Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 5, 2020 6:00am-10:01am GMT

6:00 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today: as brexit trade negotiations stall, borisjohnson as brexit trade negotiations stall, boris johnson plans a as brexit trade negotiations stall, borisjohnson plans a last ditch talks to try to break the deadlock. good morning. welcome to breakfast gp surgeries are told to get ready with rachel burden to start giving the covid faxing in and charlie stayt. our headlines today: as brexit trade negotiations stall, borisjohnson nine days. it isa plans last ditch talks to try and break the deadlock. nine days. it is a week we can for grassroots sport in england. football pitches gp surgeries are told to get ready to start giving will be full again after amateur the covid vaccine competition returns after the second in nine days‘ time. lockdown. it's a big weekend for grassroots sport. after yesterdaymy cold and snowy pitches across england will be full again, weather, it looks like it will stay as amateur competition returns pretty tidy today with outbreaks of cold rain today. join me for a full after the second lockdown. forecast later on. it's saturday, 5th december. good morning. after yesterday's cold our top story: and snowy weather, today looks like it will stay pretty cloudy, with borisjohnson has stepped in to try outbreaks of cold rain. join me for
6:01 am
the full forecast later on. to salvage the brexit trade talks. intensive discussions in london it's saturday december the 5th. our top story: failed to resolve key issues, such boris johnson will speak to the president of the european as fishing rights. michel barnier has just told reporters commission this afternoon, to try to achieve a breakthrough as fishing rights. michel barnier hasjust told reporters he as fishing rights. michel barnier has just told reporters he would continue to look for a way to do a in negotiations on a post—brexit trade agreement. talks were put on hold last trade deal with britain. we keep night, after a week of intensive discussions in london failed to resolve key sticking points, calm, as always, and if there is including fishing rights. our political correspondent still a way, we will see. let's speak to jonathan blake. leila nathoo reports. still a way, we will see. let's speak tojonathan blake. it still a way, we will see. let's speak to jonathan blake. it was still a way, we will see. let's speak tojonathan blake. it was a short little burst of michel barnier there are just four weeks to go there, they grabbed him presumably until the brexiter transition period an one room and going into another. ends, and whether there is a trade deal or not, there will be changes effectively, his job at the moment to how goods move between the uk and is paused while the politicians eu. will be get a deal? but despite separately, and essentially above them, have another think. that's a week of intensive talks in london, right. michel barnier saying they're last night negotiations were quite politely, deliberately, not suspended. the uk's chief very much at all. the discussions negotiator, lord frost, and the man between him and clawed frost on the
6:02 am
on the eu side, michel barnier, set uk side have been posed. we were inajoint on the eu side, michel barnier, set in a joint statement that the conditions for an agreement are not left with a cliffhanger last night, matched due to significant a statement issued by both sides divergences. they agreed to pause sent significant divergences remain the talks in order to brief their principles on the state of way of between them. that is something of an understatement as far as the uk the negotiations. the main issues still to be settled are how any site is concerned. they are now future deal will be governed, fair going back to their principles, as they project, their political competition rules for businesses operating in each other‘s markets, masters. the prime minister here and and fishing rights. one source on the president of the european the uk side familiar with the negotiations pointed to the demands council in brussels, they are going to see if they can inject some for eu fishing boats to have up to ten yea rs momentum into this process, or if it for eu fishing boats to have up to ten years access to uk waters is one is about to break down. the sticking issue that derailed progress. both points, as we have been saying for a sides said they still wanted a deal, while, remained the issue of fishing but believed the other should give rights for eu boats in uk waters,, ground. they hope that a political intervention and conversation the governance of any deal and between the prime minister under president of the european commission competition rules, what is known as this afternoon can provide the the level playing field. the clock breakthrough needed. is ticking. the deadline of december gps in england will start offering the coronavirus vaccine from the 14th of december. patients aged 80 or over will be the first to get it. at the 31st is approaching, when the care homes in england are expected to get the vaccine transition period comes to an end. within two weeks, with the first
6:03 am
vaccinations in hospitals taking place next week. andy moore reports. the head of the cbi, also an independent member of the house of lords, said businesses need to know any allergies that you may have? what is going to happen. nurses ina any allergies that you may have? nurses in a coventry hospital lords, said businesses need to know what is going to happenm lords, said businesses need to know what is going to happen. if we have practising how they will administer a deal at least there is some certainty. the government has sent the new pfizer vaccine, beginning next week. because the jab comes in out a letter to every business in the country saying check, change, large batches at low temperatures, go. well, check what? change what? the initial rollout will be at 50 hospitals across the uk. but we now go where? we need to know now. this has now got to be done and there has know that will be swiftly followed with the vaccinations by groups of got to be compromise on both sides. gps in england, beginning on monday 14 gps in england, beginning on monday the reason that timetable is so 1a december. the priority for tight is because before that getting the jab will be the over 80s deadline at the end of december, if a deal is reached, it needs to be who can make their own way to the vaccination centre. special freezers ratified or approved not only here in the uk, but by the other eu will be provided to store the member states. that will take time. vaccine at —70. gp practices will a legislative process needs to come together to manage the happen were parliament needs to give programme. they have been told that its approval in one way or another. is that priority, with only urgent david davis, a man who knows a thing ca re is that priority, with only urgent care for all other patients. after
6:04 am
or two about brexit negotiations, that, within two weeks, doses of the the former brexit secretary when vaccine will start going out to care theresa may was prime minister, homes. plans are in place to reduce suggested here are breakfast this the boxes containing the vaccine doses to more manageable morning suggested the process can consignments. all of this will place continue beyond that date. morning suggested the process can a huge burden on the nhs, and so the continue beyond that datem morning suggested the process can continue beyond that date. it will be decided politically, not at the negotiating chambers. i suspect chief medical officers of the four there will be compromises on both home nations have written to staff, sides. what the prime minister will praising them for their hard work, have to affect are the key issues of while warning that this winter will be especially hard because of the control, not given control way to pressures from covid. they warn of a the european union in pursuit of possible surge in cases because of economic outcomes. but there will be, in my view, it is in the extra socialising over christmas, and they say for the next three interests of everybody to come to a months, vaccines will only have a marginal effect on the burden for deal. it will be tense, the nhs. every action counts when it nerve—racking, it will run to the end of the month. so the process is comes to protecting ourselves and farfrom over at this point. we oui’ comes to protecting ourselves and our loved ones from coronavirus. that's why the nhs has launched a await the outcome of that crucial new public information film conversation between borisjohnson comparing the wrong and the right ways we can go about our lives every and ursula von der leyen. at some point this afternoon, we will see if day to stop the spread of covid. it this is a breakthrough moment or a reminds us that up to a third of breakdown of the process.
6:05 am
people show no symptoms, so they can spread the virus unknowingly. the gps in england will start offering the vaccine from the 1ath of december. care homes in england are mayor of liverpool, joe anderson, has been arrested on suspicion of expected to get the vaccine within conspiracy to commit bribery and two weeks with the first vaccination witness intimidation. is in hospital taking place next he's among five people arrested as part of a year—long police investigation. week. our correspondent mairead any allergies that you may have? smyth is in liverpool. nurses in a coventry hospital mairead, what more do we know 7 practising how they will administer the new pfizer vaccine, beginning next week. because the jab comes in large batches at low temperatures, the initial roll—out will be at 50 hospitals across the uk. well, when joe well, whenjoe anderson was made mayor of liverpool back in 2012, he but we now know that will be swiftly followed with the vaccinations became the city's first elected by groups of gps in england, mayor, and eight years on he is still an officer is now, which means beginning on monday 1a december. he is also leader of the city council. of course he is one of the the priority for getting the jab uk's most high profile mayors, will be the over—80s who can make their own way to especially so during the pandemic. the vaccination centre. he of course lost a brother to special freezers will be provided coronavirus and was also credited to store the vaccine at —70. with helping put liverpool into the gp practices will come together forefront of that mass testing pilot. but the mayor is now being questioned in connection with to manage the programme. allegations of fraudulent building
6:06 am
deals. he is under suspicion of they have been told that is their priority, with only urgent care bribery and witness intimidation. he for all other patients. is one of five men arrested across after that, within two weeks, doses of the vaccine will start merseyside yesterday, aged between going out to care homes. 25 and 72. it is in connection with plans are in place to reduce the boxes containing the vaccine doses to more manageable the police investigation into the consignments. all of this will place awarding of construction contracts a huge burden on the nhs, which has focused on a number of property developers. now, liverpool and so the chief medical officers of the four home nations have written to staff, praising them city council says it is cooperating for their hard work, with merseyside release, they while warning that this winter will be especially hard because of the pressures from covid. wouldn't say anything more about individuals involved. it is also understood the labor party has they warn of a possible surge suspended joe anderson. in cases because of extra socialising over christmas, understood the labor party has suspended joe anderson. thank you very much. and they say for the next three a man's been charged months, vaccines will only with murdering two women in kent have a marginal effect on the burden 33 years ago. for the nhs. wendy knell and caroline pierce were killed in separate attacks in tunbridge wells in 1987. david fuller, who's 66, is due every action counts when it comes to protecting ourselves and our loved ones from coronavirus. to appear before magistrates today. that's why the nhs has launched a new public information film comparing the wrong and the right ways we can go about our lives every one of the 13 prisoners deported from the uk to jamaica day to stop the spread of covid. it reminds us that up to a third on wednesday has tested positive for covid—19. the jamaican of people show no symptoms, government says the man so they can spread is being held in isolation
6:07 am
at a hospital in the capital, kingston. the flight has attracted controversy, with critics warning the virus unknowingly. that people might be wrongly removed as in the windrush scandal. after a six year mission injapanese one of the 13 prisoners deported space probe is set to return to earth with fragments of rock from from the uk to jamaica on wednesday astroid. this video shows a touching down the asteroid for the first time has been confirmed as having to collect a sample from the surface. it should land in the covid—19. the man is being held in australian desert this weekend. it is hoped studying the rocks can quarantine in kingston. the flight provide insights into how the solar attracted controversy, with people system was formed. now, how about this worrying that people could be fora hairy landing? the pilot of this light aircraft wrongly removed, like in the wintris in minnesota was forced to use a busy road as a landing strip scandal. after experiencing engine failure. two people were on board but luckily no—one was injured. a japanese mission is while. look at that. but everybody scandal. ajapanese mission is due to return to earth with a sample of rock from an asteroid. these are the pictures of it landing on the asteroid. it should land in the australian desert this weekend. it is hoped studying the rocks could provide insights into how the solar system was
6:08 am
was ok. imagine being in a car formed. we were speaking to an expert earlier on this morning, he driving behind it! that moment, was saying that obviously they don't right there. that is phenomenal. and know how much has been brought back, also slightly terrifying. it is and also they need to be very saturday morning. let's take a look at careful as they unwrap and the front pages now. like many newspapers this morning, investigate, but in theory it could the guardian carries give us all sorts of indicators the latest on the brexit trade deal negotiations. the paper reports that hopes about how we are what we are. it could be very important. those are the big questions. how about this for a hairy lantern? are rising for a deal after german the pilot in this light aircraft forced to use a busy road as a chancellor angela merkel urged both landing strip after experiencing sides to reach an agreement. engine failure. two people were on but it's a different take from the daily mail board the plane at the time and i'm with their headline "le bust—up." according to the paper, officials only smiling because no one was consider french president macron injured, not in the plane, not on to blame for the "hard—line stance" taken by the eu during the talks, which they say has led the road, anything. amazing accuracy there with which the plane is to the pause in negotiations. slanted. it is literally planting the daily mirror is calling directly in front in one of the cars for the chancellor to give a £2 billion supermarket coronavirus tax break
6:09 am
refund to struggling pubs on its front page. in the same lame, travelling at "your round rishi" approximately the same speed. quite extraordinary. everybody is safe, which is the most important thing. is the headline there. and the bbc website there is another story, you might has some lovely pictures have seen this on the bbc news of the first proper snow website this morning, concerning the of the season, after many places across the uk were transformed mayor of liverpool, joe anderson. he has been arrested under into a winter wonderland yesterday. so you've got a picture of a cat, rachel? can ijust say, iwill come investigation for witness intimidation and bribery. liverpool city council has said it is to that, i've got negus no nb this morning. i know some people had snow cooperating with merseyside police. and it is problematic, but i absolutely and it is problematic, but i a bsolutely love and it is problematic, but i let's go to liverpool. taker threw a absolutely love it. —— i've got mega bit more of the story. well, joe snow envy. so, discuss. iwonder absolutely love it. —— i've got mega snow envy. so, discuss. i wonder if anderson was elected as the city you can guess what biscuit looks like? i don't want to reveal person, mayor here in 2012. he has held that but can you see, this is slightly position for eight years. he is also complicated... you are going to have to hold it up better than that. here the leader of liverpool city we go. can you see the silhouette of council, but today joe the leader of liverpool city council, but todayjoe anderson is being questioned in connection with the's chest? it is a profile of allegations of fraudulent building
6:10 am
someone. the's chest? it is a profile of someone. can you work out who it is? the headline is a slight giveaway. deals. he is under suspicion of yes. yes. look at that! the cat but conspiracy to commit bribery and witness intimidation. he is one of five men arrested yesterday. they looks like alfred hitchcock, of course. very good. how long did it range in age from 25 up to 72. it is ta ke to course. very good. how long did it take to cut‘s owner to work that in connection with the police out? how long were they sitting investigation into the awarding of there going, hang on...” construction contracts, which is focused now on a number of property out? how long were they sitting there going, hang on... i have a lwa ys there going, hang on... i have always had a soft spot, i know it is developers. liverpool city council ridiculous, but you know when is cooperating with merseyside somebody has a pizza and it looks police. they have said that they like somebody? i have a soft spot wouldn't comment on any individual for those. it is a guilty pleasure. and it is understood that the labour and absolutely classic one, my usual party has suspended joe anderson broadcasting partners nicky pending the outcome of this campbell, and one year somebody found his face in a slice of spam, investigation. thank you very much. which led to the brilliant headline nicky spam ball. one of my favourite thank you for being with us today on bbc breakfast. the first people to headlines. i confess, i know that over the years the queen has had
6:11 am
many corgis, over the years the queen has had many corgis, i have never paid attention to their names. do you pay be vaccinated against covid—19 —— attention to their names. do you pay attention to their names. do you pay attention to that kind of thing?|j covid—19 will be given the vaccine don't attention to that kind of thing?” don't know if that is treasonous to admit. she only has one left now, on tuesday. the vaccine was approved in record time. vulcan, one of her dogs. i didn't let's speak to some experts on this. know she had a dog called vulcan. but some of the names of the dogs we'rejoined now by linda bauld, who's professor of public health that she has owned over the years, at the university of edinburgh, they include, i'm sorry if you know and epidemiologist dr mike tildesley. all of this, i didn't notice. susan, we have asked for questions from people. this one is for you, linda. good morning. it is from erica it is not an automatic dog name, is holland, who lives in devon.” it? susan, sugar, honey, mcculley and willow. those are the dog names. good morning. it is from erica holland, who lives in devon. i am erica from devon. my question is how will it work with the relics of the vaccine for households that have ididn't and willow. those are the dog names. i didn't know the willow one. but mixed age groups? my mum is in her susan! the only dog she has left now 80s and she lives with my husband is called candy. because vulcan died and i, who are in our50s. up until of old agejust is called candy. because vulcan died of old age just a few weeks ago.” now we have been very careful to keep my mum protected. at that then do like it when people give that pet mean that the tables now turn and my ‘s normal names, likejeff and husband and i need to be more things like that. there is something comic about it. there is a trend for careful for ourselves, because she
6:12 am
will have been vaccinated and we that. wouldn't have been? there are two it was meant to make people's lives easier, but residents on the isle of wight are calling for a parts to that question. a really multimillion—pound floating bridge good question. so her mum is over to be scrapped because it keeps breaking down. when it works, the ferry saves drivers a 10—mile detour around the river. but it has been left out 80. thejoint good question. so her mum is over 80. the joint committee good question. so her mum is over 80. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation have of action almost 60 times in the last three years. duncan kennedy has the story. developed this list of who will get the vaccine first and it is pretty clear that erica's mum will be it all started so well. the day amongst that first group, so it is largely age and health and social ca re largely age and health and social care board largely age and health and social ca re boa rd staff, largely age and health and social floating bridge number six arrived care board staff, as well. that will provide her with protection after in coe, but the euphoria didn't last the second dose. it means that erica long. —— cowes. the problems began and her husband. at that. erica and her husband just need to keep with loading and offloading. again following the public health guidelines at the moment because the virus will not have gone away. the and again. then there were problems second part of that question might be good erica's mum pass on the with the docking. this one took virus to erica and her husband after nearly 15 to come ashore. what would she has been vaccinated? that is the question that we do know the answer to yet. there are some signs from you do with this existing floating bridge? but the chains and let it
6:13 am
drift off! the ferry does carry the other vaccine, the astra 01,, around 350,000 cars per year, by but we are not sure. you need to pulling itself across the river medina using underwater chains. but keep following the public health its size and weight sometimes means advice and to many more people have that it can't quite make it, which been vaccinated. how effective is is when a trip becomes adept. if you the vaccine and you as an individual had your way what would you do with this one? take it out into the isa the vaccine and you as an individual is a question, but then how do we measure the effectiveness within the solvent and drill a hole in the bottom. any redeeming features? no, community. my name is sue and i live not compared to the old one, what in hampshire. can you tell me please they spent on it. the vessel's was how will we know if the vaccine is have even generated protest, with working? i guess, my, that depends locals calling it to floating fiasco. but are all the difficulty on what your definition of a working vaccine means. absolutely. this is a —— difficulties well, just eating massive undertaking, we are problems? teething problems? laughter. sorry. teething problems! vaccinating a huge number of individuals across the population. this really is way beyond any it is very hard to follow every teething problems. and it is time to single individual to see if the actually give up and build a new vaccine works on them. the key question really is how are we going to know if it is effective across placement. the current vessel ever
6:14 am
all population? what we are looking needs a barge to help it cross when for here is if you indicators. tides are strong. in just three initially, we know this vaccine will yea rs, tides are strong. in just three years, mechanical problems have seen it completely out of action nearly be rolled out to the elderly and the 60 times. including this week. the vulnerable. the people most likely to develop severe symptoms. and we latest problem is all about the start to get high coverage among hydraulics on the vessel, which controlled the ramps going up and that group of individuals, what we down. as it is out of action, it should start to see is the number of debt start to reduce, the number of means once again, no passengers and no cars. so vehicles have to take a people going into hospital and intensive care unit start to reduce. the key thing is that at that point detour around ten miles, instead of we won't really see the number of the 150 metres the chain ferry cases start to reduce. that will ta ke cases start to reduce. that will take longer as there will still be a ta kes. lot of people in the population the 150 metres the chain ferry takes. ina the 150 metres the chain ferry takes. in a statement, the isle of infected. we are looking for the wight county council which runs it pressure on the nhsjust come and says it is looking at the viability of options to resolve the issues join initially. over the longer experienced by the floating bridge, term, when it starts to roll out the so for now, this ferry across the youngerage term, when it starts to roll out the younger age groups, that is when we will start to see it turn round the numberof will start to see it turn round the medina remains a troubled bridge number of cases. it will be a long over water. duncan kennedy, haul, but hopefully we can get medina remains a troubled bridge overwater. duncan kennedy, bbc really high coverage amongst the elderly, we can start to see the news. worst effects of the virus reduced
6:15 am
so, not sure what your plans are for and that is when we will have a the weekend but you do need to know clear indication as to whether is about the weather. this is the working. on that same team, this one details for us this morning. any more snow on the way? from stephen wright. he asked what is going to be used to test the efficacy and longevity of the i have not seen a single flake yet vaccine once it is administered? this cold season but plenty of time left just yet. today a lot of cloud there are a couple of things here we can do. this is very similar to the to come and it will feel cold. way that these phase three trials patches of rain to come. a reminder then over recent days we have seen work. one thing that can be done as this area of cold air coming in from you can follow groups of individuals polar regions. this area of low and what we call cohort studies. we pressure which brought this snowy followed them over time, people who weather for some of you yesterday have had the vaccine and people who but today those temperatures are a have had the vaccine and people who degree or to hire and it means the have not had the vaccine, then see over a longer period of time whether rain's transition, sorrow, the snow those individuals get infected and has transitioned to rain. —— sorry. how many of them are from the vaccine group how many of them are from the vaccine group or how many of them are from the vaccine group or the non—taxing a winter wonderland across scotland group. this is essentially how these and a bit of snow to come across the trials work and it gives us an high ground in scotland and high indication as to how effective the ground in wales. it is not out of vaccine is. of course, we no longer have the small cohorts, we will have a huge numberof the question you will see a bit of have the small cohorts, we will have a huge number of people within the winteriness falling from this area population that potentially we could of mostly heavy rain that is follow over time, if we can put the
6:16 am
affecting central southern england methods in place to do that, to see at the moment as well. for most of us, quite cloudy and quite cold and if it works. the other thing we can do is look at it a little bit more it will be rain we see on and off in terms of geographically, look at through the day. dry and bright and areas that may have high coverage compared with areas that have low cove rage those temperatures are six or seven compared with areas that have low coverage within the country or degrees widely and some areas just between the countries, then we get an idea of whether the vaccine has four celsius was not it will feel worked. those are a couple of chilly. averages this time of year 8 methods we can use to see how or nine degrees for many of our effective the vaccine is in the long towns and cities were —— time. where term. there is going to need to be a big campaign to ensure that the we have leera spells, tempers could public have confidence in this. katharina bartholomew brings that up on this question. she asks how can get down to minus was of icy roads we be assured that there will be no on sunday morning with some fog long—term side effects from the patches to clear as well. we will vaccine? another good question. see the rain across the north—east pushing into the midlands, wales, people will be worried about that. turning patria but leaving a legacy they can be reassured because there of cloudy skies. should be a writer will be a number of things that will kind of day for parts of scotland, happen. let she's the pfizer vaccine
6:17 am
north—west england and northern as an example. over 40,000 people ireland, but after a cold start of happen. let she's the pfizer vaccine the day tomorrow, those temperatures as an example. over40,000 people in the late stage trials. they will not as high, generally. highs of continue to be followed for up to two years. that is very common in around 4— six celsius. on into next these types of trials. there will be looking very carefully at whether week, we are between areas of low the people who had the vaccine in pressure so monday, not much wind to the people who had the vaccine in the trial develop any adverse start the day and it will be a cold, outcomes over the longer term. as frosty and probably pretty foggy mike is alsojust said, there will start of the day and for some, the bea mike is alsojust said, there will be a lot of research that will fog patches could linger all day. as happen with people in the population who have had the vaccine, because the cold winds pick up, the fog will these trials, although they sound large, to calculate all the things lift into low cloud but there is the that might happen to other people. threat of sun and rain coming in there may be reactions we just don't late in the day and another cold day, temperatures are struggling particularly where the fog patches linger deeper into next week, after know about. it is the yellow card a cold and largely dry start, it syste m know about. it is the yellow card system that public health professionals can report any adverse turns largely more unsettled later in the week. that is how the weather outcomes. we will look at what is shaping up this weekend and into happened to the people on the trials, and the people in the next week. thanks, chris. population, if anything happens that now it's time for the film it shouldn't. we can change course review with anna smith. if we need to base to do two bodies of data. often it is very practical
6:18 am
things that people are asking about. this is from barry richards, he says how long from being administered hello and welcome to the film review does the vaccine become effective, with me, anna smith. i'm filling in for mark kermode to review this week's releases, whether you're at home or able to minutes, hours, days, weeks? mike may be you could pick up on this one. in some vaccination programmes go out to the cinema again. in the past, and you will know much more about this sydney, where you have had to have two vaccinations. directorjulien temple has worked with many a rock star — some people's mindset is well, i from keith richards to the sex pistols — have had one, so i have got some and his latest subject is the equally colourful shane macgowan. degree of vaccination, i am safe to a degree and then they think about getting the next one. how does that fit in in relation to the question barry is asking, how important is it to co m plete barry is asking, how important is it to complete the process? it is extremely important. the key thing to say here is that it is not an all
6:19 am
or nothing situation. it is not like all of a sudden you wake up and you have got immunity after the vaccine. what happens is this immunity sort of ramps up over time. the result that have been reported in terms of how effective the vaccine is typically have been about a week after the second dose, this 95% crock of gold: a few rounds with shane macgowan is a riveting documentary about the lead singer effectiveness. individuals have the first dose, three weeks later the and songwriter of the pogues, second dose, then we look at the who shot to fame in the ‘80s with their anarchic spin immunity levels a week after that. on irish folk music. what happens in reality is you have a rise in immunity over the period using unseen footage of time. it will start to build up, your level of immunity, over that entire process. it is really from the macgowan family important to get this out to people that once they have the first dose, it is not all of a sudden that they are effectively immune immediately i can go about our lives like we did and narration from shane himself, this shows him growing up in ireland backin with a pint in his hand can go about our lives like we did back in march. you need to be cautious because you don't have a and a song in his heart. level of immunity for a long period then it's on to english public school and the hedonistic allure of time. it is important to go back
6:20 am
of the london punk scene, and get that second dose. in order the birth of the pogues and a punishing world tour. in episodes illustrated by the great ralph steadman, to get close to full immunity you there are shocking stories need to complete the programme and about wild nights out and terrifying tales of mental institutions. the singer isn't always in the best health, or even mood, ta ke need to complete the programme and take precautions. you will start to when he's being interviewed for this documentary... see get into those levels of immunity that you really need about a week or more after that second once we've wrapped up filming... dose. i suppose that goes back to what you were saying, linda, about the messaging around this? ..so director temple brings what you were saying, linda, about the messaging around this7m what you were saying, linda, about the messaging around this? it does. we need to be very clear with the in a few friends for a chat. these include the film's producerjohnny depp, public. up to a third of people are who was filmed before what we call having vaccine losing his recent libel case... hesitancy. they are often hesitant for good reasons. the mass media what makes you think i did? ..former sinn fein president campaigns that the uk and to both gerry adams and shane's wife, victoria mary clarke. nations need to launch have to answer these questions, aided by archive footage, old—fashioned leaflets through these interviews work as a potted social history of ireland, people's doors, information in gp as well as a fascinating insight surgeries, all of that. i have seen into a musical scene the leaflet which is on the and a portrait of a troubled, talented and funny man. government website there will be crock of gold: a few rounds given to the public around the with shane macgowan is in cinemas vaccine which is very helpful, but now and on digital and dvd from monday, december 7.
6:21 am
i love seeing film—makers come up technical. we need simple language, with creative solutions in challenging situations, images. the media needs to help with and rob savage has done just that this as well to answer the with the horrorfilm host. questions. we know that it is as yet not suitable for pregnant women because pregnant women were not tested as pa rt because pregnant women were not tested as part of this trial. what about for breast—feeding women? beth sitting in a circle. asks, will breast—feeding women be able to get the vaccine? this is a really important question from beth. in general, what i would say is vaccination is commonly given, most spirit, we invite you to use us to pass on any communication. vaccines are approved for women who is there anyone there? please come forward. are breast—feeding, rather than what was that? amy, was that you? pregnancy. in the case of this taxi i heard it. because it is relatively new and we i heard something. need more data, at the moment it is i think there's something here. not being advised for use for do you see that? breast—feeding women, that is because we don't know whether the inspired by a short that went vaccine can be excreted in breast milk, and that could be passed on to viral on social media, the infant. that doesn't mean that it would be approved for breast—feeding in the future. we it's set entirely on zoom, need to keep an eye on that. actor where six friends decide to hold
6:22 am
an online seance under there will be trials not just for the guidance of a medium. this vaccine, but for pregnant women and four children. the advice at the thanks to a sharp script, naturalistic performances and a bit of improv, the characters are swiftly moment for pregnant women and established and the stage is set for demonic activity that escalates breast—feeding women is the vaccine to an alarming degree. is not for them. i may change in the shouting haley, this is all yourfault! future. in relation to the it's not my fault! this is your fault! messaging, i don't know what it's a lot of fun watching evidence there is in the work you do multiple screens for glimpses of paranormal activity. in the areas of public health, but and it's genuinely does it matter to see politicians scary when it kicks in. these are characters i enjoyed spending time with, and there's a peculiar intimacy taking the vaccine, or well—known watching them on an online people? has that had a part to play conference call. atjust 57 minutes long, host isn't especially profound, but it is very effective. in previous campaigns? is it it's in cinemas and on digital now. effective? is it the kind of thing you would expect to see? absolutely. iremember in you would expect to see? absolutely. i remember in some of the campaigns beautiful, isn't it? i have been involved in we have used that's the last thing prominent figures, we might use our irememberseeing. sporting hero, celebrities, to pass ona sporting hero, celebrities, to pass on a public health message. in the back to ireland, via somalia, case of picking up cancer symptoms, and a girl from mogadishu — the true story of activist we had well—recognised clinicians
6:23 am
fronting the campaign, people who ifrah ahmed. are in the media. leaders need to ask her, how did it happen? recognise that they have to talk about the fact that they are reassured about safety, efficacy and quality of the vaccine, and they are aja naomi king plays the teenage willing to take it. in this country ifrah, who narrowly escapes war—torn and other countries, we need leaders somalia with a trafficker, played by barkhad abdi. to demonstrate that when they are ifrah thinks she's on a plane eligible they have had it. we have to see her aunt in minnesota, but instead, she arrives in dublin and is dumped at an heard jonathan van tam talking about the advice is already given to his asylum seeker centre. mum if she gets up at the vaccine. when a medical exam reveals she's a victim of female genital it does play a role in mutilation, the true horror communication. this is from chris, of the custom begins to dawn on her. determined to save other young girls from the same fate, who lives in brittany. why does it she learns english and launches a campaign to end fgm in ireland and beyond. normally take much longer to test the narration is a bit safety of vaccines, what is be different this time? it is a really overbearing at times, but this is still a compelling film, good question. this feeds into what beginning as a gripping thriller linda has been saying about the and turning into an inspiring story of activism. vaccine reluctant see. i have had until girls like me are free this conversation quite a lot of
6:24 am
of the fear, the pain, people where they are concerned the shame, i will not stop. because the vaccine has been approved very quickly. there has beena plan approved very quickly. there has been a plan in place with pharmaceutical companies and director mary mcguckian academic researchers for a really has a broad populist touch. long time that they might have to as well as dark moments, there is hope and even humour. develop a vaccine rapidly in the ifrah is thrown headfirst into western culture, baffled by everything from event of a pandemic. usually with aeroplane food to cornflakes. a girl from mogadishu vaccine trials, these can last many years. often there are gaps between different phases of trials taking is out on digital now. place, funding issues, paperwork issues. the regulatory approval can yo, give me your chips, man! ta ke issues. the regulatory approval can take quite a long time because of red tape. all of these processes have been reduced. the corners have i literallyjust bought them... not been cut, but what has happened shut up, fam! give me your chips. is the phase two and phase three i don't care. trials have ta ken is the phase two and phase three trials have taken place simultaneously in order to collect what are you doing? the data as rapidly as possible. what? what are you doing? no, i was onlyjoking that has really been put in place. you wasjustjoking? yeah, man. that has really been put in place. i was onlyjoking with him! that is why we have manufactured my next film choice is written these vaccines rapidly. the key and directed by a youth worker question to get across here, and it who spent over a decade working with kids who have been recruited by drug runners. is very important that people know henry blake's debut, county lines, feels alarmingly authentic, the regulatory approval process is as it tells a story still the same, the fact that the that is apparently
6:25 am
relatively common. vaccine has been approved should give confidence to the general public that it is safe to use and will provide a high level of protection. that is the key message conrad khan stars as tyler, that we need to get out, that a 14—year—old londoner living with his sister and his single corners have not been cut for us to get at this stage. on a final mother, toni, who's struggling to hold down a job. tyler is easy prey for the older simon, who buys him trainers and offers him cash to smuggle drugs on the train to small towns. thoughts, linda, there has been so naive tyler is soon thrust much attention lie on the timeframe. into a world of criminals, we were learning this morning that crack dens and violence. the performances are excellent. conrad khan really holds the in ten days gps will be part of the attention in his first lead role. process , and simon is played with chilling in ten days gps will be part of the process, they will begin the brilliance by harris dickinson, vaccination process. now we have a who i reckon is shaping up to be timetable and there will be a lot of attention on that immediately, went the next tom hardy. there? we shouldn't underestimate there? we shouldn't underestimate the logistics involved in all of yes. this. for the flu vaccination campaign this winter there were right, let me call you back. bumps on the road about where would all right, all right. you get it, etc. we need to be cautious about the timeline. the government again on the communication site needs to be clear with the public over what happens what do you do?
6:26 am
entrepreneur. what? someone who works for themselves. when. we have heard from primary ca re when. we have heard from primary care that a few days ago they not all the dialogue in county lines rings true, weren't that happy that they were but the storytelling is impressive, showing most events being involved enough. the care through tyler's point of view. sector, as well. let's have a route it's a worthwhile watch that's map and recognise that the public? in cinemas and on digital now. expectations need to be managed because it will not be quick and it everyone say "christmas"! will take well into next spring for no, don't say that, just smile. these phase one groups that are 0k. blurry, boring. recommended to take it. thank you nope, nope, nope. 0k, none of these will do. both for your time, linda and mike. we will try again tomorrow. thank you. having sat through the likes they are both professors, they know their stuff! of the family stone this is breakfast. we're on bbc one until and four christmases, 10.00am this morning, i don't always relish the idea when matt tebbutt takes over of a glossy festive romantic comedy. but happiest season in the saturday kitchen. has a twist on the genre. it's about two women. how can you not like can't you see what we have put on the lights and decorations? this is beautiful. come with me to my parents' screen, if i put up a picture can house for christmas.
6:27 am
you see it? what do you think that abby, you and harper have a perfect relationship. is? i'm looking at a picture of me she is my person and i really want everyone to know that. at the moment. a set a dodgy mince i want to marry her. i'm going to ask her dad for his blessing. way to stick it to the patriarchy! pie? it is a mince pie. you have kristen stewart and mackenzie davis play a happy couple whose called it a dodgy one. it was cooked relationship is tested when they go home for the holidays. with love and care by rachel this the venue is the affluent family home of harper, played by davis. the snag is that harper morning. they were delicious! dodgy hasn't come out to her parents, despite having told her girlfriend that she already did. but delicious. that is kind of my so abby is introduced as harper's flatmate, tag line. very home-made, rustic and with a promise that all will be beautiful. can you take us through revealed in due course. what went wrong? was it puff pastry? naturally, nothing goes smoothly in this film from clea duvall, yes, i had a block of puff pastry in who delivers a consistently funny comedy with an excellent cast. the fridge and i decided to wax a stewart has never been better. mince meat into it. it was a terrible mistake. you have got to be and supporting standouts include mary steenburgen as the controlling, oblivious mother and schitt‘s creek star daniel levy as abby‘s fiercely feminist friend. more methodical. something i am not, either, i have to say. but they look very nice and nobody has made me a mince pie. they satisfy the need very quickly in the house, so it
6:28 am
worked on one level, at least. i'm yes, iamjohn, abby's heterosexual ex—boyfriend. and i have come to get her back. glad. moving on, iam isee. worked on one level, at least. i'm well, it would have been nice glad. moving on, i am very excited, to have known you were coming, you could say over the moon, because but since you are here, enjoy. thank you so much. our guest today has walked in space, ok, i nailed that, and she is fabulous. happiest season is better it is major tim peake. good morning. at comedy than it is romance, iam it is major tim peake. good morning. i am delighted to be here. we are but it's still a fun, going to talk lots about that later. inclusive christmas movie with laugh—out—loud moments. it's available on demand now. ollie is very excited here, as well. what is your idea food heaven? pastry, anything pastry. i love it. even those mince pies! ialso # the sun will rise to light the skies # and merrily, bells ring out pastry, anything pastry. i love it. even those mince pies! i also love # surprise, and brighten coriander, cinnamon. delicious. what all the folks in lockdown... # finally, a fittingly surreal experience for 2020, a festive film made during the pandemic about food hell? sprites. aniseed. in the garden of former blue peter presenter peter duncan. anything with liquorice, horrible. billed as the first ever imagine brussel sprouts in space! made—for—cinema, covid—friendly, socially distanced pa nto, jack and the beanstalk two great chefs here, as well.” is co—directed and produced
6:29 am
by duncan, who rounded up his showbiz mates for the gig. imagine brussel sprouts in space! two great chefs here, as well. i am going to make a goats cheese and this is truly a pandemic panto. there is a lockdown song, chorizo, and also a lovely yoghurt. we are making our festive marshmallow cheesecake with a with jokes about loo roll, primary filling. very nice. ollie smith, looking like a schoolboy this morning. we are going to take a full and there are gags about trump. orbit around the planet of the and then there's the giant ogre who's eating humans. it's a very strange thing grapes! i think we should just stop to watch at home alone, but it's got all you'd expect from a family panto, including terrible puns, there. don't forget, you guys at boo—worthy baddies and a pantomime dame, played by, yes, peter duncan. jack and the beanstalk is at everyman cinemas home, or inground control, are in from saturday, december 5, and it's also available charge of what tim eats later on. go to stream at home now. thanks for watching the film review to the website for details. that with me, anna smith. mark kermode will be back next week. site that you have about one, meantime, stay safe. eve ryo ne site that you have about one, everyone did the same thing here. he is good at those. stay with us, we have a summary of the sports news coming up injust a moment. hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie
6:30 am
stayt. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. boris johnson will speak to the president of the european commission this afternoon, to try to achieve a breakthrough in negotiations on a post—brexit trade agreement. talks were put on hold last night, after a week of intensive discussions in london failed to resolve key sticking points, including fishing rights. britain leaves eu trading rules hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. on the 31st december. good morning. nhs england has outlined a plan for how the first doses 9:30am exactly. of pfizer's covid—19 vaccine will be administered. after a trial in liverpool, gp surgeries will offer the jab the use of a rapid coronavirus test, from the 14th of december and it which gives a result in under could be delivered to care homes an hour, is now being rolled in england within two weeks. out to more cities. wolverhampton will begin the first vaccinations in hospitals offering all residents will take place next tuesday. the tests from this week, it comes as the chief medical whether or not they have symptoms. officers for england, phil mackie has been wales, scotland and northern ireland warned that the vaccine will only to see how it will work. have a "marginal impact" these are the lateral flow tests which give people results injust half an hour. on the number of patients they've invited a small number of people to come to help them get in hospital over the winter. ready for the launch next week, and have trained up 100 council staff to carry them out. i chose to do it because it's part of our civic duty. so therefore, work for the council, the mayor of liverpool, we work for the citizens.
6:31 am
joe anderson, has been arrested and actually it's ourjob on suspicion of conspiracy to commit to protect our citizens — bribery and witness intimidation. so therefore by volunteering we can he's among five people arrested get more people tested, as part of a year—long police therefore get much, much more information, investigation. it's a lot better for our city. it is understood the labour party and turn it five times. has suspended mr anderson pending the outcome of the case. they asked me to be a guinea pig liverpool city council said and, because i didn't have any it was co—operating with merseyside symptoms, i was happy police. to take part. ok, whoa. if you'd like to put your swab a man's been charged with murdering into the test tube. sure. two women in kent 33 years ago. just like this? wendy knell and caroline pierce were killed in separate attacks ok, so i'vejust handed in my swab in tunbridge wells in 1987. and they're behind there already david fuller, who's 66, is due starting work on it, to appear before magistrates today. which means that within about 30 after a six—year mission, minutes i should know whether or not i've tested positive or negative. a japanese space probe is due but there are concerns that, to return to earth with the first large fragments of rock because this test is less reliable, from an asteroid. this footage shows it touching down more people will be told they're on the asteroid for the first time negative when they're not. to collect a sample and if those people then go out and they visit their grandparents, they stop socially distancing and so on because they believe from the surface. they haven't got covid, that's not going to help — it could actually make it worse. it should land in the australian desert this weekend. in wolverhampton they think it's it's hoped studying the rocks a risk worth taking, could provide insights into how and know that the message the solar system was formed. must be clear. just because you've got a negative
6:32 am
we have a just a bit later on he test doesn't mean, "that's fine, i can do what i want, will explain the significance. it does go down to the origins of life, go where i want, hug me granny." you can't — you've still got it says it is as profound as that, to follow those rules. potentially. that is quite a big one in three people who have explanation that is going to be the virus don't have symptoms, required! mike? taking that in at which is why trying to find the asymptomatic cases 6:30 am! yes. for many, allthat is such a priority. it's that not knowing, isn't it? matters in life today's fatal —— is you know, you hear so many people that have got no symptoms that waking up and getting ready for a actually could be spreading it. foot ball waking up and getting ready for a football match again. and i feel like... lots of kids, thousands of people i feel that i've done my bit, really, for the city to try and get across the uk, england certainly, us into tier 2 if we can. starting again today, and they will be waking up with that special because i'm working from home, i don't go out anyway. feeling, that excitement, getting up so, no, it's not going to change anything. early, may be avoiding the computer butjust...for my own... and just getting ready for football peace of mind. to return it in a mature level for yeah. the first time since lockdown. i know there were so eager to get back so i've just got my notification to training which was allowed from from the nhs, which tells me that wednesday. parks across england will be full i've got the result less than half of the sound of football again this an hour after i took the test. weekend, with amateur clubs allowed to play competitive matches again let's have a look at what it says. after the second lockdown. thankfully it says i'm negative, they were allowed to start training again last week. but that doesn't mean there's a big step forward i change my behaviour at all — i've still got to abide by the same for the return of amateur rugby union too. rules as if i haven't had the test. players haven't been allowed to tackle at all, wolverhampton's, desperate to drop even in training, since march. from tier 3 to tier 2. that rule has now changed. there are still some restrictions,
6:33 am
but the return of tackling has been wolverhampton's desperate to drop welcomed, with competitve matches from tier 3 to tier 2. infection rates are already falling and they're banking on these tests starting again on 19th december. to help wipe out the virus. phil mackie, bbc news, wolverhampton. it is the major part of the game, contact is what rugby is all about, of course. and we need contact. but 9:33am. being rolled out in we need safe contact. and i think wolverhampton, due to go to other what the rfu has given us is a way parts of the country but i think each have to set their own systems to have safe contact. there are no for the mass testing, so there is scrums and there are no mauls, but some staggering as to when this will what that means is a faster flowing be in effect. in tier 3, those areas game, we believe. rugby is about running and it is exciting and you qualify. nothing is ever straightforward, is it? might, wa nt to running and it is exciting and you want to see tries scored and points scored. so we think it will help for nothing straightforward chris ryan a period of time. certainly not. there is a chance there will be fans at that amateur sport can get out there premier league matches today. that hasn't happened since march. today, start playing. that's right. in all three of the tears 2,000 supporters will be at two of the four top flight games today, starting with west ham's home game against manchester united, and before that, fans will return to the london stadium for the first time since march for west ham against manchester united. however, there won't be any tiers. lots of people eager to go away followers admitted. out to play, clearing snow so they it has been really strange not to have fans. but i don't know if it is can get lacrosse match on today. millions of people across england
6:34 am
going to be even stranger having are able to do the sport or activity only two—thirds in a 60,000 plus stadium. i couldn't tell you they love again this weekend after they love again this weekend after exactly, but overall, i've got to the latest lockdown 90. grassroots foot ball the latest lockdown 90. grassroots say, i'm a football supporter and it football matches in all tiers will will be great. i am sure they will ta ke football matches in all tiers will take place again. one exception is be some people out there will be the lancashire fa announcing last disappointed they can't get a ticket night it was suspending all just now, but, you know, there will grassroots football activity in be others out there are really eight different areas until the new excited that we are back to the year at the earliest due to game. bournemouth have gone to the top of coronavirus concerns. on a brighter the championship after beating note, a big step forward in ba rnsley the championship after beating barnsley 4—0 at oakwell. the south grassroots rugby union in england, coast side scored two goals in each asi grassroots rugby union in england, as i found out on a various look eye. diego's free kick was picked around at the sports resuming over the last few days. pick of both of them. they can be overta ken pick of both of them. they can be overtaken this afternoon as barnsley drops down to 15. billyjoe saunders retained his wbo the big hits i buy and loving the super—middleweight title by beating fellow briton martin murray last night. tackles, despite the bruises. they it was a unanimous decision haven't had contact like this in at wembley arena, giving saunders the 30th win of his undefeated professional career. training in grassroots rugby union he wasn't a fan of boxing since early march. really good, in an empty arena, though — he said it was like a "cemetary." exciting, the biggest fight of my game is tackling so i know i am pleased. i'm very relieved because without, like contact in rugby, it's just a game of running and catching a ball. it feels good getting your england play france in the final of
6:35 am
the ordinations come tomorrow, but anger out. west park club in st it will be fascinating to watch ireland against scotland this afternoon. ilan struggling at the helens is in tier 2. contact has been reintroduced in all tiers in moment, their victory against georgia last time out has been england, following rugby league described as one of the worst performances in years. scotland, which briefly resumed in autumn. after so long without contact in the though, are going ahead having won five of the last six. game they are easing themselves back into it here. what's more, from the we wa nt we want to finish on a hike in the 19th of december, they will start best place possible. ifeel this playing matches again. albeit with a group has bonded well off the field. we have talked a lot about being a couple of alterations to make the fan and everything, in our own game safe. we have had to make some little bubble over the past couple law variations and adaptations, such of months. we want to finish on a as removing the scrum and more high, we want to go there and face—to—face contact. still a lot to express ourselves, played a brand of go to get the game back but this is by express ourselves, played a brand of rugby that we know we can play. and a monumental step forward. this is hopefully make memories on and off all we waited for four months now. the field this weekend. real direction from rugby, we've been together for seven or brilliant. when matches start up eight weeks now so we need to make again, clubs in tier 3 will only be sure that we show real intent in everything that we've learned. very able to play opponents in the same disappointed about last weekend, obviously, across the board. the tier 3. players as well this is an opportunity they have got going into tier grassroots able to play opponents in the same the christmas break on the back of tier grassroots football resumes again after lockdown and training in something pretty special. the garden. in tier 2, basingstoke,
6:36 am
families are able to support from the sidelines as long as they observe social distancing. it is england's anti someone is out in very social, big part of our lives. front in dubai. it tells you everything you need to know about the kids have had everything to do perfect conditions for gaultier, early in his final round he has a with school changing, the social whopping 22 shots under par, so he side of their lives change, everything has changed. and really, holds a 2—stroke lead, but leading managed to build thanks to moments a bit of football is that normality like this on the 17th hole for them. it makes me feel, like, a yesterday, the most difficult hole on the course, apparently. lot better about myself. it makes me world number onejudd trump has made sleep more. at the weekend i was it into the semi—finals of the uk snooker championship. the englishman was pushed playing playstation because i didn't all the way in his quarter—final know what to do. with the football by kyren wilson. it went to a deciding frame, is pleased to be back, imagine the which trump won to make it 6—5. delight of the shot put and javelin he's looking for his second title at the event which he last won here in berkshire who lost a whole nine years ago. season. not the easiest to sports to practice at home so they can't wait earlier, neil roberston beat mark selby. the australian finished to train through the winter.l with his 750th professional century practice at home so they can't wait to train through the winter. a lot of people our age and elite athletes to win 6—2. he'll play china's zhou yuelong have been really struggling for motivation. spend all of winter building up to competition season over six months and that is normally from march to september, so we lost all of that completely. this leisure and what i start george russell has centre in tier 2 is reopening again, had in his mercedes! the 22 robin
6:37 am
kingsley was only called up to the the climbing will indoor venues pick their way back through the various at last—minute to fill in for lewis hamilton, no less, at the second restrictions. capacity reduced by grand prix in bahrain. but he went 50% and a lot more cleaning fastest in both qualifying sessions and is on course for his first ever involved, it is great for social distancing because we only have one pole position in formula 1. i suppose if you are going to get into person or a wall at a time. any car, ideally, it is the world intergroup exercises are not allowed in tier3, but champions, mercedes, isn't it? i intergroup exercises are not allowed in tier 3, but here they are. know he's had to do lots of everybody on maps, class sizes more adjusting, it isn't easy when you than halved. find it difficult to get two days notice. did he have to do that annoying thing, like when somebody else is in your current motivate myself to go running and adjust the seat? they had to do much stuff. to be able to do something more than that. lewis is going to be like this in company is a great really fed up when he gets back in it. five inches taller, is george feeling. with exercise it is very russell. he was mentioning yesterday, they had to do a lot of much we are creatures of habit and adjusting of the seat, even a size we have had this break, and getting people back into the routine of smaller shoes or boots. which is exercising regularly. wherever you are grassroots sport will continue painful. he says how painful it is to adapt and follow the latest and he is suffering the pain and bruising to try to get through. covid—19 restrictions. in northern and he is suffering the pain and bruising to try to get throughm just goes to show how precisely ireland at the moment all grassroots clu b ireland at the moment all grassroots club activities are suspended until designed these cars are for their the end of next week in line with specific drivers. diminutive. i'm the end of next week in line with the latest vibrate lockdown. in
6:38 am
scotland, most are sports and activities are now allowed but with just checking in that word. thank tighter restrictions in tier 3 and you, mike. tier a. in wales they started grassroots for its again a few weeks chris, tell us about the weather ago when there lockdown injured, and this weekend. everybody is hoping to get out, lots more and at your spot in play this weekend, which is all organisations and players should great? yes. but it is going to be a follow the various sport protocols and there are limits on the numbers. cold one, it is one of those we have the hope now on pitches across the to wrap up warm weather you are taking part in the sport or uk is eventually they can all build spectating. momentum with the promise of new the prize for the early morning vaccines sparing them onto that winning feeling again. watch a picture goes to angus and me from the staffordshire area. a bit contact sport, putting smiles on faces once more. gyms, pools, of rain, sleet and snow across this leisure centres able to open again area but it isn't really amounting to much, and for many of us it is in all three tiers. people are so just a cloudy day with outbreaks of rain on the cards. going to stay dedicated. i mustjust say, whatever pretty cloudy. a reminder that over sport you want to do, do check the the past few days, we have seen this restrictions for your tier for your and move down from the polar regions with this area of low pressure. the particular sport. very little cold outside pressure is centred information. if my husband is right of the top of the uk. that is watching, because i bet he has what has been bringing snowy forgotten that my son has boxing weather, with temperatures lifting practice this morning. he has got
6:39 am
by an odd degree or two, meaning out of the habit and he will have that the snow is transitioning to forgotten, so get on the! anything rain in many areas. still, a little else you want to tell? he make it on bit of snow across the high ground of scotland. the staffordshire and time? load the dishwasher, as well. shropshire moors, a bit of tier2? wintriness there, across the west midlands. there is a across parts of time? load the dishwasher, as well. tier 2? exactly. they are allowed to be indoors so they are excited about the mendips and cotswolds, just to being back. they are not aspiring, see something a bit too wintry for a time. for most of us it is a cloudy noncontact. it makes such a start of the day with some patchy rain around stop there is some difference to people's lives. tendency for the weather turned drier and brighter across western, matches resuming. one person hasn't southern central and eastern areas, as we head into the afternoon. even been watching this morning because across the east they will be the odd he is busy. incredible, this story. patch of rain coming and going. an update on the incredible achievements so far of kevin's perhaps just four in places, particularly across the midlands. infield —— kevin cynthia l. coming overnight tonight, after quite a chilly day, those temperatures will to the end of his fifth marathon in fall below freezing in places. the risk of icy stretches. we will have five days. two more to go as he this area of rain extending across raises money for the mnd chemical scotla nd this area of rain extending across scotland and into parts of north—eastern england, but will tend association for his ex team—mate. he wanted to raise £77,000. the current to lift temperatures here. some patches of fog as we start the day total is so nearly half a million. on sunday. so quite a murky start to
6:40 am
the day. parts of northern england, he is running past a mural of rubber the day. parts of northern england, the midlands and wales. the rain in leeds this morning. sally was turns lighter and patchy but it will leave a legacy of witty cloudy lived there earlier. he must have skies. should be more in the way of gone past the 30 kate mark meyer —— sunshine coming through across parts of western scotland, north—west england and northern ireland. after 30 kilometre mark. he is going a cold start to the day, those temperatures do not get as high. 4— incredibly fast. he has done times every day. three hours and 15 six celsius, it should be about minutes on your fifth. potentially eight or nine degrees, so it will be that's what he could do a today. he another chilly day. we have got low pressure surrounding the uk, but we are kind of between these weather isa systems and it means there is going that's what he could do a today. he is a smash and get. you can't to bea systems and it means there is going to be a quiet start to the day, but imagine the pain. he will have to probably very murky. extensive fog rub on his mind the whole way round. to my to do —— he will have rob on patches and some of it will be freezing fog as well, with that frosty start today as well. fog his mind the whole way around. and lingering in places, perhaps lifting as the cloud drops across the east, even earlier start for him for the with the threat of rain coming into coastal areas. it will be another la st even earlier start for him for the last one. 9:41am is the time right cold day. cabbages struggling, highs of around four celsius or so. after now. did you know that the fashion industry accounts for more global carbon emissions than aviation? a cold but dry start to the disease, each year around a million
6:41 am
tonnes of clothes it does look like the weather will are thrown away in the uk, causing serious problems turn increasingly unsettled with the for the environment. now, a project involving universities across the country has rain arriving late in the week. it come up with a solution. looks pretty chilly this weekend. luxmy gopal reports. i was just looking at pictures of kevin during his seven in seven the fashion sector is worth marathons, which i know that you £32 billion to the uk economy every follow, and watching him run in the year, but comes with a high cost snow yesterday. will conditions be to the planet. slightly more benign? it is still going to be cold, isn't it? that's the world's clothing industry is responsible for 10% right. there isn't that much snow of all greenhouse gas emissions, around today. you could see another more than flights and shipping, and 20% of all waste water. centimetre or two. cloudy and cold now a new project is set to make it with chilly bursts of rain. not the greener, using the rubbish from your bin and farmers' unused greatest running weather, i wouldn't wheat and other crops. have thought. still, day five of seven, charlie. yes, we're going several universities catch up with him. sally will be are involved in the project, but it is here in a lab there talking to some of the people at the university of york that supporting him along the way. just a a key step in the entire phenomenal effort. judging from what process has been developed. i've seen so far the weather is that step involves chemically rebuilding rubbish into going to make no difference sheets of fresh material. whatsoever to him. he will carry on regardless. i am crop waste and household waste, such as food scraps or kitchen roll, whatsoever to him. he will carry on regardless. lam not whatsoever to him. he will carry on regardless. i am not sure, whatsoever to him. he will carry on regardless. lam not sure, we whatsoever to him. he will carry on regardless. i am not sure, we will catch up on this, but his times each are softened into a pulp,
6:42 am
day were getting quicker. once they! which is ground up with enzymes to turn it into sugars. from number one to two to three, these are fermented each day, i think his marathon has into brand—new cellulose, got quicker, which isjust which is then sliced up, cleaned and dried, ready to be turned into fibres and eventually extraordinary. we will find out what he is doing to recover each day, high street or high—end fashion. thatis he is doing to recover each day, that is the thing, isn't it? at those legs working. forget alexander mcqueen, with christmas just three weeks this is alexandra lenoux, away, it's usually the busiest time one of york's project leaders. of the year for our retailers. non—essential shops have now reopened in england, it is amazing because this but in a week that's seen the collapse of giants including is the result of a lot of work top shop and debenham's, we have done for over ten years is this the end of the high street as we know it? and what i hope is that soon our business correspondent we will stop wearing rubbish clothes and start wearing clothes made katie prescott reports. of rubbish instead! the really cool thing lifting the shutters at bishop is that the cellulose that the bacteria produce out of these waste materials auckland, shelves here are stacked and shoppers are out and about once is essentially virgin quality again. it's not as busy as i thought material, so you can use that to make brand—new textiles. it was going to be, to be honest. we came down and didn't think would be able to get into any shops, but it the environmental footprint of such quite nice. it is a pleasure to see things is incredibly strong. people in the street and hopefully, this might not resemble fabric hopefully, we will hang on to some at the moment, but their partners of the businesses in the street. at cranfield university spin hopefully, we will hang on to some of the businesses in the streetm isn't the same, online shopping, the cellulose into fibres using because you can't see what you are an environmentally—friendly process.
6:43 am
buying, can you ? because you can't see what you are buying, can you? sometimes it is ok but sometimes it is what you get, and when dried, these will become not what you wanted. so it is nice fibres which you will use to be able to come out and look in the textile industry for clothing and fashion applications. again. it is more like the small the project is still in its early businesses, i'm pleased to see them stages, but it is hoped soon tomorrow's waste could become up businesses, i'm pleased to see them up and running, because i think, like, obviously the big high street chains, they have kind of help next season's wardrobe. themselves. it is just chains, they have kind of help themselves. it isjust all these people that have been going for generations and have had to shut down. it'sjust quite scary. it is also scary when you look at the drop in the number of people shopping around the uk. yesterday uk high well worth considering, particularly streets saw a drop of 39% compared people heading to the shops today and looking forward to buying a few to last year. uk shopping centres, festive outfits, although i don't know where you would wear them to... edible 29%. retail parks are faring what do you do with your party better, don't just outfit, charlie? you can still dress edible 29%. retail parks are faring better, don'tjust 4%. overall there up outfit, charlie? you can still dress up at home. i don't do that but why has been a drop of almost a third. don't you? why not do that? we all this pandemic induced plunge in know about your new romantic phase, footfall has been a catastrophe for small shops. trends that have been charlie. why not? lots of people brewing for years accelerated in the course of just a brewing for years accelerated in the have the opportunity for the first course ofjust a few brewing for years accelerated in the course of just a few short brewing for years accelerated in the time of getting outside. michael was course ofjust a few short months. does the cost of paying for premises saying about getting outside and like these, business rates, higher
6:44 am
playing sport, with your pals. then tax on property, and then of course we look at that picture behind you. the often cheaper and more convenient on —— convenient yes. charlie, this is ebbw vale, alternative of online shopping. it isa which is in the south of wales. it alternative of online shopping. it is a tough time to be in retail. to help sweeten the deal for is about 300 metres above sea level independent retailers like this and the higherup chocolate maker, there are calls for is about 300 metres above sea level and the higher up you are, the more the government to redistribute the likely you will have snow around. that's what we have at the moment. business rates relief cash that just moving into wales. it's not the several large supermarkets have given back to the treasury this only place we will see a bit of snow week. as for so many, christmas is but for most of us it is cold rain the most important time of year for falling today. if you are heading out and about, perhaps to take part her business. but this season in some of those grassroots sports, showers afraid they will be fewer parcels to wrap. lockdown has been a orjust watching, it is one of those days you will need to wrap up warm. rollercoaster, really. a huge amount cold air finally with us, the same area of low pressure that brought of self—doubt, a huge amount of significant snowfall yesterday. we loneliness, a huge amount of, what still have a bit of snow to come are we going to do with ourselves? today. mostly of a high ground, we this is now, we have smaller are seeing some of that in scotland, shoulders. i have to say, you know, some in the staffordshire and shropshire moors and we are seeing it turn to snow across into wales, without the masses of support from particularly over some of the hilly my customers, it would have been areas above around 200 metres different. much local supporters elevation but slow it down at times. come from lockdowns, meaning that people are shopping more in their through the rest of today, a slowly
6:45 am
local areas, to the detriment of improving weather picture for many, with the cloud thinning and cities. people have discovered breaking, a few bright or sunny spells coming through. there will stores which perhaps they never even shoppedin still be a bit of rain around for stores which perhaps they never even shopped in when they were working away or long distance or they were some as we go into the afternoon but commuting into the cities. so it is the rain becoming less widespread. a real opportunity for independence, cold afternoon, temperatures about although they are having a hard time at the moment, if they can continue six to 8 degrees, perhaps just five in parts of the midlands. overnight to capture that spirit of local, tonight, mark rein in off the north going forwards, and hopefully it will help them to recover quicker. sea, east of scotland, north—east england seen that. also potentially the limited time shops have had to some rain spreading into the open means december is even more south—east of england, but between vital than ever, as they face these areas of rain there will be pressure to make up for lost ground in the run—up to christmas. katie clear skies, allowing temperatures to dip to give a touch of frost. a prescott, bbc news. cold night and also likely to see a few mist and fog patches. a little on the slow side to clear tomorrow. a cold start to the day. rain are you ready to get out there and pushing into north—east england, spreading to the midlands, perhaps east wales. rain light is patchy, unleash in the shops? let us know if leaving a lot of cloud into the you are going out for a christmas afternoon. north—west england, ireland and western scotland probably having the best of the extravaganza. is that you? you end sunshine. but after the coldest touch to the day, even into the afternoon it will be colder overall
6:46 am
with temperatures more in the range of four to six celsius for most. cold weather stays with us into monday. uk finds itself sandwiched up extravaganza. is that you? you end up making terrible decisions and making bad choices. it scrambles between two areas of low pressure. the winds are light, fog looks to be a problem on monday morning, could your brain. kamal singh wasjust 17 be extensive and dense. some of it freezing with temperatures below zero. it means it will be particularly slow to clear, lingering in places through the day. where that happens temperatures will not be much above freezing but if it lifts into low cloud, cold weather. yea rs your brain. kamal singh wasjust 17 years old... next to a crowdfunding campaign back to hollywood stars he for it to 6 degrees. monday night, was able to make his dream and moved this band of rain starting to push to london. and, turning to snow for a time bbc asian network's pria rai across the high ground of scotland and northern england before the has been to meet him. weather turns milder and the snow transitioned back to rain. it looks the english national ballet school like it was stakeholder through most has welcomed students from all over of the week ahead with rain at times the world —— from all over the world and we are bound to see more snow but never before from india.” over the high ground. just given how the world —— from all over the world but never before from india. i feel so happy and good that i am a chilly the air is at the moment. that the weekend weather, and beyond. back to you two. thank you very much. student representing india. here,
6:47 am
dancing in india, kamal singh was a lwa ys dancing in india, kamal singh was always more taken by forms of ballet kamal singh was offered a place at than the usual alderwood numbers.” the ballet school. thanks to a found ballet style really crowdfunding campaign backed by bollywood star as he was able to attractive. —— ollie wood. we are make his dream move to london. bbc dancing the story from the 16th century and we don't speak, we just asian network went to meet him. tell a story through movement. only for more than 30 years, became popular in britain through the english national ballet school the last hundred years. now for has welcomed students from all over the world but never before from india. kamalsingh, he i feel so happy and good that i'm the last hundred years. now for kamal singh, he has to make new traditions of his own. as a son of a a student and i reached that level, rickshaw driver in delhi, his family like this is a big opportunity for me and i'm representing india, had to be convinced by his former first time abroad so i have a big teacher that ballet was a good ring. responsibility now. here, dancing in india, in future, he will be a professional kamal was always more taken by forms of ballet than ballet dancer and have a job, a monthly salary, so that my father the usual bollywood numbers. understood and he saw that loves i found ballet style is totally different and got attractive with the jump and the movements, we are dancing the story from the 16th century
6:48 am
dancing and saw my talent. his and we don't speak, we just tell the story with our dancing movements. talent is clear but his family couldn't afford to send him to ballet began its days as entertainment for wealthy italians and only became popular in london. i was very happy and along britain in the last hundred years. that a little sad because we had, now for kamal, he has to make new traditions of his own. as the son of a rickshaw driver in delhi, his family had to be living expenses is very costly. convinced by his former teacher that ballet was a good thing. in future, he will be a professional ballet dancer black so he turned to crowdfunding and he will have a job, a monthly salary, and here he is and it is hard to so, that my father understood and he saw that i loved dancing believe he only started ballet four and he saw my talent. yea rs believe he only started ballet four years ago. gallagher started at 17 and that is quite late for a belly in india, he'd film dancer so used to work really hard. and share his own videos. his talent is clear but his the 21—year—old impressed pretty family couldn't afford to send him to london. quickly. his optimism, it is so when i got invitation, i was very, wonderful and really comes through very happy and along with that his dancing. and we learn from each a little sad because we have other and i like the students to do to raise the money and at lease that, i appreciate other cultures faces £8,000 and living expenses
6:49 am
and feel united in what they do. in london is very, very costly. there we are all from such different parts of the world and it is really and so he turned to crowdfunding with donations from big amazing and inspiring for us to be bollywood stars too. in class together because we are all from such different training now, he's here in london, and it's hard to believe he only started ballet backgrounds. kamal hopes his four years ago. i started 17 and that is quite late achievement inspires others. the for a male ballet dancer element now i am getting messages in social media that now there are boys so i used to work really, really ha rd. who are starting dancing after the 21—year—old impressed starting my videos —— watching my pretty quickly. videos to am crossing my fingers his devotion to what he does that they will choose bellydancing and his optimism, it is so wonderful and it really comes asa that they will choose bellydancing as a career. “— through his dancing. and we learn from each other and i like the students to do that, that they will choose bellydancing as a career. —— ballet dancing. to appreciate each other and other cultures and feel united what a lovely story. in what they do. we'll be back with the headlines at 7:00am. we're all from such different parts now it's time for poverty and the pandemic, a look at how of the world and it's really amazing and inspiring for us to be in class the last few months has affected those living together because we're all from in severe financial hardship. such different training backgrounds. kamal hopes his achievement are broken, recovering drug addict. inspires others.
6:50 am
got a second chance and as long as a now i'm getting a lot of messages in my social media that there are boys, you know, now starting dancing after watching my videos, so i hope, i'm crossing fingers, that they will choose brief i'll serve the poor. you see ballet dance as a career. priya rai, bbc news. all these people, they have children. hungry children. it's hard the time now is 9:50am. the pandemic to keep your distance when you're old and hungry. politicians say it has changed the way we all do things this year, including, it seems, how isa old and hungry. politicians say it you record a christmas single. is a lie this coronavirus, it is a lie because if you are poor, you've got no chance. people are coming getting everybody together in a studio was out of the question, so a supergroup made up down here for hot food. i'm unable of musicians, celebrities and people with learning difficulties took to the internet to record this piece of festive joy from the comfort to get a job because caring for a disabled person is a full—time job. of their own homes. it is hard to get food for myself because i got lunch money only and i can't go out anywhere. we've got nurses over there because these guys can't access healthcare. it's what
6:51 am
# it's been quite a year # pass happening, the need is massive, but now that it's nearly over i want to wrap my arrr around the ones i love absolutely colossal. this # in christmas pyjamas we sit by the fire # watching old movies coronavirus has made the pressure until we retire ten times worse. if it wasn't # but i'm tired of christmas in lockdown # it looks like christmas dinner‘s on zoom rawles, basically i'd be dead. # so we feel like we're all the room people who are working and they can't make ends meet. the bills and # and the bells, they cannot ring # but we all can sing swallow it up. with the coronavirus as well and the reduction in wages, its not to cope. it means you can # we go la, la, la—la—la eat. yes and it helps wherever you # la, la, la—la—la stop. are you worried about # it's christmas in lockdown coronavirus? yes. why don't you work from home? i'd love to but it is well, we have a songwriter and physically demanding inside a very singer max lewis, both here now. hectic, busy wheezing —— weaving hello, tom, max. lovely to see about this morning. tom, scion of a good shed. and all this is laid on by christmas song is that you can pick it up and start singing along having pastor mick. some of these guys are only heard 30 seconds. well done. that is definitely the idea. all the
6:52 am
sleeping on the concrete. this is best christmas songs do that. how the church i represent. the level of we re best christmas songs do that. how were you inspired to lead the charge on this and get involved?” need here in burnley at the moment isi need here in burnley at the moment were you inspired to lead the charge on this and get involved? i set up an electric umbrella as a charity is i think unprecedented and its upsetting. we've got some bread as backin an electric umbrella as a charity back in 2016 and i'm a professional well, yeah? visiting a family who musician by trade. i work and sing and play with all sorts of people. i had no carpet, had no gas, no was also working in special needs schools and i pulled those two electric, no food. it broke my heart worlds together. it was the whole idea behind it. we have been online because nobody cared for them. they fell through the cracks. pot since march, obviously, going hell for leather with doing as much noodles, that kind of stuff, all connection as we can online. one of right? father alex supports pastor the shows that we did every friday mick. any are desperately looking from may until, i don't know, maybe for help. i think people are being august, was a songwriting show. we forgotten about and its money and numbers and statistics. we can't made a whole album, basically, and the christmas song was a total rely on a foodbank, it doesn't seem accident. we didn't mean to write a right, it doesn't seem modern day christmas song. it was the last show britain, but it is, it is. the of the songwriting for the album, and this christmas song just fell out of all of it. there is myself and 50 other members on the zoom.
6:53 am
biggest part of coronavirus has been the loneliness. you look like you're let's talk to max. good morning to on the mend. i hope so. most days, you, lovely to see you this morning. i know there is a couple of people, someone i know there is a couple of people, someone called tony hadley, somebody pastor mick helps people like viv who is 55. i collapsed on the who once with a band the spandau ballet. he is involved along the line but you, i think, much bigger bathroom floor and i think i was star, frankly. tell me your involvement. you are singing on the there for four days so hypothermia had kicked in and everything. living song. yes, i'm singing in the song. alone in isolation brought back have you done a lot of singing painful memories. it'sjust like before, are you a good singer? yes, brought it all back, i lost my i have sunk before. oh, yes. are you husband, i buried two of my babies. any good, that's what i want to i gave birth, i wanted them to cry know? i am very good! are very and they didn't cry. yeah. nobody enthusiastic. how did it work? has to go through that. coronavirus obviously you couldn't get together to make the music. where were you? brought all this... yeah, how does it work in practice when has to go through that. coronavirus brought allthis... yeah, it has to go through that. coronavirus you dig a bit of singing? my bit of brought all this... yeah, it has brought all this... yeah, it has brought all this back to me. when singing is overa you collapsed, what went through you dig a bit of singing? my bit of singing is over a few people. tom your mind? just let me go, my number helped with it all. great christmas,
6:54 am
must be up, i thought my time was up. she was trapped, trapped inside your house. imagine being trapped great song and i'm really a part of inside your own mind. you can't go out and a lot of people... what did it. what i would like to know a bit from you, as well... it's been a she do? she stopped living, she just difficult time for people at the moment, hasn't it? yeah! weight stopped. what have these past six during lockdown. what has it been months been like for you? really like for you? for me, really difficult because you're doing the terrible because i had my birthday dayjob, the prayers, the pastoral and then we went into lockdown, then everything went chaos! and then calls, funeral services, trying to bea dad, everything went chaos! and then everything went chaos! and then calls, funeral services, trying to be a dad, parent and you've got this everything went pete tong for me. i massive cloud that's just sat up didn't go out from march until now, i haven't been out to any shops and there. coronavirus? coronavirus, i haven't been out to any shops and yeah. the overall death rate between i haven't been out anywhere else but april and june this year in the most the rest of the stuff that i've been deprived areas of england was nearly double that of the lease deprived. doing, like chicken shed is not a
6:55 am
that at least deprived. anybody that's paul has been suffering. went priority. electric umbrella definitely. chicken shed and i've been out to do my films and musicals and it'sjust to eat and pay our bills which got been out to do my films and musicals and it's just brilliant been out to do my films and musicals and it'sjust brilliant in this us to eat and pay our bills which got us into debt. how's it going? for lockdown, but coming to christmas, i just went to my first pantomime and pete, an issue with his family's my last. it was brilliant. benefits meant payday loans and financial crisis. how much are you everything was... yeah, fine. look, in debt for? not a lot, £1000. got it down now to 2— £300. max, that's really good to hear because you are a lesson for all of us in looking for the good things in debt for? not a lot, £1000. got it down now to 2- £300. what stress did that do to you? depression, you when things are a bit tough. tom, you have been rather outshone, i'll be honest with you. we like hearing feel like you don't matter, your magister number. the governmentjust from max a lot. well done on the work. at the moment, lovely to see didn't care. i'm going to houses and you both, by the way... max, thank you both, by the way... max, thank you very much. liking max's sweater. sometimes there are children ripping the bags open to get into the food i think we can speak to tony hadley, is i'm carrying through the door. is that right. pete tong, one of the few people not involved in this
6:56 am
record, but tony hadley definitely was. as you mention, from spandau ballet, formally. this has been an and its not right, that. that's not all right. and it wasn't as bad as amazing year for people to make unexpected connections, bizarrely enough. we have had less human that before the virus. pastor mick contact that you have been getting involved with something perhaps you didn't expect to be caught up with. says he is hearing more and more of i didn't, to be honest, and it's these stories. the unfairness of just coincidence. most musicians end up just coincidence. most musicians end up knowing other musicians. tim health deprivation.” these stories. the unfairness of health deprivation. i feel angry oliver, he was in my band, he said, because people aren't listening. look, we've got this fantastic what has coronavirus meant for your charity and time is running it and care? i'm stuck here. i'm supposed so charity and time is running it and so during the summer he said, would you like to come on and sing a to have a blood test once a month, couple of songs and interact with nobody's been and done it six everybody online, on zoom or whatever? it was so lovely. it was months. may was the last time i had fantastic. i have such a good time. mine done. i've just been left for and then tom called me and said, we are doing a charity single, would you mind singing? course, iwould six months without care. what i love to be involved. it's an amazing charity and everyone is just so lovely. i love pete tong! thought was two hernias, it's not,
6:57 am
laughter it's one huge hernia. i can't max is clearly a character. the joy operated on because i can't survive of these things is at the mash up. it stop sheila relies on family, especially her granddaughter. people like yourself, with years of experience, then you get these youngsters like max, who get the i'm already dying. people need the chance to be part of something. as he said himself, he said it better than any of us. it's been difficult for people. we all need a bit of nhs. we can't do anything to help, uplifting, don't we? i played the we just have to sit back and watch song on my radio show last sunday, it. yeah, but you don't sit back, do bbc three counties! i played the you? we canjust be here, there's song and i have such an amazing response that i played it again at nothing we can do. the end because it is a really uplifting song and it is for a fantastic cause and everyone has got i've never seen anything like this on this scale. hobbies —— poverty involved, musicians and all the young people. it just seems to be hidden. we know about involved, musicians and all the young people. itjust makes you feel good and that was the feedback i got the poor but this is another level, it is underneath the surface, this, from the radio show when we first that people don't see, they think played it. everyone said it's so they do but they don't. there is not nice, so lovely and for such a good many people who lose a child... the cause. but to answer your question,
6:58 am
it's been difficult in the musical first lady of a foodbank on saturday world, the theatre world, for came and she wrote down. her technicians, everybody involved in the arts. it's been incredibly daughter had killed herself. —— difficult and, you know, this is the sort of a little chink of light and broke. hopefully this will lift people's spirits and show that there is light you have to try and find words. at the end of the tunnel, so we, as musicians, and as a charity, cannot you'll get there. without their wait to get back to be together and hugged each other and do the things support, what would have happened to we normally do. well said. good to you? i'd probably be where my chat with you this morning and of daughter is now, up there. together, course our thanks to tom and max, as well. the single is out now. they're the hope of thousands speaking of incredible charity through this crisis. efforts, kevin sinfield has topped i'm sorry, i'm sorry about getting £500,000 on his seven marathons in seven days. we will keep you up—to—date on that story over the next few days. back tomorrow at 6am. upset because, you know, you carry goodbye. goodbye.
6:59 am
people's burdens. you tried to tell them it's all right... it's just so upsetting. we pray mercy and love into the lives of the families and we pray this prayer injesus' name, amen. these people are stepping into the arena and making a massive difference. how have you been doing anyway? we've got a sleeping bag, we're doing all right. it will come into a community —— coming from a this is bbc news with the latest community of despair. to a community headlines for viewers in the uk of love and care. in that's what's and around the world. uk prime minister borisjohnson different in burnley. is this and the president of the european commission will speak testing your faith? no. no, my faith later today to try and break the brexit trade talks deadlock. is being strengthened by this we keep calm, as always,
7:00 am
crisis. because it's given me an and if there is still a way, we will see, huh? opportunity to live out the gospel to serve the poor and to help the the two sides remain divided on fishing rights — needy, all those people that you may the rules governing state subsidies have seen weeping that i do believe for business and how god weeps as well and wants this to the deal is policed. uk businesses say go away and for people to celebrate they need clarity now. the government have sent out a letter to every business a sense of community and care for in the country saying one another that is much needed in "check, change, go". this time. the government says it's well, check what? change what? go where? committed to reducing deprivation. we need to know now. this has now got to be done, there has got to be and it's spent over £100 billion on welfare support this year. the fear is that the challenges now facing our poorest communities will remain long after this pandemic is over.
7:01 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today: as brexit trade negotiations stall borisjohnson plans last—ditch talks to try and break the deadlock. gp surgeries are told to get ready to start giving the covid vaccine in nine days' time. it's a big weekend for grassroots sport in england. football pitches will be full again, as amateur competition returns after the second lockdown. good morning. after yesterday's cold and snowy weather, today it looks like it is going to stay pretty cloudy with outbreaks of cold rain. join me for a full forecast a bit later on. it's saturday, december the 5th. our top story. boris johnson will speak to the president of the european commission this afternoon, to try to achieve a breakthrough in negotiations on a
7:02 am
post—brexit trade agreement. talks were put on hold last night, after a week of intensive discussions in london failed to resolve key sticking points, including fishing rights. our political correspondent leila nathoo has this report. there are just four weeks to go until the brexit transition period ends, and whether there is a trade deal or not, there will be changes to how goods move between the uk and eu. journalist: will we get a deal? but despite a week of intensive talks in london, last night negotiations were suspended. the uk's chief negotiator, lord frost, and the man on the eu side, michel barnier, set in a joint statement that the conditions for an agreement are not matched due to "significant divergences." they agreed to pause the talks in order to brief their principles
7:03 am
on the state of play of the negotiations. the main issues still to be settled are how any future deal will be governed, fair competition rules for businesses operating in each other‘s markets, and fishing rights. one source on the uk side familiar with the negotiations pointed to the demands for eu fishing boats to have up to ten years' access to uk waters as one issue that derailed progress. both sides said they still wanted a deal, but believed the other should give ground. they hope that a political intervention and conversation between the prime minister and the president of the european commission this afternoon can provide the breakthrough needed. leila nathoo, bbc news. our political correspondent jonathan blakejoins us now from our london newsroom. jonathan, how crucial is it that progress is made today? it is so significant the premises having step in? —— the prime minister is having to step in. yes, this is a crucial moment in these talks, aimed at securing a trade agreement between
7:04 am
the uk and eu. whata securing a trade agreement between the uk and eu. what a cliffhanger we we re the uk and eu. what a cliffhanger we were left with with thatjoint statement put out by both sides yesterday evening, as you had in that report, significant divergences remain between both sides. i think as far as the uk site is concerned, at least, that's an understatement, if anything. i think what you have here is both sides, both teams on the ground, the negotiators, having gone as far as they can within that arena they have decided that the only thing left to do is to call the boss and have onside talk to the other, and see if anything can be done. to see if there's any room for movement, loosening of the mandate with the teens of negotiators here. the stakes are incredibly high. that call between borisjohnson and ursula von der leyen is due to take place at some point this afternoon, and what they are looking for is some sort of political shot in the
7:05 am
arm that will give momentum to these talks at the last minute. the pause button has been pressed and we will find out soon weather we will be pressing play or stop. gps in england will start offering the coronavirus vaccine from the 14th of december. patients aged 80 or over will be the first to get it. care homes in england are expected to get the vaccine within two weeks, with the first vaccinations in hospitals taking place next week. andy moore reports. any allergies that you may have? nurses in a coventry hospital practising how they will administer the new pfizer vaccine, beginning next week. because the jab comes in large batches at low temperatures, the initial rollout will be at 50 hospitals across the uk. but we now know that will be swiftly followed with the vaccinations by groups of gps in england, beginning on monday 11! december. the priority for getting the jab will be the over—80s who can make their own way to the vaccination centre. special freezers will be provided to store the vaccine at —70. gp practices will come together to manage the programme. they have been told that is their priority, special freezers will be provided to store the vaccine at —70. gp practices will come together
7:06 am
to manage the programme. they have been told that is their priority, with only urgent care for all other patients. after that, within two weeks, doses of the vaccine will start going out to care homes. plans are in place to reduce the boxes containing the vaccine doses to more manageable consignments. all of this will place a huge burden on the nhs, and so the chief medical officers of the four home nations have written to staff, praising them for their hard work, while warning that this winter will be especially hard because of the pressures from covid. they warn of a possible surge in cases because of extra socialising over christmas, and they say for the next three months, vaccines will only have a marginal effect on the burden for the nhs. every action counts when it comes to protecting ourselves and our loved ones from coronavirus.
7:07 am
that's why the nhs has launched a new public information film comparing the wrong and the right ways we can go about our lives every day to stop the spread of covid. it reminds us that up to a third of people show no symptoms, so they can spread the virus unknowingly. and we should say we will be talking to gp ellie cannon at 7:30am this morning. we'll get her take on the significant development that gps will be getting their hands on these vaccines soon. it is the regular slot we do, we talk to a gp most mornings, but with the news that we have a date for when they will start to get out of accent, and income thatis to get out of accent, and income that is the question they have all been asking. the mayor of liverpool, joe anderson, has been arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to commit bribery and witness intimidation. he's among five people arrested as part of a year—long police
7:08 am
investigation. our correspondent mairead smyth is in liverpool. mairead, what more do we know? well, joe anderson is elected as mayor of the city, back in 2012, a position he held for eight years. it means he is the leader of the city council as well. he is well known here, he has been a counsellor here since 1998 and nationally he has been credited with driving forward the masculine device testing pilot in liverpool. but this morning, joe anderson has been questioned in connection with allegations of fraudulent building deals. he is under suspicion of conspiracy to commit bribery and witness intimidation. now, the mayor is one of five men arrested yesterday, aged between 25 and 72. it is in connection with the police investigation into the awarding of
7:09 am
construction contracts, which has focused on a number of property developers. liverpool city council say that they are cooperating with merseyside police but will not comment on any individuals. the labor party has suspended joe anderson pending the outcome of this case. clinics in moscow will start offering covid—19 jabs from today, after president putin ordered the start of large—scale vaccination in russia for those groups most at risk. the country is using its own vaccine, sputnik v, which is approved for emergency use but still undergoing trials. our correspondent sarah rainsford is in moscow. sarah, what do we know about this vaccine? a significant difference is that this one has not gone through phase three trials yet? well, i think that is the huge difference, as you say, it is still undergoing mass trials for efficacy, to see how it affects the transmission of the virus, and
7:10 am
also for safety. about 20,000 people artificially on a child who have had the injection so far. now russia is moving to this rollout, this rapid rollout. first of all, here in moscow, but then eventually across the country as more of the vaccine becomes available. that is partly about russia's desire, the push to be first in this. it has always seen the rollout of this vaccine, or a vaccines generally, as part of a global race. and emergency rules we re global race. and emergency rules were implemented back in august, so it is perfectly legal in russia to do this, but i think it is quite clear that russia is moving as fast as it possibly can. the other thing is that the current situation here is that the current situation here is not great. we're still seeing an increase in the number of cases, 27,000 recorded yesterday. also an increase in the number of people buying from covid. that is something we really didn't see in big numbers in the first wave here. so there is a sense of urgency here, but we need to move to vaccinate, but i think because this vaccine is, in a sense, still experimental despite the great
7:11 am
claims being made for it by the developers, that means some russians are quite cautious about actually getting vaccinated. so first of all, it is going to be people who are most at risk, they were talking about social workers, anybody who works in health and education, we're told some 5000 have so far signed up in moscow to get to be jarred. but there are also concerns, questions over how much russia can actually produce on the vaccine itself. it is quite complicated, the production process. the producers themselves are quite slow to be brought into the process. so at the moment rush is saying it can inject about 2 million doses each month, but some people here are saying that even that number is looking a bit optimistic at the moment. thank you, sarah. a man's been charged with murdering two women in kent 33 years ago. wendy knell and caroline pierce were killed in separate attacks in tunbridge wells in 1987. david fuller, who's 66, is due to appear before magistrates today. one of the 13 prisoners deported from the uk to jamaica on wednesday has tested positive for covid—19. the jamaican government says the man
7:12 am
is being held in isolation at a hospital in the capital kingston. the flight has attracted controversy, with critics warning that people might be wrongly removed as in the windrush scandal. now, how about this fora hairy landing? look at data. this is an aircraft in minnesota, forced to use a very busy road, as you can see, dual carriageway. it can write down the middle, using it as a landing strip. apparently, the plane experienced engine failure, hence the emergency. two people on board, nobody injured, everybody fine. the trafficjust literally still travelling alongside the aircraft. it picked its lane. it is actually landing on one of the lanes, isn't it? this is the second
7:13 am
timei lanes, isn't it? this is the second time i have seen this. there is a car effectively travelling directly behind it, after it has landed. so it must have just dipped over its head. quite extraordinary. amazing. it is 7:12am. after an initial trial in liverpool, the use of a rapid coronavirus test, which gives a result in under an hour, is now being rolled out to more cities. wolverhampton will begin offering all residents the tests from this week, whether or not they have symptoms. phil mackie has been to see how it will work. these are the lateral flow tests which give people results injust half—an—hour. they have invited a small number of people to help get ready for the launch next week, and have trained up 100 council staff to carry them out. i chose to do it because it is part of our civic duty, we work for the city, it is ourjob to protect our citizens. so volunteering, we can get more people tested and get much more information and it is a lot better veracity. turn it five times. they asked me to bea guinea
7:14 am
turn it five times. they asked me to be a guinea pig and because i didn't have any symptoms i was heavy to ta ke have any symptoms i was heavy to take part. if you would like to pop your swab into a test tube. make sure, ok. just like this? so i have just handed in my swab, and they are already starting work on it, which means that within about 30 minutes i should know weather or not i tested positive or negative. but there are concerns that because this test is less reliable, more people will be told they are negative when they are not. and if those people then go out and they visit their grandparents, they stop socially distancing and so on, because they believe they haven't got covid, that is not going to help. it could actually make it worse. in wolverhampton, they think it isa worse. in wolverhampton, they think it is a risk worth taking, and they know the message must clear. just because you've got a negative test doesn't mean that's fine, i can do what i want, go where i want, hug my granny. you can't. you've still got to follow those rules. one in three
7:15 am
people who have the virus don't have symptoms, which is why trying to find the asymptomatic cases are such a priority. it is that not knowing, isn't it? there are so many people who have got no symptoms you could actually be spreading it. i feel that i have done my bit, really, for the city, to try to get us into tier two, if we can. because i am working from home and i don't go out anyway, so from home and i don't go out anyway, so it is not going to change anything. but for my own... peace of mind? yeah. i've just anything. but for my own... peace of mind? yeah. i'vejust got my notification from the nhs, which tells me that i've got the result less tha n tells me that i've got the result less than half—an—hour after i took the test. let's have a look at what it says. thankfully it says i'm negative. but that doesn't mean i will change my behaviour at all. i've still got to abide by the same rules, as if i hadn't had the test. wolverhampton is desperate to drop from tier three to tier two. infection rates are already falling, and they are banking on these tests to help wipe out the virus. phil mackie, bbc news, wolverhampton.
7:16 am
very interesting to see what is happening in wolverhampton. -- wolverhampton. they think mass testing is the answer. let's listen to tim specter, an epidemiologist. we will talk to you about the r number but on the case of mass testing, and flow tests, there are some issues with accuracy so how much can we rely on them? there are problems with all tests. we must not remember the original pcr test does still miss people but a positive testis still miss people but a positive test is real and this is even more true in these new fast tests and the problem is that if it is negative and 30 or40 problem is that if it is negative and 30 or a0 people are false negatives, they might be missing more infectious cases. it is only
7:17 am
useful if that person can isolate. but if you do lots of them multiple times in terms of because of this particular problem, so it depends how it is used and i do have some problems about it being used in mass testing. i think that is going to pick up some may be some mild testers, aims —— asymptomatic, that we might miss some more infectious ones that they might pick up. it is really a n ones that they might pick up. it is really an experiment at the moment for them, really, i really an experiment at the moment forthem, really, ithink really an experiment at the moment for them, really, i think that a policy that should be applied everywhere. your work has been focused on people keeping themselves aware of potential symptoms. are you more likely to be infectious if you are displaying symptoms, do we know that? we do know that. basically, the more symptoms you've got, the more likely you are to be infectious. there are a few exceptions but generally people with, and our data, it is from the covid symptoms study app, where we
7:18 am
asked over 25 with common symptoms rather than the government's three, we find that one in five people are asymptomatic in our data. and those people tend to have lower levels of virus and although they can infect others, they are not as likely to do so as people with more major symptoms or have multiple different symptoms or have multiple different symptoms in different parts of body that carry on a long time. 25 common symptoms, it is well worth pointing people in the direction of the app so they have an awareness of that because it goes way beyond what we originally thought, a cough and aching limbs or whatever. we must talk to you about the r number because it looks like there has been significant movement on this for the first time sit —— since september, the low one across all the english regions, perhaps the north—east being the exception. is that what yourjudgement you're picking up as well? al data tracks of the ons
7:19 am
pretty well over the last three months. similar results but we are about a week ahead. we actually noticed the r—value dropping below one. two weeks ago, according to our data, and it is 0.8 nationally. virtually all regions have been dropping, this is the large regions, which risks going in the other direction and we do see it dropping but it within the regions, there are of course small pockets where things are going the other direction and there are some places on teesside and around reading and slough that look as though they are going the other direction at the moment but generally it is a really good picture. we have seen drops now for several weeks and its levels of at least half than they were at the peak about six weeks ago just before we went into lockdown so it was like
7:20 am
a really good picture and that seems to be mirroring what is happening with the admissions so after we found these new cases, two weeks later, that's when the effect is seen on later, that's when the effect is seen on hospital admissions and rousing nhs admissions and bed occupancy falling across the country, again with a few exceptions but it is pretty good news, really, at this time of year where we are also not getting many other viruses because of our new type of behaviour, if you like.” because of our new type of behaviour, if you like. i think that is interesting, actually, people's general approach on sanitising is all having an impact. the rate of infection is also declining in the rest of the uk as well and just to remind people, the r number being the number of people you are likely to infect if you are likely to have the virus. if it is less than one, the virus. if it is less than one, the virus. if it is less than one, the virus in retreat, the numbers are coming down significantly. what do you think was the biggest deciding factor in bringing that
7:21 am
number down. is it fundamentally lockdown, is that the only thing that really works? no, according to our data, it didn't look like lockdown made a big difference, whereas the tiered system and social distancing and behaving well, is actually probably the answer because these infections tend to come in waves a nyway these infections tend to come in waves anyway and basically what happens is when the virus runs out of other people to infect because they're either too far away or they are not meeting, it will start to decline and we actually saw numbers declining across the country, particularly the north, before the national lockdown so it looked like the tiered system was actually working and it should have been given more of the chances of what i would like to see is a more general long—term plan about this rather than stop start idea of strict —— switching restrictions and we have seen switching restrictions and we have seenin switching restrictions and we have seen in wales how that has come under back a bit and according to our data, going under back a bit and according to ourdata, going up
7:22 am
under back a bit and according to our data, going up again in wales after the two—week short break. i think we have a longer term plan until april where people keep their social distance, keep sensible, don't meet in big groups but we don't meet in big groups but we don't have this concertina effect where people are rushing to the pub before lockdown and that sort of thing but what we're is great news that people's behaviour is paying off and that means there is less potential victims for the virus each week which is great news. well we may have great concertina over christmas which i am sure we will talk to you about again, tim. thank you for your time. just a reminder, the tracker app is the one he was referring to, the zoe tracker app. you will be able to find it on your usual app providers. how was the weather looking for the weekend, chris? well, charlie and rachel, good morning and good morning to you at home for top in a word it will stay cold throughout the weekend and just at the moment we have seen the weekend and just at the moment we have seen some the weekend and just at the moment we have seen some winteriness in the
7:23 am
showers pushing across the west midlands, some of that snowy weather is moving into the high ground of wales at the moment as well but for many of us, it is a cold and fairly cloudy day coming up with areas of cold rain coming through for most of us. cold rain coming through for most of us. a reminder, the cold air has been arriving from the north, coming down from polar regions, this area of low pressure is what brought some significant snow yesterday. the cold air is still loitering around this area of low pressure but with temperatures a degree also higher than they were yesterday, that has tipped the balance in favour of cold rain. there are still some areas of snow, snow in aviemore, for example, quite high up and as i say, we will probably see some snow moving across the brecon beacons and across the shropshire and staffordshire moors. watch out for some icy showers and the tendency for whether to brighten up the tendency for whether to brighten u p slowly the tendency for whether to brighten up slowly but a few bits and pieces are still dotted around the uk. and
7:24 am
it is cold, temperatures are six or seven quite widely. perhaps just fourfor seven quite widely. perhaps just four for some seven quite widely. perhaps just fourfor some of you seven quite widely. perhaps just four for some of you for top overnight will be cold with frost returning, mist and fog patches again where we have clear skies. it will tend to commando —— cloud over with lifting temperatures by the end of the night was not otherwise cold, frosty, some icy patches, some fog to start the day as well on sunday but generally it will be a quieter day for parts of, patchy rain moving across parts of the midlands, perhaps towards the south—east of wales as we move into the afternoon. the temperatures don't get quite as high soa the temperatures don't get quite as high so a cold day tomorrow, eyes of the forehead and six celsius. for the forehead and six celsius. for the start of the —— highs. for the start of the new working week, we find ourselves in the middle of the low pressure and we will have the
7:25 am
quieter slice of weather where the weather will be very still. widespread folk to start the day on monday and it is one of those days where the murky weather could linger even into the afternoon. where that happens, temperatures are struggling to get much above freezing was called for many of us, a—5, perhaps in late rain. dry but a cold start to the date of the week, it doesn't look like the weather will turn more u nsettled look like the weather will turn more unsettled later in the week with rain returning but for the rest of the day, patchy rain and a bit of snow moved in but it is mostly over the high ground. thanks very much, chris. a japanese spacecraft is about to deliver to earth the first large samples of rock and soil from an asteroid. scientists hope studying the rocks could provide insights into how life began. let's speak now to sara russell, who is a professor of planetary sciences.
7:26 am
tell us about this vessel and how this stuff is being brought back? this is ourjapanese space mission called hayabusu2 and it has collected some soil samples from the surface of an asteroid called ryugu. it is not the whole mission that comes back to earth, it will come close to the earth but it will deposit the capsule into the earth's atmosphere which will land in the australian desert. and there is a small amount of something, some soil or something from the asteroid cosmic surface. that right? that's
7:27 am
right. we don't know how much exactly will be, we are hoping for about a exactly will be, we are hoping for abouta gram exactly will be, we are hoping for about a gram which maybe doesn't sound like a lot but using our modern techniques, it is enough for hundreds of scientists to do all sorts of measurements so we will be looking at how or alter the rockies, looking at how or alter the rockies, looking at what sort of organic material —— how old the rock is. all of these things will give us clues about how the solar system formed because we think these rocks formed at the same time as the planet formation took place. without wishing to sound sceptical, in this past, i remember scientist saying this could be the breakthrough moment, you know, there is something contained in a little bit of soil or product come from another planet which will give us the insight we need. is this genuinely that, potentially that important? yes! i was shocked you could even ask that
7:28 am
question! absolutely! there has been one return from an asteroid before called hayabusa, a previous japanese in position but this one is special because it is going to an asteroid which we think is really rich in organic material and in water and one of the things we are looking at is whether asteroids like ryugu could have seeded the early earth so in the very earliest history of the earth, we think it might have been pelted with asteroids like that and that's what gave us the water and the carbon to form our oceans and enable life to flourish on earth. i'm going to shock you even more with my next question which is... given that we don't know what it is or where it's come from, how careful do we have to be when we unpack it? what i'm saying in a way is, is there a risk attached to it? because we don't know what it is?”
7:29 am
there a risk attached to it? because we don't know what it is? i don't think there is a risk and here is why. missions are thought through very carefully beforehand and they have to be evaluated to see if there are risks so, for example, i don't know if you are thinking that there might be bugs inside this rocks, for example. the asteroid ryugu is an airless body which means it has been pelted with radiation all the time and that means any life on the surface that exists would immediately be sterilised so we're very confident that it is a sterile sample i guess maybe the other wrist is that it will have something poisonous on it but we think we've got samples a bit like ryugu on earth already in the form of meteorites so where i work, we have this brilliant collection of meteorites and we can use those to give us some clues as to what we think ryugu might be made of it.
7:30 am
hopefully we don't have any surprises like that. this might be the most daft question i have asked so the most daft question i have asked so far. how certain are they that the thing that list that look —— lifted the soil up actually did? they are not going to open it up and find that it didn't actually bring anything back? no, i don't think so. the team is very confident that everything has gone really well with this mission and they are all very optimistic that everything will be fine and we won't know what's going to be in there do we actually open the capsule but it seems like all the capsule but it seems like all the indications are very good. very exciting, we all watch with interest as it unfolds, due to land in the australian outback, we understand. good to talk to you this morning. not the first time someone on this programme has been a bit sceptical about your scepticism, charlie, probably. i think particularly with space stories, it is fascinating to
7:31 am
ask the really basic stuff. you have to ask the obvious stuff. there was a piece in the paper you had earlier, charlie, saying that more of us are doing diy mince pies. sorry, yes, this was about, apparently, sales of the stuff you need to do baking, puff pastry, for example, this is tesco saying this, puff pastry sales this year are up 90% on the same time last year. so everybody is doing baking.” 90% on the same time last year. so everybody is doing baking. i used puff pastry yesterday to make my mince pies. we can see how they came out. yeah. someone sat in the office this morning, yorkshire puddings. more yorkshire pudding that mince pie. would you put one of those your mouth? are they supposed to be contained? it mouth? are they supposed to be contained ? it is mouth? are they supposed to be contained? it is like ice gone. it is more like two separate... it is one piece. it is like a couple of mince meat bits with a lid. it looks absolutely nothing like this, which
7:32 am
is what they are supposed to look like. i have always been of the opinion that athletics are much less important than what they are made out to be. it is all about what they taste like stop that is all you need. you are watching bbc brea kfast. need. you are watching bbc breakfast. coming up up later: the winner of i'm a celebrity get me out of here 2020, and the first ever queen of the castle! so, there were three weeks of gruelling trials involving snakes, rat, and a singing competition as welcome as you can see. the queen of the castle has been announced, we have batman, former leader of the council watson, talking about his i'm a celebrity highlights. it's coming upjust before nine o'clock. if you have any
7:33 am
top tips for making mince pies, let us top tips for making mince pies, let us know. stay with us. charlie is just saying that he would have eaten my mince pies. i said i am not sure it would have been covid secure to bring them in. he was happy to take the risk. just keep on back there will be another occasion.
7:34 am
they might be a bit mackie biden.” think they will improve with age, but i could be wrong. it is 7:33am. some of the top stories this morning. it is saturday morning, of course. gp practices in england will start vaccinating people against covid—19 from the 1ath of december. it's been described as the uk's biggest—ever vaccination programme, so what will it involve? let's speak to the gp dr ellie cannon who joins us from north london. lovely to talk to you, ali. so the 1ath of december is the date gps have been given. what have you personally been told, or hurting your surgery? yes, that's exactly what i've been hearing. we are organising ourselves either in what is called gp hubs or our groups of gp practices that are now called primary care networks. that group of gps working together to provide one centre or one team. we have been told we need to be available to vaccinate people from eight o'clock in the morning to eight o'clock in the evening. i know that there is
7:35 am
certainly a lot of enthusiasm to help and to be involved. it is incredibly exciting. just reading here, each of the first sites, i don't know how many initial sites there will be, but each are expected to deliver just there will be, but each are expected to deliverjust under a thousand doses, and those are the big trays that we know these particular vaccines come in. they come in sets of 1000, pretty much. they will be expected to deliver these in the week beginning december 1a. practically speaking, how many patients do you think that people will be able to vaccinate before christmas? that's right, they come in these large pizza boxes, with 175 vaccinations in them, and that is what we have to otherwise it is wasted. given how enthusiastic my patients are, i don't think it will be difficult to find patients to vaccinate. we have people phoning in all the time asking for their covid
7:36 am
vaccine. obviously will be following very strict groupings. the first group to be vaccinated will be the ca re group to be vaccinated will be the care homes and the care workers, those over 80, the nhs staff, but includes myself, then we'll be working through that group. so really, the 1000 patients in care homes, that will be high risk. that is the key point, isn't it? you are going to approach the patients who need this vaccine, they do not need to call into you? that's exactly right. so this is going to be organised nationally, although we are doing it on a local level, and don't call us, we will be phoning you. gps have already identified exactly who their high—risk patients are, whether they are in a care home or whether fit that iris criteria of age. we are used to contacting you, as you will know, from the flu
7:37 am
vaccination programme and from other types of screening we call programmes. so it is up to us to call you, and also, we don't have the facility to bypass the rules. it is very strict, he will be getting vaccinations. for example, yesterday i had vaccinations. for example, yesterday ihada vaccinations. for example, yesterday i had a patient who was desperate for a coronavirus vaccination, but would not be on one of the priority groups. we can't do anything about that. but is going to be very strict, and i think they've also said they are not going to let any of these doses get into the hands of, for example, private healthcare. you will be able to provide —— by them outside of the national health service. where are you going to administer these vaccines? because clearly they will need to be a very strict safety procedure in place for that. i know that people have contacted us to say that they are worried about giving up for a vaccine, for example? a very good question. i work in a gp surgery that serves about 12,000 patients. in fact, we will not be offering the
7:38 am
vaccination from my gp surgery, it will be from one of the other local gp surgeries. where we can have the facilities to vaccinate people safely, because of the space and the areas to cure, and we have already done this in general practice, to be reassured, for example, three april and may, in general practice throughout the country we set up hot hubs where we could safely see patients who had covid, and then cold hubs where we could safely see patients who didn't have covid. so we are quite used to those types of logistics within the nhs and within primary care, and of course it will be as safe as we can be, both the patients and also for staff. and if they can't actually get to the surgery, because they can't actually get to the surgery, because you may have patients who do not find it easy to leave the home, but are not necessarily in care homes, what happens then? we have that every single year without flu vaccination programme, and we are very single year without flu vaccination programme, and we are very lucky that district nurses deliver the flu
7:39 am
vaccination programme to housebound patients. that will happen also with this vaccination, so patients are vulnerable, who are in high risk groups, will be offered there vaccinations at home, and it is up to gps and the community teams to deliver that stop thank you so much, ali. always instructive to hear from you. all the best over the coming weeks and months, i know it is going to be very, very busy for you and your colleagues. that dr cannon, a gp in north london. my because the sport. mike, isuppose gp in north london. my because the sport. mike, i suppose in a way, you are presenting the spot, you have had sport as much as i don't commentate on, but the whole new thing now is that fans are coming back to the ground, to varying degrees, and people are actually playing videogames as well? that is on two levels. so much about sport is feeling more normal again, certainly in england after the lockdown and stop so people can once
7:40 am
again to the sportsday lodge, depending on which tna are in. grassroots matches taking place again today. and yes, in the premier league, a real moment, the sound of the crowd is back. there will be fans at premier league matches today. that hasn't happened since march. supporters will be at two of the four top flight games today, starting with west ham's home game against manchester united. there's loads of extra checks for the fans to go through, as you'd expect, and there'll be no away supporters either. we won't have our fans there, but we will just have we won't have our fans there, but we willjust have to use the energy or thrive off the home sounds, make them quiet, hopefully, we can make them quiet, hopefully, we can make them edgy. so we are looking forward to it. i think it is great to see fa ns to it. i think it is great to see fans back in the stadium. of course, we wa nt fans back in the stadium. of course, we want them back at old trafford is well, and hopefully we will get up soon. billyjoe saunders has retained his wbo super—middleweight title, after beating fellow briton martin murray last night. it was a unanimous decision
7:41 am
at wembley arena, giving saunders the 30th win of his undefeated professional career. he wasn't a fan of boxing in an empty arena, though — he said it was like "a cemetary." world number one judd trump is into the semi—finals of the uk snooker championship. he was pushed all the way in his quarter—final by kyren wilson. the match went to a deciding frame, which trump won. he's looking for his second uk title, having won his first nine years ago. neil robertson is also though to the semis in milton keynes. millions of people in england are able to do the sport or activity they love again this weekend, after they love again this weekend, after the latest lockdown and stop grassroots football matches across england in all tiers will be taking place again, but the lancashire fa announced last night it was suspending all grassroots football activity in eight new areas, or eight areas, until the new year at the earliest, due to coronavirus
7:42 am
concerns. on a brighter note, there has been a big step forward with grassroots rugby union in northern england, as i looked around at various new sports resuming over the last three days. the big hits are back, and they are looking for tackles, despite the bruises. they haven't had contact like this in training in grassroots by like this in training in grassroots rugby union since early march. really good, exciting, it is the biggest part of my game, tackling part, so i know i'm pleased.” biggest part of my game, tackling part, so i know i'm pleased. i am very relieved, because without contact in rugby, it isjust a game of running, catching the ball. it feels good, getting to ground.@ helens ‘s interior tier two, but contact is now being reintroduced in all the tears in england fault in by all the tears in england fault in rugby league which previously was in better grassroots level in the autumn before the season ended. after so long without contacting the game, they are gradually easing themselves back into it here. once more, from december 19, they will start playing matches again. albeit
7:43 am
with a couple of alterations to make the game safe still. we have had to make some wild variations and adaptations to the game, removing the scrum and the maul, close face—to—face contact we have in the game. still a little way to go to get the full game back, but this is my mental stuff. this is all we have waited for four months now. we have got a real direction for rugby, absolutely brilliant. when matches start up again, clubs in tier three will only be able to play opponents in the same tier. under 18 is will be exempt from the travel ban, and thatis be exempt from the travel ban, and that is the same in football, as they grassroots matches resume in england this weekend after the month long lockdown and been restricted to training in the garden. near basingstoke in tier two, families are able to support from the sidelines again, as long as they observe social distancing rules. sidelines again, as long as they observe social distancing rulesm is very social. it is a very big pa rt is very social. it is a very big part of our lives. the kids have had anything to do with school change, social side of their lives change, everything has changed. and really, a bit of football is that normality for them. itjust makes me feel a lot better about myself. it'sjust makes me sleep more. on the weekend,
7:44 am
all i was doing was playing the playstation, because i didn't know what to do. if the footballers are pleased to be back, imagine the delight of the jan—lennard and shotput athletes here in tier two berkshire, he lost a whole season. they are not the easiest sports to practise at home either, so they cannot wait to train through this winter now. i think a lot of people ourage, and winter now. i think a lot of people our age, and professional athletes even, struggle with motivation. you spend all winter building up to competition season, though six months, and that is normally from about march to september, we just lost all of that completely. and under deliberations are in hampshire, tier two, the climbing wall is reopening again this weekend as indoor venues like this pick their way back through the various restrictions. reduced by 50%, another is more cleaning involved, we cleaned was at the end of each session. it is great the social distancing because we only have one person up a wall at each time. group activities can be more of a balancing act while in tier three, indoor group exercise classes are not allowed. here in tier two and
7:45 am
over they are, where everybody on that's nearly three metres apart, class sizes more than half.” that's nearly three metres apart, class sizes more than half. i find it quite difficult to motivate myself at home or go running and stuff. and to be able to do something like this, in company, this is a great feeling again.” think would exercise it is very much going to be a creature of habit, and where we have had this break it is just getting people back into that routine of exercising and using the facility. wherever you are, grassroots boards will continue to adapt and follow the latest covid—19 restrictions. in northern ireland at the moment, all grassroots productivities are suspended until the end of next week in line with the end of next week in line with the latest firebreak lockdown there. in scotland, most sports and activities are allowed now, but there are tighter restrictions in tiers three and four. in wales, they started grassroots sports again a few weeks ago now when there lockdown ended, but all organisations and players should follow the various sports protocols and there are limits on numbers. we hope now on pictures across the uk
7:46 am
is that eventually they can all build momentum with the promise of new vaccines bearing them onto that winning feeling again. you can see what it means to have the contact back in grassroots rugby union! i must say, whatever you do, do check what is possible on the various sport websites. it is all very clear on the website. if you are trying to get out doing the thing you love doing, chris, how is it going to look across the uk? i think these guys have the right idea. definitely a weekend for a warm fleece or two. this was the hills as the snow came down, a little bit more slow —— snow mostly over high ground but many of us just have cloud and patches of cold rain
7:47 am
coming through at times. the cold air has been arriving from the north from polar regions as this area of low pressure has been pushing southwards over recent days and it is still over part of the uk at the moment, bringing plenty of showers. the showers a degree or two higher than they were yesterday so that has tipped the in favour more of rain that there is still some heavy snow at the moment across parts of scotland, for example in aviemore and there are is also this lot turning to snow across the high ground of wales so a bit of winteriness above the high ground. this drop share malls, staffordshire moors, also seeing a sprinkling of show. —— shropshire. it gets drier and brighter as we go through the day but the temperature around six or seven, maybe just four across parts of the midlands. only into tonight, is clear —— clear skies allow interpreters to drop away but then more cloud and rain coming in of the north sea affecting east
7:48 am
scotland, northeast areas of england, 2a. that should keep these areas are frost free by the end of the night at where we keep the clear skies, a cold night with temperatures dipping below freezing and that will lead to fog patches and that will lead to fog patches and icy evenings. sunday is owing to bea and icy evenings. sunday is owing to be a pretty cloudy day and it is this weather system pushing inland and we will see lighter and patio rain but still a legacy of cloudy skies. for the northwest, west, scotland, northern ireland, northern england, drier and brighter but the temperature is don't get quite as high, or heaven six, should be eight or nine in towns and cities. it was stakeholding to or nine in towns and cities. it was sta keholding to monday or nine in towns and cities. it was stakeholding to monday as well. we find ourselves between low pressure to our east and west and monday for us looks like being a dry day for the most part but murky. mist and fog patches widespread with poor visibility. frost to start the day as well because of you may see this area of rain moving in from the
7:49 am
north sea to effect our eastern coastal areas as the wind picks up later in the day. it will be cold, temperatures are struggling, particularly ref roglic —— fog lingers. and then again snow over the high ground and it turns generally more unsettled as the week goes by, certainly staying on the cold side as well. the rain still a bit of hill snow around as well. we'll be back with the latest headlines at 8:00am. not it's time for newswatch. unsurprisingly, covid—19 dominated the news again this week, but at last some good news as uk regulators gave their approval to the vaccine developed by german firm biontech, in partnership with pharmaceutical giant pfizer. there's a huge appetite for information about vaccines, so the government's chief medical officerjonathan van—tam made an appearance on bbc breakfast to answer questions from viewers.
7:50 am
so this first question is from gavin this morning, why is the uk the first to approve this vaccine and that all—importa nt question, is it safe? we are the first to approve it because we have been really, really organised about this from the word go. lots of you got in touch with your views. carly hunt was impressed. doug parret agreed, although included a smalljibe. this crisis also means lots of air time for our politicians as they seek to explain public health measures, and the decisions they are taking.
7:51 am
but are the political interviewers getting as much out of their interviewees as they could? viewers have no shortage of opinion on this subject. robert churton says... well, i'mjoined by nick robinson, the presenter of the today programme, and host of the political thinking podcast. nick, do you think that presenters are a bit too focused and their political interviews on a gotcha moment? well, your two contributors there captured the sort of tight rope that we are constantly on. i do think there is a tendency in the era of social media to go for the gotcha moment
7:52 am
that can be clipped up. i get sent an e—mail every morning from one national newspaper with clips of my interviews. they've described me as slamming politicians, raging at them, scolding at them, exploding at them. i despair if that is what an interview is really thought to be about. we are trying to get answers to questions, we are trying to get some sort of understanding. we ended up in the bizarre thing that at the last general election the most memorable interview in that election was an interview that did not actually happen. andrew neil's with borisjohnson. now, this is madness if what we say is the most important moment is when a question was not asked at all. this podcast, political thinking, that you are doing, what is that trying to do differently, then? it's trying to add to, not replace, let me stress, what i do every day on the today programme, and people do on newsnight, or world at one, or pm on the news channel and elsewhere. it's trying to say, let us get underneath the skin of a politician. let's try to get a sense of what their upbringing, what their background, what their values are and how that contributes to their
7:53 am
political thinking. because often, if you understand that rishi sunak worked in his mum's pharmacy, is now married to a billionaire's daughter, is a great fan of star wars, you get a sense of who he is. if, for example, this week you interview, as i have, the mayor of liverpool city region and you get the rage he feels about boris johnson and the comments that he made in the past about liverpool and the hillsborough disaster, you get much more of a sense of why, for him to now work with a tory government regarded by many people in liverpool as something you should never, ever do, you get a sense of who he is and why the choices he's got to make are so difficult. one of the complaints that we heard in the two comments i read at the beginning was from a viewer who thinks that, actually, bbc interviewers too often let politicians get away with not answering the question, talking out the time. what would you say? well, it is complete we get all the time,
7:54 am
and we also get people saying you interrupt too much. and they are both two sides of the same coin. we cannot force people to answer, there's this myth that if ijust ask it well enough, or sharply enough or clearly enough, i will get an answer. i won't. i think we have to treat the audience like grown—ups. we have to ask difficult questions, we occasionally have to ask them two or three times. we have to highlight when we don't get an answer, but we need to treat the audience as people who can observe that they have not got the answer and then we move on. what we shouldn't do is talk over politicians such that people would end up wondering, well why did he have them on in the first place? if you think they are not worth listening to, if you think they've got nothing to say, why have them on your programme? and more to the point, why should they bother to turn up at all? in other words, it's a bit like a dance, an interview. it does take both sides to tango. well, sometimes they don't bother to turn up at all. and a big concern, i think it's fair to say, over much
7:55 am
of the past year, has been a sense that this government has not been playing, always, by the traditional rules. that ministers were not appearing on the today programme, for example, for many months. is yourjob more difficult now do you think? well, it is easier for politicians, there's no doubt, to dodge interviews they don't want to do. yes, they boycotted the today programme, they boycotted gmb the itv breakfast programme for a while, they rarely turn up on newsnight and on channel a news, for example. although, i can't help noticing that since a certain, what was his name, dominic cummings, has found a new mode of employment, has left downing street, they have returned to all of those programmes. given all the dilemmas we have, you mentioned interruptions, do you think that there is still a case with viewers that feel that still too often journalists can be to route and interrupt crucially too much? well, of course. if you can't listen and you can't pay attention, and if, frankly, you end up shouting a radio,
7:56 am
or telly, or turning them off, then we are doing something wrong, aren't we? equally, people who get frustrated with interviewers have to realise that politicians have tactics. i've seen politicians look at the clock. look away from me or the camera, and they head for, as it were, the white tape in the race. in order that we won't be able to get another question in. so sometimes we interrupt for a purpose. for a reason. to try to get answers. and itjust, to mix my metaphors, just reminds me of what i said at the beginning of this interview, it is a tight rope. on the one hand, you want to make sure that the people and on the other hand you need to make sure that your questions are not ignored, that people at home don't feel frustrated, that the points they feel should be made and should be put to politicians, haven't been put. the reason i wrote an article about it in the last few days is that i believe the interview, despite the growth of social media, despite
7:57 am
the fact that politicians can communicate directly to people, remains one of the most important ways that we have a sense of what people in power are doing, and it underpins our democracy. and it's important they show up, it's important to answer the questions, but it's also important that we give them the chance to speak. nick robinson, thanks so much. since the pandemic started, bbc news has occasionally featured a personal and often emotional reports about the personal impact of the virus on people's well—being. they haven't always been welcomed by viewers, with linda and paul canning writing to us a couple of weeks ago. others, though, have a much more positive response to this
7:58 am
type ofjournalism, an example of which was shown on others, i go into houses, and i sometimes have children ripping the bags open to get the food as i'm carrying them to the door. and it's not all right, that. that's not all right. and it wasn't as bad as that before the virus. that report from ed thomas received plaudits from a number of newswatch viewers, including gillian robbins who wrote... jane brown agreed, and made
7:59 am
a plea shared by other viewers. well, for all of those who wanted to know how they can help some of those in need for the charity featured in that report is called church on the streets ministries in burnley. finally, a follow—up to last week's item about coverage of the chancellor's spending review. and of economics in general. on monday, it emerged that 2a leading economists had written to the bbc director general, tim davie, following these comments by laura kuenssberg on politics live. i mean, it'sjust absolutely, eye—wateringly enormous, and if you think the debate that we had, really from the late noughties, all the way through to the 2015 election, you know,
8:00 am
that was defined by, how's the country going to pay back what we had to borrow in the credit crisis. this is that, and some. this is the credit card, the national mortgage, everything absolutely maxed out. well, according to that group of economists, this was an inappropriate way to describe the public finances. in response, a bbc spokeswoman said...
8:01 am
thank you for all your comments this week, if you want to share your opinions about what you see or hear on bbc news on tv, radio, online and social media, e—mail us at... or you can find us on twitter at... you can call us on... and you have a look at our website... that's all from us, we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast.
8:02 am
as brexit trade negotiations stall borisjohnson plans last ditch talks to try and break the deadlock. gp surgeries are told to get ready to start giving the covid vaccine in nine days time. good morning. fans will be back to watch premier league games, for the first time since march. after yesterday because my cold and snowy weather, looks like it is going to stay pretty cloudy with outbreaks of cold rain. joining later for the full forecast. it's saturday december 5th. our top story. boris johnson will speak to the president of the european commission this afternoon, to try to achieve a breakthrough in negotiations on a post—brexit trade agreement. talks were put on hold last
8:03 am
night, after a week of intensive discussions in london failed to resolve key sticking points, including fishing rights. our political correspondent leila nathoo has this report. there are just four weeks to go until the break to transition ends. there will be changes to how goods move between the uk and the eu. will we get a deal? in a couple of days, with determination. despite a week of intensive talks in london, last night negotiations were suspended. the uk's chief negotiator, lord france, and the man on the eu side, michel barnier, said the conditions foran michel barnier, said the conditions for an agreement are not met. the main issues still to be settled are how any future deal will be governed, fair competition rules for businesses operating in each other‘s markets, and fishing rights. one source on the uk side familiar with the negotiations pointed to the demands for eu fishing boats to have up to ten years' access to uk waters as one issue that derailed progress. both sides said they still wanted
8:04 am
a deal, but believed the other should give ground. they hope that a political intervention and conversation between the prime minister and the president of the european commission this afternoon can provide the breakthrough needed. leila nathoo, bbc news. our political correspondent jonathan blakejoins us now from our london newsroom. we know that negotiators negotiate, but that has gone to a halt, apple is they call it. there's great significance in the fact that the politicians are now being wheeled in above, if you like. the prime minister is not directly involved in trying to change something. yes, charlie. we shouldn't be too surprised that this is happening whilst that statement yesterday, issued on behalf of both sites, was something of a cliffhanger, saying that significant divergences remain and that is something of an understatement, as far as the uk
8:05 am
site is concerned, about the gaps between the two sides on those three keyissues between the two sides on those three key issues which have been sticking points throughout. they have gone as far as they can with a remit that they have. they have tried to thrash out a compromise, but itjust hasn't happened. as you suggest, it is now the turn of the politicians to get involved. this cold this afternoon between prime minister borisjohnson and the president of the eu commission will be a chance to see if there is any wriggle room for those two key figures that are really calling the shots as far as both sides are concerned, to come to an agreement about whether there is room for compromise on both sides and whether a deal can be done, or whether we are now reaching the end of the road. there is an element of drama to this. it does both sides no harm i think to be able to demonstrate that they are taking these talks to the wire, they are
8:06 am
trying as hard as they possibly can, and sticking to their red lines, ha rd and sticking to their red lines, hard and fast. if agreement is to be reached there will need to be compromised on both sides, so with negotiations having been posed, we wait to see if this afternoon's calls is either our breakthrough or a breakdown moment. gps in england will start offering the coronavirus vaccine from 1ath of december. patients aged 80 or over will be the first to get it. care homes in england are expected to get the vaccine within two weeks, with the first vaccinations in hospitals taking place next week. andy moore reports. any allergies that you may have? nurses in a coventry hospital practising how they will administer the new pfizer vaccine, beginning next week. because the jab comes in large batches at low temperatures, the initial roll—out will be at 50 hospitals across the uk.
8:07 am
but we now know that will be swiftly followed with the vaccinations by groups of gps in england, beginning on monday, 1ath december. the priority for getting the jab will be the over 80s who can make their own way to the vaccination centre. special freezers will be provided to store the vaccine at —70. gp practices will come together to manage the programme. they have been told that is that priority, with only urgent care for all other patients. after that, within two weeks, doses of the vaccine will start going out to care homes. plans are in place to reduce the boxes containing the vaccine doses to more manageable consignments. all of this will place a huge burden on the nhs, and so the chief medical officers of the four home nations have written to staff, praising them for their hard work, while warning that this winter will be especially hard because of the pressures from covid. they warn of a possible surge in cases because of extra socialising over christmas,
8:08 am
and they say for the next three months, vaccines will only have a marginal effect on the burden for the nhs. every action counts when it comes to protecting ourselves and our loved ones from coronavirus. that's why the nhs has launched a new public information film comparing the wrong and the right ways we can go about our lives every day to stop the spread of covid. it reminds us that up to a third of people show no symptoms, so they can spread the virus unknowingly. the mayor of liverpool, joe anderson, has been arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to commit bribery and witness intimidation. he's among five people arrested as part of a year—long police investigation. our correspondent mairead smyth is in liverpool. mairead, what more do we know? well, joe anderson, as people may
8:09 am
know, was first elected as the city's mayor in 2012. he has held the position for eight years and is the position for eight years and is the leader of the city council. he also has a high national profile because of his role in pushing forward the mass coronavirus pilots here in liverpool. today, joe anderson is being questioned in connection with allegations of fraudulent building deals. he is under suspicion of conspiracy to commit bribery and witness intimidation. he is one of five men arrested yesterday. they range in age from 25 up to 72. it is in connection with the police investigation into the awarding of construction contracts, which has focused on a number of building developers. liverpool city council says it is cooperating with merseyside police, but won't comment on any individuals. the labour party has suspended joe anderson pending
8:10 am
the outcome of the investigation. a man's been charged with murdering two women in kent 33 years ago. wendy knell and caroline pierce were killed in separate attacks in tunbridge wells in 1987. david fuller, who's 66, is due to appear before magistrates today. after a six—year mission, a japanese space probe is due to return to earth with the first large fragments of rock from an asteroid. this footage shows it touching down on the asteroid for the first time to collect a sample from the surface. it should land in the australian desert this weekend. it's hoped studying the rocks could provide insights into how the solar system was formed. let's go back to one of our main stories. borisjohnson will become
8:11 am
directly and personally involved this afternoon. we look at some of the wording around what has been said about this post, this moment in time. this is from michel barnier and lord frost, the two chief negotiators. they say that after intense talks, they say that conditions for an agreement are not met. this is due to significant divergences on loving playing field, governance and fisheries. they are the same sticking point is we have been talking about for so many months. businesses are now saying they are being impacted by all of this uncertainty. lord karan bilimoria is the president of the confederation of british industry and joins us now. how critical do you think this impasse is, the fact that the negotiators seem to have thrown in the trial and said there is nothing more we can do? this of course is
8:12 am
very more we can do? this of course is very concerning more we can do? this of course is very concerning for the whole country and for business. we are less tha n country and for business. we are less than four weeks away from the deadline of the transition period ending. it is a.5 years since the referendum and we still haven't been able to agree this. the uncertainty is due soon, so scary and so worrying. what a time for this to be happening? the 31st of december, right between christmas and new year we re right between christmas and new year were right around the world many country sort of shot down! at a time like that, you have to cope with all of this uncertainty and all of this disruption. if we have a deal, at least there is some certainty. even if we have a deal we would have to adjust to it. the government has sent out a letter to every business in the country saying check, change, go. well, check what? change what? where? we need to know now. this has to be done and there has to be
8:13 am
compromise on both sides. as president of the cbi, a state on the council of business europe, which is my counterpart in all of the 27 countries around europe, including countries around europe, including countries like turkey. we had a meeting last week and it was very clear a ll meeting last week and it was very clear all businesses around europe, including the uk, want both sides to come to a compromise and to come to a dealfor all of our come to a compromise and to come to a deal for all of our sakes. come to a compromise and to come to a dealfor all of our sakes. we have struggled so much as businesses this year. it has been a nightmare of a year. it has been a nightmare of a year. our economy has been decimated, an 11% drop in gdp, the worst in 300 years, yet we have shown is a country we can get on top of the pandemic, wonderful news about vaccines, rapid mass testing being rolled out. if you add to that, the brexit uncertainty of a new deal scenario, you have to remove that. if we can have that tale we will have a platform to
8:14 am
build on. however skinny they still may be, if there is a deal, there is a platform on which to build on for the future. there is so much else to build on. security relationships, emigration, so many things. manufacturers, businesses trading in goods that will boost —— that will be most immediately affected by this, that is not a statement extend further than that into finances and so on. further than that into finances and so on. they have known about this 1st of january deadline so on. they have known about this 1st ofjanuary deadline for many yea rs. 1st ofjanuary deadline for many years. how much capacity is there within their resilience plans after a year of the pandemic? at any time, uncertainty like this for business to be very difficult to deal with because you don't know what the it systems, you have various technical requirements, documentation. we have said on our site we were given a
8:15 am
six—month transition type period after the 31st of december. the european union hasn't agreed to that yet. we have a just—in—time system. the european union makes up over a5% of our trade. it is huge. a lot of thatis of our trade. it is huge. a lot of that is goods moving across in a frictionless, seamless way where you have automobile companies with one hour just we have automobile companies with one hourjust we have have automobile companies with one hour just we have fresh have automobile companies with one hourjust we have fresh produce going into a supermarket with very short shelf lives. that is all affected by a delay at the port. we don't know until there is a deal and some clarity then we can try to prepare. even then it will be a big challenge, but business has shown how resilient we can be, over the course of this pandemic. but give us a chance. it will be very difficult, but with some certainty, we could rise to the challenge. i'm hoping
8:16 am
that david davis, whojoins rise to the challenge. i'm hoping that david davis, who joins us rise to the challenge. i'm hoping that david davis, whojoins us now, heard those comments. did you hear those comments? i did, i did. just to pick up on some of that, scary and worrying. there is this moment of confusion for people. what do you think when you hear people are trying to run business and those things? i am not surprised. he is representing the cbi, so that is what is going to say. the about this negotiation is it was always going to get scary at the end, this is the nature of european negotiations. they coated distance. i have been saying for years that the last three weeks will matter more than the first three years and that is what you're saying now. the behaviour in particular of the president of france, emmanuel macron, has been
8:17 am
almost theatrically designed to increase the tension. i think there will be a deal, let me be clear. the probability is there will be a deal, but it literally will take it to the wire, told the 31st. bear in mind, everything that was just said applies double two german industry, french industry and so on, for whom we are a huge market and they have now, quite belatedly, over the last few months been putting serious pressure on angela merkel and others to make sure a deal happens. that is why think the probability is still high for a deal. as you say, we have talked before, and you have set the same thing, it is expected to go to the very end. what we know today is borisjohnson is stepping impersonally, and maybe you can explain as you understand it, how to
8:18 am
scenario work site, the negotiators who have been given licence to work within parameters have talked and talked and talked and they have now reached the furthest edges of what they are allowed to negotiate. at which point they turn to the politicians and say, you have to give something else, otherwise this is over. is that a reasonable analysis? up to a point. the other boring crack record which i may have said to you before is that this will be decided not in brussels but in berlin and paris, in the big capitals of europe, because at the end of the date that is where the vested interests a re end of the date that is where the vested interests are represented. what has happened, of course, you talk about the negotiators being given licence, michel barnier‘s licence was changed last week quite dramatically. for the first time you are seeing criticism from brussels of paris as they thought they had
8:19 am
had it on rails, heading towards a deal. the really big decisions i suspect won't be this afternoon between the prime minister and the president of the commission, but in wires running hot between berlin and paris and other capitals, because what happens? if we get to the end of the month and there is no deal, look at it from the other side. the french fishermen will have no fish because they won't have any access. the belgian fishermen, the danish, so on. the belgian fishermen, the danish, so on. that is quite frankly a small element of this high profile and high emotional intensity, but small element of the negotiation. it will go the distance. it will be decided politically, not on the negotiating chambers. there will be compromises i suspect on both sides. at the prime minister will have to protect, the key issues of control, not
8:20 am
giving control away to the european union in pursuit of economic outcomes, but there will be, in my view, it is in everybody‘s interest to come to a deal, but i afraid it'll be tense, nerve—racking, it will run to the end of the month and the one thing i would say to the head of the cbi says it is my suspicion that when it gets to the end of the month, there is no time to ratify, so they will have to do some sort of freeze in place of current customs arrangements to take us through the few months until everybody from the european parliament, to the walloon parliament actually give their opinion. the picture that we have at the moment is the 1st ofjanuary, look out at the ports, say for example there is no deal, but you're saying even if there is a deal, essentially on that day regardless,
8:21 am
it will be business as usual because now such as the timeframe that whatever arrangements are come to, evenif whatever arrangements are come to, even if there is a deal, it cannot be put into law because there simply isn't enough time to do that. yes, in the event of a deal. in the event of no deal, everything will change and that day and it will be chaotic to say the least. in the event of a deal, the best template for this is to look back at when they did the best deal to europeans have ever done, with canada. that is the reason why i use canada plus as an example for us. when they did a deal with canada the european commission agreed, the european parliament agreed, the european parliament agreed, then if you remember, the walloon parliament, a regional parliament in belgium, said no. so the whole thing could have come crashing down. but in fact they did was they froze in place a whole load
8:22 am
of elements of the deal whilst they got the walloon parliament to change its mind and vote for it. that was a smaller deal than they say is, so you could expect some delays on that front. the europeans, as they did with canada, will have to make arrangements to get us from here to there. i think we are all passed the point at which we can get ratification before the end of the year, frankly. my hunch is that although the prime minister will have a very good conversation i'm sure with the head of the european commission this afternoon, it will still have to go back to the capital and that will take time. it might happen, but i would be surprised if we get through the thing before christmas. david davis, we appreciate your thoughts this morning. david davis, the former brexit secretary, commenting on that phone call this afternoon and
8:23 am
opposing proceedings. there has been some degree of cynicism about whether we will get toa cynicism about whether we will get to a deal or not. in the meantime, let's get the weather. this picture was sent to us by one of our weather watchers this morning. this is a cap in the cloud and northamptonshire, showing a beautiful sunrise. in eastern areas they will not be a bad start of the day. for most of us will be a cloudy day. for most of us will be a cloudy day coming up with some rain to come. cold enough for some snow on the high ground, as well. calder has been moving in over recent days, coming down from the polar regions. this is what brought some of you some significant snowfall yesterday. we still have a little bit of snow loitering around today, particularly over the high grounds, the shropshire and staffordshire mirrors, over the high ground in scotland. increasingly, we are
8:24 am
seeing mentoring this on the high ground in wales as well. for the rest of us, a chilly started the day, patches of rain coming and going. every person rain in scotland, there are some flood warnings in force for scotland at the moment. generally, through the day the weather will slowly improve and brighten up. it will stay cold, for most of us around 7 degrees, below par for the time of year. overnight tonight, more rain to come in off the north sea, affecting eastern scotland, north—east england, some rain sliding into the far south—east, as well. in between these areas of rain, with clear skies, we are looking at frost particularly in the countryside, with the lowest temperatures and western areas. a few mist and fog patches to start the day tomorrow. like with patches of rain across parts of england, the rain slowly fizzling out. the best of the sunshine across the west of scotland, parts of north—west
8:25 am
england and into northern ireland. after a culture started the day, the temperature is not quite as high, coated overall, temperatures reaching highs of between four and six celsius for the majority of us. into next week, we find ourselves between areas of low pressure. the winds quiets between these two weather systems. a cold, frosty and probably very foggy started the day on monday. some of the poor visibility lasting into the afternoon. at the fog lingers, temperature scraping above freezing. it will be a cold day even if the fog dose left, with highs of four or five celsius. when spreading into eastern areas. it looks like we will see this rain turn poor snow for a time in the high ground of scotland and northern england before it transitions back to rain. it stays cold and unsettled with further patches of rain with temperatures below average for the time of year. with christmas just three weeks away, it's usually the busiest time
8:26 am
of the year for our retailers. non—essential shops have now re—opened in england, but in a week that's seen the collapse of giants including topshop and debenhams, is this the end of the high street as we know it? our business correspondent katie prescott is live for us now in central london. are people out and about already, katie? not yet. it is still very early and pretty empty here, but shopkeepers are hoping in this crucial christmas period the people to today because it has been one of the hardest hit sectors by the pandemic. there have beenjob losses atjohn lewis, marks & spencers, and the closures of topshop and debenhams. retail sales are above
8:27 am
pre—pandemic —— above pandemic levels, but it is how we are shopping. clothing is not an accord to what was before the pandemic. in the last three days before the english lock collected, we have been out and about on the high street, just not in the droves that we wear. lifting the shutters at bishop auckland, shelves here are stacked and shoppers are out and about once again. it's not as busy as i thought it was going to be, to be honest. we came down and didn't think we'd be able to get into any shops, but it's quite nice. it's a pleasure to see people in the street and hopefully, hopefully, we will hang on to some of the businesses in the street. it isn't the same, online shopping, because you can't see what you are buying, can you? sometimes it is ok but sometimes it is what you get, not what you wanted. so it is nice to be able to come out and look again. it is more like the small businesses, i'm pleased to see them up and running, because i think, like, obviously the big high street chains, they've kind of helped themselves.
8:28 am
it's just all these people that have been going for generations and have had to shut down. it's just quite scary. it's also scary when you look at the drop in the number of people shopping around the uk. yesterday uk high streets saw a drop of 39% compared to last year. uk shopping centres, a drop of 29%. retail parks are faring better, down just a%. overall there has been a drop of almost a third. this pandemic—induced plunge in footfall has been a catastrophe for small shops. trends that have been brewing for years accelerated in the course ofjust a few short months. there's the cost of paying for premises like these, business rates, higher tax on property, and then of course the often cheaper and more convenient alternative of online shopping. it is a tough time to be in retail. to help sweeten the deal for independent retailers like this chocolate maker, there are calls for the government
8:29 am
to redistribute the business rates relief cash that several large supermarkets have given back to the treasury this week. as for so many, christmas is the most important time of year for her business. but this season she is afraid there'll be fewer parcels to wrap. lockdown has been a roller—coaster, really. a huge amount of self—doubt, a huge amount of loneliness, a huge amount of, what are we going to do with ourselves? this is now, we have smaller shoulders. i have to say, you know, without the masses of support from my customers, it would have been different. much local support has come from lockdowns, meaning that people are shopping more in their local areas, to the detriment of cities. people have discovered stores which perhaps they never even shopped in when they were working away or long distance or they were commuting into the cities. so it's a real opportunity for independence, although they're having a hard time at the moment, if they can continue to capture that
8:30 am
spirit of local, going forwards, and hopefully it will help them to recover quicker. the limited time shops have had to open means december is even more vital than ever, as they face pressure to make up for lost ground in the run—up to christmas. katie prescott, bbc news. whether people do turn out today will say so much about consumer confidence and how much we are willing to spend in the run—up to christmas. someone who is really helping that people do turn out todayis helping that people do turn out today is irena, who runs the retro boutique here in central london. what was it like getting to open your doors again three days ago? oh, my goodness, it feels so good to bring the team back together again. everybody cares very much about this small business and for us to welcome customers through the door it means a lot and it means a lot that we are still here! have those customers been coming? it has been a quiet start and we are in central london
8:31 am
but today is small business saturday, a celebration and we're hoping it galvanise public support to it, if not come saving shopping, then at least do a little shout out online to us, give us a review or a recommendation orjust online to us, give us a review or a recommendation or just a online to us, give us a review or a recommendation orjust a kind word or something. small businesses have been through tough times, like many other people this year, so however anyone supports us, we will appreciate it have you had to change how you do business? the focus has to be more online and people are shopping more online and people are shopping more online but i love the experience of having a bricks and mortar store and to the joy of coming back and coming in and actually welcoming people, we do it safely and securely, but, yeah, the in—store experience is a really great thing and i hope it's here to stay whatever the challenges. how do you feel about this period in the run—up to christmas? you mentioned a challenge. it's been such a difficult time for shops. it has and the second lockdown being in
8:32 am
november, a key trading time for us, we've lost a lot of ground and we have limited time to make it up. the future is uncertain but today i am not panicking. today there is no doom and gloom, today is small business saturday and today i will welcome everybody who wants to be pa rt welcome everybody who wants to be part of it. thank you very much. one of the many shopkeepers hoping that lots of people turn out this morning in central london in the run—up to christmas. thank you very much. really interesting when you hear hands on, what it feels like for a shopkeeper to have their shot open and people coming infor to have their shot open and people coming in for some it is financial but it is more than that. also nice for customers to be out of their houses and doing something different, being in a new environment. a lot of people are cautious about it, lots are looking forward to it. 8:32am, stay with us, a summary forward to it. 8:32am, stay with us, a summary of sports coming up.
8:33 am
hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. good morning. it is now 8:33am. over the past week, we've been following the incredible fundraising efforts of the former rugby league star, kevin sinfield. kevin's running seven marathons in seven days — in support of his friend and ex—team mate, rob burrow, who's living with motor neurone disease. kevin has now raised more than £a50,000 — much more than the £77,777 he had initially hoped for. kevin has now raised more than £150,000 — let's take a look at his extraordinary efforts so far.
8:34 am
i was asked if i fancied doing another challenge. seven in seven days. people face tough things every day. i have moments where i don't want to get out of bed and wants to pull the duvet over but ijust keep taking another step. .
8:35 am
friendships. team—mates. ithink it's important to stand for something. a50,000, as you saw there. not 150, like i made up. incredible support that they have had along the way. sally is out on her christmas jumper this morning. she is there to watch a bit later. hello. good morning, everyone. can i update you a tiny bit? a57,000. just checked a few seconds ago. the total is sticking up. we are live in leeds this morning. i want to show you something very special i am standing in front of it. this is the man that the story is all about. robert burrow. this is the reason kevin is
8:36 am
doing the run. his team—mate rob from leeds rhinos, the golden generation, the great team they are is the reason kevin is running, raising funds for him and the motor neurone disease association. we just saw kevin run past a few moments ago. it is one of those things you see, someone running a ago. it is one of those things you see, someone running a marathon, you expect there to be a lot of false and it really was. we have the pictures to show us. it really was him and his team—mate and a couple of lads on bikes making their way up this hill in leeds, keeping going. they started at 7am this morning, i was possibly the most overexcited person yet to see them running past. as they ran past, kevin just said, "hi, sal.". this man has decided to put himself through this incredible challenge for his team—mate. here we are, day five, run five, challenge for his team—mate. here we are, day five, runfive, kevin challenge for his team—mate. here we are, day five, run five, kevin has two more thans still to go. let's
8:37 am
talk more about this incredible work of art behind us here in leeds city centre. a tribute to rob burrow and, actually, the idea of one person here who can talk to us from leeds city council. this is sarah priestley. good morning. hello. tell us how this mural came about, you had a lot to do with it. it was a really exciting idea that came from between us and the bbc and such an amazing opportunity to celebrate an absolute inspirational man. what has the reaction been so far? amazing. i'm sure you can imagine. everybody is so excited both in leeds and across the country. yeah, everybody isjust across the country. yeah, everybody is just absolutely pumped about it. imean, is just absolutely pumped about it. i mean, it's a great piece of art but also celebrating such an amazing and inspirational man. watch to the people of leeds think of this man?
8:38 am
when you chat to people around here, how important is he to the people here? absolutely massive. words can't describe. creating this piece has reallyjust, i think, after a really difficult year for everybody, and rob is such an inspiration in his mindset, his positive attitude and it's more than rugby. it's about difficult times and doing everything you can to stay positive. the coat says it all. in a world full of adversity, we must dare to dream. his words —— the quote says it all. how is he inspiring people here and how has he crossed beyond the barriers of rugby, perhaps to people who aren't necessarily interested in his sport? yeah! if i'm honest, i am
8:39 am
not a huge rugby person. i think by not a huge rugby person. i think rugby is really important in leeds but i can get the other aspects that he really has an impact on people in that, you know, he's having a really difficult time and his attitude and his outlook isjust difficult time and his attitude and his outlook is just so inspirational, like, yeah, and this year has been rubbish for everybody. he has been a real role model for a lot of people. tell me about the ardwick and the artist. this is by an international artist and it is absolutely amazing, it was made by akse. we are really knows he wanted to create this piece because he really only takes on pieces of work
8:40 am
that represents something important toa that represents something important to a lot of people. so, again, that isa to a lot of people. so, again, that is a credit to rob. sarah, lovely to talk to you. thank you very much. i have to tell you one thing. one of rob's team—mates very cheekily said, yeah brilliant, but the nose isn't big enough. later on this morning there will be a lovely moment when rob burrow and his family come here to see this mural for the very first time. can't wait to see their reaction to this brilliant piece of art. back to you. just checked in with you, kevin has got... he is doing one today and then two more to go after today? he has got two more. ican give go after today? he has got two more. i can give you even more information. where are we now was yellow kevin will finish the marathon today, i reckon, about 10:15am, 10:30am. marathon today, i reckon, about 10:15am,10:30am. let's say 10:30am. another run tomorrow in leeds and he has run seven on monday, and run
8:41 am
sevenis has run seven on monday, and run seven is a big, big day. by that point we know he will be very tired. but we will be covering the start of run seven on the programme on monday morning. we will be talking to kevin before he sets off. so far, every time he has completed a marathon his attitude has just been time he has completed a marathon his attitude hasjust been incredible. he has been in cracking jokes, telling everybody to hurry up and teasing some of his team—mates were going to slowly! it is that doggy determination. we look forward to that. thank you very much, nice to see you this morning. that is something, isn't it? one marathon is a challenge for a lot of us. what gets me is sally said sally set off at around 7am and he will finish around 10:15am. three hours and 15 minutes for his fifth marathon in a row? getting quicker every day in. it's ridiculous, what an effort. for his legendary team—mate, rob. i should be telling you about england's match in south africa
8:42 am
which should have taken place yesterday. we have breaking news on this. in the last half—an—hour it has been confirmed that england's one—day series against south africa will go ahead. remember, the first match was supposed to be played yesterday, but was postponed after a positive covid test in the south africa camp. well, the latest round of tests are all negative, so the series will be allowed to go ahead, starting in paarl tomorrow. there has been another milestone for sport on the road to recovery from the pandemic, as there will be will be fans at premier league matches today. that hasn't happened since march. supporters will be at the two of the four top flight games today, the two games in tier 2, starting with west ham's home game against manchester united. the west ham boss, david moyes, says it will be interesting to see the effect that fans have on the game. dan's back with football focus on bbc one at midday and he's here with us now. good morning. that is a fantastic christmas jumper. i can good morning. that is a fantastic christmasjumper. i can only good morning. that is a fantastic christmas jumper. i can only see the
8:43 am
top of your deer. it goes all the way. it is december, cracker christmasjumpers way. it is december, cracker christmas jumpers out when you can. talking about fans going back, have a lot of that today. we also have a lovely piece on the north london derby. this is tottenham against arsenal. arsenal are in 14th, derby. this is tottenham against arsenal. arsenalare in 14th, spurs at the top of the table. also the questions over where it has gone wrong for arsenal. players like pierre comeand. unfortunately not creating chances. we will look at that with hurricane. 2000 fans at the north london derby —— we will that with harry kane. full and take on manchester city at 3pm. you might rememberthere on manchester city at 3pm. you might remember there was on manchester city at 3pm. you might rememberthere was an on manchester city at 3pm. you might remember there was an addict penalty across west ham a few doing a couple of weeks ago that went wrong ——
8:44 am
dinked penalty. a history of the dislike between the two sides, goes a long way back. i have a list of the five most watched tv events in the five most watched tv events in the uk ever. number one. the world cup final of 1966. 32.2 million. numbertwo, funeral of cup final of 1966. 32.2 million. number two, funeral of princess diana, 32.1 million. numberthree was the documentary about the royal family shown at the end of the 19605. 30.6 family shown at the end of the 1960s. 30.6 million. the apollo 13 mission was at number four, 20 8.6 million. the fifth most watched tv event ever was the fa cup final replay of 1978 between chelsea and leeds, watched by 28.4 million people. a bit of needle between these two which goes way back. frank lampard was in charge of derby and leeds, you have to that throw back
8:45 am
in. dion dublin will be back to cambridge, one of the teams where he made his name many years ago and he has been speaking to the manager. have a look. wednesday night, fans were back in, what was it like? what was the feeling like? it took a little bit of adjusting to and it added a little bit of pressure, you know? we've set some standards that gives us some expectation. that's a good thing but we've now got to handle that and deal with that and in a way i'm glad that that occasions's out of the way so that we can knuckle down and get back to being the team we know we're capable of being. but lovely to have an atmosphere, great to have people back. this place isn't built to be empty, so nice to get that back going again. all that from dion, we are packed today and we have mike and richards and alex scott from midday on bbc one fora and alex scott from midday on bbc one for a power hour. see you later on. personally i have nothing but admiration for chelsea. my brother—in—law is a chelsea fan. lovely fa m ily brother—in—law is a chelsea fan. lovely family rivalry. i'm sure we will be texting each other during the match. billy joe will be texting each other during the match. billyjoe saunders has
8:46 am
retained his title after beating martin murray last night. a unanimous decision, giving him his 30th undefeated. an empty arena, compared to a cemetery. andy sullivan is out in front at the inaugural golf in dubai. it tells you everything you need to know about the perfect golfing condition. early in his final round he is a whopping 22 shots under part. he managed to build his lead thanks to birdies like this. that apparently was the most difficult hole on the course. and what a start george russell has had at mercedes. the 22 year from kingsley was only called up year from kingsley was only called up to the team at last minute a couple of ago to fill in for lewis hamilton in bahrain. he went fastest in both qualifying sessions and is on course for his first ever pole position in formula 1. he is in a good car but you still need to know how to drive it properly and
8:47 am
quickly. given he is much bigger than lewis hamilton and has to cram into the little space lewis normally sits in, fair play to him doing a greatjob. sits in, fair play to him doing a great job. we were joking earlier that when one else drive your car and it is annoying because they have adjusted the seat and mirror, someone adjusted the seat and mirror, someone sent me adjusted the seat and mirror, someone sent me a adjusted the seat and mirror, someone sent me a video of him doing exactly that, getting in and moving everything around and asked if they think he has changed the radio station. i have an insight into what it is like to sit in a formula 1 car. in the season before ayrton senna so sadly died, invited the press to go and see his car. one thing you could do is sit in his car, the journalist. thing you could do is sit in his car, thejournalist. they didn't actually start the engine but you we re actually start the engine but you were allowed to sit in. of all the things people know, they are ludicrously cramped. quite claustrophobic. your arms are in front of you like this. but his seat, his moulded seat, was the one i sat seat, his moulded seat, was the one isat on, seat, his moulded seat, was the one i sat on, and it was absolutely minuscule. they haven't moulded
8:48 am
especially for own shape. absolutely. it would make an enormous difference.” absolutely. it would make an enormous difference. i once had a spin in susie wolff's adapted formula 1 car and i couldn't believe i couldn't see over the top. so fire down. the whole way down i had helmet lift, it felt like someone was pulling your helmet off the various g force that are going on. mike always has something about something. you reminded me, talking about sitting on a formula 1 car and how cramped they are. thank you. chris has the weather.” how cramped they are. thank you. chris has the weather. i do indeed. good morning. another cold start to the day and over recent hours we have seen a bit of fresh snowfall here over the hills in gloucestershire, quite near the wye valley. another covering of snow for some. many it is cloudy today with patches of cold rain coming through. the cold air has been moving down over recent days from the polar regions thanks to this area of low
8:49 am
pressure. that brought the significant snowfall we had yesterday. the same low is still with us, the temperature is a degree or so with us, the temperature is a degree or so higher put down at her so there snow translations back to coleraine. moving into parts of wales, some snow in the high ground in scotland above 200 metres elevation, some heavy snow in aviemore, for example. through the rest of the day, for the majority it is cold rain falling and with more wet weather we have for macro flood warnings in force in parts of scotland, so there rain not particularly welcome. a gradual drying and brightening through the afternoon but stays chilly, temperature is around five to 7 degrees for many, it may be eight in one or two spots later this afternoon. overnight come in of the north sea, eastern scotland, north—east england. we may see some rain also winning into the south—east of england, but between these areas there will be some clear skies. temperatures will dip down to give a touch of frost and we could be left
8:50 am
with them icy surfaces as we headed to the first part of sunday morning along with some fog patches. could bea along with some fog patches. could be a little on the graveside. the sunday, this area of rain pushes inland across of england and wales. the rain becomes like and patchy as it weakens but a fair bit of cloud. north—west england, northern ireland and parts of western scotland having the best of the sunshine and over all a bit brighter. overall colder. after a chilly start of the day, those temperatures four to 6 degrees quite widely. the colder air will stay for much of the week ahead. one we find ourselves tween two areas of low pressure, wind is light and it is likely to be america's tight and monday with dense patches of fog, some of which will linger into the afternoon, perhaps into the whole day in some places. temperatures struggling to get above freezing in those places. the function lift into low cloud as cloud and rain sta rts starts to pick up. temperatures at best around four or 5 degrees. from
8:51 am
monday night as the band of rain works in, it will turn to snow across the high ground of scotland and northern england before the temperatures rise and it transitioned back to rain. it will turn increasingly unsettled with rain at times and it will stay on the cold side with temperatures below par. that's the latest weather. back to you to. thank you very much. 8:51am. spoiler alert! if you haven't caught up on last night's tv, you may want to look away for a while... because after three weeks of gruesome challenges, we've finally crowned the winner of this year's i'm a celebrity — get me out of here! we arejust we are just about to tell you that it is. this is the moment. after facing—off competition from the likes of actor shane ritchie and the opera star russell watson, it was the blogger and presenter giovanna fletcher who claimed the title. we'll be getting reaction from russell in a moment. first, here's a look back
8:52 am
at events from the castle. the winner of i'm a celebrity... get me out of here 2020, and the first ever... queen of the castle... is giovanna. lets fire up the rotisserie. here it goes. got one? oh, that's cold. i take no encouragement to sing a song, pal! # nessun dorma. .. # la, la, la... please welcome, in eighth place, russell, and in seventh place, jessica. the first queen of the castle — congratulations. thank you. applause congratulations. and we can speak to russell watson now. i would rather be sitting where you are right now rather than back in
8:53 am
the castle, interviewing you there. is it nice to be home? it's lovely to be home. shane will be really pleased to be called shane russell! what are you talking about? laughter like you are really enjoying the company of the people you are with. the company was brilliant. it is an experience, no doubt about it. i'm not saying it's a fantastic experience. the people, as i say, we re experience. the people, as i say, were absolutely brilliant but you have no concept of time in there. it is freezing cold, dirty, dusty. the water it tastes like regurgitated sewage! you have to draw the water out of a well and you have to boil it then put it in a filter, then the water comes out and it is usually worn. it's a tough challenge and it is something that really kind of puts every element of who i am to the test, it really was. it totally
8:54 am
changes your perspective of everything. when you come out it is kind of like everything looks fresh and clean, particularly toilets! laughter charlie here. hello, charlie. lovely to see it. given how you described it, you look pretty well on that.” lost 20 lbs of a their! is not a good thing? definitely. this year i have been working out, trying to get some weight off. you are constantly touring, like i am, and eating at the wrong time of day, so i wanted to get a few pounds off and that was the fastest diet plan i've ever been on! it worked. let's talk about giovanna, she wasn't best known, going into the event. what were the things that you think the public loved about her, what with the qualities that made her the winner? she was like the matriarch of the camp. she has this motherly quality
8:55 am
that i think she spoke about on quite a few occasions. it's strange because the castle gets inside your head. sometimes you feel ok and other days you feel like you are missing home. don't forget, there is no concept of time in there. you just feel... there are days when you just feel... there are days when you just feel... there are days when you just feel like you don't want to get up just feel like you don't want to get up and also, we dropped 600,700 calories of food a day, a lot of it didn't taste great so a lot of the time you are tired. the other thing isi time you are tired. the other thing is i hada time you are tired. the other thing is i had a massive come—down of coffee and visit pop and headache forfour coffee and visit pop and headache for four or five days. that didn't feel good. one of the nice things for your team mates was that when they are having a low moment, the good news was that you were there. and so at the drop of a hat, or at any one's request, you are happy to sing. can we see a clip of russell singing in the clip right now? not sure if we have that. i know you
8:56 am
love to sing, fundamentally you love to sing and lo and behold, there you are, a captive audience. exactly. none of them put sk! i don't take much encouragement to get up and sing and they were calling me castle because most of the songs, i remember speaking to ruth and she asked how on earth i remember the words to all the songs and i don't know, they were just in there like an encyclopaedia of lyrics. i think they showed a few of my songs but i was constantly singing and joking around. it was great fun. you obviously always get asked for the obviously always get asked for the obvious requests, but you spent the last year writing... sorry, obvious requests, but you spent the last yearwriting... sorry, i obvious requests, but you spent the last year writing... sorry, i should say recording an album of those songs that have been meaning full to you. tell us about that. the album is called 20 because it is my 20th
8:57 am
year as a recording artist. i got together a collection of my favourite songs and what i felt were the favourite ones, ones like nessun dorma and volare, that i think the fa ns dorma and volare, that i think the fans would love. # vincero! very 2020 that you are alone with nobody around you. tell us about the experience. my producer, he was due to fly out from new zealand when all the lockdowns we re new zealand when all the lockdowns were imposed, so he couldn't. we
8:58 am
we re were imposed, so he couldn't. we were trying to figure out... festival we discussed trying to get a producer over here —— first of all. we ended up doing it basically the way we are talking, over skype. i had the way we are talking, over skype. ihada the way we are talking, over skype. i had a set of headphones on in the studio, he had a set of headphones in new zealand all those miles away. it was great because he kind of directed me with what i was doing and after a while if he got on my nerves i turned the computer around to face the wall! one thing, coming out of the non—jungle situation in the castle, a lot of people watched with slight envy because you could all hug each other. effectively hugging strangers and you have had to come out and presumably had to stop yourself from seeing people and giving them a hug when the sensibilities are different because you are all in a bubble together. yeah, that was the strangest thing of all because, again, it took two or three days to get used to the fa ct or three days to get used to the fact that i was in there with a group of people you could go close
8:59 am
to, you were not wearing masks, and we we re to, you were not wearing masks, and we were in this big bubble together. it was just for that couple of weeks that i was in there, it was such a wonderful, liberating feeling, and obviously coming back out, everybody has masks on and the world... the world just seemed a completely different place. a sobering thought, ina different place. a sobering thought, in a way. you had a great time in there and it's given a lot of people a lot of joy there and it's given a lot of people a lot ofjoy in this strange time. nice to see you this morning. great to talk to you and thank you so much, lovely to chat. the album is called 20 and there is a live stream co nsett called 20 and there is a live stream consett from london's union chapel which goes out on the 11th of 02:59:44,255 --> 2147483053:06:37,572 december at 7:30pm. headlines in the 2147483053:06:37,572 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 moment.
9:00 am
9:01 am
9:02 am
9:03 am
9:04 am
9:05 am
9:06 am
9:07 am
9:08 am
9:09 am
9:10 am
9:11 am
9:12 am
9:13 am
9:14 am
9:15 am
9:16 am
9:17 am
9:18 am
9:19 am
9:20 am
9:21 am
9:22 am
9:23 am
9:24 am
9:25 am
9:26 am
9:27 am
9:28 am
9:29 am
9:30 am
9:31 am
9:32 am
9:33 am
9:34 am
9:35 am
9:36 am
9:37 am
9:38 am
9:39 am
9:40 am
9:41 am
9:42 am
9:43 am
9:44 am
9:45 am
9:46 am
9:47 am
9:48 am
9:49 am
9:50 am
9:51 am
9:52 am
9:53 am
9:54 am
9:55 am
9:56 am
9:57 am
9:58 am
9:59 am
10:00 am

31 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on