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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 27, 2020 10:00am-1:02pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. life without parole for the gunman who shot and killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand — it's the longest sentence in the country's
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history. the trauma of march 15 is not easily healed. but today i hope is the last where we have any cause to here or utter the name of the terrorist behind it. £13 per day — the uk government trials payments for those on low incomes who have to self isolate in parts of england. and if you have been affected by not being able to work whilst self—isolating,or you'd like to share your thoughts on this or any of our other stories with me — you can contact me on twitter at annita—mcveigh, or use the hashtag bbc your questions. hurricane laura makes landfall along the coast of louisiana — hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes. a warning that complacency over getting the flu jab in the uk, could lead to the nhs being overwhelmed. and top tier basketball and baseball teams in the us
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boycott their matches — amid anger over the shooting of jacob blake by police in wisconsin. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. the man who opened fire on two mosques in new zealand last year, and killed 51 people, has been sentenced to life in prison without parole. it's the first time the sentence has ever been handed down in the country. 29—year—old australian brenton tarrant pleaded guilty to charges of murder
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and terrorism. the judge described his actions as "inhuman‘ and said tarrant our correspondent shaimaa khalil reports. for three emotionally—charged days, brenton tarrant, the killer responsible for the massacre in two christchurch mosques, sat in the dock as dozens of survivors and bereaved families spoke to him directly with a mix of anger and grief. i never would have ever imagined that the country in which my parents emigrated to for safety and for a successful future for their children would result in this. this didn't have to happen. while you are in prison, you'll come to reality that you are now in hell, and only the fire awaits you. today, the judge spent more than an hour reminding tarrant of each person he killed and injured
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and the agony the families and the muslim community now face. then he handed down the sentence. your offending constituted extreme violence. it was brutal and beyond callous. your actions were inhuman. brenton tarrant is now the first man in new zealand to be given a full life term with no parole. in many of their impact statements, survivors and bereaved families have asked the judge for exactly that. today, they feeljustice has been served. translation: she is happy that justice has been served but he is a monster — evil, and deserves everything that comes to him. when i go back to turkey, i'm going to go to my son's grave and tell my son that he is jailed for a life sentence without parole. the prime minister, jacinda ardern, also welcomed the courts decision.
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this has been a crime in new zealand, the likes of which has never occurred before. now we have seen a sentence the likes of which we have never seen before. but yes, it gave me relief to know that that person will never see the light of day. the sentencing ends one of the highest profile cases in new zealand, but march 15th 2019 will go down as a dark day in the country's history. the trauma and the tragic loss will stay with the families long after. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. the mayor of christchurch, lianne dalziel, welcomed the sentence given in court today.
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i think we all felt a sense of relief that the life imprisonment sentence we were expecting was accompanied by the statement that it would be without parole. it has relieved all of those families of ever having to confront a parole board and having to describe why somebody should never, ever be allowed to essentially live freely in our community in any way, shape or form. he has denied himself of that and i just want to pay tribute to each and every one of those family members who had the courage to stand in the court and to claim, not the status of victim, but the status of some individuals with humanity, with love and with their ability to rise above the occasion and with great dignity and poise, state how their lives had been affected by
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this atrocity. i heard one relative say that tarrant had not achieved his aims, he had not sewn division with these murders, is that something you very much see in the community of christchurch and in new zealand more broadly? and whenjacinda ardern talks about moore needing to be done to stop radicalisation in new zealand, what you think is happening on a practical level? i agree with the point that when we reflect on march 15, we will never forget the individuals whose lives were taken from us, but we will always remember the way the community came together in such an outpouring of both grief and support for the muslim community, but also that sense of compassion and kindness that really has enabled us to see us through to this day. so this is a real turning point, but i agree entirely
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with the prime minister, radicalisation is amplified through social media and the internet generally. where people are able to reach out and find comfort in the dark places on the web. i think we need to do a lot more to ensure that communities do not see themselves as setting themselves out apart from so others. i recall one of the individual standing in the court saying, who is the other today? it is you, you are the other. i think that we have to do a lot more to ensure that as a wider community, there is no place for hate, there is no place for othering, just because people's circumstances of their birth, where they are from, the religion they
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practice, all of these reasons are not reasons to hold hateful views, or to fear what people would do to disrupt your own narrow view of what the world should be. you know, this demands humanity. hurricane laura — a category four storm in the gulf of mexico — has made landfall along the southwestern coast of louisiana. with sustained winds of 150 miles an hour, laura is the most powerful storm to hit the us state in 164 years. simonjones reports. laura makes landfall, the wind is whipping up. it's a category four hurricane, expected to bring gusts of wind of 170 miles an hour, and a wall of water that could be
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two—storeys high. residents were in a rush to make their properties safe and then get out of harm's way. it's going to be real bad. we are leaving. we don't want to go, i don't want to go, but my children want to go. others though have decided to stay put. all we can do is hope for the best and prepare for the worst. so sticking it out and just going to see what happens. satellite images show what has already happened. laura has undergone a remarkable transformation. the national hurricane centre is predicting an extremely dangerous hurricane. this has been categorised repeatedly as an un—survivable storm surge, where it will be hitting. and that storm surge could continue inland for about 30 miles. this is the damage laura has already wreaked in the caribbean, claiming 2a lives. it's a warning for people
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in texas and louisiana. their evacuation is being complicated by coronavirus. the challenge, both trying to keep people safe from the storm and socially distanced. but with water levels already rising, the authority say any rescue operation will prove challenging, if not impossible. simon jones, bbc news. katelyn reulet was forced to evacute from her home in sulphur, louisiana and has moved with her family three hours away to morgan city. initially it was the wind damage but the more they talked about the landfall, we live about 35 miles north, we could have five or six feet of water in our home, which we have never had water in our home and oui’ have never had water in our home and our home is 60 years old and it has never flooded. it is a lot of anxiety to see what is going to be
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happening. we have experienced katrina, hurricane andrew, so many tropical storms. whenever they say tropical storms. whenever they say tropical storms. whenever they say tropical storm and force winds, i thought, i can handle that, but i wasn't going to stay for anything higher than a category one storm. when they projected this a couple of days ago, i told my husband i am leaving and i am taking my girls. when they say category four, i said, iam forsure when they say category four, i said, i am for sure out of here, and you are coming to. people on low incomes in parts of england where there are high rates of coronavirus will be able to claim up to £182, equivalent to £13 a day, if they have to self—isolate. a trial for the scheme will begin on the first of september for those who claim universal credit or working tax credit and cannot work from home. the benefit will be trialled in parts of north west england.
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0ur political correspondent helen catt says there has been some criticism of the scheme. somebody who has tested positive for coronavirus will get £130 because they have to stay at home for ten days. somebody who lives with them or has come into close contact will get £182, because they have to stay at home longer, 1a days. it is to try to make sure people do the self isolation, but there are restrictions on who can claim the money. because it is aimed at people on low incomes, one of the requirement is you must already be claiming universal credit or working tax credit and you must not be able to work from home and you have to lose money to be able to qualify. and you have to prove you have had a positive coronavirus test, or you have been told to self—isolate officially by the nhs test and trace programme and the government says there will be checks. but on the specific amount of money, £13 a day, the health secretary matt hancock told us why they had
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come to that figure. it's set at the level of statutory sick pay in order to make sure people don't lose out from doing the right thing. we are introducing it in 0ldham, pendle and blackburn with darwen in the first instance. these are the areas of the country where the rates are the highest and we have the highest level of intervention, the strongest, local lockdown, if you like. and we'll roll it out from next week and then obviously monitor it very closely. now, he said this measure had been introduced after feedback and it would strengthen the test and trace system, which he said had come under scrutiny, but is now working well. that is why they have introduced it but there are those who are concerned about the level of money saying it isn't enough and among them, the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, who says this move doesn't go far enough and the government should be looking at reimbursing people on full pay.
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mohammed iqbal is the labour leader of pendle borough council, where the scheme will be trialled. pendle has been under additional restriction since the 22nd of august. thank you forjoining us, do you welcome the scheme being trialled in your area? i finally welcomed the government, after weeks of persuasion from local authorities and other interested people across the country saying, that whilst we need to work with communities to eradicate covid—19 there needs to be a financial package in place. i welcome the fact matt hancock has finally announced something this morning. but the figure he has announced is a slap in the face for people who are genuinely worried, do they isolate after they have tested positive, or do they go out to work to put food on the table for their families? £13 a day, i would like to see the health secretary survive on that for ten to 1a days.
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it is not enough. not enough of an incentive for people to self—isolate? enough. not enough of an incentive for people to self-isolate? it is not only an incentive, it is a dilemma. if somebody sadly tests positive for covid—19 and the worry they have got, do they self—isolate and protect themselves and their community? 0r and protect themselves and their community? or do they put themselves at risk, the community at risk and go out to work and put food on the table for their families? it is a real dilemma for a lot of people in pendle and across the country. my plea to matt hancock is, whilst this isa plea to matt hancock is, whilst this is a trial, i urge him to increase the figure because £13 a day does not reflect anything. what should the figure be, do you think? the government have always loaded they wa nt to government have always loaded they want to provide the best for people. based on the living wage, it should be £50 a day. there is no issue for people in blackburn, pendle, what do they do, worry about the financial situation or do they... can
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you still hear me? we need to work together to eradicate covid—19. sorry, we are having difficulty with the line and we did not catch all of your last answer, perhaps you would like to say again what you are trying to tell us? i'd like the health secretary to review this financialfigure health secretary to review this financial figure immediately and increase it to the living wage, which is what the government encourages employers to pay. what i don't want is an individual who has tested positive to be buried on two fronts, do they isolate and protect the community or do they put themselves at risk, their families and the community at risk by going out to work and put food on the table? sadly, the government have not taken this into account. do you think that accounts for higher rate of infection in areas like pendle? people going out to work, too as you say, put food on the table, does that explain it? it
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is one of the explanations. the community have been fantastic in pendle over the last couple of weeks and the infection rate is coming down. i don't want anybody to be sat at home with that dilemma and the worry about what to do. do they isolate for 1h days, or do they go out to put food on the table? i know what most hard—working put food on the table? i know what most ha rd—working people put food on the table? i know what most hard—working people would do in the situation and it is not the worry i want people to have and that is why the government should be listening. have you talk to people who have said, i think i might have the virus, but i have got to go out to work? i have spoken to people since friday when the government announced additional restrictions across parts of pendle. it is a real concern for people who are saying, i am scared to go and get tested because if i test positive, what do ido? doigo because if i test positive, what do i do? do i go out to work or do i sit at home? my children, my wife, husband or whoever is left as a
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dependent, is asking a real question, where is the food coming from this evening? who will put the meal on the table? that is not a worry people should be having in this current day and age. if someone doesn't get tested, they cannot say prove positive they have the virus and they think, i will go to work?|j am and they think, i will go to work?” am urging people to go and get tested, but on the other side, i am facing genuine questions from people, which the government need to work with local authorities to help answer. financial stress, financial worry is a real burden on some families in pendle. i want to work with government to address that worry. 0k, labour leader of pendle borough council, thank you very much. a number of major sport events across the us have been postponed in response to the shooting of a black man, jacob blake, by police in wisconsin. a curfew has been imposed in the city of minneapolis, in the neighbouring state of minnesota, after looting broke out there. 200 us federal agents have now
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been sent to kenosha, where jacob blake was shot and wounded and where a fourth night of curfew is in effect. 0ur correspondent david willis has more. don't shoot. into a vacuum created by daily protests and an initially overstretched police force has come armed vigilantes — one of whom was caught on camera before tuesday night's violence. reports suggest the individual interviewed, 17—year—old kyle rittenhouse later put his weapon to use. this mobile phone footage appears to capture the moment someone fires on protesters and later zooms in on an individual lying motionless on the ground. another video appears to show a similar incident, again a protester is gunned down. two people were killed, a third seen here, was injured. someone who appeared to be armed was later seen walking with his hands up towards the police.
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a 17—year—old has since been charged with first—degree murder. all this in response to sunday's shooting of a black man, jacob blake, by a white police officer. officials say the officer, rustin chesky, fired seven times into mr blake's back after being called upon to investigate a domestic dispute. during the investigation following the initial incident, mr blake admitted that he had a knife in his possession. dci agents, the division of criminal investigation, recovered a knife from the driver's side floorboard of mr blake's vehicle. a search of the vehicle located no additional weapons. president trump, in a series of tweets, vowed to clamp down on the violence in kenosha, whilst, in a video message, his democratic rival joe biden, appealed for calm. protesting brutality is a right and absolutely necessary but burning down communities is not protest,
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it's needless violence. in a statement, the local basketball team, the milwaukee bucks, announced a surprise boycott of their play—off game in response to the shooting of jacob blake. it is possible the entire season could now be injeopardy. meanwhile, hundreds of national guard officers have now been sent to kenosha, as the latest protests over police brutality and racial injustice threaten to spread across the country. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. former president barak 0bama showed his support tweeting: at least 100 people have died in flash flooding in northern afg hanistan's pa rwan province. the flooding, caused by torrential rains, struck the city of charikar early on wednesday morning
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while people were asleep. rescue workers and families have been searching for survivors. the country's disaster management ministry says dozens were injured and nearly 500 houses were destroyed. people who organise illegal gatherings could be fined up to £10,000 under new police powers coming into effect in england tomorrow. the move follows an increase in raves and parties over the summer as coronavirus lockdown restrictions were eased. the home secretary, priti patel says the police will crack down hard on the perpetrators. we have seen far too many unlicensed music events, so parties, illegal raves and gatherings of over 30 people. people that are coming together in unregulated environments. and i think it's important that we remember we are still in the midst of the covid pandemic, we have a covid crisis, a health emergency that's taking place and people need to be responsible. and so that is the reason why we are going to put fines in place, so
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the police, as i have been seen here today, as i have been seeing here today, are absolutely geared up now to implement fines of £10,000 for those individuals that are facilitating these illegal parties and raves. these are dangerous places, people should not be going along to them and that is why the police are absolutely clear that they are going to be enforcing these fines and absolutely shutting down these illegal parties and raves. a freight train carrying diesel has derailed in south wales, and burst into flames. emergency crews were called near llanelli and nearby homes were evacuated after the fire was reported last night. british transport police said the two workers who were on board the train had been accounted for and no injuries had been reported. today marks a year since the death of 19—year—old harry dunn, who was killed after his motorbike collided with a car outside a us airbase in northamptonshire. the driver of the car left the uk
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and flew to the united states, claiming diplomatic immunity. since then, harry s family has been everywhere from downing street to the white house, campaigning tirelessly to bring the driver to justice. graham satchell has been to meet them. portland on the south coast of england. it's always been a special place for harry dunn, where he came on family holidays every year. i said to the guys when it's my time to go, you know, for my ashes to be scattered here. and harry said the same. it was like, you know, "same for me, dad, this is where i want to be, as well." and then, unfortunately, you know, a month later we lost him. definitely, it definitely is my special
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place, harry's ashes were scattered here a few weeks ago. it's become a place for the whole family, parents, step parents, siblings, team harry, to remember and reflect. the pain that you're left with every moment of every day, 24/7, is always there so you can never not realise that he's gone. we definitely know that he's gone. harry dunn was riding his motorbike next to raf croughton in northamptonshire when he was allegedly hit head—on and killed. the driver of the car, anne sacoolas, the wife of an american intelligence officer, claimed diplomatic immunity and left the country. harry's family has been campaigning ever since to get her back to face the british justice system. if she had stayed none of this would have even come out, nobody would have known who she was, nobody would have known her name, the children's names, the husband's name, whatjob role he
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had. they'd have carried on being able tojust integrate into the community because we were more than willing to do everything we possibly could to ensure that she at least had a suspended sentence so that she could carry on being a mum. all we wanted was for her to go through the ukjustice system. you didn't want to see her in prison? no. not at all. want do we want? justice! when do we want it? the family's campaign has seen some remarkable successes. diplomatic immunity rules have changed. american personnel on bases in the uk will now get driver training. in december, anne sacoolas was charged with causing death by dangerous driving and an extradition request was made. harry's parents and stepparents even went to the white house. president trump said anne sacoolas was there to meet them and there was the suggestion the family might be given money. when we were very strong and said no, that was probably why they let us out the back door
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of the white house and not out on to the south lawn where all the press were setup. he didn't get what he had planned to do. at their home in northamptonshire, harry's spare biking gear is where he left it the day he died. gloves, helmet, jacket. it's a source of comfort for charlotte, but she says she'll only be able to grieve properly for her son when anne sacoolas has accounted for what happened last year. you know, it was time a year ago almost, but it's absolutely time now. we don't want to go into year two of fighting. we want to go into year two to try to start to rebuild our lives, to try to start possibly celebrating who harry was. but it doesn't feel like we are living. we are just existing at the
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moment. and that's why we need the justice, because without it, we will always feel like we are just existing. you're not going to give up? never. back on portland, the family stand as one. we, as a family, loved our son so much. he was a good, honest lad. he deserves the truth to be known of what happened that night, and why she was allowed to leave. we are normal people. i never follow politics, but i would say we know the difference between right and wrong and so did harry. so that's why we can't stop. it's for harry. a year after harry dunn died, his family are united in grief and determined to carry on the fight for justice. graham satchell,
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bbc news. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... life without parole for the gunman who shot and killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand — it's the longest sentence in the country's history. hurricane laura makes landfall along the coast of louisiana. hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes. £13 per day — the uk government trials payments for those on low incomes who have to self—isolate in parts of england. a warning that complacency over getting the flu jab in the uk could lead to the nhs being overwhelmed. and top—tier basketball and baseball teams in the us boycott their matches amid anger over the shooting ofjacob blake by police in wisconsin.
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day three of the republican national convention has ended with vice—president mike pence using his speech to focus on the us economy and on what he called the dangers of electing joe biden, as he argued for donald trump's re—election. earlier, the president's former adviser kellyanne conway praised mr trump for promoting and respecting women and said his success had confounded critics. paul hawkins reports. please welcome the vice president of the united states, mike pence. the man who could one day replace donald trump as the republican party leader stuck to familiar lines, like the ongoing criticism of the violence in wisconsin. the violence must stop, whether in minneapolis, portland, or kenosha. too many heroes have died defending our freedom to see americans strike each other down. we will have law and order on the streets of this country
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for every american of every race and creed and colour. there was also praise for the police. president trump and i know that the men and women that put on the uniform of law enforcement are the best of us. but no mention of police brutality. the american people know we don't have to choose between supporting law enforcement and standing with our african—american neighbours to improve the quality of their lives, education, jobs and safety. and from the first days of this administration we have done both. it all started at a tea party... with polls showing african—americans and women are more likely to vote forjoe biden than donald trump
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at the moment, there were a significant number of female speakers, including the vice president's wife speaking about the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment when women were given the to vote. were given the right to vote. because of heroes like susan b anthony and lucy stone, women today, like our daughters audrey and charlotte, and future generations, will have their voices heard and their votes count. good evening, i am kellyanne conway. there was also the president's outgoing top adviser praising his support for her. for decades he has elevated women to senior positions in business and in government. he confides in and consults us, respects our opinions, and insists that we are on equal footing with the men. the spirit of heroism stands in the breach. the theme of the evening was a land of heroes. eight years ago in the fields of helmand province in afghanistan, a close friend and team—mate laid down cover fire against taliban
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insurgents so that i could walk blind and bloodied to the medevac helicopter and survive. but as events in wisconsin show, the definition of a hero depends on your viewpoint. there is one convention that is a empathetic, compassionate, sympathetic, speaks in softer tones that is trying to appeal to the swing voter in america, the floating voters. then there is the second convention primarily with the trump kids and their significant others that is much more red meat, much more in your face, and they are trying to appeal to the trump loyalists. the question i have as a pollster is which convention is the public going to remember after all the shouting is over? the final night sees president trump make his keynote speech. paul hawkins, bbc news. clark sjudge was the speechwriter for president reagan and joins me
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now from washington dc. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news today. it is a pleasure. thank you. there was a pretty bold claim from mike pence, given that lots of people have accused donald trump of stoking racial tension, he said violence in cities would spread ifjoe biden wins in november. what did you make of the tone and the content did you make of the tone and the co nte nt of did you make of the tone and the content of his speech? well, it was an excellent speech, it laid out the differences between the two size very well, very clear. but let me expand to the tone of the entire evening. your report missed one big thing, which is that the republican party made a big play last evening for the african—american vote. a
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large number of the speakers were african—american, african—american candidates or officeholders, and they made a strong direct pitch for that vote. there is a lot of polling now apparently from the two parties, there has been speculation that the democratic inside poles are this way, that african—american men are moving in unprecedented numbers towards the republicans. do you think kenosha will change that? that does not mean that the republicans will win, but if the republicans get 20% of the african—american male vote, that is a sea change. and about 69 days to go to see what change, if it happens, might bring. do you think kenosha will have an impact on that?
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there are two views of kenosha, you have heard the other view from your reporters. that solidifies african—america ns with the democrats. the other view is, and one that is showing up at least in polling, is that african—americans are in polling, is that african—america ns are horrified in polling, is that african—americans are horrified by the violence, which has hit the african—american community is particularly hard. shop owners and other community leaders and the like. we do not know yet how that is going to turn out, but the president and the vice president last night, and the vice president last night, and presumably the president tonight, made a strong pitch for the african—american vote. tonight, made a strong pitch for the african-american vote. let's see what president trump says it later today, and we will come to that in a
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minute. to take you back to my first question when i asked you what you thought the tone and content of the speech was and you said you thought it was a good speech and set out the differences between the two sides, but on that topic of mike pence warning that in his opinion violence will spread ifjoe biden wins in november, that is an incredible claim. we know there has been a lot of violence on president trump's watch, but how can he possibly say it will spread ifjoe biden wins? you have got to set it in the context, which your report did not do, of howjoe biden and the democrats have responded to this. there is a great deal of criticism in the united states that all of the municipal leaders and governors, the mayor is under governors of cities that have been hit hard, have been democrats and they have not responded. they have allowed the violence to continue and
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they have pulled back the police. i am sure your reports have reported that in portland the police have been outraged that they have not been allowed to protect the city. similar things in seattle and minnesota and minneapolis. the democrats were very, very unresponsive on a national level in their convention last week. i think there have been lots of counterclaims on that point about the level of responsiveness both on a national and state level from democrats. there are counterclaims of course because the people who have been unresponsive do not like to be called out on it. but iam not like to be called out on it. but i am saying in the context that is the context of the vice president's remarks last night. how
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important was his speech in the grand scheme of things? one of our washington correspondence said he was calling donald trump psychic. does his speech really matter in the grand scheme of things, given we will get president trump's speech later on today? i think the larger question is in both of these conventions, if you will call them that, they are really large information commercials more so really large information commercials more so than ever, but in each of them who is watching? is it simply them who is watching? is it simply the faithful on each side? is there any movement? 0ne the faithful on each side? is there any movement? one of the things we have seen over the last four years is how steady opinion is no matter what happens. people who like president trump continue to like him, people who do not like president trump continue to dislike him. has any of this move
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anything? we don't know that. the big national polls at the moment do show thatjoe biden has a lead. perhaps this speech for donald trump tonight is one of the most important that he has ever given, would you agree? you a lwa ys has ever given, would you agree? you always say that about the candidate for the president's acceptance speech, and it is always true. and it is true because you are campaigning, even if the two sides are campaigning, even if the two sides a re pretty campaigning, even if the two sides are pretty much set in the public. the question here is as much who turns out? both sides have low turnout core voters that they are trying to get excited, and both sides have parts of the other side's base that they are trying to win over. the republicans are trying to
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win over african—americans and minorities, the democrats are trying to win over suburban women. and which one will prevail in that? the african—american vote turns out to bea african—american vote turns out to be a low turnout vote, except when barack 0bama won. the suburb vote tends to be a lower turnout and will it turn out? it did turn out last time in unusual numbers. well it ain? time in unusual numbers. well it again? both sides are competing, those are the battle grounds here. and how much anyone speech impacts this, you would have to take your best shot, as each party has tried, at these events, the conventions, but how much anybody is actually moving the boat or encouraging turnout over what it was before is anybody‘s guess until election day. good to talk. clark
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isjudge, a former speech writer. firefighters in california say they're making good progress in tackling wildfires which are among the worst in the state's history. the governor, gavin newsom, said every resource possible was being deployed. since the fires began earlier this month, seven people have been killed and more than 1,700 structures have been destroyed. chief executive, kevin mayer, has left popular video sharing app, tiktok. he will be replaced by general manager, vanessa pappas. president trump imposed a ban on transactions with tiktok‘s owner bytedance. officials say they are concerned american users' data could be passed to the chinese government. riot police in belarus have detained about 20 people protesting against the disputed re—election of president alexander lukashenko. hundreds had gathered in the capital, minsk, where daily demonstrations have been held since the vote earlier this month. there will need to be a major campaign urging people to get a flu
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jab to ease pressure on the nhs this winter, according to medical experts. last month, the government announced plans to double the amount of vaccinations available, but analysis by the bbc has found the proportion of people getting vaccinated has fallen in recent years. emily unia reports. every winter, the over—65s and those with serious health conditions such as asthma or diabetes are offered a free flu vaccine, because catching flu could make them seriously ill. this year, there are concerns that a second wave of coronavirus infections combined with a major flu outbreak could overwhelm the nhs. so, last month, the prime minister announced plans to expand the flu vaccination programme. he wants to double the number of people who get the jab from 15 million to 30 million. the government is offering a free vaccination to everyone over 50 this year, once the over—65s and those with serious health conditions such as diabetes and asthma have been treated. but new analysis by the bbc shows
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the proportion of vulnerable people who take up the free vaccination has been falling. in scotland, there was a fall of 15% between 2015 and 2020. take—up dropped 13% in northern ireland during the same period. and in wales, it fell 7%. in england, the proportion of vulnerable people getting vaccinated dropped 6%, with take—up last year just 45%. concerns about side effects, religious objections and a tendency to under—underestimate the severity of flu are all reasons for not getting vaccinated. flu has the potential to cause significant problem to the nhs significant problems to the nhs with the threat of coronavirus in the community. it's incredibly important for us to start to raise awareness of not only the availability of flu vaccines, but also who needs to take them and why. without increase to the uptake unfortunately we could see the nhs struggling this winter.
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there are now calls for the government to carry out a major national campaign this winter to meet the vaccination target and reduce demand for the nhs. earlier i spoke to drjonathan leach, honorary secretary for the royal college of gps, who says uptake in older patients in the uk is good, the concern is for vulnerable youger people. where maybe somebody has asthma or maybe they have had a heart attack, where actually we as gps would be sending them an invitation to come down and get that for vaccination and clearly flu vaccination and clearly we would like them to take that invitation up and the concern is making sure that they come along. it is notjust for their benefit, it is also for the benefit of their relatives. if, for example, we had somebody in their 40s who would be in one of these groups because they had diabetes, it is notjust to protect them but it also might protect other people, for example, elderly relatives, who might be visiting. so it is very important
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for the whole population to get behind this, and that is probably the main message of. behind this, and that is probably the main message. let's look at those points in more detail. first of all, what do you think are the barriers to taking up a flu jab? so, a lot of these are the younger people. some of it is fear and anxiety. a lot of my patients have said, am i going to get flu from this? actually, you're not, it is scientifically impossible for you to get flu. there are stories around, will i have side effects, flu vaccines are very effective and safer. i have mine every year and occasionally i might get a bit of a stiff arm but actually it is very safe effective. a lot of people may be at work, and also, particularly for one of the children's vaccines, some of that is on a porcine basis. actually we can offer alternative vaccines if it might be a cultural or religious barrier.
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so there are lots of ways we can get round this and we would be encouraging people to come forward. and let's talk in a bit more detail, you touched on it briefly, about the implications for the community if there is a low take—up of the vaccine this year, and also the applications for the nhs? yes, so, there is a direct on the individual... a lot of people think flu isjust a mild disease. actually there are people who die from flu each year and that is something we are trying to avoid. so, there is the direct effect, particularly if it was let's say a mother who was pregnant, it is really important that they approach their practice or their midwife and get vaccinated. so that is the direct effect. then there is the effect on other people because they have been vaccinated. a pregnant mother is helping to protect their unborn child, but also if they were going round to elderly relatives, it would help protect them because you are not bringing it in, even given social distancing. and finally, it is there making sure that the nhs,
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because we do expect in a normal year or even in a worse year because of coronavirus, it's really important that we keep the nhs going. and this is one of the most effective things that we can do to make sure that those people who actually do need access to the nhs services, particularly intensive care, actually, there is sufficient space and capacity. so, flu vaccination is really important for all of those reasons. and very briefly, are the vaccines ready now or will it be next month? so, i willjust use my surgery, so, we have got our first vaccination clinic a week on saturday. we are using our branch surgery because we are having to socially distance and we at the royal college have published guidance on how to do mass vaccination, because that is where we are. and then clearly there will be a campaign right across the autumn and then, provided there is insufficient vaccine, then we will be
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looking people over 50—64. but the priorities are this group, and clearly the elderly, to make sure that we protect them as best we can. doctorjonathan leach. at least seventeen dolphins have been found dead on the coast in mauritius after a huge oil spill. last month, a japanese tanker ran aground on a coral reef and broke in two, leaking hundreds of tonnes of oil into the indian ocean. some viewers may find some of the pictures in sylvia lennan—spence's report upsetting. 0ne mauritian called it a nightmare, 17 dead dolphins washed up on the coast of mauritius. others were alive, but onlyjust. some had difficulty breathing. an investigation is under way, but fingers are already being pointed at the recent oil spill or the japanese owned ship it came from, the bow of which was taken out to sea and deliberately sunk last week. we are working on the hypothesis that it either was actually
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fuel that had leaked as a result of the accident, but also the heavy metals that are contained in the ship when it was sunk and when it broke apart. obviously there were fragments of metal, but there was also quite heavy deposit of materials that also went into the ocean, so we believe there will be a link between not only the ship itself, and the substances from the fuel within the body of the animals. but the mauritian government said initial tests showed there was no link between the oil spill and the dolphins' deaths. it has pointed to shark bites but said further tests are needed. but if the ship or the oil spill is to blame, more marine life could be harmed. the mammals that are there are sensitive, but they are not the only ones and should it be that there are unfolding consequences, we foresee that there will be more other
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animals that will suffer the same fate. it is over a month since the ship ran aground, spilling 1200 tonnes of oil, damaging the biodiversity here and also impacting on tourism which makes up 14% of the economy. historically this may not have been a big oil spill, but its aftermath will be felt for a long time to come. to north korea and a typhoon has uprooted trees there and dumped heavy rain on land which has already seen widespread flooding this month. state television interrupted its regular broadcasts to give updates on typhoon bavi. there are concerns that millions of people could go hungry if the storm causes significant damage, shortly before the autumn rice harvest begins. north korean leader, kim jong—un, was seen telling the authorities to prepare for the typhoon on wednesday.
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havana is perhaps latin america's most beautiful capital city. but it is a constant battle to protect it from the tropical elements and keep it from crumbling. now the man credited for its conservation over many decades, eusebio leal, died last month after a long illness. as cubans pay their respects in a condolences book in havana, minds are also turning to how to continue his vital preservation work without him. will grant reports from havana. eusebio leal, was considered the man who saved havana. urbane, affable and deeply respected in cuba. as a young man, he once lay down in front of the bulldozers to save a street of the cuban capitalfrom destruction. it was the start of a lifelong commitment to restoration, as fidel castro named him the, "historian of havana," in charge of preserving the city from the ravages of the sea spray and tropical rain. speaking in 2016, he told me it was a costly but vital task.
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translation: restoration costs money, money and more money. it's like the national sport for decaying countries. that is why you've seen the disappearance of the historic city centres in latin america and the rise of the megacities. when other latin american capitals knocked down and rebuilt their historic centres, often with ugly results, eusebio leal always tried to keep havana intact. he created a unique system of shops and hotels which paid for the restoration work in old havana and was often praised by international bodies like unesco. but a few years ago, that mini—empire was passed into the hands of the cuban military and many now wonder about the future preservation of havana without eusebio leal at its helm. his last major work was the resplendent capitolio building. cuba's former parliament returned to its 1930s glory, with original marble
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and gold leaf fittings. but he took controversial decisions over which buildings would be saved and which condemned, leading to a greater role for private capital in saving the city. translation: when a building collapses anywhere in this city, it takes with it, a piece of my heart. so when we hear of people buying up old buildings and restoring them in keeping with the original blueprints, with a well qualified architect behind the project, then i'm happy and i applaud that. private money has its advantages and disadvantages in restoration. as cubans mourn eusebio leal, it remains to be seen if his disciples will carry out his work without the same depth of feeling. certainly, the task ahead of them is daunting. havana is crumbling fast. if leal‘s legacy is to be upheld, the city itself must be saved from collapse. will grant, bbc news, havana.
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bollywood actor anushka sharma and her husband, indian cricket captain virat kohli, have announced they are expecting a baby. the couple shared the news on twitter, saying, "and then we were three" — arriving jan 2021. anushka sharma is one of the most successful female bollywood stars, with hits including pk and sultan. she is also a film producer. virat kohli is in dubai, along with his royal challengers bangalore team—mates, to play in the indian premier league. thousands of people have watched a spectacular light show to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the shenzhen special economic zone. buildings across shenzhen city were lit up with the main displays in the city's bay area. and more than 800 drones performed stunts alongside the light shows. you're watching bbc news.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. we've got a fairly quiet day of weather compared to what some of us have seen of late. we have got low pressure coming in from the atlantic, bringing in some rain. and today it is going to be a fairly cloudy day more or less across the board. we start cloudy and we are going to end cloudy and we have got some showers and rain coming our way. look at the greens and the yellows on the chance, that is where you can expect some heavy bursts, we may even hear the odd rumble of thunder in the south of england. temperatures disappointing for this stage in august, 12—19. this evening and overnight we hang onto some cloud and some showers, still the potential for them to be heavy. tomorrow, we have got this area of low pressure still with us, slowly meandering towards the north sea, and with it, various fronts. but the wind direction will have more of a northerly component in it,
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which is a cold direction for us. tomorrow again, the risk of some thunderstorms in the south, still some rain around, and we have also got some cloud in the north, with some brighter breaks, but it will feel cool. temperatures low across the board for this stage in august, but adding in the wind, and it will feel even cooler. into the weekend, we continue with the dry and cool theme, the wind will ease, particularly on sunday. on saturday, the tail end of the weather front still producing rain in the south—east, but look at the isobars, it will be quite windy. still coming from the north. so, here is the dregs of the rain, very slowly pulling away from the south—eastern corner. there will be some sunshine. equally there will be areas of cloud, and we've got some gusty winds. particularly gusty down the north sea coastline, where once again we are likely to see some large waves crashing onto the shoreline of norfolk, for example. temperatures, 12 in the north, 17 in the south, below—average for the time of year.
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on saturday, high pressure starts to edge in from the west. but not as windy, but it still will be windy for some, particularly in eastern areas. but it is looking dry on sunday, with a bit of cloud around, some sunny skies as well, and temperature—wise, 12 in the north, 18 in the south.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. life without parole for the gunman who shot and killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand — it's the longest sentence in the country's history.
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the trauma of march 15 is not easily healed. but today i hope is the last where we have any cause to hear or utter the name of the terrorist behind it. hurricane laura makes landfall along the coast of louisiana — hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes. £13 per day — the uk government trials payments for those on low incomes who have to self isolate in parts of england. net in parts of england. migration to the uk is at its highest net migration to the uk is at its highest level since the brexit referendum. new figures show mainly driven by increases in migration from outside the eu for study. top tier basketball and baseball teams in the us boycott their matches amid anger over the shooting of jacob la ke anger over the shooting of jacob lake by police in
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wisconsin. hello and welcome, if you're watching in the uk or around the world, and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. the man who opened fire on two mosques in new zealand last year — killing 51 people — has been sentenced to life in prison without parole. it's the first time the sentence has ever been handed down in the country. 29—year—old australian brenton tarrant pleaded guilty to charges of murder and terrorism. the judge described his actions as "inhuman" and said tarrant was devoid of empathy for his victims — he was neither contrite nor ashamed. 0ur correspondent shaimaa khalil reports. for three emotionally charged days brinton tarrant the killer
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responsible for the massacre in two christchurch masks sat in the dock as dozens of survivors and bereaved family spoke to him directly with a mix of anger family spoke to him directly with a mix ofangerand family spoke to him directly with a mix of anger and grief. i never would have ever imagined that the country in which my parents emigrated to for safety and for a successful future for their children would result in this. this didn't have to happen. while you are in prison, you'll come to reality that you are now in hell, and only the fire awaits you. today, the judge spent more than an hour reminding tarrant of each person he killed and injured and the agony the families and the muslim community now face. then he handed down the sentence. your offending constituted extreme violence. it was brutal and beyond callous. your actions were
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inhuman. brenton tarrant is now the first man in new zealand to be given a full life term with no parole. in many of their impact statements, survivors and bereaved families have asked the judge for exactly that. today, they feeljustice has been served. she is happy that justice has been served but he is a monster — evil, and deserves everything that comes to him. when i go back to turkey, i'm going to go to my son's grave and tell my son that he is jailed for a life sentence without parole. the prime minister, jacinda ardern, also welcomed the courts decision. also welcomed the court's decision. this has been a crime in new zealand, the likes of which has never occurred before. now we have seen a sentence the likes of which we have never seen before. but yes, it gave me relief to know
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that that person will never see the light of day. the sentencing ends one of the highest profile cases in new zealand, but march 15th 2019 will go down as a dark day in the country's history. the trauma and the tragic loss will stay with the families long after. the mayor of christchurch — lianne dalziel — welcomed the sentence given in court today. we all felt a sense of relief that the life imprisonment sentence we were expecting was accompanied by the statement that it would be without parole. it has relieved all of those families of ever having to confront a parole board and having to describe why somebody should never, ever
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be allowed to essentially live freely in our community in any way, shape or form. he has denied himself of that and i just want to pay tribute to each and every one of those family members who had the courage to stand in the court and to claim, not the status of victim, but the status of some individuals with humanity, with love and with their ability to rise above the occasion and with great dignity and poise, state how their lives had been affected by this atrocity. let's hear now from rashid 0mar, whose son tariq was killed in the attack. thank you very much for taking time tojoin us in what must be immensely difficult day for you all. rashid,
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tell us what your son was like a man? a very gentle man. he loved sports, football, he loved his family, and he just loved sports, football, he loved his family, and hejust loved outdoor living, and he has lots and lots of friends, he is a very friendly present was that yes, i've read some wonderful tributes from those who played football alongside him. rosemary, it was an immensely confusing day when those shootings we re confusing day when those shootings were happening. you were waiting for tariq outside the mosque. tell us what happened and how you discovered he was one of the casualties. what happened and how you discovered he was one of the casualtiesm what happened and how you discovered he was one of the casualties. it was a really bad nightmare really. there was lots of shooting, ijust parked the car, heard the shooting and i thought the shooting was at our house, where i parked, so i drove
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around towards the mosque and the gunmen was outside and there were people deceased, and i sort of hoped that tariq would have been fine but it wasn't for another two or three days that we found out he was on the list of deceased people. you have the opportunity, rashid, to make an impact statement in court. how important was that to you and how did you use that opportunity? yes, i feel relieved after the statement. i used that statement as my own personal feeling, and also used that statement as my own personalfeeling, and also my used that statement as my own personal feeling, and also my own, in my own words that i managed to talk to him and stare at him and make eye contact, and when i said to him that i will never be able to
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forgive him, and hejust nodded his head, as if in agreement of what i said to him. rosemary, thejudge spent about an hour telling brinton tarrant spent about an hour telling brinton tarra nt about his spent about an hour telling brinton tarrant about his 51 victims. how significant was that for you, obviously to hear tariq's name mentioned amongst them? yeah, i think it was very good, what the judge did, and the way he presented each victim, and made the terrorists know that these were real people, this is their future ahead, you know, you have destroyed really good people. personally i found it really quite harrowing, very emotional, but also kind of healing as well. rashid, we have heard this is the longest sentence that has ever been handed down in new zealand, the first as well
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for terrorism. what message do you think the courts are trying to send? the message is to tell anyone who has any hatred towards a ny tell anyone who has any hatred towards any other communities apart from themselves, that this is a warning to them, this is not right, so this is an absolute stern warning and a strong message that this will not happen again. rosemary, you are left as you said with this sadness for the rest of your lives as well, even though this court case is now over and he's got life in prison without parole. what sort of community support at local and national level have you all had? we've had lots of support from our friends and
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family, and within the community, especially the women, you know, the mothers and the widows, just keeping together and supporting each other, all those sorts of things. it's been very close, and we've just all been on the same dreadful journey, we've just all been on the same dreadfuljourney, really. rosemary, rashid, 0mar and all of yourfamily, thank you for talking to us and our very best wishes. thank you. hurricane laura — a category four storm in the gulf of mexico — has made landfall along the southwestern coast of louisiana. with sustained winds of 150mph, laura is the most powerful storm to hit the us state in 164 years. simonjones reports. laura makes landfall, the wind is whipping up. it's a category four hurricane, expected to bring gusts of wind of 170 miles an hour, and a wall of water that
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could be two—storeys high. residents were in a rush to make their properties safe and then get out of harm's way. it's going to be real bad. we are leaving. we don't want to go, i don't want to go, but my children want to go. 0thers though have decided to stay put. all we can do is hope for the best and prepare for the worst. so sticking it out and just going to see what happens. satellite images show what has already happened. laura has undergone a remarkable transformation. the national hurricane centre is predicting an extremely dangerous hurricane. this has been categorised repeatedly as an un—survivable storm surge, where it will be hitting. and that storm surge could continue inland for about 30 miles. this is the damage laura has already wreaked in the caribbean, claiming 2a lives.
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it's a warning for people in texas and louisiana. their evacuation is being complicated by coronavirus. the challenge, to try to keep people both say from the storm and socially distanced. but with water level is already rising, the authority say any rescue operation will prove challenging, if not impossible. simon jones, bbc news. katelyn reulet was forced to evacute from her home in sulphur, louisiana and has moved with herfamily three hours away to morgan city. initially, our concern was just the wind damage. but the more they talked about the landfall, we live about 35 miles north of cameron, we could have five or six feet of water in our home, which we have never had water in our home, and our home is 60 years old and it has
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never flooded. so it is just a lot of anxiety to see what is going to be happening. we have experienced rita, katrina, hurricane andrew, so many tropical storms. whenever they say tropical storm force winds, i thought, i can deal with that, but i wasn't going to stay for anything higher than a category one storm. when they projected this a couple of days ago, i told my husband i am leaving and i am taking my girls. when they say category four, i said, i am for sure out of here, and you are coming too. at least 100 people have died in flash flooding in northern afg hanistan's pa rwan province. the flooding, caused by torrential rains, struck the city of charikar early on wednesday morning while people were asleep. rescue workers and families have been searching for survivors. the country's disaster management ministry says dozens were injured and nearly 500 houses were destroyed. people on low incomes in parts
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of england where there are high rates of coronavirus will be able to claim up to £182, equivalent to £13 a day, if they have to self—isolate. a trial for the scheme will begin on the first of september for those who claim universal credit or working tax credit and cannot work from home. the benefit will be trialled in parts of north—west england. it's set at the level of statutory sick pay, in order to make sure that people don't lose out from doing the right thing. and we are introducing it in 0ldham and pendle and blackburn with darwen in the first instance. these are the areas of the country where the rates are the highest and we have the highest level of intervention. the strongest local lockdown, if you like. and we will roll that out from next week and then obviously monitor it very closely. earlier, we heard from mohammed iqbal, the labour leader of pendle borough council, where the new government support scheme is being trialled. he said the support was "welcomed
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— but not enough". i finally welcomed the government after weeks of persuasion from local authorities and other interested people across the country, saying that, whilst we need to work with communities to eradicate covid—19, there needs to be a financial package in place and i welcome the fa ct package in place and i welcome the fact that finally matt hancock has about something this morning, but the figure he has announced is really a slap in the face for people who are worried, genuinely worried, that do they isolate after they have tested positive, or do they go out to work to put food on the table for their families? and £13 a day, i would like to see the health secretary survive on that for up to 1014 days. just not enough. the headlines on bbc news — life without parole for the gunman who shot and killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand — it's the longest sentence in the country's history. hurricane laura makes landfall along the coast of louisiana — hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes. £13 per day — the government trials payments for those on low incomes who have to self—isolate
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in parts of england. a number of major sport events across the us have been postponed, in response to the shooting of a black man, jacob blake, by police in wisconsin. a curfew has been imposed in the city of minneapolis — in the neighbouring state of minnesota — after looting broke out there. 200 us federal agents have now been sent to kenosha — where jacob blake was shot and wounded and where a fourth night of curfew is in effect. 0ur correspondent david willis has more. don't shoot. into a vacuum created by daily protests and an initially overstretched police force has come armed vigilantes — one of whom was caught on camera before tuesday night's violence. reports suggest the individual interviewed, 17—year—old kyle rittenhouse, later put his weapon to use. this mobile phone footage appears
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to capture the moment someone fires on protesters and later zooms in on an individual lying motionless on the ground. another video appears to show a similar incident, again a protester is gunned down. two people were killed, a third seen here, was injured. someone who appeared to be armed was later seen walking with his hands up towards the police. a 17—year—old has since been charged with first—degree murder. all this in response to sunday's shooting of a black man, jacob blake, by a white police officer. officials say the officer, rustin chesky, fired seven times into mr blake's back, after being called upon to investigate a domestic dispute. during the investigation following the initial incident, mr blake admitted that he had a knife in his possession. and dci agents, the division of criminal investigation, recovered a knife from the driver's side floorboard of mr blake's vehicle. a search of the vehicle located
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no additional weapons. president trump, in a series of tweets, vowed to clamp down on the violence in kenosha, whilst, in a video message, his democratic rival joe biden, appealed for calm. protesting brutality is a right and absolutely necessary but burning down communities is not protest, it's needless violence. in a statement, the local basketball team, the milwaukee bucks, announced a surprise boycott of their play—off game in response to the shooting of jacob blake. it is possible the entire season could now be injeopardy. meanwhile, hundreds of national guard officers have now been sent to kenosha, as the latest protests over police brutality and racial injustice threaten to spread across the country. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. former president barack 0bama showed his support for the sport walkout in the united states, tweeting:
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net migration in the uk has risen to its highest level in four years, driven by a jump in non—eu students coming to study. figures from the office for national statistics show that in the year to march the balance between the number of people entering and leaving the country was around 313,000. with me now is the bbc head of statistics robert cuffe. robert, tell us first of all about the overall figures. the big driver is migration from outside the eu, and in total in the year to march 2020, migration from outside the eu added about 316,000 people. now the eu still adds people to the population of the uk, about 60,000 in the last year of data, but that's a much lower level and roughly the
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same level as the number of people from the uk leaving, or the balance of people living from the uk, again about another 60,000, so you end up with that picture that has really been driven by changes in the volume of the number of people coming from outside of the eu to the uk to live. is what is driving that increase, who other people who want to come to the uk? principally students and remember this is the balance of entering and leaving. after the eu referendum, the falls and migration we re referendum, the falls and migration were driven both by fewer people coming to live here and by an increase in the number people living but what is drawing the changes is really the increase in the number of people coming to the uk to study. for example, if you look at the number of students, the sponsored visas for people coming to study, the number of people from china coming has doubled i think since 2012, the number of people from india has doubled even in the last year, and the number of visas granted for study in that way have
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increased significantly, year on year. so if they are students, then, you would imagine they are temporary, short—term, time—limited people who are arriving and not going to stay forever? the definition of a long—term migrant is someone who comes to stay for a year. you may have been on holidays at some point and been nabbed by someone from the 0ns with a clipboard, where are you going, how long are you going for? that is what these estimates are based on, so if someone says they plan to stay for a year they are counted as a long—term migrant. there are some difficulties on following up on students and you have to do some very technical adjustments to the data but broadly thatis adjustments to the data but broadly that is the intent, coming for a year and most students fall into that. how tricky are these figures for the home office, which is in charge of immigration? these figures are one part of the story, i think there is another set of figures that come out with them, that talk about the home office actions, and it ta kes the home office actions, and it takes on people who have no right to remain in the uk, and those figures
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probably are not happy reading. the number of forced removals, forced returns from the home office, that is down to just over 5000, down by a third on the year and at its lowest level on record since 2004. volu nta ry level on record since 2004. voluntary returns down as well, passengers deported after being refused entry, all down. exacerbated of course by the reduction in the lockdown and a number of flights coming in and out since march, but those numbers are a continuation of a long—term downward trend, so not happy reading. for the reading, -- for the moment, thank you. there will need to be a major campaign urging people to get a flu jab to ease pressure on the nhs this winter — according to medical experts. last month, the government announced plans to double the amount of vaccinations available, but analysis by the bbc has found the proportion of people getting vaccinated has fallen in recent years. every winter, the over 65 is and those with serious health condition
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such as asthma and diabetes are offered a free flu vaccine because catching flu could make them seriously ill. this year there are a concern that a second wave of coronavirus infections combined with a majorflu coronavirus infections combined with a major flu outbreak coronavirus infections combined with a majorflu outbreak could overwhelm the nhs, so last month the prime minister announced plans to expand the flu vaccination programme. he wa nts to the flu vaccination programme. he wants to double the number of people who get the jab from 15 million to 30 million. the government is offering a free vaccination to eve ryo ne over offering a free vaccination to everyone over 50 this year, once the over 65s and those with serious health condition such as diabetes and asthma have been treated. but new analysis by the bbc shows that the proportion of vulnerable people who actually take up the free vaccination has been falling. in scotland, there was a fall of 15% between 2015 and 2020. take up dropped 13% in northern ireland during the same period, and in wales it fell 7%. in england, the proportion of vulnerable people getting vaccinated dropped 6%, with
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ta ke getting vaccinated dropped 6%, with take up last yearjust getting vaccinated dropped 6%, with take up last year just 45%. getting vaccinated dropped 6%, with take up last yearjust 45%. concerns about side effects, religious objections and a tendency to underestimate the severity of flu are all cited as reasons for not getting vaccinated. flu has the potential to cause significant problems to the nhs, and with the threat of coronavirus as well in the community, it is incredibly important for us to start to raise awareness of not only the availability of the flu vaccines, but also who needs to take them and why they should take them, because without increased uptake, then u nfortu nately we could without increased uptake, then unfortunately we could see the nhs struggling this winter. there are now calls for the garment to carry out a major national campaign this winter to meet the new vaccination target and reduce demand for the nhs. riot police in belarus have detained around 20 people protesting against the disputed re—election of president alexander lukashenko. hundreds had gathered in the capital, minsk, where daily demonstrations have been held since the vote
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earlier this month. chief executive, kevin mayer, has left popular video sharing app, tiktok. he will be replaced by general manager, vanessa pappas. president trump imposed a ban on transactions with tiktok‘s owner bytedance. officials say they are concerned american users' data could be passed to the chinese government. firefighters in california say they're making good progress in tackling wildfires which are among the worst in the state's history. since the fires began earlier this month, seven people have been killed and more than seventeen hundred structures have been destroyed. you're watching bbc news. time for a look at the weather forecast with carol. hello again, a fairly quiet
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day in weather terms compared to what some of us have seen of late. low pressure coming from the atlantic, with its attendant fronts bringing in some rain as it does so, and todayit in some rain as it does so, and today it will be a fairly cloudy day, more or less across the board. we start cloudy, we will end cloudy and we have some showers and some rain coming ourway. and we have some showers and some rain coming our way. look at the greens and yellows on the charts, thatis greens and yellows on the charts, that is when you can expect some heavy bursts and may even hear the odd rumble of thunder in the south of england through the course of the afternoon. temperatures are a bit disappointing in this stage in august, 12 to 19 degrees. through this evening and overnight, we hang onto quite a bit of cloud, also some showers, still the potentialfor them to be heavy and as we head into tomorrow, this area of low pressure still with us, slowly meandering towards the north sea with its various fronts, but the wind will be more salient because the wind direction will have more of a northerly component to it, which is a co—direction for us. tomorrow again, the risk of sums on thunderstorms in the south, still some rain around, we also have some
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cloud in the north with some brighter breaks, but it will feel cool brighter breaks, but it will feel cool. temperatures a low across the board for this stage in august but also add on the strength of the wind and it will make it feel even cooler than these temperatures suggest. into the week and we continue with the cool and dry theme, the winds will ease, particularly on sunday, this saturday's picture, the tail end of this weather front still producing rain in south—east, but it is going to be quite a windy day and still the source of that wind coming from the north. so here is the dregs of the rain, very slowly pulling away from the south—eastern corner. there will be some sunshine, equally there will be areas of cloud and we've got some gusty winds, a noticeable wind, particularly gusty down in the north sea coastline where once again we are likely to see some large waves crashing onto their shorelines for example of norfolk. temperatures 12 in the north, 17 in the south, so below average for this time of year. into saturday, high pressure starts to edgein saturday, high pressure starts to edge in from the west but again if you look at the isobars, not as windy, but it still will be windy
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for some, particularly windy, but it still will be windy forsome, particularly so windy, but it still will be windy for some, particularly so in eastern areas. but it is looking drier during the course of sunday, with a bit of cloud around, some sunny skies as well, and temperatures wise, 12 in the north, to 18 in the south. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... life without parole for the gunman who shot and killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand. it's the longest sentence in the country's history. hurricane laura makes landfall along the coast of louisiana — hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes. £13 per day — the uk government trials payments for those on low incomes who have to self isolate in parts of england. net migration to the uk is at its highest level since the brexit referendum, new figures show, mainly driven by increases in migration from outside the eu for study.
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and top—tier basketball and baseball teams in the us boycott their matches amid anger over the shooting of jacob blake by police in wisconsin. in a moment, we'll be hearing who the next liberal democrat leader is. let's take a look at the two contenders for the position. sir ed davey has been the party's acting leader since jo swinson lost her seat in the 2019 election. he's the mp for kingston and surbiton and he first entered the house of commons in 1997. sir ed davey was the secretary of state for energy and climate change between 2012 and 2015 under the coalition government. up against him for the top job is layla moran. she's the mp for oxford west and abingdon, having won her seat in 2017. before entering politics,
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she was a maths and physics teacher. layla moran is currently the lib dem spokeswoman for education. (pres )0ur political correspondent helen catt is in westminster. they have been without a permanent leaderfor they have been without a permanent leader for quite they have been without a permanent leaderfor quite a while. they have been without a permanent leader for quite a while. yes, they have been without a permanent leaderfor quite a while. yes, since you mentioned when jo leaderfor quite a while. yes, since you mentioned whenjo swinson lost her seat last year. five months before, she was one of the really big casualties of the election. ed davey has been acting as a kind of co—leader. they decided to hold it this summer instead, and very quickly, it was whittled down to those two contenders that you gave a summary of there, ed davey, the current acting leader and layla moran, who has been an mp since 2017. voting in this contest started
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backin 2017. voting in this contest started back injuly. 2017. voting in this contest started back in july. they 2017. voting in this contest started back injuly. they have been counting overnight, and we will get that result very shortly. they have been having to campaign for the leadership under restricted conditions. yes, they have campaigned unlike any other. ed davey arriving this morning wearing facemasks. that is a really visible sign of how different this has been. usually, in a leadership election, they would be out talking to members all over the country, in a town halls, all sorts of venues, but they have been doing a lot of online campaigning and zoom castings. it has been a very different campaign this time around because of the restrictions imposed by coronaviruses. but that doesn't mean it has been any less competitive. the leadership contests tend to be fairly amicable as we have seen in recent yea rs, fairly amicable as we have seen in recent years, but certainly, they both want the job. they have been having to go through the same issues but ina having to go through the same issues but in a different format and
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confronting a very different style. the two candidates are very different in so many different ways. 0ne different in so many different ways. one has been in parliament for a long time and the other is a real new b. you couldn't really get to different propositions in a way, could you? different propositions in a way, could you ? ed different propositions in a way, could you? ed davey was elected in 1997. this layla moran wasn't elected until a whole decade after that, but she marks a change from the coalition years, when ed davey, of course, was a key part of that and was a cabinet minister in the coalition. layla moran didn't even enter pilot meant until two years after the coalition ended, so she does mark a completely new break from that. they are a totally different proposition. he is seen as the steady hand, she is seen as the vibrant figure that is very good at getting the lib dems coverage in the media, and that is quite difficult
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for them at the moment because over successive elections, they haven't really increased their seats. they have lost that position as the third—party in westminster to the snp. so actually getting their presence out and their stories out into the media becomes even more important. layla moran is seen as very good as that. he is seen as being very experienced statesman, if you like. we sought ed davey arriving there, hidden behind his mask as we are all used to at the moment, but where does that leave the liberal democrats in parliament because my whoever the leader is, they have done well in more recent times ina they have done well in more recent times in a local elections. how do they use that as a springboard to? traditionally, the liberal democrats to perform well in a local elections and have quite a strong grassroots base. that doesn't always translate into a national vote. they have struggled in recent years, so while
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there have been real signs of optimism, think back to last we have but the announcement coming. i know you are not here to here from me. before we move onto the result, i wa nt to before we move onto the result, i want to briefly and sincerely say, thanks to all the staff and volu nteers thanks to all the staff and volunteers who have worked so hard to make the selection run so smoothly and such a challenging time. there were 117,924 ballot papers issued. a record high for any of our leadership elections. turnout was 57.6%. the votes for candidate were. ed davey, 42,756. layla moran, 24,564. and so, ed davey has been elected the next leader of the liberal democrats.
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congratulations. we will wait for him to make his way to the state and we will hear from the new liberal democrat leader, ed davey. i would like to start by thanking my friend layla moran. you have fought a passionate campaign full of energy and since becoming an mp, you have inspired so many people, particularly young people. your future is bright people, particularly young people. yourfuture is bright and i look forward to you playing a bigger role in my team. two members of the liberal democrats, thank you for putting your faith in liberal democrats, thank you for putting yourfaith in me and giving me the honour of leading a party i joined 30 years ago. and i also want to thank a whole host of people who have run this campaign, whether in party headquarters alongside the officer or in my own campaign team. the thousands of people who volunteered to campaign with me, who have donated to my campaign,
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who have donated to my campaign, who have championed our vision of a greener, fairer, more caring country. and i would particularly like to thank player, my campaign manager. claire, you have been fantastic. and of course, emily, my wife and our two beautiful children. thank you, emily, for your amazing support, patience and love. and i sure i am speaking for many people when i say that for all of the stress and uncertainty of the past few months, one positive has been at the chance to spend more time with ourfamilies. and the chance to spend more time with our families. and so the chance to spend more time with ourfamilies. and so i would like to thank ellie in particularfor appearing in so many of my zoom calls and hustings. ijoined this party 30 years ago. i met emily here. i'm made so many good
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friends here, and with those friends, i campaigned across the country, knocking on tens of thousands of doors and delivering hundreds of thousands of leaflets. the reason i have done all of this is simple. i love our party, and i believe in it. i stand for all the things that liberal democrats stand for. social justice, political reform, equality and protecting our environment. i stand for fairness, and for fighting to protect the rights of ordinary people. and i and determined our party backs a britain that works with other countries across the world for peace and prosperity. but it is my love of our party that makes me recognise that we must change. we have two way up and smell the coffee. nationally, our party
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has lost touch with too many voters. yes, we are powerful advocates vocally. 0ur campaigners listen to local people, work hard for communities and deliver results. but at the national level, we have two face the facts of three disappointing general election results. the truth is, voters don't believe the liberal democrats want to help ordinary people get on in life. voters don't believe we share their values, and voters don't believe we are on the side of people like them. nationally, voters have been sending us a message. but we have not been listening. it is time for us to start listening. as a leader, i am telling you, i haven't got that message. i am listening
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now. so whether you are from the north, south or somewhere in between, whether you voted for brexit or remain orjust wanted the whole thing settled, whether you voted labour, conservative, snp or plaid. my message is this, i will travel up and down the country to hear you. to listen to your hopes and fears, your dreams. i will face up and fears, your dreams. i will face up to uncomfortable truths and i will make your concerns my own. 0ur country is going through one of the most extraordinary and difficult periods for generations. the challenge of covid—19 will affect our country and the world for decades to come. millions of people are suffering. as
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leader of the liberal democrats, i want to reach out to help you and your community get through this. whether your concerns are your family's health, education or livelihood, i want to understand the new feature you want after a ll understand the new feature you want after all of this and help to deliver it. myjob from today is to rebuild the liberal democrats to national relevance, so that we can deliver this future for you, your family and for the people who need it the most. none of this is going to be easy. none of this is going to be straightforward. and none of it is going to be quick or simple to achieve. but i want the liberal democrats to represent the whole country, not just some democrats to represent the whole country, notjust some people, and to stand for fairness and opportunity for all. that is my commitment to you as the new leader
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of the liberal democrats. the hardware starts today. thank you. —— ha rd hardware starts today. thank you. —— hard work. ed davey, the new permanent leader of the liberal democrats, having won 42,756 votes compared with layla moran, who ran against him, getting 24,564 votes. he was saying that he realises that the party has got to become relevant again, has got to be able to make its message heard across the country. we are years away, of course, from the next general election, or it so we think. let us speak to sean, former head of media... your reaction, it was quite a convincing win? it was
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quite a convincing win, more convincing than i was expecting. i thought we were going to be in line for a very close result, but she ran a good grassroots campaign and i think that has really paid off. he has won quite a big mandate there, and bigger than i think people thought he would. he has got a royalty in the party and history of campaigning in the party, doing a lot of work at various levels, including senior levels. i think there is a lot of affection for him. he is seen as being someone who understands the party through and through. hejoked understands the party through and through. he joked they're about all the leaflets delivering there. he has got that grassroots credibility that i think the party really likes and appreciates, the party is familiar with him. he has been a
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seniorfigure in the party familiar with him. he has been a senior figure in the party for quite a long time now, and i think that page to his advantage. liberal democrats away so they love democracy, but 42% of people who could have voted didn't, so even their supporters wouldn't united by this? in these kind of elections, you do get... people are still members, but some are not particularly active at all. to be frank, i think there are a lot of people in the party who feel that it is ata people in the party who feel that it is at a bit of people in the party who feel that it is ata bit ofa people in the party who feel that it is at a bit of a low ebb, which i think ed davey was quite frank about in his speech. it has been quite a long campaign. it hasn't set the world on fire, generally, but i think even in the party, sometimes people think may be worn down by it a little bit, but may also have been a little bit, but may also have been a factor. that isn't great, is it,
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at this point in the proceedings?” think the honest truth is, and i don't want to over blow it at all to be honest because i don't think the turnout is that bad, but i do think the party has been through a lot of blows, like elections and so on have been very disappointing. things like the referendum and so on, everything post coalition has been quite tough for the party. i do think it is a little bit part of the job as leader, how do you sort of gee up that troops and get people ready? there are other things the party has to do well in if it wants to build any kind of platform for recovery. hisjob will be any kind of platform for recovery. his job will be to try and bring enthusiasm back into the activist base. he was very cordial towards layla moran and very complimentary about the campaign that she fought. what sort of role will there be
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for her now with ed davey as a leader?” think they will have to find a role for her that enables her to get quite a lot of media coverage, because i think one of the strengths that she really played to join the leadership campaign was that she was freshfaced, she was different, she stood out from the rest of the political crowd. she wasn't someone who was tainted a bit by having been in government during the coalition, and she was an asset and a media performer, someone who sorta stands out from the crowd at that. it wouldn't surprise me at all if ed davey tried to make sure she was given quite a high level public facing role. buti was given quite a high level public facing role. but i think it is probably going to be public facing lib dems that we will see on television... you need multiple
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portfolios when you are a lib dems mp. multi. lib dems special adviser and head of media, thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news... life without parole for the gunman who shot and killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand. it's the longest sentence in the country's history. hurricane laura makes landfall along the coast of louisiana — hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes. ed davey wins the race to be the next leader of the liberal democrats. he says it's time for the party to make changes and face the facts the vice president of the united states, mike pence, has told the republican national convention that ‘violence and chaos' is engulfing cities across the country. speaking in baltimore, mr pence described police officers as heroes and called for law and order
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to be restored. the vice president heaped praise on donald trump, saying his response to the coronavirus pandemic had saved an ‘untold number‘ of american lives. paul hawkins reports. please welcome the vice president of the united states, mike pence. the man who could one day replace donald trump as the republican party leader stuck to familiar lines, like the ongoing criticism of the violence in wisconsin. the violence must stop, whether in minneapolis, portland, or kenosha. too many heroes have died defending our freedom to see americans strike each other down. we will have law and order on the streets of this country for every american of every race and creed and colour. there was also praise for the police. president trump and i know that the men and women that put on the uniform of law enforcement
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are the best of us. but no mention of police brutality. the american people know we don't have to choose between supporting law enforcement and standing with our african—american neighbours to improve the quality of their lives, education, jobs and safety. and from the first days of this administration we have done both. it all started at a tea party... with polls showing african—americans and women are more likely to vote forjoe biden than donald trump at the moment, there were a significant number of female speakers, including the vice president's wife speaking about the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment when women were given the to vote. because of heroes like susan b anthony and lucy stone, women today, like our daughters audrey and charlotte,
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and future generations, will have their voices heard and their votes count. good evening, i am kellyanne conway. there was also the president's outgoing top adviser praising his support for her. for decades he has elevated women to senior positions in business and in government. he confides in and consults us, respects our opinions, and insists that we are on equal footing with the men. the spirit of heroism stands in the breach. the theme of the evening was land of heroes. eight years ago in the fields of helmand province in afghanistan, a close friend and team—mate laid down cover fire against taliban insurgents so that i could walk blind and bloodied to the medevac helicopter and survive. but as events in wisconsin show, the definition of a hero depends on your viewpoint. there is one convention that is empathetic, compassionate, sympathetic,
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speaks in softer tones that is trying to appeal to the swing voter in america, the floating voters. then there is the second convention, primarily with the trump kids and their significant others that is much more red meat, much more in your face, and they are trying to appeal to the trump loyalists. the question i have as a pollster is which convention is the public going to remember after all the shouting is over? the final night sees president trump make his keynote speech. paul hawkins, bbc news. at least seventeen dolphins have been found dead on the coast in mauritius after a huge oil spill. last month, a japanese tanker ran aground on a coral reef and broke in two, leaking hundreds of tonnes of oil into the indian ocean. some viewers may find some of the pictures in sylvia
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lennan—spence's report upsetting. 0ne mauritian called it a nightmare, 17 dead dolphins washed up on the coast of mauritius. others were alive, but onlyjust. some had difficulty breathing. an investigation is under way, but fingers are already being pointed at the recent oil spill or the japanese—owned ship it came from, the bow of which was taken out to sea and deliberately sunk last week. we are working on a hypothesis that it either was the actual fuel that had leaked as a result of the accident, but also the heavy metals that are contained in the ship when it was sunk and when it broke apart. obviously there were fragments of metal, but there was also quite heavy deposits of materials that also went into the ocean, so we believe there will be a link between not only
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the ship itself, but the substances from the fuel within the body of the animals. but the mauritian government said initial tests showed there was no link between the oil spill and the dolphins' deaths. it has pointed to shark bites, but said further tests are needed. but if the ship or the oil is to blame, more marine life could be harmed. the mammals that are there are sensitive, but they are not the only ones, and should it be that there are unfolding consequences, we foresee that there will be more other animals that will suffer the same fate. it is over a month since the ship ran aground, spilling 1,200 tonnes of oil, damaging the biodiversity here and also impacting on tourism which makes up 14% of the economy. historically, this may not have been a big oil spill, but its aftermath will be felt for a long time to come.
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cu ba ns cubans pay their respects, thoughts are returning to how to conserve his vital conservation work without him. eusebio leal, was considered the man who saved havana. urbane, affable and deeply respected in cuba. as a young man, he once lay down in front of the bulldozers to save a street of the cuban capitalfrom destruction. it was the start of a lifelong commitment to restoration, as fidel castro named him the "historian of havana," in charge of preserving the city from the ravages of the sea spray and tropical rain. speaking in 2016, he told me it was a costly but vital task. translation: restoration costs money, money and more money. it's like the national sport for decaying countries. that is why you've seen
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the disappearance of the historic city centres in latin america and the rise of the megacities. when other latin american capitals knocked down and rebuilt their historic centres, often with ugly results, eusebio leal always tried to keep havana intact. he created a unique system of shops and hotels which paid for the restoration work in old havana and was often praised by international bodies like unesco. but a few years ago, that mini—empire was passed into the hands of the cuban military and many now wonder about the future preservation of havana without eusebio leal at its helm. his last major work was the resplendent capitolio building. cuba's former parliament returned to its 1930s glory, with original marble and gold leaf fittings. but he took controversial decisions over which buildings would be saved and which condemned, leading to a greater role for private capital in saving the city.
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translation: when a building collapses anywhere in this city, it takes with it, a piece of my heart. so when we hear of people buying up old buildings and restoring them in keeping with the original blueprints, with a well qualified architect behind the project, then i'm happy and i applaud that. private money has its advantages and disadvantages in restoration. as cubans mourn eusebio leal, it remains to be seen if his disciples will carry out his work without the same depth of feeling. —— with. certainly, the task ahead of them is daunting. havana is crumbling fast. if leal‘s legacy is to be upheld, the city itself must be saved from collapse. will grant, bbc news, havana.
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hello again. we've got a fairly quiet day of weather compared to what some of us have seen of late. we have got low pressure coming in from the atlantic, bringing in some rain. and today it is going to be a fairly cloudy day more or less across the board. we start cloudy and we are going to end cloudy and we have got some showers and rain coming our way. look at the greens and the yellows on the chart, that is where you can expect some heavy bursts, we may even hear the odd rumble of thunder in the south of england. temperatures disappointing for this stage in august, 12—19. this evening and overnight we hang onto some cloud and some showers, still the potential for them to be heavy. tomorrow, we have got this area of low pressure still with us, slowly meandering towards the north sea, and with it, various fronts. but the wind direction will have more of a northerly component in it, which is a cold direction for us. tomorrow again, the risk of some thunderstorms in the south, still some rain around, and we have also got some cloud in the north, with some brighter breaks, but it will feel cool.
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temperatures low across the board for this stage in august, but adding in the wind, and it will feel even cooler. into the weekend, we continue with the dry and cool theme, the wind will ease, particularly on sunday. on saturday, the tail end of the weather front still producing rain in the south—east, but look at the isobars, it will be quite windy. still coming from the north. so, here is the dregs of the rain, very slowly pulling away from the south—eastern corner. there will be some sunshine. equally, there will be areas of cloud, and we've got some gusty winds. particularly gusty down the north sea coastline, where once again we are likely to see some large waves crashing onto the shoreline of norfolk, for example. temperatures, 12 in the north, 17 in the south, below—average for the time of year. on saturday, high pressure starts to edge in from the west. but not as windy, but it
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still will be windy for some, particularly in eastern areas. but it is looking dry on sunday, with a bit of cloud around, some sunny skies as well, and temperature—wise, 12 in the north, 18 in the south.
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this is bbc news. the headlines — life without parole for the gunman who shot and killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand — it's the longest sentence in the country's history. the trauma of march 15 is not easily healed. but today i hope is the last
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where we have any cause to here or utter the name of the terrorist behind it. to hear or utter the name of the terrorist behind it. hurricane laura makes landfall along the coast of louisiana — hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes. sir ed davey wins the race to be the next leader of the liberal democrats. he says it's time for the party to face the facts after three disappointing general election results. nationally, voters have been sending usa nationally, voters have been sending us a message, but we have not been listening. it is time for us to start listening. £13 per day — the government trials payments for those on low incomes who have to self—isolate in parts of england. new figures show net migration to the uk is at its highest level since the brexit referendum, mainly driven by arrivals from outside the eu for study.
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and top tier basketball and baseball teams in the us boycott their matches — amid anger over the shooting of jacob blake by police in wisconsin. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. the man who opened fire on two mosques in new zealand last year — killing 51 people — has been sentenced to life in prison without parole. it's the first time the sentence has ever been handed down in the country. 29—year—old australian brenton tarrant pleaded guilty to charges of murder and terrorism. the judge described his actions as "inhuman", and said tarrant was devoid of empathy for his victims. 0ur correspondent shaimaa khalil
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reports. for three emotionally charged days, brenton tarrant, the killer responsible for the massacre in two christchurch mosques, sat in the dock, as dozens of survivors and bereaved family spoke to him directly with a mix of anger and grief. i never would have ever imagined that the country in which my parents emigrated to for safety and for a successful future for their children would result in this. this didn't have to happen. while you are in prison, you'll come to a reality that you are now in hell, and only the fire awaits you. today, the judge spent more than an hour reminding tarrant of each person he killed and injured and the agony the families and the muslim community now face. then he handed down the sentence. your offending constituted
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extreme violence. it was brutal and beyond callous. your actions were inhuman. brenton tarrant is now the first man in new zealand to be given a full life term with no parole. in many of their impact statements, survivors and bereaved families have asked the judge for exactly that. today, they feeljustice has been served. she is happy thatjustice has been served but he is a monster — evil, and deserves everything that comes to him. when i go back to turkey, i'm going to go to my son's grave and tell my son that he is jailed for a life sentence without parole. the prime minister, jacinda ardern, also welcomed the court's decision. this has been a crime in new zealand, the likes of which has
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never occurred before. now we have seen a sentence the likes of which we have never seen before, as well. but yes, it gave me relief to know that that person will never see the light of day. the sentencing ends one of the highest profile cases in new zealand, but march 15th 2019 will go down as a dark day in the country's history. the trauma and the tragic loss will stay with the families long after. 24—year—old tariq 0mar was one of those killed in the shooting. earlier, i spoke to his parents, rosemary and rashid 0mar. tariq's mother was in her car close to the mosque when the attack happened — waiting to pick her son up. there was lots of shooting, ijust parked the car, heard the shooting and i thought
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the shooting was at our house, where i parked, so i drove around towards the mosque and the gunman was outside, and there were people deceased, and i sort of hoped that tariq would have been fine but it wasn't for another two or three days that we found out he was on the list of deceased people. you had the opportunity, rashid, to make an impact statement in court. how important was that to you and how did you use that opportunity? yes, i feel relieved after the statement. i used that statement as my own personal feeling, and also my own, in my own words that i managed to talk to him and stare at him and make eye contact, and when i said to him that
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i will never be able to forgive him, and he just nodded his head, as if in agreement of what i said to him. rosemary, the judge spent about an hour telling brenton tarrant about his 51 victims. how significant was that for you, obviously to hear tariq's name mentioned amongst them? yeah, i think it was very good, what the judge did, and the way he presented each victim, and made the terrorist know that these were real people, this is their future ahead, you know, you have destroyed really good people. personally i found it really quite harrowing, very emotional, but also kind of healing as well. rashid, we have heard this is the longest sentence that has ever been handed down in new zealand, the first
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as well, for terrorism. what message do you think the courts are trying to send? the message is to tell anyone who has any hatred towards any other communities apart from themselves, that this is a warning to them, this is not right, so this is an absolute stern warning and a strong message that this will not happen again. a line of breaking news from the metropolitan police. they are saying a man has been arrested in south—east london, around 7:20am this morning on suspicion of war
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crimes. this is relating to the first and second several wars in liberia in west africa, which took place between 1989 and 2003. the met say that it was their war crimes tea m say that it was their war crimes team who have arrested the 45—year—old man on suspicion of war crimes, contrary to section 51 of the international criminal court act of 2001. he has been taken into custody in central london, and the arrest follows an allegation of offences relating to those civil wa rs offences relating to those civil wars in liberia. hurricane laura — a category four storm in the gulf of mexico — has made landfall along the southwestern coast of louisiana. the storm is one of the most powerful on record to hit the region — with sustained winds of 150 miles an hour. this is the moment laura made landfall in lake charles louisiana close to neighbouring texas — both states are bracing for the worst. laura is expected to bring with it a storm surge of at least four and half metres, which officials have warned is ‘unsurvivable'.
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more than half a million people have been told to leave their homes. let's cross to louisiana and speak to news reporter rob kirkpatrick. rob, it is a tricky one for reporters, how do you report it but stay safe yourself? so i am in lafayette, louisiana, about 50 to 60 miles west of where this storm made landfall, and it is really hard to cover because you live here. i grew up cover because you live here. i grew up in louisiana, so it is hard to see, and we are equipped to deal with hurricanes but nothing like this one. hurricane laura made la ndfall this one. hurricane laura made landfall just between midnight this one. hurricane laura made landfalljust between midnight and 1am local time, and like you said, bringing 150 mph winds, making it the strongest storm to strike the louisiana coast. we are waiting for the sun to come up, i have moved back into a studio but we are waiting for the sun to come up, and
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our fingers waiting for the sun to come up, and ourfingers are waiting for the sun to come up, and our fingers are crossed. you don't know until after how many people actually heeded the warning and really obeyed those mandatory evacuations. as you say, it is mandatory, but how do the authorities check that everyone has complied? the geographic area is massive, down along coastal louisiana, we are about 15 years to the day of hurricane rita and katrina, obviously hurricane katrina devastated the new orleans area, then you had hurricane rita had that damage the south—western coast, this storm took the same track and we don't know yet, there is no way to go to every single home u nfortu nately. go to every single home unfortunately. but people who have seen through those —— been through those hurricanes surely would have made the sensible decision and enough they were asked? you may remember when hurricane katrina
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happened, you had people who were at shelters. because of covid—19, the state did not shout as it normally did, didn't put the shutters with hundreds, sometimes thousands of people together, so the word really started late last week to get people out of these areas. the forecast tracks were really great. at the end of the day we were expecting for a few days of landfall exactly where this happened, and you have some local leaders that said if you can't get out, if you choose not to get out, maybe you need to put some identifying information in your pocket, because we just need to prepare for the worst. what are you supposed to do if you remain in your home when the conditions are said to be un—survivable? home when the conditions are said to be un-survivable? there are people who think because they survived rita, or because they survived audrey, there is a lot that goes into these names, they are very loaded, and people just into these names, they are very loaded, and peoplejust have into these names, they are very loaded, and people just have their plan. here some people who say they
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are going to put a chain saw in the attic of their house so if there water rises, they will at least be able to get to the roof. the year we have had with the covid—19 pandemic which is still raging on, especially in the state of louisiana, things are improving, but there are a lot of people who do it. 0fficials are improving, but there are a lot of people who do it. officials are very clear in their messaging that if you decide to stay, first responders can't get to you. we wish you well, rob kirkpatrick from kpl news. thank you very much. the liberal democrats have elected their fifth leader in five years. sir ed davey has been announced as the new leader of the party, beating the education spokeswoman layla moran to become the permanent replacement forjo swinson. he's the mp for kingston and surbiton and he first entered the house of commons in 1997. sir ed davey was the secretary of state for energy and climate change between 2012 and 2015 under the coalition government. here's sir ed a short while ago, giving his acceptance speech. and outlining his plans to rebuild
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the liberal democrats. we have to wake up and smell the coffee. nationally, our party has lost touch with too many voters. yes, we are powerful advocates locally. 0ur campaigners listen to locally. 0ur campaigners listen to local people, work hard for communities and deliver results. but at the national level, we have to face the facts of three disappointing general election results. the truth is voters don't believe the liberal democrats want to help ordinary people get on in life. voters don't believe we share their values, and voters don't believe we are on the side of people like them. nationally, voters have been sending us a message, but we have not been listening. it is time for us to start listening. as a
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leader, i am telling you i have got that message, i am listening now. we can speak now to polly mackenzie, chief executive of demos — she was formerly a special adviser in downing street during the conservative/lib dem coalition. polly, thank you forjoining us today. how surprised were you that ed davey beat layla moran so easily. i probably expected him to win but he basically got two votes for eve ryo ne he basically got two votes for everyone that she got, and that is a pretty resounding victory. he has served as interim leader and then that was quite controversial for him to have extended the leadership, they had to bring the leadership election forwards, so i thought there would be more of an uprising against him in favour of change. the key question really is whether layla moran is somebody who was not involved in the coalition, she should have been a replacement in order to allow the party to move on
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from kind of coalition toxicity, or perceived coalition toxicity, because of course aird was the secretary of state for climate change in the coalition and he cannot wash his hands of the responsibility for the decisions that coalition made, and some people, lots of members of the party, believe that that is the only thing kind of holding the liberal democrats back. it is such a small number of mps he is in charge of now. and we could be quite some time away from a general election, so how does he spend those intervening yea rs ? does he spend those intervening years? well, the key thing is to reach out to voters to try and work on communication, on building a profile. historically, leaders of small parties have to find kind of a single issue to batter on about. for paddy ashdown it was the citizenship rights of the british hong kong residents during the transition from moving hong kong back to chinese
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rule, that was a long time ago. nigel farage, these days, goes around making videos about migrants, and grandstanding about that issue. i think we can expect that ed davey will find either one or two issues that he uniquely can own, because eve ryo ne that he uniquely can own, because everyone else is ignoring them, and try and build up a kind of campaigning narrative and zeal, because the key challenge for the lib dems is not those things listed about don't think they are nice, it is much more that people don't really see what the point of the liberal democrats is any more because we have a first past the post voting system in which it is almost impossible for a third to get elected. polly, good to talk to you, we can go straight to edinburgh and the first minister of scotland nicola sturgeon is holding her virtual coronavirus briefing with the chief nursing 0fficer fiona mcqueen. two people are in intensive care, the same as yesterday. i am also pleased to say again in the
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past 24 hours no deaths were registered for patients tested positive over the past 28 days and the number of deaths under that measurement therefore remains 2494. however, as we were reminded yesterday, people are still dying of this virus, so we must continue to treat the threat it poses very seriously. every death is of course a source of heartbreak and grief to many, so again i want to send my condolences to everyone who has lost a loved one. there are a few issues i want to briefly cover today before the chief nursing 0fficer i want to briefly cover today before the chief nursing officer and i take questions from journalists. the first is our latest estimate of the our number, which you will recall as the average number of people infected by one other infectious person. modelling suggests the our number is currently between 0.8 and 1.2, which is unchanged from our previous estimate. 0bviously 1.2, which is unchanged from our previous estimate. obviously we look at the our number carefully, though
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with prevalence generally as low as it is just now across scotland, it can be influenced disproportionately by the kinds of clusters that we have been seeing lately. however we have been seeing lately. however we have also seen a recent rise in daily cases, although many of them are connected with no clusters, and of course as i have just highlighted today, our daily testing positivity rate remains low, around one, or as we have seen today, significantly below one. however we have nevertheless been reminded on a daily basis that covid is still out there, it hasn't gone away, so there isa there, it hasn't gone away, so there is a continued need for caution and all of us have a part to play in suppressing the virus and denying it wherever possible the chance to spread. let me now give a quick update on the most significant clusters that we are currently dealing with, firstly in relation to the cluster linked to the two sisters plant in cooper angus. as of yesterday there were 166 positive
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cases linked to that, workers at the factory and 20 were contacts. an increase of ten positive cases since yesterday. virtually all of the workforce have now been tested, in fa ct workforce have now been tested, in fact more than 5000 people at tayside have been tested and at this stage there is still no evidence of wider community transmission, which is very positive news. all employees of the factory and their households should continue to self—isolate until monday and i want to thank them and indeed everyone else who is helping us to maintain this outbreak and prevent further spread. let me also update at the situation at kings park school in dundee. 34 cases have been identified as part of that cluster, which is three more than yesterday. of these 34 cases, 21 are staff members, ten are contacts and three are pupils of the
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school, all from within the same class. all staff, pupils, household contacts class. all staff, pupils, household co nta cts of class. all staff, pupils, household contacts of pupils and other releva nt contacts of pupils and other relevant contact should now be self—isolating, and again in this cluster there is no evidence at this stage of wider community transmission. there is also a cluster of cases in hoyt we are dealing with. seven positive cases have been confirmed, all from a small number of families in the area, control measures are being put in place. the process of contact tracing is under way —— in hoy. a mobile testing facility in the area will support that process. finally in relation to the outbreak in aberdeen, there are now 263 cases associated with the pub cluster, thatis associated with the pub cluster, that is an increase of two since yesterday. all of the signs continue to be that this outbreak is now under control, so again i want to thank everyone who has played a part
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in achieving this. i want now to say a word about recent testing numbers, and particularly, and i hope this is helpful and gives you an insight into the testing of children and young people since schools returned recently. we know that in recent weeks the number of children and young people under the age of 17 who have been going for testing has increased significantly, based on management data that we have got from public health scotland, we know that it has in fact increased eightfold since the middle ofjuly. last week alone, just short of 17,500 young people aged between 12 and 17 were tested. that is a very significant number, but the key point i wanted to make and share with you today from that is this one. of those almost 17,500 young people who were tested
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last week alone, only 49 of them tested positive, so that is a positivity rate of just positive, so that is a positivity rate ofjust 0.3%. i know and can well understand why many parents and teachers and young people themselves have concerns about the return to school, and yes we have had clusters of cases and some communities involving young people but i think these figures reveal the bigger picture. despite an increase of more than 300% in the number of young people that were tested from one week to the nest from the week before last to last week, the number of positive cases recorded increased by just two, and of positive cases recorded increased byjust two, and that is not 2%, thatis byjust two, and that is not 2%, that is just two in total. so i think that is encouraging, and i hope it is reassuring to parents and teachers across the country, and i hope it will encourage you to absolutely continue to be vigilant. we all have to be vigilant
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right now, but not to be unduly concerned about young people in schools. and while it is understandable that people, parents in particular want to airon the people, parents in particular want to air on the side of caution, it is also important to remember the symptoms of covid that trigger the need for a test. these are only one ofa need for a test. these are only one of a new persistent cough, a fever ora of a new persistent cough, a fever or a loss of or change of sense of taste or smell. any symptoms like a runny nose if they are not accompanied by one of the covid symptoms should not lead to the need for a test. so i hope i have provided some additional assurance is the term continues. we will continue to closely monitor these results over the coming weeks, and if there are any changes i need to bring to your attention, please be assured i will do that but i thought it was important to give you an insight into this information today. the final item i
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want to cover today consists restrictions on social gatherings, and this relates to an announcement i made last week in parliament when i gave the three weekly review update, and i can confirm that from tomorrow, police will have powers to disperse house parties of more than 15 people from one household are in attendance. we know from the reports of test and protect and also from evidence around the world that these kinds of gatherings pose a significant transmission risk. and of current guidance of course, no more than eight people from a maximum of three different households should be meeting indoors. the vast majority of people i know we'll be sticking to these limits and i am grateful for that, but we know a minority don't come out of course as we head into autumn and winter, with the colder weather, the temptation to hold big indoor gatherings will understandably be even greater. the higher limit, 15 as opposed to eight
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that we sit in this new law are not a green light, i want to stress this, to ignore the existing guidance that a maximum of eight people from three households should meet indoors, but in recognition that we intend these new legal powers to be a last resort only, and for use in the most blatant breaches of the guidance, we have decided to set a higher threshold for their use, ensuring that police have the powers to disperse large house parties, where that is necessary, is another important tool in trying to keep this virus suppressed, and we hope it will help to reduce the potential for future clusters and outbreaks, leading to greater lockdown restrictions having to be imposed. as i said already, we expect these powers to be used only asa expect these powers to be used only as a last resort, as all of these legal powers we have deployed during this pandemic have been a last resort, and the restrictions will only be in place so long as they are necessary. we will review them every three weeks. i also want to make it
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clear, particularly to young people, this is not about trying to stop people having fun. we are not trying to police your social lives. seeing and socialising with your friends is important, especially during what continues to be a really difficult period. but for the overall health and well—being of the country, it needs to be done safely and responsibly, because that is how we will avoid the return to some of the stricter lockdown measures and it is how we will continue to keep this virus under control. of course we all have a part to play in this, so i end this always by stressing the importance of the advice. the recent rise in prevalence in these clusters we are seeing in parts of the country show us and remind us how quickly and easily covid is capable of spreading, so we all need to do everything we can to avoid that happening and keep it under control, and that means complying strictly with the guidance on social
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gatherings but fundamentally it means in all of our day to day interactions continuing to follow the five golden rules of facts, so let's remind you of those. face coverings in enclosed spaces should be worn, avoid crowded places indoors or out, clean your hard surfaces and hands regularly, to me to distancing is the overall rule we are asking people to abide by an self—isolate and book a test if you have any of the symptoms i have already spoken about today. if we all comply with these rules then despite the challenges we are seeing as we come out of lockdown, we do give ourselves a real fighting chance of keeping this virus under control. so all of you who are watching, i suspect because you are watching, i suspect because you are watching, you are taking care to comply with all of this advice. please continue to do so, please help us in getting the message across by spreading it to everybody
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in yourfamily, your across by spreading it to everybody in your family, your friends network, and of course colleagues. so my thanks to all of you for joining us again today. we will move straight to questions, the chief nursing 0fficer straight to questions, the chief nursing officer will assist me with the questions today, but we will move firstly to gillian sharp from bbc scotland. hello. the uk government is piloting a scheme in england in local lockdown areas to pay £130 to people who have to self—isolate. this is to help reach more contacts through track and trace. the level currently stands at 80%. would you consider a similar scheme in scotland and what is the current level of contacts being traced here? i reported on the figures through test and protect last week. we have a very high percentage of contacts of positive cases being identified through test and protect, and then there contacts being traced from over 90% in both cases, and we are not complacent about that but it is a real tribute
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to those working in test and protect. 0n the issue of support for people who have been asked to self—isolate, we have been encouraging the uk government to put in place to support. as we speak we are ascertaining the details of what i understand what a pilot that has been announced in england today, how thatis been announced in england today, how that is going to be paid. it seems to me to make sense for that to be administered through existing welfare or benefit systems, and obviously we are seeking to understand what the financial consequential position is for the scottish government, so as we have more details, that will allow us to base decisions of our own on. colin white from stb. just wondering... sorry, colin camille sound has gone. just wondering what you make of the latest homelessness figures, which show a rise in homelessness. some of the figures are among the highest on
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record. they don't really take into account the lockdown on the situation with covid, but would you expect next year's figures to be even worse , expect next year's figures to be even worse, and what can you do to try and alleviate the situation as we come out of the pandemic? this figure is largely predated the pandemic. any rising homelessness is a concern and railway to us, and obviously we have seen over recent times a real pressure on benefits and the welfare system. we have been working hard. we had the task. homelessness and rough sleeping that made a number of recommendations that we are in the process of... scale up the housing
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first approach and working towards eradicating rough sleeping and homelessness. we have taken particular steps with local authorities during the covid—19 pandemic which has helped to get people out of the rough sleeping situations, and one of the things we are looking to do now is in bad some of the measures we are taking during covid—19 two make sure they are longer lasting and that we do not slip back. —— embed. in a nswer to do not slip back. —— embed. in answer to the question what will be expected to see in a next year's figures, we will be looking to do everything within our power and resources to make sure that we do not see further increases, but we cannot be complacent about that, particularly in light of the figures we have seen today. that is where we will even nicola sturgeon's conference now. she said there have been 68 cases overnight, 16 of them in tayside where there have been a
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cluster and 21 in the glasgow and clyde area. time for a look at the weather. rain could, at times, in the south, proved to be thundery. low pressure is driving our weather with various fronts coming in from the atlantic. wherever you can see the atlantic. wherever you can see the greens and yellows, that is telling you where you can see the heavy bursts. temperatures 12 to about 19 degrees. through the evening and overnight, we hang on to a lot of cloud and showers as well. still the potential for them to be heavy. temperatures in towns and cities, seven to 13 degrees. they will be lower than this in rural areas. tomorrow, a fair bit of cloud around. it will feel cooler because we have more of a northerly component to the weather. we will still have some rain and on the
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wind to these temperatures, which are low a nyway to these temperatures, which are low anyway in august, it will feel cold. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... life without parole for the gunman who shot and killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand. it's the longest sentence in the country's history. hurricane laura makes landfall along the coast of louisiana — hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes. sir ed davey wins the race to be the next leader of the liberal democrats. he says it's time for the party to face the facts after three disappointing general election results. £13 per day — the uk government trials payments for those on low incomes who have to self—isolate in parts of england. new figures show net migration to the uk is at its highest level since the brexit referendum, mainly driven by arrivals from outside the eu for study. and top—tier basketball and baseball teams in the us
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boycott their matches amid anger over the shooting of jacob blake by police in wisconsin. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's holly hamilton. good afternoon. more on those developments in the us where athletes and teams are refusing to play acoss the country as part of a protest against sunday's shooting ofjacob blake, an unarmed black man in wisconsin. in basketball, all of the nba matches were cancelled. it started with the milwaukee bucks, who are from wisconsin, decided to boycott their game against orlando magic. the teams senior vice president alex lasry tweeted that, "some things are bigger than basketball." and the players came together to make a statement after leaving the court. we are expected to play at
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a high level, give maximum effort and hold each other accountable. we hold ourselves to that standard and, in this moment, we are demanding the same from lawmakers and law enforcement. we are calling forjustice forjacob blake and demand the officers be held accountable. three wnba games were also postponed, with some players taking to the court in t—shirts with seven bullet holes in the back. that represents the seven shots police fired into jacob blake. the atlanta dream and washington mystics players then took a knee in protest. well, that led to former president barack 0bama getting involved. he tweeted: "i commend the players on the bucks for standing up for what they believe in — coaches like doc rivers, and the nba and wnba for setting an example. its going to take all our institutions to stand up for our values." well, later, the la lakers are meeting to decide if they'll boycott the rest of the nba campaign —
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while lebron james has told the team he doesn't want to play again this season. and it's notjust basketball — three major league baseball games were also postponed and five major league soccer matches have also been cancelled. and in tennis, naomi 0saka — the highest paid female athlete in the world — pulled out of her semi—final match at a tournament ahead of the us open. the two—time grand slam champion — who earlier in the year travelled to minnesota to pay tribute to george floyd — said on twitter that "watching the continued genocide of black people at the hands of the police" was making her sick to her stomach. the atp tournament has now been suspended for the day. in other news, cycling's tour de france gets underway this weekend and one of the teams looking to get their hands on that famous yellow jersey is the newly—renamed ineos grenadiers. chris froome or geraint thomas were dropped from their squad which led to suggestions the team have moved away from backing british riders. but that's something team
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principal sir dave brailsford denies. i think it is time for us now to turn back in two british cycling now, actually, and identify some of the great young talent that is dotted around various young teens and academy programmes. we have signs adam, who has been involved already, and we will very invest in the next generation of cycling. it is quite the opposite and really focusing on putting energy into the next generation. britain's tennis players will eagerly be awaiting the draw for the first round of the us open which gets underway this evening. and british number one johanna konta looks in good form ahead of the tournament — she's into the semi finals of the western and southern, which has been paused after the protests forjacob blake. she'll play victoria azarenka in the finalfour.
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men's world number one novak djokovic is the heavy favourite for the title at flushing meadows — he's also through to the semis after beating jan—lennard struff to extend his unbeaten record in 2020 to 21 matches. the premier league's record appearance holder gareth barry has retired from professional football. barry spent the first 12 years of his career with aston villa before moving to manchester city, with whom he won the premier league in 2012 and the fa cup the previous season. he made a total of 653 apperance in the top flight england batsmanjason roy will miss the t20 series with pakistan after sustaining a left side strain. he was injured during training for the three—match series, which starts at old trafford tomorrow. he had a scan yesterday and will remain with the england set—up during his rehabilitation programme. and some breaking news in the past few minutes. tennis' most successful men's double team — bob and mike bryan —
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have retired from the sport. they've won 16 grand slam titles together plus gold at the 2012 london olympics. there's more on that and all our other stories on the bbc sport website. i will bring you more after the lunchtime news at 130. see you then. the latest test and trace figures in the week to 19th august fewer than half of in—person tests were processed in 24 hours. test turnaround time is not looking so good. those are the in-person sites. they are still the fastest way to get tested if you have got the symptoms. faster than sending off me test in the post. but the turnaround times have been falling
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steadily since the end ofjune. they hit around 90% of these by the end ofjune, and you will remember boris johnson said when pressed byjeremy hunt earlier in the month that all of those tests would be turned around barring problems in 24 hours. getting tested quickly is key to getting people into the system quickly. it is one of the measures we keep an eye on to understand how well the system is working. how well i they doing in terms of reaching those contacts? asking people for their contact details, that is down a little bit on last week, but is in the 70s or 80s. they name somebody, and that is running at around three quarters as well. a little bit up on last week, but the kind of target that they set themselves is probably 80%. it is hard to see where the extra improvement is coming from. contact tracing divides into two
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pieces. 0ne, you get an outbreak in a hospital care home, you find everyone, you trace everyone, and almost all the contacts there, 95% they contact. but individuals in the community, you or i, we get confirmed and then you look to find who you have been in contact within the last few weeks. it is in the mid—60s for the last couple of weeks, and it hasn't increased, that is what you need to drive up. you wa nt to is what you need to drive up. you want to get up to that level of 80%. how many people are testing positive when we are testing. that is coming down, and that is good news. this is one of the key numbers that we keep an eye on, whether the rise in cases we see are telling us about more infections or just we see are telling us about more infections orjust more testing. this week, the number of people coming back positive, in england, these figures are for nhs trust and trace in england, about 6100, down from about 6500 last week, even though the number of people being
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tested was stable. you would be very worried if you saw the positivity rate, the proportion of tests coming out positive, going up because that means there's infection, but if it comes down a little bit, that gives us comfort that hopefully the rises we have seen in recent weeks in positive tests is due to more testing, not due to more infections. thank you very much. people on low incomes in parts of england where there are high rates of coronavirus will be able to claim up to £182 — that's equivalent to 13 pounds a day — if they have to self—isolate. a trial for the scheme will begin on the first of september for those who claim universal credit or working tax credit and cannot work from home. the benefit will be trialled in parts of north—west england. in order to make sure that people don't miss out for doing the right thing. we are introducing
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it in 0ldham and thing. we are introducing it in 0ld ham and blackburn thing. we are introducing it in 0ldham and blackburn in the first instance. these are the areas of the country where the rates are the highest and we have the highest level of intervention. the strongest local lockdown, if you like. and we will roll that out from next week and then, obviously, monitor it very closely. the vice president of the united states, mike pence, has told the republican national convention that ‘violence and chaos‘ is engulfing cities across the country. speaking in baltimore, mr pence described police officers as heroes and called for law and order to be restored. the vice president heaped praise on donald trump, saying his response to the coronavirus pandemic had saved an ‘untold number‘ of american lives. paul hawkins reports. please welcome the vice president of the united states, mike pence. the man who could one day replace donald trump as the republican party leader stuck to familiar lines, like the ongoing criticism of the violence in wisconsin.
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the violence must stop, whether in minneapolis, portland, or kenosha. too many heroes have died defending our freedom to see americans strike each other down. we will have law and order on the streets of this country for every american of every race and creed and colour. there was also praise for the police. president trump and i know that the men and women that put on the uniform of law enforcement are the best of us. but no mention of police brutality. the american people know we don‘t have to choose between supporting law enforcement and standing with our african—american neighbours to improve the quality of their lives, education, jobs
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and safety. and from the first days of this administration, we have done both. it all started at a tea party... with polls showing african—americans and women are more likely to vote forjoe biden than donald trump at the moment, there were a significant number of female speakers, including the vice president‘s wife speaking about the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment when women were given the right to vote. because of heroes like susan b anthony and lucy stone, women today, like our daughters audrey and charlotte, and future generations, will have their voices heard and their votes count. good evening, i am kellyanne conway. there was also the president‘s outgoing top adviser praising his support for her. for decades, he has elevated women to senior positions in business and in government. he confides in and consults
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us, respects our opinions, and insists that we are on equal footing with the men. the spirit of heroism stands in the breach. the theme of the evening was land of heroes. eight years ago in the fields of helmand province in afghanistan, a close friend and team—mate laid down cover fire against taliban insurgents so that i could walk blind and bloodied to the medevac helicopter and survive. but as events in wisconsin show, the definition of a hero depends on your viewpoint. there is one convention that is empathetic, compassionate, sympathetic, speaks in softer tones that is trying to appeal to the swing voter in america, the floating voters. then there is the second convention, primarily with the trump kids and their significant others that is much more red meat, much more in your face, and they are trying to appeal to the trump loyalists. the question i have as a pollster
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is which convention is the public going to remember after all the shouting is over? the final night sees president trump make his keynote speech. paul hawkins, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... life without parole for the gunman who shot and killed 51 people at two mosques in new zealand — it‘s the longest sentence in the country‘s history. hurricane laura makes landfall along the coast of louisiana — hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes. sir ed davey wins the race to be the next leader of the liberal democrats. he says it‘s time for the party to face the facts after three disappointing general election results. at least 17 dolphins have been found dead on the coast in mauritius after a huge oil spill. last month, a japanese tanker ran aground on a coral reef and broke in two, leaking hundreds of tonnes of oil
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into the indian ocean. some viewers may find some of the pictures in sylvia lennan—spence‘s report upsetting. 0ne mauritian called it a nightmare, 17 dead dolphins washed up on the coast of mauritius. others were alive, but onlyjust. some had difficulty breathing. an investigation is underway, but fingers are already being pointed at the recent oil spill or the japanese—owned ship it came from, the bow of which was taken out to sea and deliberately sunk last week. we are working on an informed hypothesis that it either was the actual fuel that had leaked as a result of the accident, but also the heavy metals that are contained in the ship when it was sunk and when it broke apart. obviously there were fragments of metal, but there was also quite heavy deposits of materials that
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also went into the ocean, so we believe there will be a link between not only the ship itself, but the fuel and the substances from the fuel within the body of the animals. but the mauritian government said initial tests showed there was no link between the oil spill and the dolphins‘ deaths. it has pointed to shark bites, but said further tests are needed. but if the ship or the oil is to blame, more marine life could be harmed. the mammals that are there are sensitive, but they are not the only ones, and should it be that there are unfolding consequences, we foresee that there will be more other animals that will suffer the same fate. it is over a month since the ship ran aground, spilling 1,200 tonnes of oil, damaging the biodiversity here and also impacting on tourism which makes up 14% of the economy. historically, this may not have
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been a big oil spill, but its aftermath will be felt for a long time to come. the widow of pc andrew harper — who was killed after responding to a burglary a year ago — has been campaigning for a new law that would mean anyone convicted of killing an emergency service worker would be jailed for life. lissie harper will meet the home secretary, priti patel to discuss the change in law. 0ur correspondent helena wilkinson has been to meet her. after the court case, we were really disappointed with the verdict and the sentencing and just not getting thatjustice that andrew deserved, really. so that‘s kind of where harper‘s law has come from. he was a fighter and he would love to know that, you know, instead ofjust sitting in the corner, you know, feeling sorry for myself, even though i have all the reasons to, that i‘m not doing that and i‘m
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doing something to help others, mainly the people that he respected and worked alongside. this is the protection that we can offer them and maybe it might act as a deterrent for people considering committing crimes that they are not just going to get away with it. so that is kind of why harper‘s law is the way we are wanting it to be. not because their lives are more important, but more because they need the protection law. you have a meeting with the home secretary priti patel. first of all, was that difficult to try and arrange? getting that confirmation of the meeting is really, really important. notjust to me, but the almost 500,000 people who had signed the petition. you‘ve had a huge amount of support. what impact, or how has that helped you? it has helped me immensely. even from the early days when andrew
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was first taken from us, i have had so many messages of support. with the campaign, it‘s just been on a whole other level, and that‘s really kept me going. it‘s given me the focus that i needed. if all goes to plan sitting down with the home secretary next month, just imagine you are in that room, what exactly are you going to be saying to her? i think really i want to explain to her my experience, what it is like to sit in a courtroom and witness the people responsible for taking my husband, showing no remorse and knowing that, you know, this has happened because of a choice they‘ve made, because they made a decision to go out and commit a crime. i just want her to truly understand, as i‘m sure she already does on some level, just how wrong it is that they can do that and then end up with just such
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a meagre conviction and sentencing. itjust isn‘t right and that‘s what i will be saying to her, that we need to do this for all of the people who go out every day, putting themselves at risk, just to protect us and to look after us. that goes for all of the emergency services. you wrote an open letter to the prime minister a while ago and he said that he would respond once legal proceedings had been completed and he has now, and has sent you a letter. just tell us what he said in that letter. i had the letter a while ago, so it was before sort of all of this. it was around all of my campaigns for a retrial and a review of the sentencing which now is being reviewed, so it was kind of a general support about that. you just touched on it. the attorney general has referred
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the sentences of the three teenagers to the court of appeal. what was your reaction when you first heard about that? i was relieved, because we have been kind of waiting for a decision about that. there‘s nothing i can do about that now, it‘s totally out of my hands. and ijust hope that we reach a good decision about that because obviously the attorney general has seen what we all see, that the sentences are too lenient. 0n the other side of it, two of them, albert bowers and jesse cole, they are... they are seeking permission to appeal against their sentences. yeah. your thoughts on that? everyone knows what they‘ve done. whether they intended to go out on that night to do that or not, this is what has happened. they need to realise that they can‘tjust, you know,
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not deal with any sort of punishment for that. i mean, i‘m not sure why they think that that‘s acceptable. i‘ll do everything i can to make sure that that doesn‘t happen in the future. what are days like for you now? very different, entirely different actually. andrew was my whole life. but i‘ve got this focus now i and think it sort of got to the point now where i‘ve actually managed to get a little bit of composure and energy to really do something good instead ofjust coping, you know, actually achieving something that might help people in the future. thousands of people have watched a spectacular light show to celebrate the 40th anniversary of china‘s shenzhen special economic zone.
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buildings across shenzhen city were lit up with the main displays in the city‘s bay area. and more than 800 drones performed stunts alongside the light shows. the zone was set up in 1980 and was the first in china. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. with the bouts of wind and rain we have had to content with over the past week or two, you would be forgiven for thinking summer has made an early exit. more heavy rain to come at times, and it will also turn cool and windy for a time as well. through the rest of today, some very heavy rain pushing through central and eastern parts of england. further north, a scattering of showers. some of which will be heavy. a bit brighter in the south—west. those are the temperatures for the start of the evening. through this evening and tonight, further showers or longer spells of rain across many parts of the uk. the five north of scotland
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getting away with lightly dry weather and fear spells. lows between nine and 13 degrees. tomorrow, we will have this band of rain pushing across northern england, down into the midlands, parts of wales. a mixture of sunny spells and thundery showers breaking out into the afternoon. scotland and northern ireland, here, one or two showers, but a decent amount of dry weather and some spells of sunshine. but the winds will be picking up all the while. thus of the 40 or maybe 50 miles an hourfor some exposed north sea coasts. 14 to 19 degrees is not going to feel warm by any stretch. that theme continues into the weekend. an area of low pressure bringing in at the rain at the moment slides eastwards. high pressure builds in from the west. this set up leaves us with a northerly wind. unusually chilly wind for this time of year. windy
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on saturday morning, particularly for eastern coastal counties of england. elsewhere, things are drying up, brightening up, and the wins will eventually ease from the west. again, temperatures disappointing for this time of year. through tonight, the orange coloured will just melt away from the map. these are your overnight lows to take you through saturday night and into sunday morning. some spots down to two or three degrees. it will feel decidedly chilly for the time of year. call for sunday and into monday as well. dry for many. 0n monday, a bit of rain later across the west the uk.
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the white supremacist who killed 51 muslim worshippers in new zealand is jailed for the rest of his life. 29—year—old brenton tarrant is told he‘ll never get parole and will die behind bars. relatives of the victims
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say it‘s justice. i have this necklace that i wear of our favourite picture of me and him and what i would tell him is justice is served today. justice is served. it‘s the first time in new zealand anyone has been jailed for life with no prospect of release. also this lunchtime: a 17—year—old boy, kyle rittenhouse, is arrested for murder in wisconsin after two people die in protests over the police killing of a black man. anger across america at the death of jacob blake leads to a boycott by athletes of key sporting events. despite the overwhelming plea for change, there has been no action, so our focus today cannot be on basketball. forecasters warn of an "unsurvivable" storm surge,

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