—face learning stopping of the school is divided into different zones. yes, we are a large scale, we are over zones. yes, we are a large scale, we a re over two zones. yes, we are a large scale, we are over two sites which makes it more complex and we could do without our new build in the background but we have two buildings so we have had an awful lot of complex issues to look at with planning and social distancing and bubbles and zones. so we have been able to create protective bubbles for our young people and zones so they are not mixing at break time at lunchtime so
6:06 am
we can do a test and trace if need be was that we have three lunch times on each site, so huge implications for supervision and of course costs. you have had a very busy few weeks planning for all this. thank you for for the moment. i'm pleased to say we will be back here throughout the morning on bbc brea kfast. here throughout the morning on bbc breakfast. see how it goes as pupils return. i'm sure people will be very interested to see how it works out. we will speak to that skills minister nick gibb —— we'll be speaking to schools minister nick gibb and england's deputy chief medical officer later on this morning. we will also be speaking tojenny harry. if you have any questions about your children going back —— check outjenny about your children going back —— check out jenny is not just the pa rents check out jenny is not just the parents and grandparents. do get in touch. a number of lockdown restrictions that were imposed in aberdeen earlier this month have been lifted. tighter rules were introduced because of a surge
6:07 am
of cases in the city. a five—mile limit on non—essential travel and a ban on indoor gatherings has been removed, while pubs, cafes and restaurants will be able to re—open from wednesday, subject to environmental health checks. president trump has announced that emergency authorisation has been given to use blood plasma to treat coronavirus patients. 70,000 people have already received a transfusion, which is taken from those who've sucessfully recovered from the virus. the announcement was made on the eve of donald trump's presidential campaign launch. he called it a major breakthrough which could reduce death rates by 35%. this is a powerful therapy that transfuses very, very strong antibodies from the blood of recovered patients to help treat patients battling a current infection. it's had an incredible rate of success. today's action will dramatically expand access to this treatment. firefighters in california are preparing for conditions to worsen as they try to bring nearly 600 wildfires under control. lightning strikes, which were blamed for starting many of the blazes last
6:08 am
week, are forecast to return, along with warm and windy weather. tens of thousands of people have already been forced to flee their homes. rich preston reports. the golden state. more than 4,000 square kilometres of it burning. in the napa valley, california's winemaking heartland, a perilous journey caught on dash cam. an ominous orange sky around a deserted university of california, santa cruz. fire retardants are being dropped from the sky to try and stop the flames spreading. but for some, it's too late — the damage has already been done. president trump has declared the fires a major disaster. i spoke to governor newsom as they battle two of the worst wildfires in the history of their state. that continues. the federal government has already deployed over 26,000 first responders and personnel
6:09 am
to battle the wildfires. we're working very closely with the governor. more than 100,000 people have been forced to flee, but where they'd normally sleep in shelters, many are avoiding them overfears of the spread of coronavirus. we have more than 400 red crossers who are on the ground and hundreds more who are helping virtually, and those folks are out there making sure that we're getting people in shelters or in hotel rooms where it's available. and they're also there just to make sure that the people who are coming to our shelters have a safe place to stay and food to eat. emergency crews have been overwhelmed by the number and intensity of the fires. the job is now to save lives and protect only the most essential buildings. but with warnings of more lightning strikes and high temperatures in the days ahead, fears that the fires could continue for at least another week. rich preston, bbc news. the sentencing hearing has started
6:10 am
for the far—right gunman who murdered 51 people in attacks on two mosques in new zealand last year. 29—year—old brenton tarrant, who is representing himself, faces life in prison without parole. our sydney correspondent shaimaa khalil has been following the case and joins us now. shaimaa, what talk us through what has happened today. good morning. it's been a very emotional day in court. this is the first day and the first time that survivors and victims of‘ relatives we re survivors and victims of‘ relatives were in the same room as the killer responsible for the christchurch mass shootings. they told brenton tarrant himself mass shootings. they told brenton tarra nt himself how mass shootings. they told brenton tarrant himself how his crimes devastated their lives. many chose to start their impact statement with verses from the koran aboutjustice and peace. one person said she drove her husband to the mosque and when they had the shooting she hid in a
6:11 am
cupboard and when she came out she described how bodies were piled on each other, including a man who was holding on his dead toddler. she went to the car park to find her husband dead there. we also heard from a mother tea rfully husband dead there. we also heard from a mother tearfully directly spoke to the killer himself. she told him she could not forgive him and that the world would not forgive him for what he'd done, and that she hopes he gets the maximum severe punishment in this life and the hereafter. the court also heard how brenton tarrant hereafter. the court also heard how brenton tarra nt flew hereafter. the court also heard how brenton tarrant flew a drone over the mosque to make sure he inflicted as much damage as possible. we will hear from as much damage as possible. we will hearfrom him as much damage as possible. we will hear from him and as much damage as possible. we will hearfrom him and more impact state m e nts hearfrom him and more impact statements in the day to come —— in the days to come. thank you. with less than 200 cases worldwide, the progressive neurological condition h—abc is thought to be one of the rarest diseases on the planet. there's currently no known cure for the disorder — but breakfast‘s graham satchell has been speaking to three mums
6:12 am
who live just an hour apart, who are hoping to change that for their children. frankie. frankie is just five. he has an extremely rare brain condition called h—abc. well done. we were told, nothing we can do, go home, enjoy your time. quite ironic, really. sorry. and this is a year ago, so it's not been too long. oh, he loves to kiss and cuddle me. he tells me he loves me all the time. the fact he can lose his voice in just the hardest thing. is just the hardest thing. to think that one day he won't be able to tell me he loves me. it's just really hard. what are you doing, baby? huh? you enjoying yourself? you having mr crab for dinner? this is sophia. her parents began to worry when,
6:13 am
as a baby, she was late to sit, cruel and walk. after years of tests, sophia was also diagnosed with h—abc. you can spend quite a bit of time being paralysed with fear and grief. i mean, i'll be very honest with you — i couldn't really accept it for a while. it took me years and years to come to terms with it. aggy was diagnosed with the condition five years ago. h—abc is a genetic disorder — a faulty gene and the white matter of the brain means messages to the rest of the body don't go through. as she's got older, it's affected aggy‘s walking and speech, but so far not her smile. hi! she's very happy. she's very positive. and strangely, she's never asked why she's lost the ability to walk now. she's never asked any questions. and i say to her, you know, "if you want to ask, if you have any questions..."
6:14 am
and she just gummed down. it's her her way of coping with it, i think. let's go have a sit down. it's the first time these three families have met in person. h—abc is incredibly rare — there are only 200 recorded cases in the whole world. these families live within an hour of each other in england. all of us felt like we were just like a small little sailing boat in this sea, in an ocean of being lost with your child, you know, and then you just have to find something, somewhere, an island of hope. i think we'll all say we've got amazing family and friends that are so supportive, but they don't understand it. until you've been there, you don't understand it. it's tough. it's very tough. most children with h—abc won't survive into adulthood. but these three families are determined not to give up. they formed a charity, the h—abc foundation, to raise awareness of leukodystrophies — the umbrella term for genetic brain disorders.
6:15 am
by chance, michelle is a trained genetic scientist. she's been busy making contacts around the world. do you just accept it and support her, or do you think, actually, there could be something out there that could help her? the children's hospital of philadelphia in america — the families are in touch with professor vanderver, one of the only clinicians in the world researching treatments for h— abc. for h—abc. gene therapy, where the faulty dna in the brain is either edited or removed now a realistic possibility. i've been caring for this group of diseases for almost 20 years. and if you had told me evenjust as you said from ten years ago where we were today, i'm not sure i would have believed you. it's just a question of getting the work done and getting it done as quickly as possible so that we can help children who are alive and suffering from these diseases today. are you able to give a timescale? it's hard to know because some of it is beyond my...
6:16 am
..you know, my ability, but i would say certainly hopefully within the life span of the children you spoke with today. the doctors, all of them say this is such an exciting, exciting time. things are moving. science is, you know, changing every day. so that gives us so much hope. and that's basically what kind of gets me out of bed in the morning — to know that there is a chance, there is a chance to cure our kids. all three families will continue to raise money for research, continue to raise awareness of the condition, and continue to hope for a treatment. graham satchell, bbc news. let's take a look at some of today's papers. boris johnson‘s appeal to parents to send their children back to school features on a number of the front pages. the daily mirror says the prime minister "begged" parents in his message — which was released ahead of schools reopening in england next week.
6:17 am
in the vast majority of places that is next week. "teachers spread virus more than pupils" is the lead story in the times. it says new research from public health england showed that two thirds of outbreaks came from staff—to—staff transmission, or staff to pupil. and "raving idiots" is the headline in the metro, which reports that the police had to break up at least 100 illegal mass gatherings across the uk at the weekend. it says more than 70 of those events took place in birmingham — including one party which had two marquees and a dj. we will be talking about that later in the programme. and a dj, full stop. there is a piece in the telegraph. how do you feel about the use of a full stop in a text message? i would typically end a message? i would typically end a message with a kiss or it may be two. i will have to check my text
6:18 am
messages. this is because linguists have been debating the use of full stop and white some young people interpret correctly punctuated text asa sign interpret correctly punctuated text as a sign of annoyance. interpret correctly punctuated text as a sign of annoyancelj interpret correctly punctuated text as a sign of annoyance. i can see that, because if someone puts one on it it would look like they are trying to make a point. some people say it is obvious when a text message ends and therefore you don't need a full stop. one says instant m essa 9 es need a full stop. one says instant messages have a new role in signifying an abrupt and angry tone of voice if you use a full stop. someone wrote a book in 2015 cold making a point and they said it is an emotional market signifying anger or annoyance. they also found that if you use exclamation it makes you feel more sincere and more engaged. i would disagree with that. exclamation i find more aggressive. i will have to watch my text m essa 9 es i will have to watch my text m essa g es to i will have to watch my text messages to you very carefully and
6:19 am
how i punctuate them and end them. we also have great puns later on. today marks the start of the last full week of the government's eat out to help out scheme. ben's got the latest. you are in a beautiful setting. diners out there yet but they will be later. welcome to the heart of the city of london. you'll see from our amazing view we are a0 floors above london at the duck and waffle restau ra nt. above london at the duck and waffle restaurant. normally this is very busy with all the city workers in the offices around here. no surprise forgetting it is pretty quiet at the moment. a lot of the stuff still working from home. they have changed the opening hours here. it is one of thousands of businesses up and down the country that is taking part in the country that is taking part in the eat out to help out scheme. 85,000 have signed up but, as you said, this is the last full week of that scheme, it is due to end at the end of august. the industry says they need more time. extend the
6:20 am
scheme, they are asking the chancellor, to make sure the future for thousands of other bars, restau ra nts a nd for thousands of other bars, restaurants and pubs can be safeguarded. let's talk about it in more detail. elliott is the executive chef at duck & waffle, and kate from uk hospitality. give me a sense of what it has meant for you here. normally you are really busy, all day, every day, but if workers means all day, every day, but if workers m ea ns fewer all day, every day, but if workers means fewer customers. absolutelym was shocking when we first came back and since the scheme started, lunches have been doing well, so the scheme has been a good thing. do you think it is bringing people in here who wouldn't normally be tempted up toa who wouldn't normally be tempted up to a restaurant so far above london in the middle of the city? are using different customers? at duck & waffle you always have a large amount of people coming in. it tempts them out even more which is exactly what we need. that is the point, isn't it? tempting people to get back out to remind them that
6:21 am
pubs and restaurants are open after a really difficult time for the hospitality industry. absolutely. boosting confidence, boosting foot ball boosting confidence, boosting football has been the most significant thing this scheme has done. over the course of the three to four weeks so far we have seen two in five of those who come back out our first—time users and 70% have said it is the scheme that has brought them out. they needed it to boost confidence and now they feel they can return to restaurants, pubs, buyers, and also the high street and they are more confident about public transport, which is critical by getting the economy moving. it is about creating that confidence because we know about one third of bars and restaurants are still not open. absently. in july when we got there reopening day one third open so this has been significant in getting us from about half of our premises open to two thirds, but there is still that there. lots of them in city centres and town centres where the footfall is lower, confidence is lower. they are still yet to open and it means there is a million of our team is
6:22 am
still on furlough. what would an extension mean for you? the last full week, due to finish at the end of august. you want to see this go on. absolutely. we need the extension. it will keep bringing people into the business. if we don't have it, i really do worry about what it will do but fingers crossed. how many of your staff have you been able to get back, how many can you re—employ? ultimately this isa can you re—employ? ultimately this is a business decision. you have to have the people here to pay your bills. we have been really fortunate at duck & waffle to bring about 99% of the kitchen team back but if we don't get the scheme, if it doesn't happen, that is a worry. kate, what other help can be given to the hospitality industry? we know it has been really difficult. is this scheme enough on its own? no, you need a package of measures. we have the vat cut from the chancellor, belo continuing until october and it is critical, given we are the third largest employer, that we have
6:23 am
something that sustained employment. half of our team are under 24, so it is critical for young people. the final bit of the puzzle is rent and property cost. in city centre locations, if you don't have the footfall coming through, don't have money coming through the doors, you cannot afford to stay open because re nt cannot afford to stay open because rent and business rates are such a significant cost. going forward that is the area we need the chancellor to look at. fascinating, isn't it? thank you very much for now. we will talk later. i am thank you very much for now. we will talk later. iam now thank you very much for now. we will talk later. i am now tied to the chair. excuse me one second while i get up. you heard it is about also as of different things. it is about getting people back, having the confidence to get back out to city centres to be able to make the most of these things on offer. it is pretty striking. you look around here, all of these offices, still many here, all of these offices, still r here, all of these offices, still many very quiet. the scheme is the chancellor and the government have laid out hopefully getting my people back but as you heard they are calling for the scheme to be extended. i'm just going to untangle myself and i'll see you later. don't worry, nobody noticed! a nice place
6:24 am
to enjoy your scrambled eggs. hollandaise. 0h, hello. i like it clean. do you? may be a bit of mayonnaise. more important things to speak about. the us presidential race is well under way, with president donald trump set to open the republican convention later today — with the majority of it being held virtually due to coronavirus. with just a few swing states likely to be pivotal in the election, our north american editorjon sopel sent us this report from one of them — pennsylvania. white—water rafting on the lehigh river in pennsylvania, and a wild, bumpy ride ahead for voters in this key swing state. michelle and kevin are registered republicans, but not happy with the choice before them. i work in health care, so i'm really not pleased with trump's response to what's going on. i'm also not happy with how biden might run the country, and maybe i really think it's
6:25 am
going to cost a tonne of money. we've gotten no leadership from the very beginning. but though polls suggest the trump campaign is under water, don't be fooled — coronavirus might have cost him, but... but though polls suggest the trump campaign is under water, don't be fooled — coronavirus might have cost him, but... given the choices, i'm going to vote for trump because i think the alternative is bad. i think he's done a brilliant job with the economy. i think we're in a better position than we were. what do you think of donald trump as a person? he's not the nicest guy in the world. i don't think he does very well with people. the contrast between rural, idyllic pennsylvania and its post—industrial heartland is stark. back in 2016, donald trump promised that blast furnaces like this one would be firing up again. that hasn't happened. and with coronavirus the us economy has cratered. polls suggests that here in pennsylvania he is way behind. but defectors are hard to find and his supporters still back him fervently. and the president has far from given up on the state —
6:26 am
he came here on thursday to the town wherejoe biden grew up, painting a bleak picture of what life under the democrats would be like. think of the smouldering ruins in minneapolis, the violent anarchy of portland, the bloodstained sidewalks of chicago. and imagine the mayhem coming to your town. but for duane miller — the former mayor of bangor and owner of the local paint and diy store — trump has lost his sheen. my definition of donald trump, you know, isjust him as an individual, not the position of the president of this country. but he's a spoiled brat and he acts... but you voted for him in 2016. yes, yes. don't tell anyone — no. and that's the thing — a lot of people don't want to tell. state polls didn't do well measuring support for trump in 2016. masked faces may well be hiding masked views in 2020. john sopel, bbc news, pennsylvania.
6:27 am
long road to the election. you are watching bbc breakfast, still to come... just a5 of the national trust's 200 historic houses are expected to reopen by next month — that's amid growing fears ofjob losses and permanent closures. we'll find out more at 6.a5. we'll be discussing that shortly and bringing you the latest news. we will discuss that shortly and we got all the latest news coming up, but right now the time is 6:27am. time to get the weather. we've been admiring your beautiful dress this morning. top of the frock. bless you, thank you. the weather isn't too bad if you like it is dry with some sunshine. that is after we lose the showery outbreaks of rain this morning, which are splitting from the west to the east and more especially across southern parts of wales and southern england. then we
6:28 am
will be left with sunshine and showers and you can see that in a satellite. but i would draw your attention to this great big lump of cloud in the atlantic and that is low pressure that will bring wet and windy weather tonight and tomorrow. the showery rain scooting across the south. also showers across eastern scotland, north—east england, the we st of scotland, north—east england, the west of northern ireland. some of those could be thundery, more especially in the south. a lot of dry weather, sunshine, gentle breezes and highs between 12 and 21. a cold start in the highlands, temperatures hovering around freezing. as we head on through the evening and overnight, you can see we lose a lot of the showers initially. a lot of dry weather. incomes this rain, heavy at times pushing steadily eastwards and with it we will see the wing strength. overnight for west wales, northern ireland, north—east england, gus r
6:29 am
as mph and upwards. once again, we are in that realm is similar to last week. as we go through the course of tomorrow, my wet and windy weather tomorrow, my wet and windy weather to come our way. it is courtesy of this low pressure, look at the spacing in the iso buys. if you are in the centre of the low pressure the winds will be light but elsewhere they are going to be strong and the rain will rattle quickly through england and wales but we have a wraparound occlusion coming back bringing more rain through the afternoon through north wales and northern england. these are the kind of gusts you can expect. 71 mph plus some southern areas, widely as to 50 and as low pressure moves northward through the afternoon winds will strengthen along the east coast of scotland, as well. gusts of ao along the east coast of scotland, as well. gusts of 40 to as mph. like la st well. gusts of 40 to as mph. like last week, this could bring down some small branches, you could see your bin down the road, and temperatures only 12 degrees in aberdeen. that is a very poor temperature for this time of year, but up to about 21 as we head down
6:30 am
towards london. overnight and into wednesday we watch this low pressure pull away, but still isobars tightly packed across the north sea coast line for a while, so it will still be windy if you are on the north sea coastline. the winds will ease and then acquire today ahead on wednesday. dry conditions, variable cloud and sunshine. temperatures by then 12 cloud and sunshine. temperatures by then12 in cloud and sunshine. temperatures by then 12 in lerwick,13 cloud and sunshine. temperatures by then 12 in lerwick, 13 in aberdeen still and 21 in london. i'll have more in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and nina warhurst. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. wheelchair racer hannah cockroft has been telling sally about her concerns for the sport's recovery ahead of what should have been the start of the 2020 paralympics. we'll catch up with veteran firefighterjohn chart who cycled 1,000 miles for charity
6:31 am
after being diagnosed with motor neurone disease. and we'll speak to double amputee ben parkinson who also took part. the heroic police dog finn, who was a britain's got talent finalist, is being made ambassador of a charity supporting other retired police dogs. we'll hear more just before nine. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the prime minister has warned the life chances of a generation are at stake, if children don't go back to school over the next few weeks. boris johnson has made a direct appeal to parents, saying the risk of contracting coronavius at school was "very small", but that it would be more damaging for children to be away from the classroom any longer. a number of lockdown restrictions that were imposed in aberdeen earlier this month have been lifted. tighter rules were introduced because of a surge of cases in the city. a five—mile limit on nonessential
6:32 am
travel and a ban on indoor gatherings has been removed, while pubs, cafes and restaurants will be able to re—open from wednesday, subject to environmental health checks. president trump has announced that emergency authorisation has been given to use blood plasma to treat coronavirus patients. 70,000 people have already received a transfusion, which is taken from those who've sucessfully recovered from the virus. the announcement was made on the eve of donald trump's presidential campaign launch. he called it a major breakthrough which could reduce death rates by 35%. in california, firefighters are preparing for conditions to worsen as they try to bring nearly 600 wildfires under control. lightning strikes, which were blamed for starting many of the blazes last week, are forecast to return, along with warm and windy weather. tens of thousands of people have already been forced to flee their homes and six people have died. the sentencing hearing has started for the far—right gunman
6:33 am
who murdered 51 people in attacks on two mosques in new zealand last year. after pleading guilty, 29—year—old brenton tarrant, who is representing himself in the case, faces life in prison possibly without parole, a sentence never before imposed in the country. let's get some more reaction to pupils returning to the classroom. we can now speak to today's gp, dr nighat arif. good morning, thank you very much. i will try to find out what happened to your massive mug later on but we have more pressing concerns! i know that schools go back today in northern ireland and in leicestershi re northern ireland and in leicestershire this week, in england, but most schools next week in england. we have had this proclamation from the prime minister and chris whitty as well about there being a bigger risk of not sending children back to school. what are your medical thoughts? children
6:34 am
haven't been at school since march and the whole reason of keeping them off school is that we were concerned that parents coming into school, the higher volume of congregation, the spread of the virus would be a lot more. children don't get affected but we were worried that children would pass it on to other vulnerable people in the community so we had to close the schools to protect lives and protect the pressure on the nhs. as we have come out of that, we have realised that children are the least affected, not .8% of admissions tutor covid—19 —— 0.8% of admissions from covid—19 is children under 18. there have been a couple of cases where children have had kawasaki disease but that is incredibly rare. we need to start getting confidence back, as we are easing out, getting pa rents back, as we are easing out, getting parents more confident sending their children to school. i agree with chris whitty, the virus is going to affect people but lack of education and interaction, lack of psychological well—being, that isn't
6:35 am
being managed at home appropriately, should be cared for at schools and we need to get people back into school safely. you are a parent as well, you find with your children go back? of course, i need to get them back, they are driving me crazy, guys! i have three, my middle one had a liver transplant and he is on the shielded group, and thankfully he has done really well. we realised asafamily he has done really well. we realised as a family we got covid back in february before any of us knew about it, loss of smell and herbal symptoms. he had it as well, being a transplant patient but he recovered really well —— we had lots of smell and horrible symptoms. children are robust and recover really well. pa rent robust and recover really well. parent out there, please work with your school teachers, i have been speaking to teachers locally and they are desperate to have children back and they work really hard with government guidelines. the world health organization has said that
6:36 am
children over 12 should be wearing some sort of facemask, that we really haven't heard anything about here. i feel that that is something that should be incorporated to our children so that when they're getting buses to school, etc, we get used to people wearing masks. we will be talking to some ministers later on so we will come back to you on that. we have spoken to a lot recently on that. we have spoken to a lot rece ntly o n on that. we have spoken to a lot recently on this issue of mental health, there has been a new study suggesting that for some teenagers, lockdown has a chilly reduced anxiety lockdown has a chilly reduced a nxiety levels. lockdown has a chilly reduced anxiety levels. is there a fear that returning to school will bring those back up again? —— actually reduced anxiety back up again? —— actually reduced a nxiety levels. back up again? —— actually reduced anxiety levels. this was a great study in bristol that showed that children who haven't been going to school, because of lack of peer pressure and pressure at school, their mental health has improved and they are happier. i guess some
6:37 am
kids... i wonder how many teenagers like going to school! the amazing thing is that they have found that mental health has improved in boys as well which is always the tougher group, to get a gauge on how they are doing. there's a lot of things involved on that. they have used social networking a lot more and that seems to be conversely helping their mental health. some great mental health people are on tiktok, instagram and twitter supporting these young people. so some interesting research, it's not all bad, great data coming out. now the most important issue of the day, you are showing off with your massive mug last week, what happened to it? i think we have photographic evidence of some damage. i think we have photographic evidence of some damagelj i think we have photographic evidence of some damage. i was heartbroken! i choke. materialthrew it out of the window, —— my
6:38 am
two—year—old threw it out of the window, i saw him do it, i said, you broke my mug. he looked at me and said, ididn't broke my mug. he looked at me and said, i didn't do it! i havejust got a normal—sized mug now. we will have to make you another one for next time. thank you so much! when you lose your favourite mug, next time. thank you so much! when you lose yourfavourite mug, though. it looks like you could glue it together. although when you refill it and it drops... carnage. thank you for being with us this morning. holly is reflecting on, can we officially say that the football season has ended ? we officially say that the football season has ended? i know it starts again next week! not quite, the women's champions league has been going on. it feels like it has been going on. it feels like it has been
6:39 am
going on. it feels like it has been going on for a decade, but it has finally finished. it's bayern munich, the champions of germany are now the champions of europe after an incredible campaign that culminated in last night's victory over paris st germain. despite two of the most potent attacks in europe, there was only one goal in it. and we had to wait until the second half. it was a frenchman scoring against his former club, kingsley coman with his first goal against psg. star player neymar was in tears by the final whistle as the french giants continue their search for that elusive champions league triumph. a record breaking result for bayern, who become the first team to win every single game on the way to their sixth title. they won it in front of an empty stadium, of course. but the fans were celebrating in full force back in germany. few of them could have predicted this earlier in the season. they sacked previous coach niko kovac in november after a 5—1 defeat to eintracht frankfurt that left them fourth in the budesliga. so a greatjob done by hans flick.
6:40 am
contrast that with paris where police had to disperse fans unhappy with their team's defeat. marseille remain the only french team to have won europe's top prize. closer to home, two matches in the scottish premiership yesterday as hibs continued their best start to the season in a6 years with victory over stjohnstone. it looked like the game was heading for a goalless draw but stevie mallan scored from the penalty spot in inury time to claim the win. hibs are now tied on points with rangers at the top but are second on goal difference. elsewhere aberdeen beat livingston 2—1. england's cricketers are closing in on victory in the final test at southampton. they have a first innings lead of 310 against pakistan, and james anderson is getting close
6:41 am
to his 600th test wicket asjoe lynskey reports. this test match has seen new england talent emerge with the bat, but when they're bowling, they have a history maker. jimmy anderson is 38 and closing in on 600 test wickets. batsmen still can't figure him out. that was anderson and england's fourth wicket of the innings. pakistan were more than 500 behind and climbing a mountain in a storm. rain delays like this have made this test stop—start. but after a frustrating morning, england got back to it after launch. england got back to it after lunch. their fifth wicket came not with pace, but through quick reactions. jos buttler here held onto the deflection. pakistan were heading straight for defeat. butjust as they looked brittle, the tourists found stubborn runs. there he can. glorious drive. azhar ali's third century against england kept his team in the game.
6:42 am
eventually, england broke through at the other end. then buttler produced more brilliance. anderson needs two more for the milestone. it might have been fewer were it not for dropped catches. one slipped out the hands of stuart broad, but he recovered it with this run—out. pakistan is still so far behind, they'll have to bat again today. the outside edge and it carries. for england, after weeks inside a bio secure bubble, seeing their superstar reach 600 would be the perfect finish. joe lynskey, bbc news. british number one dan evans is through to the second round of the western and southern open after beating world number 17 andrey rublev. evans dominated the deciding set and clinched victory on his fourth match point to win 7—5 3—6 6—2, next he'll face world number 30 milos raonic of canada. over to stockholm where flatmates
6:43 am
laura muir and jemma reekie dominated their track events at the second diamond league meeting of the year. reekie won the 800m while muir clocked a world leading time in the 1500 metres at three minutes 57.87 seconds, looking in imperious form, while fellow britons laura weightman and melissa courtney—brya nt completed a clean sweep of the top three places. a fairy tale victory always sounds like a cliche. but at the women's open at royal troon yesterday, sophia popov shocked the world of golf as she defied the odds to pull off a remarkable win. she's ranked 30ath in the world and has never won on the lpga tour or ladies tour before. but she shot a three under 68 to finish on seven under, winning by two shots. she was understandably emotional to take not only her first
6:44 am
professional win but more significantly a first major win too. it's a really brilliant story. she has had a really difficult year, she considered last year quitting the sport altogether so it feels like a little bit of an inspirational motivational monday story. never give up on your dream. we need a bit of that at the moment, thank you! holly is back with more later on. also we will be telling you about hannah cockroft. the tokyo paralympics should be getting under way this week, but instead athletes will have to wait until next year to compete at the rescheduled games. one of those is five—times gold medallist, wheelchair racer hannah cockroft, who has been telling sally about her lockdown training regime, and her fears for the sport's recovery. japan postpones the tokyo olympics and paralympics to next year. olympics would be held by the summer of 2021. tokyo's olympic flame will have to keep burning for another year as the games are finally postponed.
6:45 am
when it was announced i was absolutely gutted. at the start it felt like my world had just ended. but once i'd had time to kind of, you know, make a new plan, full steam ahead now. that's where i want to be in a year's time. it is going to be hannah cockcroft who takes the gold for great britain! the last few months have really made me appreciate what, you know, what sport is to me. she is delighted! how difficult has it been to maintain any type of training routine during lockdown? so it never actually changed my training at all. we just obviously had to adapt bits of it because nothing was open. kind of the night before lockdown was put in place, our gym coach came and left loads of dumbbells on our doorstep and over lockdown we managed to kind of build our own home gym in the garage. so we've been, you know, on the rollers in the back bedroom for a lot of the time. i'm very much a routine person, you know, i like to know when i'm competing, where i'm competing you know, all the dates, all the times. i have it all set out in my diary. i like to know, i'm at the track
6:46 am
this day, at this time. i just like to know those things. and that was all kind of whipped from under yourfeet in a day. you know, in one sentence that was gone. do you feel that the pandemic and the situation that we've all been living through for the last several months has hit paralympic sport, paralympians, harder maybe than anyone else? it's hit everyone hard. so i'm not saying us more than everyday people, but i think in sport, paralympians definitely have been hit hard because we already struggle to put on events. we already struggle to attract sponsors, attract crowds and taking a whole year away from that kind of circuit, i think we might struggle to recover from that. i guess like everyone, again, so many questions around, you know, are my sponsors going to hang around? are we going to get a crowd in again to watch us race? when will we compete again? going into tokyo next year, if they said to you, it's going ahead, but there'll be no supporters, there'll be no crowds, no spectators cheering you on,
6:47 am
how would you manage with that? used to it! we compete every weekend most summers in front of your dad and his dog. there's no—one there. and, you know what, it would be heartbreaking. the games are the one place that you can almost guarantee a crowd. and you've actually raced in the stadium in tokyo, haven't you? what was that like? i did, i competed in an event called one race, which was the opening ceremony of the new olympic stadium. honestly, it was incredible. being back in front of 60,000 people. is it true that there was you and usain bolt? handed him the baton. that's cool, isn't it?! that's pretty cool. i would still compete if it was definitely safe and it just meant no crowds, then i would definitely compete. but ultimately, another part of me would think, well, if it's not safe to let thousands of people come and watch, is it safe for thousands of athletes to be together in a village
6:48 am
or in a competition ground? probably not. so then i would have to ask questions as to whether we should be competing at all. ultimately, i am a person at risk. you know, i didn't get a letter or anything, but i've got a disability. and that does mean that unfortunately i am going to catch things a bit quicker. so you have to be a little bit more careful, a little bit more cautious. and hopefully that doesn't mean throwing away my dreams, but we'll just have to see what happens. you obviously have a real drive and a determination to go, but do you think other para athletes might struggle with that decision? when we're out there training, we're pushing our bodies to absolute limits. and your whole immune system is then lowered because you are finding those limits and then you're more at risk. so a lot of athletes have actually stepped back and gone, i need to tone down my training, just make sure that i'm safe. and i think that it's going to be a massive decision for a lot of us to decide, you know, what's more important? my life or my sport?
6:49 am
she speaks so well, really great to hear from hannah talking to sally about the pa ralympics. hear from hannah talking to sally about the paralympics. which, like many things, has been delayed. but it will be back, i'm certain, one way or another. the national trust looks after some of the uk's most treasured buildings, but since the pandemic it now faces job cuts and permanent closures. the trust says almost a quarter of its historic houses will reopen by the middle of next month, but will that be enough for it to survive? director general hilary mcgrady joins us from the argory in county armagh. good morning to you. first of all, just give us an overview of how significant the pandemic has been for the trust. without a doubt, this has been the biggest financial crisis we have experienced since wartime. i'm on record already is a saying we will lose 200 million this
6:50 am
year and we expect to be trailing well below our budget for even up to three years, so it has been massively impactful and it has affected nearly every part of our organisation from income through our businesses, membership, rent, we have been impacted on every front. a5 of your 200 sites you hope will be able to open by the end of next month. what is that based on? as you can imagine, these are houses, these aren't big museums. they are small and intimate spaces so from the outset, and i'm at the argory today because this was the first property to open in northern ireland, the teams have had to work quickly and carefully to make sure they opened safely. so we have got small spaces and that is hard to do a one—way system. we have been opening our properties little by little, 20 open at the minute and a5 by september and we will continue to open as we go. with our gardens and estates, they have been open sincejuly and
6:51 am
we have welcomed 6 million people sincejuly which we have welcomed 6 million people since july which has we have welcomed 6 million people sincejuly which has been wonderful and we have had a great response to that. so we are really keen to make sure that our members come back and can enjoy our properties. inevitable job losses coming, you say part of the ten year vision is to dial down the ten year vision is to dial down the role of the, the cultural aspect of the trust. what would you say to people who say that dialling down is actually dumbing down? there are two things there. the first is, i need to be clear, we have proposals on the table at the moment for redundancies and i'm mindful that we are ina redundancies and i'm mindful that we are in a consultation phase and i am mindful of the staff affected. we are making the cuts because of covid, that's a different thing to the document so killing over the weekend, that was an internal draft document doing the rounds and that will not come back to us till november. i can understand people are confused about that but i want to be really clear. we are not dialling down on our houses. this
6:52 am
houseis dialling down on our houses. this house is really important to me, as are all of our houses. people love the national trust for our houses and our landscapes, they are built in landscapes, the two go together, the idea that you separate them is nonsense. the other thing is, why don't you use the 1.3 billion reserves that you have to secure these jobs? 80% of that 1.3 reserves that you have to secure thesejobs? 80% of that 1.3 billion is restricted to care for places like this. people give us money to look after and do conservation work on these places. it would be a matter of legal charitable law that i cannot use that money. but more importantly a matter of trust when people give us money to care for places, i should people give us money to care for places, ishould not people give us money to care for places, i should not use it on salaries. i'm taking a responsible decision to ensure that our cost baseis decision to ensure that our cost base is reduced. but none of that is impacting on the experience that i wa nt impacting on the experience that i want people to have. you are confident that the national trust experience will be the same as before covid conditions in the
6:53 am
fullness of time. is this an opportunity? some families watching this morning don't know about the national trust and don't engage with what you do, is this a chance to reframe it for a wider audience, more diverse families coming through the gates? completely, and if there isa the gates? completely, and if there is a silver lining to covid, it's been that people from all backgrounds have been coming to national trust houses, particularly the landscapes. people who have never been to us before have loved it. there has been an opportunity i wa nt to it. there has been an opportunity i want to build on. some of the document you referred to, there are good ideas in that that we want to make sure that all of the properties aren't the same. the same critics have said that we are so samey and identical, but we want to bring all of the personality to the full. if you want to go to buckland abbey and see a rembrandt, brilliant. but if you want yours kids to be free in a
6:54 am
space and have a lot of environment, we can do that too. the national trust is about something that everybody can enjoy. many thanks. like many organisations, looking at this and thinking, can we make this an opportunity to change things and improve things longer term, but really ha rd if improve things longer term, but really hard if you don't get that cash. a massive financial hit for the national trust and many other institutions. let's talk about golf. that amazing story in the british open. some of you may have been on the golf course enjoying the sun in recent weeks but have you been putting sun cream on? here's former strictly come dancing judge and keen golfer len goodman after an operation to treat skin cancer on his forehead. now the charity melanoma fund hopes this will highlight the risks to golfers regularly exposed to sunlight. let's speak now to the charity's chief executive michelle baker. good morning. lovely to speak to you on the programme. good morning. i
6:55 am
a lwa ys on the programme. good morning. i always wonder with stories like this, how big an impact do you think len goodman being happy to share that photo, how big an impact will that photo, how big an impact will that have? i think in effect, a massive impact. learn effectively gifted us that image, and i have beenin gifted us that image, and i have been in pr for a long time and i didn't realise the effect that it would have. it basically went viral on our socials and was picked up by every tabloid this week. that's unprecedented. so an incredible and powerful impact. and the really important message to get across as well, because len, and many other regular golfers in that position, they can be outside for a long time, len was wearing a hat in that picture, but many people will be unprotected out there for hours on end. absolutely. and this is one of the considerations and why we
6:56 am
started a campaign called slip, slap, swing, sun protection campaign designed especially for golfers and green keeping staff. golf is a sport which is played on very reflective surfaces and many golfers don't like wearing sunscreen, mainly due to the greasy group that happens after you have applied it. —— greasy grip. so we have a campaign that addresses that issue. the greasy grip can be an issue but a wet wipe can solve that and then wipe it on your golf towel and you can crack on! golf isn't the only sport or area of concern, who else might be at risk in the sort of situation? we have three campaigns, one is... all designed to people who are at high risk of sun cancer. one group is gardiner‘s, obviously this year have been —— gardeners. obviously more
6:57 am
people have been in the gardens this year. gardening is something you do, you go into your garden, and i do it myself, you think, i'lljust be five minutes and then you are out there foran hourand you minutes and then you are out there for an hour and you get sunburned. and another risk area is children in sport. it's very important to raise awareness of sun protection from an early age that we have a campaign called the outdoor kids sun safety code, which is supported by over 125 national governing bodies of sport, and outdoor organisations, urging those people who look after children outdoors to remember sunscreen. good to talk to you, thank you so much for that. i like the way you have got very easy to remember campaigns. the sun safety code, what your back the gardeners, and slip, slap, swing. change to the old classic vocal. —— for golf. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
6:58 am
the sun will be shown this week, and in fact today it will also be shining. that is when we lose some showers. beautiful weather watchers pictures this morning from sarah, this is in staffordshire. the forecast is sunshine and showers, heaviest at the moment west to east, across south wales and southern england. you can see the lump of cloud on the satellite picture. there is a big lump in the atlantic which will bring us some heavy rain and strong winds tonight and tomorrow. there goes the showery rain moving across the southern part of wales and southern england, we also have showers across north east england, eight in scotland, the west of northern ireland, some could be thundery. more especially so in the south. in between, look at all this dry weather, temperature is 12 to 21 degrees. there will be some sunshine today. this evening and overnight, the showers will fade, a largely dry
6:59 am
sta nce to the showers will fade, a largely dry stance to the night. then heavy rain coming our way, a developing area of low pressure which will be accompanied by strengthening winds. by accompanied by strengthening winds. by the end of the night, gusts up to a5 miles an hour across west wales, south—west england and northern ireland. the cooler night in some of the sheltered glens, but not as cool further south. tomorrow looking pretty wet and windy. more or less across the board. here is this area of low pressure, look at the isobars, in the centre of the loan not much wind, but all around it is tightly packed isoba rs not much wind, but all around it is tightly packed isobars so it will be windy. these are the strengths of gusts you can expect. the rain is moving north but we have a wraparound occlusion so it is curling around parts of northern ireland, north wales and northern england so you will get a double whammy of rain, it will clear then arrive. 12 in aberdeen, fourth at the time of year, 21 dance was the
7:00 am
south—east. —— 12 is poorfor the time of year. 21 down towards the south east. on wednesday, we still have coastal counties adjacent to the north sea with close isobars so you will start of windy, but that will pull away and for most of us wednesday will be dry, with some sunshine. variable cloud with highs up sunshine. variable cloud with highs up to 21. the headlines are coming up up to 21. the headlines are coming up next. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and nina warhurst. our headlines today. the prime minister urges parents to send their children back to school — saying it's far more damaging for their development and health to be kept at home. we'll be speaking to schools minister nick gibb and england's deputy chief medical officer this morning. in northern ireland, many children will return to class today for the first time since the lockdown was imposed. the man who killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand in march last
7:01 am
year arrives in court to be sentenced for the worst terror attack in the country's history. firefighters in california warn that conditions will worsen as they battle to bring nearly six hundred wildfires under control. bayern munich are crowned kings of europe for a sixth time. they beat paris st—germain in lisbon to claim the champions league title after winning every game in the tournament this season. it's monday 2ath august. our top story. borisjohnson has issued a direct appeal to parents to send their children back to school when they reopen. he says the risk of catching coronavirus in school is "very small" but that the life chances of a generation of pupils are at stake if they don't go back. our political correspondent, nick eardley, joins us from westminster.
7:02 am
good morning. this is the big issue of the moment, isn't it? yeah, that they test for the government in the next couple of weeks because the prime minister has talked about the idea of a moral duty of getting all kids in england back to school when they start to open next week. a big boost at the weekend when the chief medical officers from across the uk came out and said they think it is safe, that the chances of children getting the virus at the school are pretty low, and borisjohnson is continuing that statement, making a direct plea to our viewers, to pa rents direct plea to our viewers, to parents across the country to send kids back next week. let me tell you exactly what the prime minister says this morning.
7:03 am
why is the government doing this? there is some evidence of nervousness among pa rents, there is some evidence of nervousness among parents, about sending kids back to school. there was an ons survey last week that suggested half of parents were a bit worried about their kids going back. we also know that the unions are calling for a plan b for more information about what will happen if there is a local outbreak but ministers in england have made this the big priority and we will hear a lot for them —— from them of the next few days. kids in england are due to go back next week. some in northern ireland starting today and later in the month. wales is in september. scotland, most kids are already back. interestingly there has been an increase in the virus
7:04 am
and officials are saying that is not down to transmission in schools, but the other activities around schools like parents of the front gates, people going to back, teachers being back. interesting topic to pick up on. thank you for that and we will put some of those questions, particularly what has been led from the situation in scotland, because nick gibbs is the schools minister for england and also england's deputy medical officerjenny harries will be here. thank you for your questions. lots of people getting in touch about children returning but also people shielding at home or a teacher with an underlying health condition. keep them coming in. a number of lockdown restrictions that were imposed in aberdeen earlier this month have been lifted. tighter rules were introduced because of a surge of cases in the city. a five—mile limit on non—essential travel and a ban on indoor gatherings has been removed, while pubs, cafes and restaurants will be able to re—open
7:05 am
from wednesday, subject to environmental health checks. president trump has announced that emergency authorisation has been given to use blood plasma to treat coronavirus patients. 70,000 people have already received a transfusion, which is taken from those who've sucessfully recovered from the virus. the announcement was made on the eve of donald trump's presidential campaign launch — he called it a major breakthrough which could reduce death rates by 35%. this is a powerful therapy that transfuses very, very strong antibodies from the blood of recovered patients to help treat patients battling a current infection. it's had an incredible rate of success. today's action will dramatically expand access to this treatment. the sentencing hearing has started for the far—right gunman who murdered 51 people in attacks on two mosques in new zealand last year. 29—year—old brenton tarrant, who is representing himself, faces life in prison without parole. our sydney correspondent shaimaa khalil has been following the case. it's been a very emotional day in court.
7:06 am
this is the first day and the first time that survivors and victims' relatives were in the same room as the killer responsible for the christchurch mass shootings. they told the court and they told brenton tarrant himself how his crimes devastated their lives. many chose to start their impact statements with verses from the koran aboutjustice and peace and martydom. one woman told the court she drove her husband to the mosque and when they went in and they heard the shooting she hid in a cupboard and when she came out she described how bodies were piled on each other, including a man who was holding on to his dead toddler. she went out to the car park to find her husband dead there. we also heard from a mother who tearfully directly spoke to the killer himself. she told him she could not forgive him and that the world would not forgive him for what he has done, and that she hopes he gets the maximum severest punishment in this life and the hereafter. before that, the court also heard how brenton tarrant had
7:07 am
planned the whole act, that he flew a drone over the mosque to make sure he inflicted as much damage as possible. we will hearfrom him representing himself and more impact statements in the days to come. the inquest is under way into the death of 15—year—old nora quoirin, whose body was found in a malaysian jungle last year. the teenager, who had special needs, disappeared from her hotel while on a family holiday and was found dead ten days later. from manila, here's our news correspondent howard johnson. what's the latest? well, this enquiry began this morning, this inquest, around 9am local time in malaysia. what we saw is the first witness, the police chief involved with the search effort to find nora quoirin. the family lawyer asked mr yousef whether he had seen the body at the
7:08 am
site where she was discovered some one mile away from the resort. he said he couldn't see where she was found, or her body at that site, because it was a very hilly area. at the time the body was airlifted to hospitalfor an autopsy. the time the body was airlifted to hospital for an autopsy. he also said he didn't see the body during the autopsy. the family lawyer asked whether he had seen pictures of the body that suggested they were not many marks on the bottom of nora quoirin's feat. the coroner then intervened and said that the finer details of this case would be a nswered details of this case would be answered by the investigating officers underneath mr yousef‘s command. he was also asked whether he had been... accepted some technical assistance from the uk embassy in the search effort, but he said his team did not need that technical assistance so he refused it. now, this inquest will go on for two weeks. the family of ten won are expected to give evidence next week
7:09 am
and we will hear from about 6a witnesses in the next couple of weeks —— the family of nora quoirin. in california, firefighters are preparing for conditions to worsen as they try to bring nearly 600 wildfires under control. lightning strikes, which were blamed for starting many of the blazes last week, are forecast to return, along with warm and windy weather. tens of thousands of people have already been forced to flee their homes. rich preston reports. the golden state. more than a,000 square kilometres of it burning. in the napa valley, california's winemaking heartland, a perilous journey caught on dash cam. an ominous orange sky around a deserted university of california, santa cruz. fire retardants are being dropped from the sky to try and stop the flames spreading. but for some, it's too late — the damage has already been done. president trump has declared the fires a major disaster.
7:10 am
i spoke to governor newsom as they battle two of the worst wildfires in the history of their state. that continues. the federal government has already deployed over 26,000 first responders and personnel to battle the wildfires. we're working very closely with the governor. more than 100,000 people have been forced to flee, but where they'd normally sleep in shelters, many are avoiding them overfears of the spread of coronavirus. we have more than 400 red crossers who are on the ground and hundreds more who are helping virtually, and those folks are out there making sure that we're getting people in shelters or in hotel rooms where it's available. and they're also there just to make sure that the people who are coming to our shelters have a safe place to stay and food to eat. emergency crews have been overwhelmed by the number and intensity of the fires. the job is now to save lives and protect only the most essential buildings. but with warnings of more
7:11 am
lightning strikes and high temperatures in the days ahead, fears that the fires could continue for at least another week. rich preston, bbc news. many school pupils in northern ireland will be dusting off their uniforms for the first time since lockdown this morning, as students begin a phased return to the classroom. but it will be a very different experience — with measures put in place to stop the spread of the coronavirus. our ireland correspondent chris page is at a secondary school in county armagh. good morning to you. good morning. whenever pupils arrive here at the couege whenever pupils arrive here at the college they will notice a big differences immediately. this is one of the biggest schools in northern ireland. each area will be divided into bubbles, the school has been divided into zones. some examples as to how that will work. staircase has
7:12 am
been marked as an upstairs route only so there will be one—way systems. and across the other side of the corridor it you can see these doors have been marked as an exit for year 11 pupils only. this is one of the boundaries between the different zones. the pupils coming back today will mainly be pupils in year 12 and 1a, the people sitting gcses and a—levels in the coming academic years. also children in the final year of primary school are going back. i've been to one primary school in west belfast to see how their preparations are going. more than five months after face—to—face lessons stopped, teachers have been preparing to welcome children into their classrooms again. st paul's primary school in west belfast is in an area of high social deprivation, so the principal has decided to restart school for all pupils today, and begin by focusing on their experience of lockdown. the children have probably been in quite close quarters at home and maybe no access to gardens and things like that. so just give them an opportunity to speak about their experiences and to share that with each other.
7:13 am
hopefully that'll begin to allow them to start processing it and be ready to move on, be ready to start learning whenever we come back to the formal education. the difference to school life will be noticeable — not least colourful reminders of social distancing. but families are looking forward to the new term. happy...to see my friends again. yeah. i miss my friends. obviously a lot of nervousness in terms of a lot of pupils come back together and, you know, you worry about whether that's going to cause further transmission or not. but, broadly speaking, i think it's important to get the young people back. home schooling was fun, but it'd be nice to have the teachers back doing it properly. schools in northern ireland have been closed for longer than in the other uk nations. reopening will be a learning experience for children, parents and teachers — a new term unlike any before. chris page, bbc news, belfast.
7:14 am
back here at st ronan's in lurgan in cou nty back here at st ronan's in lurgan in county armagh, we are in a classroom that has been sat set aside for children who are particularly vulnerable. we will hear more about that at the moment. let's have a word with fiona, the principal. thank you for being here with us. what are your thoughts? a big day for your staff and students at. we are really looking forward to welcoming our year 12 and ia students back this morning. it has beena students back this morning. it has been a long time since we had them in our classroom, since much. it has. the devolved government in northern ireland has announced £a2 million of funding to cover potential staff absences, equipment. will it help? absolutely, we are delighted at the announcement because the onlyjurisdiction around the uk and the republic of ireland that didn't have funding around the restart. i very much welcome the announcement from the minister and it will definitely take financial
7:15 am
pressure off and enable us to focus on the teaching and recovery and get the very best for our young people and their education. thanks very much indeed. let's also speak to maria, one of the teachers here. this classroom has been refurbished, we have seen the desks are spaced out. clearly making school work for vulnerable children is a really important part of bringing pupils back full—time sign absolutely stop it is about building confidence for pa rents to it is about building confidence for parents to know that children will be safe, particularly the vulnerable ones, and also for the young people to come back into an environment where they feel safe and secure and we are able to do this with a very small protective bubble in this environment. your thoughts on today, i would imagine during your career in teaching this has been a very, very long time that you have not seen a very long time that you have not seen a pupil face—to—face very long time that you have not seen a pupilface—to—face in very long time that you have not seen a pupil face—to—face in a classroom. we have been open since easter for vulnerable children and children of key workers, which has been great because we have been able
7:16 am
to have those services. at the idea of having all of our community back in the school building because a school is not a skill without young people. to have that life and everything back, we are excited to have the opportunity. have you missed it? absolutely. that is what you are in teaching for, for the children. all the very best indeed to you and to fiona and all your collea g u es to you and to fiona and all your colleagues for the date that lies ahead. a lot of preparation has gone into today, we really appreciate you having us here at st ronan's on brea kfast. having us here at st ronan's on breakfast. as you've heard, plenty of excitement and anticipation. also some nervousness but on the whole everybody here at this college and many others across northern ireland, primary and secondary level, very much looking forward to school coming back. it has been five months since full classes were on, and today will be a major day for teachers, for pupils, for the families, and also from northern ireland's political leaders who will wa nt ireland's political leaders who will want things to move very smoothly
7:17 am
top right it will be interesting to hear from top right it will be interesting to hearfrom some students top right it will be interesting to hear from some students going back later. and also lovely to hear about how the teacher is excited to get back and teach. there is excitement amongst all the anxiety and nervousness around the new way of working. kids and teachers are dying to get back. i can also hear a lot of teachers shouting, "we haven't been up since march!" there are key workers children's and they have been very busy. i have a new teenager in our house, and she is desperate to go back. it will be very interesting to hear from pupils in northern ireland. as schools in england and wales also prepare to reopen, the prime minister has urged parents to allow their children to return to the classroom. he says the life chances of a generation are at stake. we're joined now by paul whiteman, the general secretary of the national union of head teachers. presumably you welcome the medical
7:18 am
advice that children are very low risk when it comes to being affected by the virus, but that sort of pressure around making sure kids do go back to school, what does that mean for teachers? we do welcome the advice coming through. as we understand the virus more we can have more confidence in what goes on and the chief medical officer's comments yesterday, long way to doing that, but there is still an awful lot of anxiety in the system, as you say, and 62% of parents according to ons data have some nervousness about sending their children back to school, despite everything you have seen in northern ireland, which is being replicated across the country. the back—to—school campaign really has to engage with parents, let them know what to expect, and to make sure parents know what to do around the school to make sure that all of the school to make sure that all of the measures being taken in school are as secure the measures being taken in school are as secure as the measures being taken in school are as secure as they can be. do you think all parents are aware today that schools are reopening and it is
7:19 am
their duty and responsibility to make sure their kids are at the gates on monday morning?” make sure their kids are at the gates on monday morning? i think pa rents a re gates on monday morning? i think pa rents are aware gates on monday morning? i think parents are aware skills are opening. our members are making sure they are communicating with parents around their school at the moment so that they are prepared for school and know what to do when they get there. it is this level of anxiety at the moment and we have been asking the government for some time to engage with families and carers to engage with families and carers to make sure that there is a level of confidence and everybody knows what to do when they get there. the systems of control we have at the moment will work in school but they cannot work alone. the chief medical officer yesterday was making the point that this may put pressure, and upward pressure, on the reproduction rate because of the extra mixing between adults, and the evidence around transfer from children to adults is not as clear, or they are not as confident that children don't transfer to adults as aduu children don't transfer to adults as adult to adult does. there are some worries there. we want to engage
7:20 am
with the government, we want more advice from government about what to do if the pressure comes, and what to do if we do need a plan b. it seems to be an act of heresy at the moment if you talk about wanting a plan b. it is not defeatist to plan for the worst whilst hoping for the best. if we do have to experience some form of shutdown going forward, we wa nt some form of shutdown going forward, we want to learn from what happened before when we had no time to prepare, and be prepared if it comes against a part of the education secretary has said there will be fines of £120 placed on parents u nless fines of £120 placed on parents unless they keep children out of school without good reason, and fears around covid—19 is not a good reason in their eyes. is it fair to ask teachers to follow that up? when you talk about cooperation rather than compulsion, the relationship between school and family or school and home is a very precious one. you put that at risk if you start talking about fines and compulsion against the backdrop of a disease that nobody understands and the backdrop of anxiety. i don't
7:21 am
think you can underestimate it at the moment. we don't think that is helpful. everybody understands the need for education and i think with a proper engagement from government, real encouragement, and messages about how safe it is and what to do around those areas of risk. if we acknowledge the risk, quantify and mitigate it, there will be enough confidence for parents to return their children and we can engage with those that still have a lack of confidence hopefully without fines. so you don't foresee teachers enforcing those fines?|j so you don't foresee teachers enforcing those fines? i think if the government puts skills in a position where they have to enforce it, i think that damages the relationship between school and home. you need it to be at its absolute strongest. i don't see that as the strongest weight to encourage children back into school. the latest who advises that children over the age of 12 should be wearing masks, possibly in the classroom. what are your thoughts on that? masks, possibly in the classroom. what are your thoughts on that7m isa what are your thoughts on that7m is a really, really difficult subject. the advice from government
7:22 am
as they are not necessary. we would like to talk to government again about that if new evidence is coming through saying that should be the case. learning is a complicated thing and it is a people business and masks may hinder that experience and masks may hinder that experience and may hint at the quality of that. that is something we would like to talk about more if the latest advice is that they should be won by children of that age. what are you saying to your members who may have been shielding and i've been told they have to return to the classroom or they will not get paid? our advice to members, so school leaders who are having to make that decision, i is to talk to staff in that position. we need confidence, collaboration again. it is about what can be done and what accommodations can be made for people to come back. if we force people to come back. if we force people back into a situation where they are unsure why they feel they are in danger, then their performance will not be what it needs to be in any event. that is about talking to those individuals and seeing what can be done rather
7:23 am
than an act of compulsion. paul whiteman from the national union of head teachers, thank you forjoining us. organisers of illegal gatherings in england will face fines of up to £10,000 from this friday as police are handed stronger powers to enforce social distancing rules. it comes after a rise in the number of forces responding to large—scale unauthorised events. we can speak now to waheed saleem, deputy police and crime commissioner for the west midlands. good morning to you. really good to speak to you. offices went out to a number of these incidents over the weekend. what sort of things did they say? good morning. yes, i was out with them on saturday night and the number of things we saw that where illegal gatherings in homes, we saw illegal raves happening, as well. we also saw people gathering for quakes and weddings. what sort of reaction did you get? i know you
7:24 am
are not there to enforce, but to observe, but when officers were trying to stop things, what did you see? the majority of the residents, or individuals, members of the public, who were involved in this way receptive to our approach, which is to engage, explain and encourage. a number of them did disburse from these gatherings. what do they say when the officers speak to them? oh, sorry, we didn't know, or apologies, we we re sorry, we didn't know, or apologies, we were trying to get away with it and we will stop? i think it was a number of factors. people think the virus isn't out there or it will not affect them and they can carry on enjoying themselves in these gatherings. that is not the case. these gatherings are notjust breeding grounds for the virus, but also breeding grounds for criminality, as well. there is a steady rise in these sorts of events. i suppose it is a wider
7:25 am
indication of people being tired of lockdown and having their activities restrict. how do you feel about increased fines? is that the answer? i very welcome the increase in fines because i have been calling for this over the last couple of weeks because we have seen a steady increase in the number of these events across our patch. although we could have done with these fines far earlier, i think these fines will act as a deterrent for people who are gathering, organising these illegal gatherings. of course you talk about how you deal with these things, finds is one way. they have been allsorts of reports about the way that some people, when asked to break up these parties, have been reacting to police. what did you see with regard to that and how the police were trying to do theirjob? we always use the four es approach, encourage, explain before enforcement. the majority of the
7:26 am
public do listen. but there is a narrative who don't. a lot of people we re narrative who don't. a lot of people were also very annoyed —— a minority who do not. a lot of people were annoyed we were breaking up the parties. they are illegal and we need to ensure that people follow the guidelines. we have seen an increase in coronavirus rates here in birmingham and these kind of illegal gatherings do breed to the virus, especially when people are gathering up to 30, a0 people in our house, which we also saw. and the majority of the calls on saturday night warehouse parties. i'm glad you were safe. waheed saleem, deputy police and crime commissioner for the west midlands. thank you for letting us know what your weekend was like a. busy. you are watching bbc breakfast. still to come... we'll catch up with veteran firefighterjohn chart who cycled 1,000 miles for charity after being diagnosed with motor neurone disease. and we'll speak to double amputee
7:27 am
ben parkinson who also took part. we'll be discussing that shortly and bringing you the latest news. hollick has the sport, but right now it is... hollick has the sport, but right now itis...i hollick has the sport, but right now it is... i will wait three seconds, i know it's a bit partridge. it's a 7:27am! laughter good morning, carol. misty behind you in northern ireland. that's right. we've got some fog around across parts of england and wales, as well. that should lift and for most it will be a day of sunshine and showers. some of us already had some showers and some of them particularly in the south could prove to be thundery today. you can see the cloud associated with the showers across southern areas but i want to draw your attention to this area of cloud in the atlantic. a developing area of low pressure and later tonight and tomorrow it will bring some heavier rain and some unseasonably strong winds yet again. today we have the showers moving across south
7:28 am
wales, southern england and some showers in eastern parts of england, eastern scotland and through the day through northern ireland. and west of scotland. in between a lot of dry weather and sunshine. temperatures 12 in lerwick to 21 in london but worth mentioning if you are in the highlands first thing this morning, a cold start. temperatures hovering in the north island is around freezing. as we head on through this evening and overnight, showers will tend to fade. a lot of dry weather to start with than a low pressure comes our way. bringing the rain. greens and yellows denoting heavy bursts and strengthening winds. because of winter night in west wales, north—west england, northern ireland, a0 to a5 mph. tomorrow it will be a particularly wet and windy day. more or less across the board. here is the low pressure, in the centre it hardly a breath of wind. the isobars wrapped around that indicate wherever you are we will have gusty winds. the rain continuing to migrate northwards but
7:29 am
look at the great big curl around it. for parts of northern ireland, north wales and northern england, you will get a double swipe of rain. these black circles indicate the strength of the wind gusts, so we can see branches from trees, potentially power cuts and travel disruption. temperatures are disappointing for this stage in the year. 12 in aberdeen, 15 in glasgow, 20 in birmingham and 21 in london. as we had from tuesday into wednesday the low pressure drifts off into the near continent. squeezing those isobars towards the north sea coastline. first thing in the morning across eastern areas, it will still be windy. but it will ease through the day is that low pressure drags it away and we are left with a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine around. variable cloud and temperatures of 12 in lerwick, 13 in stornoway, 19 in birmingham, 21 in london. by the time we get to thursday we have this
7:30 am
band of rain moving from northern ireland into scotland and turning showery. then our next area of low pressure comes our way and that will bring in heavy rain again accompanied by strengthening winds. top temperatures up to 20. i will have more in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and nina warhurst. more on our top story. and the prime minister is appealing for parents to allow their children to return to school. he's warning that missing out on education is more of a risk for pupils, than the possibility of catching coronavirus. england's deputy chief medical officer, drjenny harries, joins us from westminster. good morning. let's get one thing straight festival, for parents who are concerned, their children are safe going back to school? well know environment anywhere we can say is 100% risk—free stop —— know
7:31 am
environment anywhere is 100% risk—free. —— we cannot say that any environment is 100% risk—free. we have looked at the evidence and put it down in a statement so parents can understand the risk and we think the risks for children in schools is exceptionally small from covid, but the risks of not attending school are significant. particularly those on more deprived areas. this e-mail says, how will the government protect children with conditions such as severe asthma? the advice seems to be to wear a mask. there is one thing about understanding masks, but also the
7:32 am
control measures that have been put in place, teachers are supporting that brilliantly. then the clinical condition itself. within schools, there is clear guidance supported by public health england and the chief medical officer's office, outlining the kind of precautions that have been taken in schools to keep children safe. a hierarchy of controls, washing hands, distancing where possible, lots of ventilation, keeping students side to side or back to back where possible, a whole list of measures there. then i think that particular reader, with a child with asthma, we took a very precautionary approach without having much evidence when we went into covid. we know now that most children, even those initially in the shielding group and extremely vulnerable, do not have severe
7:33 am
outcomes from covid if they catch it. so for most children with asthma, this is not a significant issue. and we would encourage all of them to go to school. the likelihood of them missing out from their education is a much greater problem than the risks of covid to them. that might put parents at ease. what about teachers? this e—mail says, i ama about teachers? this e—mail says, i am a secondary school teacher, i teach across five groups, and i have five bubbles, class sizes will be 30 but it will be impossible to socially distance for most of the day so will i be safe as a teacher? the medical evidence about children passing it on to adult is less unequivocal. the evidence is growing and we expect it to continue. we will be looking at it going forward and public health england are running studies, they published a report yesterday and they will be continuing to look at the effects of covid in schools for children which
7:34 am
is important to keep monitoring. for teachers who are concerned, there is reasonably good evidence now that for younger children, the risks, they are very unlikely or less likely to catch the disease themselves, we think, is still out for further review. that seems to be the way. and the risk of transmission to adults is far less than the risk of transmission from the teacher to the child, if you like. so a report published yesterday by public health england on outbreaks and cases in schools suggest that the majority of those asked staff to staff interactions. soi asked staff to staff interactions. so i think really important to reassure teachers on the can but also encourage them, when it is their coffee break and they get a well earned break, to ensure that they maintain social distancing, good hand hygiene, all those things while they have their break. that does seem to be a risk factor. we
7:35 am
have had lots of questions about extended family. we know in lots of communities grandparents will be at the school gate, picking up grandchildren from different bits of the family so you could have three orfour the family so you could have three or four households being collected at the same time in a car, so what would your advice before them? because this is about parents getting back to work. if you look at the guidance, we very much hope that people will not be sharing transport. household, people who live under the same roof, not your family which can be quite extended, the people who live under your roof, you ideally travel as much as you can within your own private vehicle or if not, within the bubble that you are within school. so that reduces the risks of transmission. but the concern here is that somehow, a bit like blue, that the perception is —— a bit like the flu,
7:36 am
the perception is there is a risk of bringing it home. but it is much more likely that the community could bea more likely that the community could be a source of ingress, of bringing a case of covid into the school. so it's important that all the things that people have been doing at home, normal social distancing, they continue to do that. that will protect all generations of the family. staying with extended family, if you have somebody in your bible who is elderly and vulnerable who has been shielding, should your relationship change with them once the kids start back at school? the advice with those individuals who are shielding is still to maintain strict hygiene, catch it, bin it, kill it, and hand washing in those households to keep those people as safe as possible and still limit your social interactions. since the 1st of august in england, we have paused shielding, because the rates of community transmission generally have gone very much lower than when the pandemic started, and that peak was starting to rise. in areas where
7:37 am
there is potential risk and rates are higher, we are working with local directors of public health to make sure specific advice to those people who are shielding goes out to them. what people might see is a slightly differential message depending on the community transmission rates. it's important for that group, that if we need to, if we find very high rate in the community, we can contact those individuals directly and we will work with directors of public health to make sure they have the right messaging for their rates of community transmission. so increasingly important to keep an eye on what is happening in your local area. we have learned this morning that cases in covid—19 have been detected in two more schools in dundee. if one case is confirmed in one bubble within a school, what would your advice to the head teacher be? they first need to discuss that with their public health england team in england, and the director of public health, these systems a re
7:38 am
the director of public health, these systems are set up very much that as soon as an systems are set up very much that as soon as an individual case is detected, as long as it is reported through test and trace, contact tracing will go on. it will depend on the local circumstances of that school and the different connections that people have. if you have a single case, it's most likely on our current evidence to be from the family oran current evidence to be from the family or an outside transmission. it may not always be necessary for a bubble to go into isolation. we you need to listen very carefully to the local public health advice and the contact tracing teams. so get tested, anybody who has symptoms, teachers or children, gets tested as quickly as possible and take yourself out of circulation and then test and trace in the local health protection teams will give you advice. can i ask you about face coverings? the latest world health organization advice is that children over the age of 12 should wear masks in an environment where you cannot maintaina metre,
7:39 am
in an environment where you cannot maintain a metre, that we know that would be happening in schools. should everybody over 12 be wearing a mask in school? it's very much consensus advice and it recognises that the evidence on this topic is still being developed. in this country we are recommending in public settings, public transport, that children over 11 wear face coverings. that who report also noted that children, certainly 15 and under, are not very compliant and under, are not very compliant and it also detests that children who are running and jumping and playing should not —— suggests that children who are running and jumping and playing should not be wearing masks. the advice we have provided is in public settings, same as adults, where you are mixing with other people that you don't normally mix with, and in an enclosed space, where a face covering and that's the same for children over 11. but in a school setting where askew pointed out, there are bubbles and specific control measures put in place, and
7:40 am
children are generally staying with their own social groups, we think that it their own social groups, we think thatitis their own social groups, we think that it is probably the better thing to do, to engage normally. there are of course problems in the sense of, if you are trying to learn, having a mask on starts to detract from that psychosocial interaction and your learning as well. it's really important as with everything with covid, that we get the balance right on these precautionary interventions. could we get some clarity on second spikes? there are conflicting reports that the r number is rising and it could lead to enhanced measures across the country. and the four nations. especially in light of your colleague chris whitty saying that a vaccine is not likely before the end of next year. i think chris's comments around a vaccine are of next year. i think chris's comments around a vaccine are very practical comments around a vaccine are very practical and realistic. people are working incredibly hard and huge amount of science has been done in a very short time. but we need to make
7:41 am
sure that any vaccine available, evenif sure that any vaccine available, even if it is sooner than that, is it safe for the public. the r rate at the moment is broadly flat right across all of the uk countries, up a bit in some places, down in others. it is not a foregone conclusion that it will go up. but i think as we approach winter, people tend to go inside more, less ventilation, we shut our doors because the weather is colder, we aren't all outside. and we tend to interact internally in enclosed environments. so all of these things create a stronger risk. so we can actually try and keep the r level down, much more will be focused on local areas, as you see, working with directors of public health in local areas, to make sure the advice is focused just on the population where we know we can control the disease. but we still need to do all of the things that we have been doing, however much we would like to move back to normal
7:42 am
life, as chris has said, we need to keep going until that vaccine is out there. washing our hands, socially distancing wherever we can, wearing face masks in enclosed spaces where... face masks in enclosed spaces where. .. with other face masks in enclosed spaces where... with other people that we don't usually meet. all of those things apply. if we all do that, we can keep the r level flat. things apply. if we all do that, we can keep the r levelflat. taking it back to the basics. many thanks. it's clear that there are so many questions around schools going back but that the added complexity about where you live, that's not easy to follow. we will be speaking to the schools minister nick gibb at 8:30am. i suppose it's one of those subjects, i'm sure you have questions about it so i'm sure you have questions about it so do send them through. please e—mail us. so do send them through. please e-mail us. let's check in with holly for the sport. i had to go to bed at half—time. for the sport. i had to go to bed at half-time. she didn't know who won
7:43 am
the champions league final! you missed all the action, there was only one goal in it! it's hard to believe that we are sat here on the 2ath of august talking about the winner of the champions league when it started all the way back injune last year. it's bayern munich, the champions of germany are now the champions of europe after an incredible campaign that culminated in last night's victory over paris st germain. there was only one goal in it. and we had to wait until the second half. it was a frenchman scoring against his former club, kingsley coman with his first goal against psg. star player neymar was in tears by the final whistle as the french giants continue their search for that elusive champions league triumph. a record breaking result for bayern who become the first team to win every single game on the way to their sixth title. they won it in front of an empty stadium of course, but the fans were celebrating in full force back in germany.
7:44 am
few of them could have predicted this earlier in the season. england will look to wrap up victory against pakistan today after enforcing the follow—on at southampton. and we could see a special moment as james anderson needs just two more for 600 test wickets. the weather was causing issues again yesterday but didn't stop pakistan captain azhar ali hitting a defiant century as his side looked to eat into england's mammoth first innings total of 583. england dropped three catches all off the bowling ofjimmy anderson as he searched in vain for his 600th victim. he did manage to get wicket number 598 eventually with pakistan all out for 273. spinner dom bess reckons the light affected the fielding. to be honest, it was dark. that's no excuse in terms of the dropped catches, but i was stood at the sort of square of the wicket,
7:45 am
azhar pulled one, and i did not see it at all. and we talk about obviously wanting to play the game, we all want to get out there, but i think there has also got to be a bit of common sense in terms of when it does get dark. at a period of time that, this is my personal view, i thought it was way too dark. they will be looking to get things wrapped up today because the weather does not look too good for tuesday, don't blame me, i'm not in charge of the weather! over to stockholm where flatmates laura muir and jemma reekie dominated their track events at the second diamond league meeting of the year. muirwon the 1500m in a world leading time. reekie comfortably won the 800m pulling away on the final bend to win in a fraction under two minutes for her fourth victory this season. and karsten warholm clipping the last barrier looked like it cost him a world record
7:46 am
in the a00 metre hurdles. the norwegian ran the second fastest time ever and was just nine hundredths of a second short of kevin young's mark from 1992. a fairy tale victory always sounds like a cliche. but at the women's open at royal troon yesterday, sophia popov shocked the world of golf as she defied the odds to pull off a remarkable win. she's ranked 30ath in the world and has never won on the lpga tour or ladies tour before. but she shot a three under 68 to finish on seven under, winning by two shots. she was understandably emotional to take not only her first professional win but more significantly a first major win too. i'm just glad i was able to overcome everything and keep my head in it. i knew i was capable, ijust, i had a lot of obstacles thrown in my way. ijust, i'm glad i stuck with it, you know, i almost
7:47 am
quit playing last year. so thank god i didn't. her story is unbelievable, she actually lost her card on the lpga tour last year. you heard from her there, she considered quitting the sport altogether, she has been struggling with some problems in her health, and it just struggling with some problems in her health, and itjust goes to show, doesn't it, that whole idea of not quitting, don't give up on your dreams. she is a brilliant example of that for a monday morning. just what we need for a drizzly monday. good want to win, your first one, no other wins and you win the big one. especially if you nearly quit and you come back. with less than 200 cases worldwide, the progressive neurological condition h—abc is thought to be one of the rarest diseases on the planet. there's currently no known cure for the disorder but breakfast‘s graham satchell has been speaking to three mums who live just an hour apart, who are hoping
7:48 am
to change that for their children. frankie. frankie is just five. he has an extremely rare brain condition called h—abc. well done. we were told, nothing we can do, go home, enjoy your time. quite ironic, really. sorry. and this is a year ago, so it's not been too long. oh, he loves to kiss and cuddle me. he tells me he loves me all the time. the fact he can lose his voice is just the hardest thing. to think that one day he won't be able to tell me he loves me. it's just really hard. what are you doing, baby? huh? you enjoying yourself? you having mr crab for dinner? this is sophia. her parents began to worry when, as a baby, she was late to sit, crawl and walk. after years of tests, sophia
7:49 am
was also diagnosed with h—abc. you can spend quite a bit of time being paralysed with fear and grief. i mean, i'll be very honest with you — i couldn't really accept it for a while. it took me years and years to come to terms with it. aggy was diagnosed with the condition five years ago. h—abc is a genetic disorder — a faulty gene in the white matter of the brain means messages to the rest of the body don't go through. as she's got older, it's affected aggy‘s walking and speech, but so far not her smile. hi! she's very happy. she's very positive. and strangely, she's never asked why she's lost the ability to walk now. she's never asked any questions. and i say to her, you know, "if you want to ask, if you have any questions..." and she just gummed down. it's her her way of
7:50 am
coping with it, i think. let's go have a sit down. it's the first time these three families have met in person. h—abc is incredibly rare — there are only 200 recorded cases in the whole world. these families live within an hour of each other in england. all of us felt like we were just like a small little sailing boat in this sea, in an ocean of being lost with your child, you know, and then you just have to find something, somewhere, an island of hope. i think we'll all say we've got amazing family and friends that are so supportive, but they don't understand it. until you've been there, you don't understand it. it's tough. it's very tough. most children with h—abc won't survive into adulthood. but these three families are determined not to give up. they formed a charity, the h—abc foundation, to raise awareness of leukodystrophies — the umbrella term for genetic brain disorders.
7:51 am
by chance, michelle is a trained genetic scientist. she's been busy making contacts around the world. do you just accept it and support her, or do you think, actually, there could be something out there that could help her? the children's hospital of philadelphia in america — the families are in touch with professor vanderver, one of the only clinicians in the world researching treatments for h—abc. gene therapy, where the faulty dna in the brain is either edited or removed, now a realistic possibility. i've been caring for this group of diseases for almost 20 years. and if you had told me evenjust as you said from ten years ago where we were today, i'm not sure i would have believed you. it's just a question of getting the work done and getting it done as quickly as possible so that we can help children who are alive and suffering from these diseases today. are you able to give a timescale? it's hard to know because some of it is beyond my...
7:52 am
..you know, my ability, but i would say certainly hopefully within the life span of the children you spoke with today. the doctors, all of them say this is such an exciting, exciting time. things are moving. science is, you know, changing every day. so that gives us so much hope. and that's basically what kind of gets me out of bed in the morning — to know that there is a chance, there is a chance to cure our kids. all three families will continue to raise money for research, continue to raise awareness of the condition, and continue to hope for a treatment. graham satchell, bbc news. amazing that they live so close to one another. hopefully, they will get a lot of support from that. thank you for all of them to speaking to us.
7:53 am
when former firefighterjohn chart was diagnosed with motor neurone disease last year, he was determined to do what he could to raise awareness of the illness. this weekend he completed a 1,000—mile charity cycle from john o'groats to lands end — accompanied by nine team—mates who are all amputee veterans. let's take a look at theirjourney, with some special messages of encouragement they received along the way. safe riding, ladies and gents. i take my hat off to you and how wonderful you're raising money for this extraordinary cause. mnd. i am sending all my regards and the greatest amount of respect. you're extraordinary. for people suffering from motor neurone disease globally, als in america, they really need to follow your example. i cannot believe what you're doing. applause and cheering
7:54 am
endorsements from eddie redmayne and sarah ferguson, not bad! johnjoins us now from south london. and from doncaster we can hopefully speak to his team mate, former paratrooper ben parkinson, later. i'm wondering how you feel about it this morning, having achieved this amazing thing, looking back on it.|j feel quite emotional, actually, just listening then almost brought me to tea rs. listening then almost brought me to tears. it's been absolutely incredible and unbelievable. presumably, you were all reliant on one another, a big team, ten amputee vetera ns, one another, a big team, ten amputee veterans, what is your message to the rest of the team that was with you? just, thanks so much for an unbelievable experience. thanks for
7:55 am
your support, pilgrim bandits, cha rlotte's your support, pilgrim bandits, charlotte's tandems, i could not have got this awareness is big and is out there without their support and their help. we were incredibly lucky, we really got this awareness out there and that's what this is about, this cruel disease, getting awareness out there. i'm sure your son christopher is totally aware of what you have been through, individually and as a family. you say quite emotional, i imagine completing this with your son, having him alongside you for this, but have been quite difficult on occasions. —— it must have been quite difficult on occasions. occasions. —— it must have been quite difficult on occasionsm was, at times i was worried for him, i needed to know he was in front of our tandem because some of the road conditions were quite terrible, with traffic and weather. and at other times, it was more emotional.
7:56 am
christopher is my right—hand man, he means everything to me. this for him has been a learning curve as well, not just about the disease but about co ro nary not just about the disease but about coronary artery, awareness and support, and it's been a great —— about com —— about friendship, awareness and support. let's bring then in here. how are you feeling? hi, i'm very tired! i bet! i know your mum is listening in as well, john has told us about this was a great team was, it was brilliant. and the very day we came over the border, it was hammering down. and my partner on my tandem, they were unbelievable. we
7:57 am
did it somehow. typical, you cross the border and it hammers it down! a question for both of you, to raise awareness, this diagnosis must have been an absolute shock to you. yeah, it turned my life upside down. it was ina it turned my life upside down. it was in a second. i never thought in my wildest dreams i would have motor neurone disease. we thought it was a neck injury from my powerlifting days. and then to be told that three yea rs days. and then to be told that three years later, i have motor neurone disease, sorry, i have a tear running down my cheek now. it destroyed me, it destroyed me. but you have got to bounce back, you've got to do something to make people aware of this awful, incurable disease, which still flabbergasted to me that it is incurable. then, from your perspective, you are a couple of weeks away from —— you
7:58 am
we re couple of weeks away from —— you were a couple of weeks from finishing your tour in afghanistan when your vehicle was hit by a mine. what drives you on, ben? what keeps you going? this isn't about me, this is aboutjohn. you going? this isn't about me, this is about john. ijust you going? this isn't about me, this is aboutjohn. ijust liked to be with the lads. well, it's amazing to hear from you, with the lads. well, it's amazing to hearfrom you, ben, and from you, john. clearly it emotional for you. well done for doing it with your son, and! well done for doing it with your son, and i really hope you raise as much money as you can. thank you. if you want to support pilgrim bandits online. it is like a band name! they should release a single! let's find out what's happening with
7:59 am
the weather. good morning. mixed fortunes with the weather, if you are in northern ireland, if you are there, you'll some fog, but in anglesey, blue skies. sunshine and showers today, some will be heavy and thundery, particularly in the south. this developing area of low pressure is in the atlantic and tonight and tomorrow that will bring us once again some unseasonably strong winds, and also some heavy rain. a lot of dry weather today, a fair bit of sunshine around, gentle breezes, yes, there are showers in eastern scotla nd yes, there are showers in eastern scotland and eastern england, western northern ireland but they are the exception rather than the rule. this evening and overnight, many of us will start off with a dry night. then all of this rain comes in. the green and yellow tells us we
8:00 am
are expecting heavy bursts. it will bea are expecting heavy bursts. it will be a gusty wind, a5 miles an hour in northern ireland, western wales and south—west england. this area of low pressure, because of that, the centre of it, there will not be much wind at all. but the rain will be curling back around through northern ireland, north wales and northern england so you will get it double whammy of rain. gusts are in the black circles, so they could cause some travel disruption, you could find some small branches on the roads, but it will brighten up in the south with one or two showers. if you are in aberdeen, only 12. pretty disappointing for this stage in august. on wednesday, the low pressure pulls away but before it does, there will still be narrow isobars across eastern coastal counties, so it will still be windy.
8:01 am
the wind will ease, then a dry day with sunshine and variable cloud. temperatures 12—21 north to south. for thursday, rain moving across northern ireland and the isle of man heading into scotland, turning more sherry as it does so. our next area of low pressure coming our way, bringing more heavy rain across the south—west, spreading through wales and the midlands and the south—east of england, and that will also be accompanied by strengthening winds. the headlines are next. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and nina warhurst. our headlines today... the prime minister urges parents to send their children back to school — saying it's far more damaging for their development and health to be kept at home. we'll be speaking to england's schools minister nick gibb in the next half hour. in northern ireland, many children will return to class today for the first time
8:02 am
since the lockdown was imposed. the man who killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand in march last year arrives in court to be sentenced for the worst terror attack in the country's history. good morning. as the government's eat out to help out scheme enters its fourth week. people are asking, should it be extended to secure the future for thousands of bars, pubs and restaurants. paralympic champion, hannah cockroft, tells sally about her fears over whether disability sport will recover from the coronavirus pandemic. it's monday 2ath august. our top story. borisjohnson has issued a direct appeal to parents to send their children back to school when they reopen. he says the risk of catching coronavirus in school is "very small" but that the life chances of a generation of pupils are at stake if they don't go back. our politcial correspondent, nick eardley, joins us from westminster.
8:03 am
nick, how significant is this? it isa it is a big deal because clearly the government sees it as a big priority, to make sure that kids are backin priority, to make sure that kids are back in school in england when they start to reopen next week. boris johnson is making a pretty direct plea to pa rents, johnson is making a pretty direct plea to parents, saying to them, we think that it is safe, we think that the best thing to do is to make sure as many children are back in the classroom as quickly as possible. let me tell you exactly what boris johnson is saying this morning. he says, as the chief medical officer has had, the risk of contracting covid—19 in school is very small and it is far more damaging for a child's development and their health and well—being to be away from school any longer. he says it is vitally important we get our children back into the classroom to learn and be with their friends.
8:04 am
nothing will have a greater effect on the life chances of our children than returning to school. boris johnson has the experts on his side as well. over the weekend, with the chief medical officers and their deputies across the uk, said the chances of kids getting coronavirus in school and becoming seriously ill are in school and becoming seriously ill a re pretty in school and becoming seriously ill are pretty negligible. we have heard from the deputy chief medical officerfor england, from the deputy chief medical officer for england, doctorjenny harries. listen to what she had to say. we think that the risks for children in schools is exceptionally small from covid but the risk of not attending school are significant. we know if children miss out on their education, particularly those in more deprived areas, that will have a lasting, in a negative impact on their health and life chances. we know there is some nervousness among pa rents know there is some nervousness among parents about the prospect of
8:05 am
schools opening up in england next week. unions have been calling for more information from government, a plan b for if there are local outbreaks. the government is definitely wedded to this idea, it has set itself a big, political challenge to make sure schools do reopen in england next week. it is worth pointing out that in northern ireland, some are going back today and some later. in wales, the plan is to get kids back to school next month. in scotland, it has already happened. there have been some local outbreaks but officials are insisting it is worth pointing out that in northern ireland, some are going g back today and some later. in wales, the plan is to get kids back to school next month. in scotland, it has already happened. there have been some local outbreaks but officials are insisting it is not because older pupils when schools in england do start
8:06 am
transmission in school, it is activity around the school, parents at the front gate, some going back to work because of childcare issues. and another message we are getting, social distancing will be important for teachers and older pupils when schools in england do start we'll be speaking to schools minister nick gibb at 8.30. a number of lockdown restrictions that were imposed in aberdeen earlier this month have been lifted. tighter rules were introduced because of a surge of cases in the city. a five—mile limit on non—essential travel and a ban on indoor gatherings has been removed, while pubs, cafes and restaurants will be able to re—open from wednesday, subject to environmental health checks. the sentencing hearing has started for the far—right gunman who murdered 51 people in attacks on two mosques in new zealand last year. 29—year—old brenton tarrant, who is representing himself, faces life in prison without parole. joining us now live from the high court in christchurch is tv nz‘s ryan boswell. it is the issues around the schools opening, isn't it. you for talking to us on there is a very long delay on the line. thank you for talking to us on an emotional day for some
8:07 am
of the families today? good morning. yes, today brenton tarrant came face—to—face with some of his victims and their families. the court hearing how the shooting played out and how he left out. he shot people and then went back to shoot them again as they lay on the ground. the court heard that tarrant had amassed a number of weapons and then modified them to make them as deadly as possible. he also planned to blow up the two mosques in christchurch involved in the shootings. i know this is something which has taken the attention of people, not only in new zealand, but around the world, i wonder what the feeling is now remembering the worst terror attack in new zealand's history? it has been traumatic, no doubt for the victims and their families and that will continue to
8:08 am
be the case. today we did hear from some of the victims and their families. one woman said she had forgiven tarrant. another man said he was thankful to tarrant for bringing the community closer together. there are 66 a victim impact statements that will be presented to the court over the next few days. thejudge presented to the court over the next few days. the judge ultimately deciding whether brenton tarrant should serve life behind bars with no parole. thank you forjoining us outside the high court in christchurch. that sentencing hearing expected to last about four days, so it is something we will be touching on throughout the week. now, back to our top story. one—way systems and staggered start times — just two of the ways schools have adjusted as pupils prepare to return. this morning some children in northern ireland will return to the classroom for the first time since lockdown started. our ireland correspondent chris page is at a secondary school in county armagh. he has got some guests with him.
8:09 am
good morning to you, chris. good morning. this is one of the biggest schools in northern ireland. it has been five months since full classes stop, slightly more than that. it is a huge day for teachers, families and people. we are going to have a word with a couple of them now. eve, what is it like to be back after so long? i am very excited because i cannot wait to get —— see my friends and geta cannot wait to get —— see my friends and get a routine in order. how much have you missed school? so much, i have you missed school? so much, i have missed my friends and getting a routine, i have been out of structure. matthew, how are you feeling this morning? very glad to be back with my friends, great to be backin be back with my friends, great to be back ina be back with my friends, great to be back in a safe environment. what are you looking forward to? getting back to class, getting my routine back in order and working hard for my gcses.
8:10 am
how have you found the last few months being out of school and how do you different will it be coming back? it was very hard. you don't have somebody talking to you face—to—face and it is so much better to learn when someone is talking to you. best of luck to you both today and the rest of the term, which isjust beginning. let's talk to parents. what does it mean to have school back, what difference will it make to your family life? absolutely delighted, it is about time. my children are definitely ready for school. they have enjoyed the time off, we have enjoyed it as a family, some of the lockdown, but after a while, they needed stimulation, they needed learning and we were not able to provide that all the time as working parents. it is absolutely time for them to be back at school. eugene, what are your thoughts? similar, they are
8:11 am
looking forward to it and hopefully they will carry on, pick up and be a successful year for them. what has lockdown been like to mark we did work with them and virtual learning, all that was a success. but it doesn't replace a classroom and a teacher in front of the children. that will be very much echoed by thousands of parents across northern ireland today. last, but no means least, let's not forget a group of people who are pretty important in this plan, the teachers. charlie, how will you approach the first few daysin how will you approach the first few days in particular? we are delighted to have the staff and pupils back, but we are apprehensive. we are worried how they will take on new bubbles and social distancing. we will be watching for the time being, we are looking forward to having them and we will see how the
8:12 am
structure in the place will work with the bubbles, the junior side especially. this is a big school, and the school is divided up into different zones, bubbles, so your groups do stay together. what do you think the first day will be like and the first few days as peoples comeback after five months? firstly, it will be very strange because five months has been a long time and i am delighted to see the students back and to see their enthusiasm. it will ta ke and to see their enthusiasm. it will take a few days to ensure the peoples become familiar with the new routines for a safe return to school. following that, we want to know about their lockdown experience, to support them and engage with their learning again. experience, to support them and engage with their learning againfl is going to be a big moment for everybody involved in the school community? absolutely big moment. big moment for the staff, big moment for the pupils and also the parents, who have worked extremely hard with
8:13 am
us during the past five months to ensure that the peoples have continued with their learning. but as mr mcalinden has said, nothing can replace the teacher in front of the peoples in the classroom. thank you to all the staff and students here for hosting us this morning on such a significant day. as you have heard, there is some nervousness, but more than that, plenty of excitement. quite right, chris. it is absolutely lovely, despite the anxiety and nervousness, loads of excitement about getting back to school, may be just for geeks like me. they are looking forward to getting back because of the uncertainty and it has been difficult for lots of children over the last few months. you can understand why they are so keen. loads of questions around that and they will be put to nick gibbs, schools minister in about 15 minutes.
8:14 am
from today, pupils at a high school in edinburgh will have to add a face covering to their uniform after the headteacher made wearing them compulsory for both students and teachers. natalie homer's sons go to james gillespie's high school in edinburgh. shejoins us now. thank you, good to talk to you. how do you feel about face masks at school, how do your sons feel about it? i think it is a really good idea. they are quite happy to wear a face covering. they have been back for over a week and they were already going in with face coverings. when they came back on friday to say it will be mandatory to walk through corridors between class wearing face coverings, they seemed to accept that and did not question it. i am fine with it, they are fine with it, so i think that is fine. lots of parents, looking at the school going back in northern ireland and lots of parents in england considering things for next week and some going back this week,
8:15 am
did you have concerns before term started again and how do you feel about it now? i did have concerns. my about it now? i did have concerns. my eldest son has asthma and it had been something i was wondering about as the school term approached. but i think the school has done a great job of reassuring parents and children and they did take a day, or set any part of the day as an induction return to reassure them and teach them how they should behave. when i came back, they have come back with positive stories about how it works and how there is about how it works and how there is a one—way system. i think it has been fine since, but i definitely had reservations initially and if something does happen in the future, then we will be asking questions to ourselves. but you can only... it is such an important thing for the children to go to school, they have
8:16 am
been so happy since going. my younger son was starting high school, but he has come back so buoyant and it has been a good experience so far. how was the home schooling from your perspective and perspective of your sons. it seems they've a desperate and you are desperate to get back to school? they've a desperate and you are desperate to get back to schoonm isa desperate to get back to schoonm is a terrible thing to say, lots of families that have had troubling times, but we are lucky to have a garden and we spent a lot of time outside and we were blessed with the good weather. generally, we did well, the home learning that was sent home kept them occupied. i was working from home. we did have to invest in a computer, there is a lwa ys invest in a computer, there is always something you might have to do for such a dramatic change, but generally it was a good experience. but they definitely need other role models, teachers to teach them. i can do so much, we can all do so much, but it is so important for
8:17 am
them to have other role models. natalie, thank you for speaking to us. the mother of two boys who have gone back to school in edinburgh last week. face have become compulsory. she said it was fine at home over lockdown. millions more pupils will return to the classroom over the next few weeks, with many schools in england and wales set to welcome children back from the 1st of september. claire meakin is the principal of pool academy in cornwall. shejoins us now. good morning. itake good morning. i take my hat off to all teachers because i would imagine the biggest challenge last term and over the summer has been communicating with parents and advising them. what had parents been saying to you in the lead up to september? i think the big thing when we are making these decisions isa when we are making these decisions is a collaborative decision, the community working together and put
8:18 am
the governing guidelines. we have received positive feedback from stu d e nts received positive feedback from students and parents because we did ta ke students and parents because we did take the time in earlyjuly to come up take the time in earlyjuly to come up with the plan we are confident and competent with. so staff, pa rents and competent with. so staff, parents and students altogether and we where positive moving forward into the summer holiday, that the plan we had come up with was as good as we were going to be able to get. the education secretary and the prime minister has said the expectation is all children return to school, unless there is a reasonable excuse and it will be incumbent on teachers to impose fines if that does not happen. what position does that put you in as principal? you are right, this is a time when we need the best relationships between school and home. we need to step away from such an aggressive stance, a threat of a fine and actually take the time to
8:19 am
work with individual students, families, to understand what their concerns are about coming back to school and actually together, working to help them to feel more confident so they do return. we have been really proud how students have engaged in the long distance learning programme, but it is not the same. we are reaching out and we are asking parents and students to talk to us, if they have got concerns let's find a way together to return everybody safely to school. so you hope is it would never come to that. we have been talking about wearing masks, we heard from a parent of a second ago about how her kids are already wearing masks in the school environment and the world health organization saying maybe it should be obligatory for students over 12, what are your thoughts? the guidance currently say it is not recommended in schools. we will keep monitoring that and see if it changes. if the
8:20 am
student or a parent is parent is raising concerns, or staff member about wanting to wear a face mask, we will talk to them. how can we help to reassure them that schools are safe places and places they want to be at. but we are always going to be looking at the guidance from the government and actually seeing what their current advice is. so waiting to get the confirmation from government? we have been talking this morning about if there is a suspected case. if one of your kids displays symptoms, what would your chain reaction be? if the test came back positive, obviously you would send the bubble home? the thing to note, the head teacher is not the person making all the decisions on their own. actually working with the public health, we will come up with a plan that is right for the
8:21 am
context. every individual case will be different and every circumstance will be different. together, it is about having the right people around the virtual table to come up with a plant everybody can be comfortable and confident with. we were talking to chris page in northern ireland, presumably you are quite excited to doing what you love again and teaching kids? you are absolutely right, every teacher around the country is very, very excited about next week. we believe the students are equally excited when we saw the year ten returning before summer. they were delighted to be back around theirfriends, they were delighted to be back around their friends, teachers and a routine. we are going to ensure we co nsta ntly routine. we are going to ensure we constantly review the plan and making sure everybody does feel safe and our doors are open and we are looking forward to seeing everybody. we wish you all the best for a smooth return. today marks the start
8:22 am
of the last full week of the government's eat out to help out scheme. ben's got the latest. we have been looking at this this morning. and ben has a room with a view. welcome to central london and we are here with the most glorious brea kfast we are here with the most glorious breakfast time view as the diners start their breakfast here. we are a0 floors above london, looking out on the city. some glorious views but one of the 85,000 or so places that have signed up to the government scheme. officially, it ends next monday said this is the final full week. there are calls from the industry to extend it into september and they had to do that to get the remaining third of bars, pubs and restau ra nts remaining third of bars, pubs and restaurants that have not reopened after lockdown to get their doors
8:23 am
open again and customers in. let's talk about whether it has been enough to safeguard the future of the industry. kate is from uk hospitality and elliott is the executive chef here. kate, talk me through the impact of the scheme, because we know it has been enough to encourage people out to try bars and to encourage people out to try bars a nd restau ra nts to encourage people out to try bars and restaurants that maybe they would have been nervous about going back to? it has been a life-saver for the industry and has allowed us to bring a million more people off furlough. so about half the people who have come out over the course of august have been first—time customers, first time they were trying to come back to eat out and drink out and go back onto the high street. it has driven footfall. we will come onto whether it can be extended in a moment, but elliott, what difference has it made for you? normally this place is open 2a hours a day, such is the demand. you have
8:24 am
reduced your hours, but has it been enough? the scheme has been enough, it has almost been back to normal. our worry is, when september comes, will we be back to normal when the offices are not here? what are people told you, have they been relu cta nt to people told you, have they been reluctant to eat out, you are in the middle of the city centre, it is quiet, when the offices are full, the bars and restaurants are full but that is not happening is it? £10 off is beneficial to everybody. you as an industry would like to go into september, we have no indication from the chancellor it might happen, what difference would it it would be incredibly helpful to the sector. we have city centres who are struggling
8:25 am
and businesses are still closed or operating at significant loss. so just to give the extra boost to encourage customers back to work and see us through before we get to winter when we are having to close outdoor areas and we have a big struggle to get people into the premises. elliott, what would an extension mean to you? i know you can get more customers input in terms of getting enough staff back in and boost your opening hours?“ we continue doing the scheme we can bring more people back off furlough and get back to normality, which is exactly what we need. kate, at what cost has all this come? i know there isa cost has all this come? i know there is a price tag we will eventually pay, because nothing is forfree, but what of the hell would you want to see from the government as well? we have furlough running out, a third of premises are not open so unless we lose more jobs in the sector, hospitality employs 3.2
8:26 am
million people and half of those are under the age of 24, unless we get more help and support through an extension of the scheme, or extended furlough for those businesses that are not open or support and property costs, we will see furtherjob losses. the industry generates £40 billion of tax each year the exchequer, the same as the social ca re exchequer, the same as the social care budget. so getting people back into work means we can help pay the cost of the covid crisis. how difficult has the last few months been? it has been extremely difficult. we did the takeaway with our sister restaurant, and we had staff still in work, but we take each day as it comes. good luck to you. i know you have got your work cut out and also kate, representing the industry. that view, in terms of what it means for the industry, has significant it has been in terms of getting people back. it is about
8:27 am
confidence, reassuring people it is said to come out, safety spend money and to safeguard all of those jobs, thousands of jobs up and to safeguard all of those jobs, thousands ofjobs up and down the country in the hospitality sector but a third of bars, pubs and restau ra nts but a third of bars, pubs and restaurants still not able to reopen. so clearly, a lot of work to do. iam reopen. so clearly, a lot of work to do. i am off for my breakfast. don't blame you. it is an important time. you are watching bbc breakfast, still to come. wheelchair racer, hannah cockroft, has been telling sally about her concerns for the sport's recovery ahead of what should have been the start of the 2020 paralympics. we have all that to come and soon we will be talking to nick gibb, the schools minister. now, it is 8.27. let's get the latest weather with carol. anglesey, one of my favourite spots.
8:28 am
isn't it beautiful. we do have mist and fog, particularly across northern ireland. fewer people seeing showers, more seeing the sunshine. but i want to talk about something developing in the atlantic, an area of low pressure. tonight and tomorrow it will bring unseasonably strong winds and heavy rain. this morning, we have got showers moving across southern areas, some could be heavy and thundery and we have showers affecting eastern parts of england and scotland. some showers to the day on and off with western parts of northern ireland and western parts of scotland. away from the showers it is dry and we will see sunshine. as we had two this evening and overnight we start off on a relatively dry note. but then this area of low pressure comes in, bringing its reign where ever you see yellow and green, it is
8:29 am
indicating heavy bursts of rain and also gusty winds, gusting 45, potentially across western wales, northern ireland and also south—west england. as we head through the course of tomorrow, this area of low pressure will be with us. in the centre, not much wind, but you can see the isobars around it so it will bea see the isobars around it so it will be a windy day. the rain advances noted, follow this wraparound occlusion and it will bring more rain across northern ireland, north wales and northern england. these are the wind gusts you can expect a potentially there could be disruption to travel and also, like last week, we could see some branches of trees falling down, that kind of thing. temperatures are disappointing in the north, 12 in aberdeen which is poorfor the stage. liverpool 20, cardiff 20 and 21 in london. on wednesday the low pressure m oves 21 in london. on wednesday the low pressure moves away into the near continent, dragging the wind with it but before it does, you can see the
8:30 am
isobars are so close together down the north sea coastline. it will start windy in eastern and coastal counties, but as the low pressure moves away, the wind will ease and then much of wednesday will be dry, some sunshine. yes, bits and pieces of cloud floating around and temperatures 12, 13 in aberdeen, 20 in cardiff and 21 in london. on thursday, we will have rain moving out of northern ireland across the isle of man, skimming england and scotla nd isle of man, skimming england and scotland turning more showery. we have this next area of low pressure coming our way have this next area of low pressure coming ourway and have this next area of low pressure coming our way and that is bringing ina lot coming our way and that is bringing in a lot of rain and once again, some strong winds as well. temperatures by then, 12 in the 0220 as he pushed out towards the south. have a great day, i will day, i will see you tomorrow. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and nina warhurst.
8:31 am
it is 8:30am. the prime minister has appealed directly to parents, asking them to send their children back to the classroom when schools reopen. he warns the life chances of a generation are at stake. let's discuss this with the schools minister, nick gibb. good morning to you and thank you for being with us. we've had a look at the office for national statistics survey this morning which says more than half of parents are worried about the return to school. there is a quote from one parent told us she would never forgive herself for a child went to school and code coronavirus. what assurances and reassurances can you give parents that it is safe this morning? the chief medical officers have made it very clear at the risk of acquiring the infection in schools is very minimal given the measures that have been put in place in schools, the hygiene, hand washing, the fact we are keeping young people in those social bubbles, class bubbles in primary school and your group bubbles in secondary school, minimising any
8:32 am
unnecessary contact between pupils. i went to a school in leicestershire on friday and saw first—hand the extraordinary measures that school and other schools are putting in place to minimise the risk of transmitting the virus within schools. and yet there are parents who are worried and many of them contacting us this morning. i wonder what success would look like for you, the schools minister, in terms of the percentage of pupils to go back. 90% plus, would that be a success ? back. 90% plus, would that be a success? i am absolutely confident we will have all schools open, 97% of all schools open injuly, when schools went back injune and the survey from the ons says 90% of pa rents a re survey from the ons says 90% of parents are likely or very likely to send their children back to school in september. it is a moral imperative to have young people back in school, in fact, the risks of long—term harm to pupils of not being in school according to the chief medical officer outweigh the risks, the small risks of children acquiring the virus within the
8:33 am
school environment. and children wa nt to school environment. and children want to be back in school, they want to be with their friends, they want to be with their friends, they want to have lessons where the teacher is leading the lessons because most effective way for young people to catch up on their education, that's why the prime minister is right to say it is moral imperative for schools to be open in september and for young people to come back into school and resume their education. just to be clear, schools reopened injune you said, but only a small number of schools went back you talk about the language of the prime minister, he called it vitally important, you mention are moral imperative. will you find parents if they don't send their children back to school, that's what the education secretary gavin williamson said a few weeks ago? is that the case, will parents be fined if their children don't go back? education is compulsory in this country, we believe in the compulsory education system and from september it will be mandatory for young people to go back to school. fines have always
8:34 am
been available to head teachers, is one of the measures they can use i don't want to interrupt you or run out of time but we have spoken to a number of head teachers and they have spoken on this issue of fines, this really delicate balance, especially at the moment, trying to maintain relationships between staff and parents who are anxious, worried about their children going back. our fines the right way to impose that? fines have always been the last resort that head teachers turn to in terms of school attendance and of course, parents terms of school attendance and of course, pa rents are terms of school attendance and of course, parents are concerned about their children returning to school will have conversations with the head teacher and the head teachers will take into account the very real concerns that some families will have about returning to school and trying to reassure them that all the measures that had been put in place to make the school site will be sufficient to minimise any risk of an increase in the virus happening within the school environment and again, it is about a balance of
8:35 am
risk, the risks of not attending school now according to the chief medical officer, the long—term harm that not attending school will cause the pupil really outweighs any of the pupil really outweighs any of the small risks of the virus transmitted within the school environment, particularly given all those measures that schools are putting in place, hand sanitiser is and all of those measures. keeping children separate from one another, the staggered lunch and playtime bricks, all those measures are designed to keep pupils safe in schools and keep teachers say. head teachers have tojudge schools and keep teachers say. head teachers have to judge whether those reasons are fine to avoid a fine but appearances there are worried about the children come to school because of coronavirus, is that a valid excuse? head teachers in this country are professionals, they are reasonable, they want young people to attend school, it is mandatory, fines are available, we haven't suspended the law on that issue from september onwards but knowing head
8:36 am
teachers as i do, they use that measure absolutely is a very last resort and in the current climate, they will want to be talking to pa rents, they will want to be talking to parents, to allay their concerns, to find out what their concerns are and to see what they can do to help reassure those parents that it is safe to send their child back to school. the other thing head teachers are telling us this morning, they would love advice and guidance. we have spoken to a number of them on the programme and the national association of head teachers told us principles haven't been given guidance about what to do if there is an outbreak. when will that guidance becoming and what is it? the guidance came out in early july, it's very comprehensive and goes through all the scenarios about what should happen if there is an outbreak so if a young person or teacher display symptoms, they will be asked to go home and encouraged to ta ke be asked to go home and encouraged to take a test, if the test proves positive, the local health protection teams will advise the school about tracing the contacts of
8:37 am
that person, usually the class bubble, maybe perhaps it is beyond that. if there has been more than one positive test, they will be bringing ina one positive test, they will be bringing in a mobile testing unit to test more young people in that school to try and find out and deal with that localised outbreak.“ school to try and find out and deal with that localised outbreak. if a child was to contract the virus and showed signs of the virus is the bubble quarantine, the class? these are the questions head teachers are asking us? yes, the guidance that came out in earlyjuly is very clear about these issues. you have to bring in the local health protection tea m bring in the local health protection team to advise the school and then they will trace the contacts, the reason why we have those bubbles is to try to minimise the contacts that any person who does test positive for the virus will have had while they are in that school but of course, all close contacts with any infected person, they will be asked to self quarantine at home, not to be in school and to quarantine for 14 days to make sure that they
8:38 am
haven't got the virus themselves. one other thing lots of people are talking about this morning, the wider issue, i suppose, of those dropping children off at school, family is trying to get back to work and if children are in quarantine are in quarantine or self isolating, then their work is impacted? what sort of measures that you put in place to try and deal with those issues? in terms of dropping off at school we want to make sure that is a safe issue and schools are putting in place measures to make sure that is safe. one of the reasons, the key reason why we want young people back in school is because it is for their own well—being and to make sure they can catch up on their own education but a side issue is that parents need to be able to go back to work and that is another reason why we need to have schools open in september so they can do that. when there are quarantining issues and children need to be looked after at home, that is a consequence of making sure we are all tackling the virus together and employers, i am sure, will be sympathetic to parents
8:39 am
that have to stay at home to look after a young child in those circumstances. what if they are not sympathetic? these are the issues that we are grappling with. we are encouraging employers to be sympathetic to parents of young children who are self isolating and quarantining is an issue for us all. if we want to tackle this virus, all of us in society and the community have to work together, adhere to the rules, socially distance, wearface masks in shops and public places and public transport and so on and be sympathetic and understanding for those people that have to socially isolate at home. find ways to enable employees to work from home if they find themselves having to quarantine for a period of 1a find themselves having to quarantine for a period of 14 days. last month, the chief medical officer professor chris whitty said and i quote, i think we have probably reached near the limit of what we can do in terms of opening up society, that means potentially if we wish to do more things in the future then we will have to do less of some other
8:40 am
things. if schools are to reopen and children go back where will the tightening be? we have much more granular information now then be used to have. the test and trace system has capacity for 300,000 tests a day, going up to 500,000 by the end of october and that gives us, there is also survey testing happening all over the country so we have much more granular detail of where local increases in the transmission rate or occurring and we can take that localised action to deal with the rise in infections in that area, which prevents us from having to take more national measures in terms of lockdown. and what the prime minister has said is that in those circumstances, closing schools will be the last resort because it is absolutely imperative to have young people back in school and to remain in school but of course, those issues, what closes and what does not close will be matters for the local health protection team who can advise,
8:41 am
based on the circumstances of how that infection, that increase in infection rate in that locality arose. what about what you've been learning from scotland, watching their schools go back over the last few weeks because there are some schools that are giving their stu d e nts schools that are giving their students and asking their students to wear masks. we had just spoken to a parent at one of those goals, two of her children going back so is that something you are looking at? the advice from the world health organization is that children over 12 should use masks like adults, if they cannot maintain at least one metre of social distance which will happen in schools? the current scientific advice, provided schools are adopting all the measures that i talked about, the hygiene, cleanliness, the bubbles and so on in schools, then they are not recommending use of face in school. it does inhibit the process of being taught in the process of education in the school. they do have to wear masks on public transport and on dedicated home to school transport
8:42 am
so dedicated home to school transport so children over 11 will be required to wear masks in those circumstances but where children are with the same consistent group of people each day, then the current scientific advice is that it is not necessary to do so. is that it is not necessary to do so. nick gibb, we appreciate your time, thank you for talking to us. the schools minister, live with us this morning. it is 8:42am. tough new penalties are coming into force this week for those who ignore the guidelines on face coverings in england. people could be fined between £100 and £3,000 for not wearing a covering, but that does not include those who are already exempt. adam mclean has been to preston to see how people have been adapting to the changes there. it is nowjust part of a trip to the shops. here in preston's market hall a face covering is as essential as remembering your cash or bank card. people are coming in, generally, sticking to the rules. but it is an irritant, there is no doubt about it. but let's do the right thing, basically. i don't like wearing masks. they make you sweat.
8:43 am
they make you hot. wearing a face covering has been the norm for passengers travelling by public transport for ten weeks. i do not like it when i go on the bus and there are some people on there without a mask. if you need them, you need them. the majority of people seem to be using them. i think everybody should wear them where they're required, it's quite annoying when you see people getting on buses without them. but you can't really say anything because you don't know if they are exempt from not wearing a mask. face coverings have been required on public transport since the start ofjune and it's now been a month since they were made mandatory in shops across england. and on the 8th of august that requirement was broadened out to include cinemas, places of worship and many other public spaces. for someone like myself who works in retail, it's pretty frustrating when sometimes customers come in, they don't wear a face mask. people seem to think they are this
8:44 am
huge big deal and they pull them down below their noses and stuff like that, and i wear glasses and they steam up and stuff like that. but overall, in the grand scheme of things, it's really not a big deal. tougher new measures will be in place across england from friday. the £100 fine for not wearing a face covering where required, will be doubled with each offence, up to £3200. adam mclean, bbc news. i don't was really clear on the guidance, i think i might have confused you in the introduction, if you are a repeat offender it can go up you are a repeat offender it can go up to over £3000, the fine. let's speak to some experts this morning. dr ignazio maria viola is from the university of edinburgh and has been researching the effectiveness of face coverings — hejoins us now. alongside dr heleyna—mari van—der westhizen from the university of oxford who is exploring the social science behind masks. first of all, are we doing any good by wearing these, that is the
8:45 am
fundamental question people are asking? without any doubt. the facemask works very, very well. our research shows in alignment with the research shows in alignment with the research of many others, the majority of the droplets which are injected by a person speaking, coughing or sneezing, is completely trapped by the mask and we know the virus is mostly transmitted by these droplets. so, if we stop most of them and buy most of them, i mean 99.9% of them, then we can make a massive difference. can you explain to us, there is a distinction between the larger droplets and the aerosol, the particles that are carried through the air. what is the difference and have how do we mitigate against them, does the quality of the mask matter?“ mitigate against them, does the quality of the mask matter? it is critical information to understand, there are two ways we know the virus can be transmitted and we think that the majority of the cases, the virus
8:46 am
is transmitted by larger droplets and masks are extremely effective in stopping larger droplets, 99.9% but if the virus was confirmed to be transmitted also by aerosol, which are much, much, smaller droplets, so small we cannot see them, and so small we cannot see them, and so small they stay in the air for many, many hours without landing because they are so small they are not weighty enough to fall on the floor, they remain in the air and we might breathe them in, for example. if the virus was confirmed to be significantly transmitted with this mechanism, breathing the air which includes the smallest droplets, then mask effectiveness depends on the fabric. because when you breathe and you have a mass, the amount of air that comes out is the same, it does not change, you need that amount of airto not change, you need that amount of air to breathe and if that includes smallest droplets, not all of the mask filter is all of them so in
8:47 am
that case, a different mask mount make and have different effectiveness. but, what we know now, the larger droplets are those that matter and masks are extremely effective. if that was not the case, there will still be effective but perhaps it will depend on the fabric. let's bring in helena. you been studying this for quite a while so been studying this for quite a while so in terms of our behaviour towards facemasks, coverings, how we are feeling, what have you picked up?l really interesting opinion poll from yugo which shows the of face coverings in public has increased over the past month since they've been mandated and the introduction ofa been mandated and the introduction of a new intervention, something that we haven't been used to doing in public, people embracing it, i think part of that means we need to shift the conversation from focusing
8:48 am
on face coverings as this medical tool on face coverings as this medical tool, mandated as social practice. something we do based on social norms, may be a show of solidarity, so norms, may be a show of solidarity, so it has symbolic meaning with it as well. to what extent could there be missed placed confidence if you are wearing a mask, you think you are wearing a mask, you think you are protecting yourself and others and you perhaps start forgetting about two metres, washing your hands, when it should be on top of those measures? that wasn't a main concern for policymakers initially but we have great papers that have come out that look at people's behaviour as they add facemasks into that and that hasn't been shown to be based on evidence so overall, people who had been using their face coverings have also been doing their physical distancing and hand hygiene better than others so it hasn't been a concern. people are using them on top of the other measures? just to
8:49 am
come back on the issue of physical and social distancing, didn't you find something in your study about wearing a mask and not wearing a mask and the distance that people stand from each other? what was that? we found if you wear a mask, you are exposed to way less number of droplets, even at very, very short distances, less than half a metre, compared to being a two metre distance without the masks. if we accept the same level of risk from a two metre distance without a mask, this same level of risk will be much lower with the mask at less than half a metre distance. but having said that, and we have also to include other social behaviour and so include other social behaviour and so on, from a physical point of view it is certainly true, as ago distance we could decide we want to add an additional level of
8:50 am
security. and so we keep both physical distance and face coverings. really interesting. thank you both and fascinating to talk to you. all this incremental, scientific evidence that will eventually build up the full picture that we simply don't have yet but so interesting. the tokyo paralympics should be getting underway this week, but instead athletes will have to wait until next year to compete at the rescheduled games. one of those is five—times gold medallist, wheelchair racer hannah cockroft — who has been telling sally about her lockdown training regime, and her fears for the sport's recovery. japan postpones the tokyo olympics and paralympics to next year. olympics would be held by the summer of 2021. tokyo's olympic flame will have to keep burning for another year as the games are finally postponed. when it was announced i was absolutely gutted. at the start it felt like my world had just ended. but once i'd had time to kind of, you know, make a new plan, full steam ahead now. that's where i want to be in a year's time. it is going to be hannah cockroft who takes the gold for great britain!
8:51 am
the last few months have really made me appreciate what, you know, what sport is to me. she is delighted! how difficult has it been to maintain any type of training routine during lockdown? so it never actually changed my training at all. we just obviously had to adapt bits of it because nothing was open. kind of the night before lockdown was put in place, our gym coach came and left loads of dumbbells on our doorstep and over lockdown we managed to kind of build our own home gym in the garage. so we've been, you know, on the rollers in the back bedroom for a lot of the time. i'm very much a routine person, you know, i like to know when i'm competing, where i'm competing, you know, all the dates, all the times. i have it all set out in my diary. i like to know, i'm at the track this day, at this time. i just like to know those things. and that was all kind of whipped from under yourfeet in a day. you know, in one sentence that was gone. do you feel that the pandemic and the situation that we've all been living through for the last
8:52 am
several months has hit paralympic sport, paralympians, harder maybe than anyone else? it's hit everyone hard. so i'm not saying us more than everyday people, but i think in sport, paralympians definitely have been hit hard because we already struggle to put on events. we already struggle to attract sponsors, attract crowds and taking a whole year away from that kind of circuit, i think we might struggle to recover from that. i guess like everyone, again, so many questions around, you know, are my sponsors going to hang around? are we going to get a crowd in again to watch us race? when will we compete again? going into tokyo next year, if they said to you, it's going ahead, but there'll be no supporters, there'll be no crowds, no spectators cheering you on, how would you manage with that? used to it! we compete every weekend most summers in front of your dad and his dog. there's no—one there.
8:53 am
and, you know what, it would be heartbreaking. the games are the one place that you can almost guarantee a crowd. and you've actually raced in the stadium in tokyo, haven't you? what was that like? idid. i competed in an event called one race, which was the opening ceremony of the new olympic stadium. honestly, it was incredible. being back in front of 60,000 people. is it true that there was you and usain bolt? handed him the baton. that's cool, isn't it?! that's pretty cool. i would still compete if it was definitely safe and it just meant no crowds, then i would definitely compete. but ultimately, another part of me would think, well, if it's not safe to let thousands of people come and watch, is it safe for thousands of athletes to be together in a village or in a competition ground? probably not. so then i would have to ask questions as to whether we should be competing at all. ultimately, i am a person at risk. you know, i didn't get a letter or anything, but i've got a disability. and that does mean that
8:54 am
unfortunately i am going to catch things a bit quicker. so you have to be a little bit more careful, a little bit more cautious. and hopefully that doesn't mean throwing away my dreams, but we'll just have to see what happens. you obviously have a real drive and a determination to go, but do you think other para athletes might struggle with that decision? when we're out there training, we're pushing our bodies to absolute limits. and your whole immune system is then lowered because you are finding those limits and then you're more at risk. so a lot of athletes have actually stepped back and gone, i need to tone down my training, just make sure that i'm safe. and i think that it's going to be a massive decision for a lot of us to decide, you know, what's more important? my life or my sport? he helped change the law around attacks on service animals and was even a semi—finalist on britain's got talent. now he is being made ambassador of a new charity to help retired police dogs. apologies for this
8:55 am
all of that seems pretty impressive — until you paws to consider — that he is actually a german shepherd named finn, and our reporter ben schofield is in hertfordshire this morning to meet him. good morning and hello from hertfordshire. and it is good morning from finn as well, he took a knife for his police handler, saving his life, and last year, he made it so his life, and last year, he made it so that anyone who attacks a police officer —— police dog like him cannot claim a defence. here we go. flawless. much better than in rehearsal. let's look at his performance on britain's got talent last year. heroic. there is no possible way i could no what you are going to pick. no. but finn did. because before we came here this evening, finn had a word engraved on
8:56 am
the tag on his collar. simon. can you look? at this time? read out loud the word that is there. heroic! heroic! that was finn 's performance on britain's got talent, memorable pa rt on britain's got talent, memorable part ofan on britain's got talent, memorable part of an extraordinary career. his hand is here with me. explain what happened when he took a knife for you. we were chasing a robbery suspect through hertfordshire, no idea they had a weapon and when we caught up with them he thrust the largest knife i've ever seen into finn ‘s chest, into his lungs, when he pulled it out he went for me and to himself in the way of that second thrust, i wouldn't be talking to you today if he done that. he has now been named ambassador of the thin blue port foundation, tell me about the gap that is trying to fill for retired police dogs. during their
8:57 am
working career everything is catered for, their kennels, food, veterinary bills, annual jabs and for, their kennels, food, veterinary bills, annualjabs and that sort of thing, hydrotherapy and any operations at something goes wrong but the day they retire, that is it, there is nothing for them so the new owner or handler, if they decide to keep them has to take on all the bills which i understand, people will say, i have to do that for my pet but these guys have served their country and picked up knocks and niggles on the way so the thin blue port foundation looks to fill that 93p- port foundation looks to fill that gap. i'm told it's very difficult to get insurance for retired police dogs. we found it impossible. let me bring in another dog with his owner. jessica and ty, enjoying, i think, his retirement, a former police dog, he retired in october last year. jessica, you are the owner, what other concerns that you might have about paying for those during retirement? huge concerns because dogs are very expensive. and as they
8:58 am
get older, things do go wrong so having the reassurance of the foundation that they can potentially help towards paying for treatment or cover the treatment costs is great. obviously people cannot take their dogs on, and is, it's attractive for people who may want to rehome police dogs. how was he enjoying retirement? very much now, he has been on holiday to norfolk so he is loving it. lovely, back to finn, life—saver in his career, and a law change and now this is the last part of his career, potentially but i think he has a message for you. what a superstar! go on, then, have a treat! well done, what an incredible story, so brave. that's all from us for today. breakfast will be back tomorrow from six. enjoy the rest of your day. bye— bye.
8:59 am
9:00 am
good morning, hello, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to bbc news. here are the headlines this monday morning: "vitally importa nt" — the prime minister urges you as mums and dads to send your children back to school, saying it's more damaging to their development and health the longer they're away from the classroom. pupils have already returned to the classroom in scotland — this morning schools in northern ireland open their doors for the first time since march. the white supremacist who killed 51 people at two mosques in the new zealand city of christchurch planned to attack a third and cause maximum casualties. firefighters in california warn conditions will only get worse as they battle to contain nearly 600 wildfires —

32 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on