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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 4, 2021 6:00am-9:00am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today... paying for the pandemic, the chancellor delivers a budget that will take the uk's tax burden to its highest level since the 1960s. it isa it is a buy now, pay later budget. there is worry about who will pay long—term. a question we will put to the chancellor.
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the duchess of sussex accuses the royal family of "perpetuating falsehoods" about her and prince harry. i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time we would stilljust be silent if there is an active role the firm is playing in perpetrating falsehoods about us. this latest extract from the us tv interview with oprah winfrey, comes as the palace investigates claims that the duchess bullied royal staff. england in a spin again. they have to win the final test against india, to avoid losing the series, but on the first morning are in trouble once more. there you go. the dramatic moment an unmanned spacex rocket explodes after a test flight. another chilly start to the day. a fair bit of cloud around. dense fog in southern areas. rain in the forecast as well. i will tell you where later in the programme.
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it's thursday 4th march. our top story. rishi sunak has defended his plans to raise overall taxation to the highest level since the 1960s, saying no chancellor since has had to deal with a pandemic. yesterday, he set out plans in the budget to begin repairing the nation's finances post—coronavirus, but labour leader sir keir starmer says he's just �*papering over the cracks�*. paul hawkins reports. billed as a budget to rescue an economy ravaged by covid. the chancellor has promised to protectjobs. tax increases loom, taking the uk's tax burden to its highest level since the 1960s, according to the office for budget responsibility. obviously, the pandemic has dealt us pretty bad damage to the public finances and the economy, and i think i and the government have a responsibility to put those back in a strong position over time but do in a way that is supportive of economic recovery in the short—term but also do
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so in a way that is fair. this is how he intends to do it. the furlough scheme is to be extended until the end of september, as well as higher universal credit payments. the headline rate of corporation tax will go up from i9% to 25% from 2023, though smaller firms will be exempt. and a freeze on income tax thresholds is expected to lead to 1.3 million more paying income tax, plusi million more paying the higher rate. but there will be some more help for hospitality. pubs won't have to pay business rates until the end ofjune. we have been open forfour months out of the last 12 when we get to reopen. when we reopen, it's going to be gardens only, and then restricted inside. we are going to need all the help we can get to get hospitality through. labour talk of a missed opportunity. ijust think this didn't deliver the scale of what was required. for most people what they're going to see is a very big
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increase in council tax, possibly a universal credit cut, and a very high level of unemployment, no matter where they live. although much of the focus has been on business, some number crunchers say the effects of the budget will also be felt far wider. much less attention is paid to what is happening to british households. in many ways, the year ahead for them is more difficult than the year we've been through, with falling living standards this autumn. for public services, too, further cuts to public spending may feel a lot like austerity. there is now a route out of lockdown. but tough times ahead. the chancellor says not all his decisions will be popular but they are, he insists, honest. paul hawkins, bbc news. let's get more now from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, whojoins us from westminster. good morning to you. give us a sense
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of... the scale of what has been outlined is huge, in terms of spending and the tax that has to be recouped one day. the spending and the tax that has to be recouped one day.— spending and the tax that has to be recouped one day. the chancellor has three episodes _ recouped one day. the chancellor has three episodes in _ recouped one day. the chancellor has three episodes in the _ recouped one day. the chancellor has three episodes in the budget. - three episodes in the budget. firstly giving massive support to businesses during the pandemic may keep inach going till september. the second phase is trying to boost the economy by giving a massive tax breaks to businesses that invest. step three, increasing tax on company profits we are hearing about and increasing tax on most of the rest of us by freezing those thresholds for the different rates of income tax. more people will pay income tax and more people will pay the higher rate of income tax. this is all shrouded in uncertainty. we do not really know how the economy will behave over the next few years, it is a guest. we do not know how the virus will behave over the next
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few years. how will conservative mps behave over the next few years? they are ok with tax increases at the moment but will they be ok with the highest tax burden since the 19605 when it actually exist5? and nina will be speaking to the chancellor, rishi sunak, at 7:30am. the duchess of sussex says she's not afraid of the consequences of speaking out in her and harry's interview with oprah winfrey, 5aying, "a lot has been lost already". a second extract from the heavily anticipated interview has been released overnight, in which meghan said she could not be expected to stay silent if the royal family played a part in "perpetuating falsehoods" about the couple. it comes as buckingham palace launched an investigation into claims the duchess bullied former royal staff. simon jones has more. meghan is making it clear she will not be afraid to speak out in a second trailer for the interview released overnight.
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how do you feel about the palace hearing you speak your truth today? i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time we would stilljust be silent, if there is an active role that the firm is playing in perpetuating falsehoods about us. if that comes with risk of losing things, there's a lot that's been lost already. this is a second clip released by cbs but a first in which we have heard the duchess speak. the interview was recorded before buckingham palace began an investigation into claim5 meghan had bullied former royal staff. the times newspaper has obtained an e—mail, written in late 2018, by the couple's communication secretary, to simon case, he is now the cabinet secretary.
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in it he is reported to have written, and very concerned that the duchess was able to bully two pas out of the household in the past year. the treatment of x was totally unacceptable. buckingham palace said it was very concerned about the allegations. former members of staff are being invited to participate in its investigation. in a statement, it added... but a spokesperson for meghan said... the latest interview clip will do little to heal any apparent rifts between the sussexes and the palace. simon jones, bbc news. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has insisted she had no motive, intention or desire to "get" her predecessor alex salmond. giving evidence to the inquiry into her government's handling of harassment allegations against mr salmond, she described claims of a plot against him as "absurd." our political correspondent nick eardley reports. after months of allegations, yesterday nicola sturgeon had her
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chance to make her case. i solemnly, sincerely and truly declare and affirm that i will tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. scotland's first minister insists she followed the rules — that her government was right to investigate alex salmond, and that there was no plot to take him down. alex salmond has been, for most of my life, since i was about 20, 21 years old, not just a very close political colleague, a friend and, in my younger days, somebody i looked up to and revered. you know, i had no motive, intention, desire, to get alex salmond. this was a marathon session, more than seven hours of questioning. m5 sturgeon apologised to women, who were let down by the government, but she insisted all the decisions she made were for the right reasons. i have never claimed in this or anything else to be infallible. i have searched my soul on all of this many, many times over.
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it may very well be that i didn't get everything right, that's for others to judge. but in one of the most invidious, political and personal situations i have ever faced, i believe i acted properly and appropriately, and that overall i made the best judgments that i could. this row isn't over, though. there could be more claims to come. and a report on whether m5 sturgeon broke the rules ministers have to follow is expected this month. nick eardley, bbc news, holyrood. the delay in introducing tighter brexit checks on goods between northern ireland and the rest of the uk, has been strongly criticised by the eu, saying it would breach international law. the irish government has also criticised the uk's move as deeply unhelpful. it comes as loyalist paramilitary organisations have told the prime minister that they will temporarily withdraw their support of the good friday agreement. a court in virginia has ruled that the family
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of the motorcyclist, harry dunn, can seek damages from the husband of the driver involved in the accident which killed him. mr dunn was 19 when his bike collided with a car, driven by the wife of an american diplomat, near an raf base in northamptonshire in 2019. anne sacoolas was charged with causing death by dangerous driving, but the us refused to allow her to be extradited to the uk. ambitions to send humans to mars have suffered another setback, after a prototype rocket exploded. the unmanned space—x rocket blew—up after what appeared to have been a successful test flight in the united states. russell trott has the story. three, two, one... ignition... ..we have liftoff. it was all running so smoothly. the starship prototype rocket launch from boca chica, in cameron county, texas. five minutes in and the space—x
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craft begins its tricky descent back to the landing zone, ten kilometres — or 30,000 feet below. a near—perfect landing, or at least that's how it looked and despite some flames needing to be put out, it was all systems go for a second flight. whoa, whoa, whoa. this time, not so good. thankfully, no one was on board and there were no injuries among the safety crews on the ground. two previous tests also had failed. space—x, founded by the tesla electric car entrepreneur, elon musk, hopes to eventually send a reusable rocket to mars. it may need more testing. russell trott, bbc news. it is always very dramatic. before we did our rehearsals this morning,
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i had not seen those pictures. i was taken aback. carol was watching as well. you did exactly the same, didn't you? when you saw those pictures. glad to hear no one was on board. it has been cold the last few days. we had that lovely mild spell last week. that's right. a cold start to the day. for the next few days, we remain cloudy and chilly. tomorrow will start off on a sunnier note. having said that mcleod will build through the day. this morning heavy showers in the south—eastern quarter of the country. dense fog in southern counties, the south—west and the bristol area as well. a weather front sinking south, taking its reign with it, getting into east anglia, the midlands and northern
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ireland by the afternoon. behind that it will brighten up. not as cold as it has felt earlier in the week when temperature struggled to get above four degrees. the up that we are in the mild category, at 11 degrees, in the south—west. —— ahead of that. clear skies coming in behind. once again it will be a cold night. in scotland for example, in some of the glens, it could full 2-4. it some of the glens, it could full 2—4. it could full 2—4 in east anglia if we had breaks in the cloud long enough. more details on about half an hour. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has promised another £65 billion of economic support in his budget, which he says will help businesses and people through the pandemic. he also explained how he plans to start paying the bill, which will push britain's tax burden to its highest
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level since the 19605. nina's in redcar this morning and has been getting reaction from people there. morning to you. all of this ahead of us talking to the chancellor in about an hour and 15 minutes. that is riuht. about an hour and 15 minutes. that is right- good _ about an hour and 15 minutes. tsisgt is right. good morning from medicare on the windy, beautiful north—east coast. you will probably know this name because it used to be synonymous with steelworks. places like teesside, darlington, hartlepool, they often felt left out of economic growth. yesterday a boost from the chancellor. just over there, a free port will be built. that means goods built in that area will not be subject to uk tax before they are exported and just over there, in darlington, and northern england treasury office will be built. the idea being the wealth
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created there will trickle around the wider region. i spent the day in newcastle yesterday, talking to people about whether they believe that will happen. every town and every city has thousands of stories of what should happen now. bailey deserves a break. he trained for three years as a rail engineer before cancer treatment cut off his career before it even had a chance to start. i was trying to get a job but 700 people are applying for the same job i applied for, so that's probably going to be a no—go. singing kobe dreams of being a singer. times are tough for his mum. she used to be a special needs nurse but stopped to look after her daughter, who has complex disabilities. they just about get by on universal credit
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and her husband's income. it's been a bit of a struggle here and there because i think during kind of the first lockdown, people were quite happy to get takeaways and things. my husband's a takeaway driver. obviously, that's not there. so his hours have been kind of up and down in bits but, yeah, we'll get by. so things are ok at the moment but you worry about what comes next and what things will be like for the kids? absolutely. the kids are the future, aren't they? it's notjust about education, it's about mentally. i think, especially, you ask all the time, don't you? about covid, about when he's going to see his friends, when can he hug people? joanne runs three pubs. she's desperate to get customers back through the doors but she is worried about what happens if tax goes up and punters can't splash out. she's glad vat has come down
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and thinks it should stay down. one thing i would like to see is something they do in europe, and that is a fixed vat percentage for the hospitality trade. a country like spain and france that does rely heavily on tourism and hospitality. we're in that boat now here in the uk. a fixed rate that's lower than the standard rate everybody else pays is what they do. in spain, i think it's round about 11%. for something like that to be brought here in the uk — that would be a great asset. but gary's hair salon is not farfrom joanne's pub. he was hoping he might have had a surprise vat cut from the chancellor. we pay 20% vat, where hospitality pays 5%. we are not to service you can put online, a takeaway service. when we are closed, we are closed. the theory is, once it's back to normal, everyone will want a haircut, so your industry will bounce back quickly. there is no doubt we're going to be
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really, really busy. i worry for salons because they'll have taken out extra debt, extra loans, they'll have deferred payments. those payments will have to be paid back eventually, so it's added pressure on businesses. who are the real winners? who will be the long term losers? we won't truly know how successful the chancellor's support has been for months, even years. for now, everyone is just trying to make it to tomorrow. and the boffins have made it crunching on these numbers overnight. one thing they are questioning is whether or not we will all have the same take—home pay is the impact of the budget comes through. the chancellor saying yesterday all our pay will stay the same. is it true with the tax
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threshold staying the same taking in information? also questions about the extent to which that can balance the extent to which that can balance the books. overall the new tax measures will bring a 19 billion by 2026. think about what he also said yesterday. spending because of the pandemic, theirfiscal support, that pandemic, their fiscal support, that will come pandemic, theirfiscal support, that will come to £400 billion. that does not leave a lot of room for manoeuvre if there is a surprise. very dramatic backdrop you have. absolutely stunning today. it is raw but it looks absolutely stunning. quite a lot of hair in my mouth now. but the background absolutely but the background looks absolutely stunning. but the background looks absolutely stunninu. �* , but the background looks absolutely stunninu. �*, . ., ., but the background looks absolutely stunnin.. �*, .., . ., ., ., stunning. let's concentrate on that. absolutely- — let's take a look at today's papers. the financial times leads on the budget, which it describes as a "spend now, tax later plan." the paper says rishi sunak is the first chancellor to raise corporation tax in 50 years. away from the budget,
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the daily mail reports that the queen has launched an "unprecedented inquiry," following allegations that meghan and harry bullied their staff. meghan is said to be saddened by the allegations. the daily mirror says the queen "went to war" with harry and meghan by ordering a probe into the allegations. the couple have described the story as part of a smear campaign, but the mirror says a royal insider branded that suggestion "ludicrous." and these images of a rare black fox from a story featured on bbc news online. the animal was caught on camera in a garden in west london. the family say they first thought it was a wolf, or a wild dog. could have been a wolf cub, couldn't it? absolutely gorgeous. used obviously a kind of getting a bit of
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food. it is really stunning. i don't want to leave the fox, oh, we have left it. an animal theme of sorts. we are going to put an earworm into people of a certain age's head stop you can't touch this, by mc hammer. when i say a song title, i say how it is sung. you do not know how it goes by mc hammer. we can play it to you later. this song is a 1990 hip—hop track, a great tune. the scientist has been looking at how fish brains respond to certain types of music. it has been looking at the baby zebra fish. it has found, this scientist is also australia's first female dance producer and dj. she has been looking see how neurones
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respond to the base of the vocal from the zebrafish's brains. i do not know the point of this. it gives me an opportunity to talk about mc hammer�*s you can't touch this. there is a publication saying the hearing range of fish is far broader than initially thought. what other tracks do they play? i will tell you what they did say. maybe someone can help me out. when the vocal goes, oh, oh, the fish responds to debate with neurones lighting up. they could have played a rod stewart track like i am saying. rod stewart is famously keen on his train sets. he is moving
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from los angeles back to the uk. he spent time and money bringing his model railway set. he has an enormous model railway set. his kids are at school in the uk and he has shipped the whole lot back to the uk. 1500 square feet! i knew he was very keen on his railway set when i interviewed him. itook very keen on his railway set when i interviewed him. i took a very keen on his railway set when i interviewed him. itook a model trained to share with him. he was instantly transformed. he knew exactly what it was. it was an old iron... someone technical is going to help with their size. it is this size. almost like a working model you could get going. ijust had the engine partand you could get going. ijust had the engine part and i took it in. he knew what it was. he was like a kid
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in a sweet shop. that is how to warm someone up. i am impressed. the duchess of sussex has accused the royal family of "perpetuating falsehoods" about her and prince harry. in a clip of an interview with oprah winfrey, which has just been released ahead of the full broadcast this weekend, meghan says she could not be expected to stay silent and is prepared for the consequences of speaking out. here's what she had to say. how do you feel about the palace hearing you speak your truth today? i don't know how they could expect that after_ i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time we would still be _ that after all of this time we would still be silent if there is an active _ still be silent if there is an active role the firm is playing in perpetuating falsehoods about us. if that comes with the risk of losing things. _ that comes with the risk of losing things, there is a lot that has been lost already.
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good morning to you. words that people will be picking up when talking about the royal family are the firm. , ., , , the firm. the establishment, if you like. the the firm. the establishment, if you like- they will _ the firm. the establishment, if you like. they will also _ the firm. the establishment, if you like. they will also be _ the firm. the establishment, if you like. they will also be picking - the firm. the establishment, if you like. they will also be picking up. like. they will also be picking up on the words like perpetuating falsehoods and questioning what that would mean. this is the interview that harry and meghan had given to oprah winfrey, the queen of chat show hosts over in the united states. the interview was conducted in the last couple of weeks. this is sort of part of the publicity blaze ahead of the broadcast, which in us terms will be on sunday evening, sunday march the 7th. uk viewers will be able to watch it in full the following day. if there were any concerns after the first trailer, which has released a couple of days
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ago, in which meghan who didn't actually say anything and oprah winfrey brought up the comments, i think this first trail with meghan is not going to give any comfort at all for anyone watching from buckingham palace because the inference is across cross that hilarity interview is expected to run full, a lot of words will be said. ., ., , ,., , run full, a lot of words will be said. ., ., , , ., said. now we are seeing reports of allegations — said. now we are seeing reports of allegations of _ said. now we are seeing reports of allegations of bullying. _ said. now we are seeing reports of allegations of bullying. indeed. - allegations of bullying. indeed. these are the _ allegations of bullying. indeed. these are the allegations - allegations of bullying. indeed. these are the allegations that l allegations of bullying. indeed. - these are the allegations that came to light in the times newspaper the day before yesterday. it was reported people had approached a reporter for the times about allegations of bullying, which allegedly happened in 2018. there was an e—mail which was written by
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the sussexes communication secretary at the time, talking about particular members of staff. there was the unprecedented step. we are not aware any allegation of misconduct or bullying by a member of the royal family has ever been undertaken by buckingham palace's hr before. that is what has been launched. basically, members of staff involved with the duke and duchess at that time, including those no longer with the household, will be invited to participate in confidence to see if any lessons can be learned from this process. we know that process is expected to start soon. we also know it was taken with the knowledge of senior officials within the palace and with the knowledge of senior members of the knowledge of senior members of the royal family. really so many questions to be asked, some of them will be answered, no doubt in this broadcast, which is due to take
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place this weekend.— broadcast, which is due to take place this weekend. always good to talk to you- — place this weekend. always good to talk to you. sarah _ place this weekend. always good to talk to you. sarah campbell. - time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. plans are being unveiled later — aimed at bringing visitors back to the west end after lockdown. westminster council's due to announce a £150 million project to try to create more jobs and boost business, including al fresco dining areas, as well as a pledge to build almost 2000 afforable homes by 2023. a murder investigation's been launched after a teenager was stabbed in croydon yesterday afternoon. the 19 year—old was attacked on alpha road just after mid—day. london's transport bosses are encouraging children to walk or cycle to school when their doors reopen to all pupils from monday. tfl will be laying on extra buses and �*5chool only�* services. they're asking other passengers to bear that in mind when planning theirjourneys and avoid travelling at peak times.
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online retailer amazon is opening its first high street grocery store in west london, one where customers won't have to scan items or queue at tills. instead cameras and contactless technology will be used to identify what they've taken from the shelves. the store in ealing brodway will be the first to open in the capital, with plans for more. it's a few more weeks until gyms and fitness centres might be able to reopen and many people have of course been finding alternative ways to stay healthy. one organisation called ability bow, which says it tailors activities for disabled people, has moved online. some londoners who've been shielding say it's been a lifeline. when you've got a neurological condition like i have you spent 24 hours a day thinking about your condition. so being able to keep moving is so important to me. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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let's start with the tube and that's all looking good so far — no reported problems there. however— this is how it looks in bexleyheath— those a2 roadworks still slowing things down at the danson interchange, with london bound delays at times from hall place and on the m25, clockwise traffic is slow heading towardsjunciton 30 for lakeside, the inside lane is closed following the lorry fire last week. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. once again, poor visibility to start the day across the capital. some mist, some patches of fog and lots of low cloud around. it will all lift into low cloud as we head through the morning. there's some early rain around, we're starting off with five or six celsius, so it's a little milder than it has been of late. that rain is set to peter out, it will be easing and it will move gradually south eastwards as we head through the morning. so there'll be lots of dry weather around today but always plenty of cloud. quite a cool and brisk north—easterly wind setting up, too. you'll notice the drop in temperature, it's going to feel colder today — highs between six and 8 degrees celsius, perhaps a little more patchy rain as we head through the afternoon
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but lots of dry weather too. overnight tonight then, it should stay dry, there'll be some clear spells at times, temperatures will drop very close to freezing, it's a colder start to friday. but on friday it should be dry, or mostly dry, small chance of a shower and some spells of sunshine, we'll keep that cool, north—easterly wind. it's looking dry over the weekend. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and naga, bye for now. hello this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up on breakfast this morning. it's world book day and we'll speak to horrible histories author terry deary about his new book on the history of flight. thank you today for letting me speak in front of all of you. i want to especially thank mr burton.
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we'll catch up with educating yorkshire's head teacher matt burton and his former pupil mushy, who has overcome his stammer and is now hoping to become an english teacher. we'll be joined by two of the uk's most promising actors, conrad khan and kingsley ben—adir, who have been nominated for the bafta, rising star award. the rate of decline in covid—19 infections in england has slowed and in some places, including london the south east and the midlands, cases are increasing. researchers at imperial college london say infection rates need to be as low as possible to give the vaccination programme the best chance of working. we'rejoined now from birmingham by gp, dr mohit mandiratta. good morning to you. good morning, how are you? — good morning to you. good morning, how are you? he _ good morning to you. good morning, how are you? he really _ good morning to you. good morning, how are you? he really well, - good morning to you. good morning, how are you? he really well, thank . how are you? he really well, thank ou. how are you? he really well, thank you- looking _ how are you? he really well, thank you- looking at _ how are you? he really well, thank
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you. looking at this _ how are you? he really well, thank you. looking at this rate _ how are you? he really well, thank you. looking at this rate of - how are you? he really well, thank you. looking at this rate of decline| you. looking at this rate of decline in cases. we are still seeing a decline but it is slowing, so what does that tell you? bearing in mind the numbers are smaller so the changes are expected to be smaller? indeed. partly it will be that and we all have this hope that the vaccine programme is running so well and nhs staff are working so hard, the days are getting longer with spring here now and community cases are declining. but we need to follow the guidelines, follow the hands, space and face guidance, follow the social distancing advice that is out there because we do want cases to continue coming down. we are not enjoying this lockdown at all and we have been in this situation for a long time, but the desire is we don't end up in lockdown again. so please bear with us, keep working hard with the guidance, we will get
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there if we are all careful and keep following the advice that is out there. it following the advice that is out there. , . ., ., following the advice that is out there. , .., ., ,., following the advice that is out there. , .., ., i. ., there. it is quite candid of you to sa ou there. it is quite candid of you to say you are _ there. it is quite candid of you to say you are not _ there. it is quite candid of you to say you are not enjoying - there. it is quite candid of you to say you are not enjoying it - there. it is quite candid of you to l say you are not enjoying it because it reflects what a lot of people are saying. no doubt you will be seen in patients who are saying i am done, i have had enough and this is harming me. as well as treating them for their medical conditions, you are having to deal with this as well so how difficult is it to pet them up and tell them that this is the last push and not long to go? it’s and tell them that this is the last push and not long to go?- push and not long to go? it's not eas , push and not long to go? it's not easy. the — push and not long to go? it's not easy. the reat— push and not long to go? it's not easy, the real legacy _ push and not long to go? it's not easy, the real legacy of- push and not long to go? it's not easy, the real legacy of the - easy, the real legacy of the pandemic when the critical care beds are not full of covid any more, it will be the mental health. i am seeing patients with mental health, stress and anxiety, the job losses, so many people have suffered through the pandemic and the national restrictions. but it is supporting them through this. if there are
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people you have not heard with from a while, send them a message. i am sure they will appreciate you checking on them. if you are feeling low and struggling, there are probably tens of thousands of people out there feeling exactly the same way. we will get through this, there is that hope and a lot of professional support. we are here as gps, mental health services and the samaritans. from my perspective, for the first time we will be out of the pandemic with the vaccination programme but there is a bit more time to go so we cannot relax at the moment. , ., , ., moment. yesterday, we saw news that matt hancock — moment. yesterday, we saw news that matt hancock telling _ moment. yesterday, we saw news that matt hancock telling mps _ moment. yesterday, we saw news that matt hancock telling mps that - moment. yesterday, we saw news that matt hancock telling mps that a - matt hancock telling mp5 that a quarter of people in england coronavirus antibodies. but we are aware of new strains and what science is doing in terms of tweaking vaccines are getting better at doing that, what more do you know
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about that? we at doing that, what more do you know about that? ~ ~' ., at doing that, what more do you know about that? ~ ~ ., , , ., about that? we know viruses mutate, we are well drilled _ about that? we know viruses mutate, we are well drilled dealing _ about that? we know viruses mutate, we are well drilled dealing with - about that? we know viruses mutate, we are well drilled dealing with the i we are well drilled dealing with the flu virus every year, there is a slight tweak of that vaccine to manage the particular strain that is there each year. this is something scientists have been doing for such a long time. incredible work done by all researchers and scientists to get us to 20 million vaccines or over done now. but you do need the protection to be even higher. the fact that the vaccines can be changed quite easily to deal with any new variants, i think that is a real note of reassurance that there is a way, we have all these new brazil variants and the african variants. the current vaccines are affected but may be not as effective as to the initial strains of the kent variant of the covid—19 virus. but there is the ability to tweak them. ,, ., ., but there is the ability to tweak them, ., , ,., 4' but there is the ability to tweak
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them. ., , ., them. something we have spoken about before about vaccine _ them. something we have spoken about before about vaccine hesitancy - them. something we have spoken about before about vaccine hesitancy among . before about vaccine hesitancy among ethnic communities, minority ethnic communities, but also more research being needed as to why they have been disproportionately affected and now there are call for more volunteers from ethnic minority communities? i volunteers from ethnic minority communities?— volunteers from ethnic minority communities? i would encourage eve bod communities? i would encourage everybody to _ communities? i would encourage everybody to be _ communities? i would encourage everybody to be involved - communities? i would encourage everybody to be involved in - everybody to be involved in research. that is how we get the information we need to tackle these viruses. initially there was a lot of concern as to why these vaccines have come out so quickly. research has been going on for so long against different coronaviruses and that helped get to a point where we could make a vaccine against covid—19 so quickly. i would encourage people to be part of the research. it is voluntary so if people are not very keen, it is about speaking to them and encourage them to participate. it is for the greater good and we need volunteers
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and trials to take place so we know what vaccines are made and what medicines are made are safe in our communities. medicines are made are safe in our communities-— medicines are made are safe in our communities. ., , . communities. schools, many children auoin back communities. schools, many children going back to — communities. schools, many children going back to the _ communities. schools, many children going back to the classroom - communities. schools, many children going back to the classroom next - going back to the classroom next week and concerns from some parents and children about using testing kits, what is the message to be given regarding those? i kits, what is the message to be given regarding those?- kits, what is the message to be given regarding those? i know there are lots of excited _ given regarding those? i know there are lots of excited people _ given regarding those? i know there are lots of excited people getting i are lots of excited people getting back to school, but as health care professionals we have been doing these lateral flow tests. yes, they are unpleasant and tickle the back of your throat and make you cough a little bit when you put them up your nose and make your eyes water. it is only for a few seconds and the tests are 75% effective. no test is perfect but the real benefit is if lots of people have it, the more that have it, the more effective it is. if one person is picked up as having coronavirus that did know they had it, they then isolate and
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get a pcr test done, that will prevent spread and keep a lot of people say if you haven't had the vaccine. i do have the swab here, it is very thin and small, it doesn't cause any harm and it is very safe and i have my test here yesterday with the result, which is negative. it is all pretty self—explanatory and very quick to do. it is all pretty self-explanatory and very quick to do.— it is all pretty self-explanatory and very quick to do. thank you for talkin: to and very quick to do. thank you for talking to us _ and very quick to do. thank you for talking to us this _ and very quick to do. thank you for talking to us this morning - and very quick to do. thank you for talking to us this morning and - and very quick to do. thank you for talking to us this morning and takej talking to us this morning and take care. now, michael tell us about the sport. i am looking at your script. i am delighted to have seen the world bamboozle. what a great word, i haven't had it in a sports bulletin for a while. imagine you are batting on the sports pitches like india and the ball is spinning like a snake and you are bamboozled. england needed to win this one to level the series.
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yes, the good news is that england won the toss out in ahmedabad. the bad news is their early batting has once again crumbled to the india bowlers. england decided to play an extra batsman, dan lawrence, instead of a fast bowler and it looks like they're going to need him because at lunch england are 74 for three. dom sibley was first to go to axar patel forjust two. patel�*s been england's nemesis taking 18 wickets in the last two tests, and he tempted zak crawley into a rash shot. crawley gone for nine. and then the biggest blow of all, captainjoe root lbw to siraj forjust five. so real trouble, but ben stokes and jonny bairstow have repaired some of the damage. both have reached the 205. rangers are within touching distance of being crowned champions in scotland, after victory at livingston. it means they now need four more points to stop, celtic winning ten titles in a row. and that was their main aim this season.
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but rangers manager steven gerrard, on the brink of his first, was sent off at half time for comments he made to the referee who'd booked alfredo, morelos earlier. and it was morelos who came up with the only goal, to secure the win, that moves them 18 points clear of celtic again. elsewhere hamilton drew 1—1 with stjohnstone. there was frustration, in the premier league, for second—placed manchester united, who dropped more points. they lost their way, a bit, in the fog in south london, but credit to crystal palace, who came close to scoring the only goal of this draw, near full—time. united are 14 points behind leaders manchester city. we have the quality to win games but we haven't produced that quality. we just have to find that spark again, we have to find that quality again and we'll win games. if we keep on having clean sheets, at least we've got a foundation to build from. leicester city, also dropped points but stay third in the table — they came from behind to draw 1—1 at burnley thanks to a great finish from kelechi ihea nacho. it means they're a point behind manchester united. and it may be too late in the end to save them, but bottom club,
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sheffield united beat aston villa 1—0. david mcgoldrick scored the only goal. and united, held on for the win, despite having philjagielka sent off. despite their heroics, they're still 12 points from safety. manchester city have one boot, in the women's champions league quarterfinals, after beating fiorentina 3—0 in the home leg of their last 16 tie. city scored twice in the first four minutes through lauren hemp and ellen white, before sam mewis added another late on. it was a good night for chelsea in their first leg. they beat atletico madrid 2—0 at kings—meadow. fran kirby with chelsea's second goal. finally... a cameraman's worst nightmare came true at the argentina open. he was walking backwards, filming the players coming onto court, when he falls over the advertising board. he may have been bamboozled! he was helped up and is doing fine.
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the player was forced to gently tiptoe around the cameraman to begin his match. you are meant to walk behind the camera operators to make sure they don't do that. probably not his fault, he is concentrating. they do get in the way, those hoardings. i don't think they were looking and thinking, let him become a social distancing. absolutely, yes. concentrating on the game, getting ready. i hope someone being injured takes precedent. he got up, so he was fine. an excerpt from a heavily anticipated interview with the duke and duchess of sussex and chat show host, opera winfrey, has been released overnight. the duchess of sussex accuses the royal family of "perpetuating falsehoods" about her and prince harry and says she could not be expected to stay silent. here's what she had to say. how do you feel about buckingham palace hearing you speak your truth
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today? i palace hearing you speak your truth toda ? ., �* ~ ., ., , palace hearing you speak your truth toda ? .,�* ~ ., ., , today? i don't know how they could exect today? i don't know how they could exoect that — today? i don't know how they could expect that after _ today? i don't know how they could expect that after all _ today? i don't know how they could expect that after all of _ today? i don't know how they could expect that after all of this - today? i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time - expect that after all of this time we would — expect that after all of this time we would stilljust be silent if there — we would stilljust be silent if there was an active role that the firm is _ there was an active role that the firm is playing in perpetuating falsehoods about us. and if that comes— falsehoods about us. and if that comes with risk of losing things, i mean, _ comes with risk of losing things, i mean, there is a lot that has been lost already. we're joined now from los angeles by entertainment reporter, sean mandell. good morning. let's talk about what we have heard for the first time here in the uk. the previous moment we saw that was released was the duchess of sussex alongside prince harry. this is the moment when she and oprah winfrey are talking? that's correct, we understand the beginning of the interview is going to start with meghan and oprah and then prince harry willjoin them later. it is a two hour interview so
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there will be plenty of time for meghan and oprah to talk before harryjones. this is the first time we have heard her speakfrom any clips. the previous clips have showed harry speaking and then showing oprah asking meghan question asking if she was silent or silenced in reference to the duchess of sussex not speaking out in the attacks she received in the press and the media. now we are hearing she believes that the firm, which is a very interestingly chosen phrase, is actively trying to undermine them and spread mistruths about them. it gives us a lot of context in terms of why they have made certain actions they have made. i don't think we can help but look at this that about these allegations of
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bullying. this teaser may not have planned to be released but the timing of it is definitely in response to what the news has been over the last 24 hours. to response to what the news has been over the last 24 hours.— over the last 24 hours. to some extent, over the last 24 hours. to some extent. this _ over the last 24 hours. to some extent, this is _ over the last 24 hours. to some extent, this is tricky, _ over the last 24 hours. to some extent, this is tricky, clearly - over the last 24 hours. to some| extent, this is tricky, clearly the interview was done before this latest news about the buckingham palace investigation into these bullying claims. so the interview took place before that? absolutely. it is also interesting _ took place before that? absolutely. it is also interesting because - took place before that? absolutely. it is also interesting because you i it is also interesting because you have to wonder whether or not what was in the interview, the contents of it made its way to staff members orformer staff members of it made its way to staff members or former staff members and people decided on their own to try and get ahead of it and have a pre—emptive strike, if you will. because they knew this part of the interview existed. we don't know if anyone on that side of the pond has seen the interview, this is something that
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has been closely guarded. but it is always possible. when you look at the content we have just seen, it seems like the royal court knew some of what was coming out which is why those bombshell reports were released. and this clip, while you are right it was recorded before any of this came out, the timing of that has to be seen in the context of what we have all been talking about. help us with some context here, people have their own views in the uk about them speaking out now more generally, about how much interest there is an people have their own views about that. how is this stuff playing in the us right now? we received this latest clip at about three o'clock in the morning, that would have been prime time in terms of the us. our people interested, fundamentally?— of the us. our people interested, fundamentall ? ~ , .,
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fundamentally? absolutely. the more cli -s we fundamentally? absolutely. the more clips we see. — fundamentally? absolutely. the more clips we see, considering _ fundamentally? absolutely. the more clips we see, considering the - fundamentally? absolutely. the more clips we see, considering the first i clips we see, considering the first teaser was already salacious and intriguing and definitely what you would expect out of a typical oprah interview and this to come on the heels of the reporting which was already getting a lot of traction, but maybe not for the reason that people in the uk might think. because the reports that have been happening over the last 24 hours about bullying have galvanised her supporters in the us and on social media. it has hardened the factions, her supporters thinking this is the palace out to get meghan. a lot of celebrities are coming out in support of meghan as well, given again that this doesn't smell right. in the united states, there is tremendous interest because there is meghan, harry and they will be a conversation about princess diana as well. we are getting new titbits about this and the stakes keep
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getting raised. it definitely makes people more interested so we can expect some pretty big broadcast numbers this sunday in the us. thank ou ve numbers this sunday in the us. thank you very much. _ numbers this sunday in the us. thank you very much. we — numbers this sunday in the us. thank you very much, we will _ numbers this sunday in the us. thank you very much, we will speak- numbers this sunday in the us. thank you very much, we will speak again, i am sure. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it is not whether to have a little dip in the sea is it? no, probably not. good morning. what is happening today is we have this weather front producing showers in the south east and that will clear away but this weather front which is away but this weather front which is a cold front is seeking steadily south westwards. watch how the blue starts to push further south in the next few days, just indicating it is going to turn that bit colder. it is colder in the north this morning, colder in the north this morning, cold in many areas. there is a fair bit of cloud around. we lose the showers through the course of the
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morning. some dense fog across southern counties around bristol, for example and the west country. some breaks out towards the west, allowing some sunshine to come through. the weather front slipping south, getting into northern ireland, northern england and the midlands as we go through the afternoon, leaving brighter skies but cooler conditions. this evening and overnight, there is the weather front. it continues to slip down towards the south—west with clear skies behind. pulling in a north—westerly breeze and another cold night. particularly where the skies remain clear, the glens of scotland could get down to minus four. if the cloud remains broken across the south—east of england and east anglia in particular, here, too, temperatures could slide to minus four so they could be some frost. tomorrow we have high pressure across the uk. a weak weather front feature fizzles out and things will be quiet. there will be frosty start with and areas of cloud but there will be a fair bit of sunshine as well. through the
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day, the cloud will start to build and it will extend across many areas. but generally it will be a brighter day than we have seen of late. temperatures, nothing to write home about, five to 7 degrees. where we have clung on to them are the conditions in the south, here too, temperatures will be slipping. a5 conditions in the south, here too, temperatures will be slipping. as we go into the weekend, we continue with that trend and areas of cloud with that trend and areas of cloud with rain trying to come in from the atlantic during the weekend and that will introduce milder conditions next week, but unsettled ones as well. carol, thank you so much. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon spent more than seven hours giving evidence to yesterday's parliamentary inquiry at holyrood. the hearing has been looking at her government's handling of allegations of harassment made against her predecessor, alex salmond.
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we'rejoined now by the snp's foreign affairs spokesman, alyn smith. what did you make of nicola sturgeon's appearance and what she had to say? i sturgeon's appearance and what she had to sa ? . , sturgeon's appearance and what she hadto sa ? ., , ., had to say? i was exhausted after seven and a _ had to say? i was exhausted after seven and a half— had to say? i was exhausted after seven and a half hours, _ had to say? i was exhausted after seven and a half hours, so - had to say? i was exhausted after seven and a half hours, so god i had to say? i was exhausted after- seven and a half hours, so god knows how nicola and the committee members were feeling. they spent a lot of theissues were feeling. they spent a lot of the issues venting the issues that were part of this and she spent more time than tony blair spent talking to the enquiry about the war in iraq. there were deficiencies in the process of the way the scottish government dealt with the complaints. it was a strong session from nicola sturgeon. we have heard from nicola sturgeon. we have heard from some quarters that some of the matters have been put to bed yesterday and we need to move on. who are those wacky conspiracy
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theories? ., , ., theories? people on the internet, trolls. so people _ theories? people on the internet, trolls. so people who _ theories? people on the internet, trolls. so people who won't i theories? people on the internet, trolls. so people who won't have l theories? people on the internet, i trolls. so people who won't have an effect on nicola _ trolls. so people who won't have an effect on nicola sturgeon's - trolls. so people who won't have an effect on nicola sturgeon's future i effect on nicola sturgeon's future of the snp?— effect on nicola sturgeon's future ofthe snp? ., ., , ., ., of the snp? you say that, but a lot of the snp? you say that, but a lot of stuff has — of the snp? you say that, but a lot of stuff has been _ of the snp? you say that, but a lot of stuff has been put _ of the snp? you say that, but a lot of stuff has been put into _ of the snp? you say that, but a lot of stuff has been put into the i of the snp? you say that, but a lot of stuff has been put into the mix, | of stuff has been put into the mix, the integrity of the lord advocate has been called into question and the integrity of scotland's decision—making apparatus was called into question. donald trump still thinks he won the us election, he is putting out that misinformation. likewise in scotland, i hope we move on now. ., ., ., , on now. look at one of the things bein: on now. look at one of the things being challenged, _ on now. look at one of the things being challenged, government i on now. look at one of the things i being challenged, government e-mails being challenged, government e—mails showing the party's own lawyers said this case against, the legal fight against alex salmond was likely to result in a loss, yet it still continued. that is one of the things being questioned? it is continued. that is one of the things being questioned?— being questioned? it is also one of the thins being questioned? it is also one of the things been _ being questioned? it is also one of the things been answered. - being questioned? it is also one of the things been answered. at i being questioned? it is also one of the things been answered. at the l the things been answered. at the start of the judicial review against
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the scottish government in their handling over the policy of sexual harassment, there was ground to take it forward. it was as subsequent facts came to light, which is where your e—mail comes in, saying the case needed to be settled. which is why it was subtle. what we saw in seven hours and i appreciate many people were not watching seven hours, but we saw a number of questions which had been raised quite rightly and properly, being properly answered and there is a number of lessons we need to learn about this. but the conspiracy stuff has been put to bed.— has been put to bed. when the documents _ has been put to bed. when the documents were _ has been put to bed. when the documents were published i has been put to bed. when the documents were published on | has been put to bed. when the - documents were published on tuesday, the e—mails showed, in regards to this case, that a senior lawyer, "was very concerned indeed about the case" this was in october 2018 but it urged the government's council to admit defeat by the 6th of december. the scottish national party didn't
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do that until 2019 and that is when it had to pay alex salmond's legal costs. so it didn't react space away. costs. so it didn't react space awa . ., ., costs. so it didn't react space awa , ., ., . ., , costs. so it didn't react space awa. ., ., , away. you are confusing if you different things, _ away. you are confusing if you different things, with - away. you are confusing if you different things, with respect. j away. you are confusing if you i different things, with respect. the government of scotland has judicial roles which is where this case was taken. it was the government's mishandling of the enquiry that was thejudicial mishandling of the enquiry that was the judicial review. mishandling of the enquiry that was thejudicial review. six mishandling of the enquiry that was the judicial review. six weeks isn't a long period of time in a legal case. �* , ., a long period of time in a legal case. , ., , ., ., , case. but it is not straightaway, is it? it is case. but it is not straightaway, is it? it is simple. — case. but it is not straightaway, is it? it is simple, the _ case. but it is not straightaway, is it? it is simple, the advice - case. but it is not straightaway, is it? it is simple, the advice you i case. but it is not straightaway, isj it? it is simple, the advice you are talkin: it? it is simple, the advice you are talking about _ it? it is simple, the advice you are talking about was _ it? it is simple, the advice you are talking about was acted _ it? it is simple, the advice you are talking about was acted upon, i it? it is simple, the advice you are talking about was acted upon, it . it? it is simple, the advice you are l talking about was acted upon, it was settled and the legal fees were paid. clearly, iam not denying settled and the legal fees were paid. clearly, i am not denying for a second there is lessons we need to learn from this.— learn from this. what happened with the relationship, _ learn from this. what happened with the relationship, what _ learn from this. what happened with the relationship, what did _ learn from this. what happened with the relationship, what did you i learn from this. what happened with the relationship, what did you gonna from this enquiry yesterday? what happened when it came to the relationship between nicola sturgeon and alex salmond? how has it broken down, apparently, irretrievably? it
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is sad. i have said before, alex salmond was a hero of mine, it is why i became in the snp, he is a giant of scottish politics and a lot of people are very sad about this and scottish politics is a small place, we have been working with each other for over 20 years. the breakdown came from nicola's refusal to allow a powerful man to use his power to subvert a process. the fact that somebody who has known somebody and been an ally and friend for over 20 years means that processes into sexual misconduct is subverted. so there is a process to go through and it is sad. ., . ., ., i. ., it is sad. how certain are you now that nicola _ it is sad. how certain are you now that nicola sturgeon _ it is sad. how certain are you now that nicola sturgeon hasn't i it is sad. how certain are you now| that nicola sturgeon hasn't broken the ministerial code? we that nicola sturgeon hasn't broken the ministerial code?— that nicola sturgeon hasn't broken the ministerial code? we are midway throu~h the ministerial code? we are midway throu . h the the ministerial code? we are midway through the enquiry _ the ministerial code? we are midway through the enquiry and _ the ministerial code? we are midway through the enquiry and yesterday i through the enquiry and yesterday there was a strong rebuttal to a lot of this stuff from nicola. there was
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an enquiry by the independent investigator and the committee enquiry is into the judicial review in the aspect of the failings there. we are midway through the process and we are of these allegations done, so a lot of people are feeling happier today that things are being done properly and we take this stuff seriously in scotland so i will not prejudge any of the enquiries. but i think nicola sturgeon gave a good account of herself yesterday. mr; account of herself yesterday. my interpretation of your answer, for you the jury is out, you are not certain yet that she has not broken the ministerial code? my certain yet that she has not broken the ministerial code?— the ministerial code? my own ersonal the ministerial code? my own personal views _ the ministerial code? my own personal views are _ the ministerial code? my own personal views are probably l the ministerial code? my own i personal views are probably best to keep to myself because a lot of people have been bumping their gums on this stuff. i am not in the investigation into these issues, i am waiting for the report. anybody sensible would do that. a lot of the
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conspiracy theories but about were comprehensively put to bed by nickel yesterday. not a shred of evidence have been brought forward. —— nicola. let's see what the enquiry actually said. nicola. let's see what the enquiry actually said-— actually said. thank you for your time with us. _ actually said. thank you for your time with us. time _ actually said. thank you for your time with us. time to _ actually said. thank you for your time with us. time to get i actually said. thank you for your time with us. time to get the i actually said. thank you for your i time with us. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm sonja jessup. plans aimed at bringing visitors back to the west end after lockdown are being unveiled later. westminster council's due to announce a £150 million project to try to create more jobs and boost business, including alfresco dining areas, as well as a pledge to build almost 2,000 affordable homes by 2023. a murder investigation's been launched after a teenager was stabbed in croydon yesterday afternoon. the 19—year—old was attacked on alpha road just after midday. no arrests have been made. amazon is to open its first food shop in the uk today in west london but there won't
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be any checkouts. the store, in ealing, will use technology that allows shoppers to choose their items and then walk straight out. it's a few more weeks until gyms and fitness centres might be able to reopen, and many people have of course been finding alternative ways to stay healthy. one organisation, called ability bow, which says it tailors activities for disabled people, has moved online. some londoners, who've been shielding, say it's been a lifeline. when you've got a neurological condition like i have you spent 24 hours a day thinking about your condition. so being able to keep moving is so important to me. firefighters have had to help rescue a minibus in tottenham, after it got trapped in a sink hole. crews say it was parked up at the time when the tarmac collapsed underneath it. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the hammersmith and city line has minor delays
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due to some train cancellations that's affecting services. however this is how it looks in bexleyheath. those a2 roadworks still slowing things down at the danson interchange, with london—bound delays at times from hall place. on the m25, clockwise traffic is slow heading towardsjunction 30 for lakeside, the inside lane is closed after a lorry fire last week. and in kingston upon thames, we have temporary lights on kingston hill at the junction with queens road. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. once again, poor visibility to start the day across the capital. some mist, some patches of fog and lots of low cloud around. it will all lift into low cloud as we head through the morning. there's some early rain around, we're starting off with five or six celsius, so it's a little milder than it has been of late. that rain is set to peter out, it will be easing and it will move gradually south eastwards as we head through the morning. so there'll be lots of dry weather around today but always plenty of cloud. quite a cool and brisk
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north—easterly wind setting up, too. you'll notice the drop in temperature, it's going to feel colder today — highs between six and 8 degrees celsius, perhaps a little more patchy rain as we head through the afternoon but lots of dry weather too. overnight tonight then, it should stay dry, there'll be some clear spells at times, temperatures will drop very close to freezing, it's a colder start to friday. but on friday it should be dry, or mostly dry, small chance of a shower and some spells of sunshine, we'll keep that cool, north—easterly wind. it's looking dry over the weekend. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and naga, bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today... paying for the pandemic, the chancellor delivers a budget that will take the uk's tax burden to its highest level since the 19605.
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but it is a buy now pay later budget for uk debt soaring. i am in the northeast where new investment has been welcomed but where there is worry about who will pay long—term, a question i will be putting to the chancellor shortly. the duchess of sussex accuses the royal family of "perpetuating falsehoods" about her and prince harry. i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time we would stilljust be silent if there is an active role the firm is playing in perpetrating falsehoods about us. this latest extract from the us tv interview with oprah winfrey, comes as the palace investigates claims that the duchess bullied royal staff. england's batsmen are struggling once more. even their captain, was rooted to the spot — one of four wickets to fall now, on the opening day of this final test, against india.
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oh, my god! there you go! the dramatic moment an unmanned spacex rocket explodes after a test flight. another chilly day ahead, fairly cloudy for most of us. also some rain in the forecast. i will tell you where in about ten minutes. it's thursday 4th march. our top story. rishi sunak has defended his plans to raise overall taxation to the highest level since the 19605, saying no chancellor since has had to deal with a pandemic. the labour leader sir keir starmer says he'sjust �*papering over the cracks.�* let�*s get more now from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, whojoins us from westminster. i know you spent all evening going to be the main points of the budget and disseminating what it means. can
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you do it again for us this morning? this budget is basically in three bits, that is the best way to think about it. the first chapter is continuing support for people and businesses to help them get through coronavirus. that goes through till september and it is a lot of money. the second phase is trying to boost economic recovery. the chancellor building by giving a massive tax break to businesses investing in buying stuff. the third phase is him raising more money from taxation. companies that make more than a quarter million pounds of profits will see tax rate increase and the chancellor will also freeze the threshold for income tax rates, which means more people start to pay the basic rate as their pay goes up and more people will be brought into the higher rate as their pay goes up. there is a lot of uncertainty around this, what actually happens
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with the virus? it�*s a situation better or worse than the chancellor is predicting?— is predicting? with all those facts we now know. — is predicting? with all those facts we now know, what _ is predicting? with all those facts we now know, what has - is predicting? with all those facts we now know, what has the i is predicting? with all those facts i we now know, what has the reaction be? �* , we now know, what has the reaction be? �* y,, .«r we now know, what has the reaction be? �* ,~ ., , ., be? broadly speaking, conservative mps, be? broadly speaking, conservative mps. economy _ be? broadly speaking, conservative mps, economy and _ be? broadly speaking, conservative mps, economy and business - be? broadly speaking, conservative mps, economy and business is i be? broadly speaking, conservative mps, economy and business is ok | be? broadly speaking, conservative i mps, economy and business is ok with mp5, economy and business is ok with theirs. they think it strikes a good balance. it is good to boost the recovery and good to try to rebuild public finances by raising taxes in a way people might not usually notice. the resolution foundation think tank looking at people on low incomes say actually the chancellor might need to raise even more money in the years ahead. that debate we have just had about extending the £20 a week increase to universal credit, that debate will probably be had again in september when the increase comes to an end but it could coincide with unemployment coming up. i get the impression from talking to conservative mp5, they are ok with the big tax rises when
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they are on paper and in future but will they be quite so ok with them when they are real and actually happening? we�*ll be speaking to the chancellor, rishi sunak, at 7:30am. the duchess of sussex says she�*s not afraid of the consequences of speaking out in her and harry�*s interview with oprah winfrey, saying "a lot has been lost already." a second extract from the heavily—anticipated interview has been released overnight, in which meghan said she could not be expected to stay silent if the royal family played a part in "perpetuating falsehoods" about the couple. it comes as buckingham palace launched an investigation into claims the duchess bullied former royal staff. simon jones has more. meghan is making it clear she will not be afraid to speak out in a second trailer for the interview released overnight. how do you feel about the palace hearing you speak your truth today? i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time we would stilljust be silent,
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if there is an active role that the firm is playing in perpetuating falsehoods about us. if that comes with risk of losing things, there's a lot that's been lost already. this is a second clip released by cbs but the first in which we have heard the duchess speak. the interview was recorded before buckingham palace began an investigation into claims meghan had bullied former royal staff. the times newspaper has obtained an e—mail, written in late 2018, by the couple�*s communication secretary, to simon case, he is now the cabinet secretary. in it, he is reported to have written... buckingham palace said it was very concerned about the allegations. former members of staff
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are being invited to participate in its investigation. in a statement, it added... but a spokesperson for meghan said... she will keep striving to set an example for doing what is right and good. the latest interview clip will do little to heal any apparent rifts between the sussexes and the palace. simon jones, bbc news. we�*re joined now by our royal correspondent, sarah campbell. there are many elements to this. we know what the us network is doing. they are checking out these bits to get more interest in the big interview when it comes out with oprah winfrey. when you hear those words from meghan, the duchess of sussex, what do you think? this
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words from meghan, the duchess of sussex, what do you think?- sussex, what do you think? as you sa , this sussex, what do you think? as you say. this is — sussex, what do you think? as you say. this is a _ sussex, what do you think? as you say, this is a publicity _ sussex, what do you think? as you say, this is a publicity blitz - sussex, what do you think? as you say, this is a publicity blitz in i say, this is a publicity blitz in the run—up to this interview on sunday night. it is the first clips we have had in which we have actually heard meghan speak in her words. when you listen to the clip, it is only a few seconds long but if anyone had any doubt as to whether meghan was planning to reveal details about her life within the royal household and the royal family, she uses the phrase, meghan, which refers to individuals as opposed to the palace machine, any doubts will have to be dispelled. —— the phrase, the firm. in this clip today, she talks about them perpetuating falsehoods about the couple. this of course will be released. wejust couple. this of course will be released. we just heard yesterday the palace has taken the unprecedented step. never before has
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a member of the royal family being investigated by the palace hr but this is what is happening after allegations of bullying by the duchess were revealed in a british newspaper. there will be a lot to talk about in the coming few days. for the moment, thank you. a delay in introducing tighter brexit checks on goods between northern ireland and the rest of the uk, has been strongly criticised by the eu, saying it would breach international law. it comes as loyalist paramilitary organisations have told the prime minister that they will temporarily withdraw their support of the good friday agreement. our ireland correspondent chris page has the latest. chris, morning tea year. good to see it. when you first hear this withdrawal of support by loyalist paramilitaries, immediately eyebrows pa ramilitaries, immediately eyebrows prick paramilitaries, immediately eyebrows prick up, is prick up as well. —— morning to you. there has been a caveat in terms a peaceful
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withdrawal.— caveat in terms a peaceful withdrawal. , ., , ., withdrawal. there is no sign that lo alist withdrawal. there is no sign that loyalist paramilitaries _ withdrawal. there is no sign that loyalist paramilitaries are - withdrawal. there is no sign that i loyalist paramilitaries are planning a return to violence. i think a statement by this group that represents three of the paramilitary groups, the significance of it is it is a sign of increased pressure, increased tension within loyalist communities in northern ireland. over this part of the brexit deal called the northern ireland protocol. it is seen as putting an economic border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. northern ireland has remained in the eu single market for goods while the rest of the uk has left my back was a move to avoid checks on the land border on the irish republic but the result means there had been checks on goods arriving here from great britain. there has been a degree of disruption on businesses and the business community warned there would be a cliff edge at the start of april when the rules were due to be tightened. the government has
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pushed back that day till october but that has drawn criticism from brussels, which says it is a breach of international law. bhki brussels, which says it is a breach of international law.— brussels, which says it is a breach of international law. anki very much for takinr of international law. anki very much fortaking us— of international law. anki very much for taking us through _ of international law. anki very much for taking us through all _ of international law. anki very much for taking us through all of - of international law. anki very much for taking us through all of that. i here�*s carol with a look at this morning�*s weather. good morning. a chilly start to the day once again. a cloudy day generally, as it is for the next few days. as we go through the next he days, like these prints are trying to nudge in from the west. we have a weather front sinking south across scotland. some heavy showers which will clear. from the west country around bristol, heading in the direction of the southern counties generally, there is some fog. a5 direction of the southern counties generally, there is some fog. as we made further north, look at this cloud! this is the rain. also some
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clear skies. all of us will see more sunshine than we have of late. the emphasis is still on a lot of cloud. here comes the patchy rain across northern england into east anglia and northern ireland through the afternoon. some sunshine coming from behind. not as cold across parts of north—east england. there will be some brightness. the head of the weather front, some brightness. the head of the weatherfront, there some brightness. the head of the weather front, there will be brightness and we are clinging the milder conditions. this evening and there goes the front. there will be some clear skies with a bit of cloud around. where the cloud does remain broken all night is where we are going to see the lowest temperatures. the sheltered glens of scotland could see temperatures as low as minus four degrees. if the cloud is unbroken in east anglia, you could see temperatures as low as -4 you could see temperatures as low as —4 as well. there will be a touch of frost around. thank you. see you
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later on. labour leader sir keir starmer says yesterday�*s budget "papers over the cracks rather than rebuilding the foundations." so what would labour do differently? let�*s speak now to the shadow chancellor, anneliese dodds, who joins us from westminster. thank you for your time this morning. should we go through a checklist? that would be helpful. extending furlough, is that a tick box for you? taste extending furlough, is that a tick box for you?— box for you? we did call for furlough — box for you? we did call for furlough to _ box for you? we did call for furlough to be _ box for you? we did call for furlough to be extended i box for you? we did call for i furlough to be extended many box for you? we did call for - furlough to be extended many weeks ago. had the chancellor taken a decision as well as other decisions like extending the business rates holiday. like extending the business rates holida . �* , ., like extending the business rates holida. fl ., , , holiday. let's do it step-by-step, if i ma . holiday. let's do it step-by-step, if i may- go _ holiday. let's do it step-by-step, if i may. go through _ holiday. let's do it step-by-step, if i may. go through it _ if i may. go through it step—by—step. ifi may. go through it step-by-step.- ifi may. go through it ste-b -ste. �* ., ., step-by-step. around furlough, the chancellor should _ step-by-step. around furlough, the chancellor should have _ step-by-step. around furlough, the chancellor should have made i step-by-step. around furlough, the chancellor should have made that l chancellor should have made that system smarter. he should have included training in this game and stamp out abuses we have seen with
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the furlough scheme. we do welcome an extension. it should have been reformed to make it smarter yesterday. reformed to make it smarter yesterday-— reformed to make it smarter esterda . �*, ., ., yesterday. let's go through the next ste - , the yesterday. let's go through the next step. the tax — yesterday. let's go through the next step, the tax breaks _ yesterday. let's go through the next step, the tax breaks in _ yesterday. let's go through the next step, the tax breaks in the - yesterday. let's go through the next step, the tax breaks in the future i step, the tax breaks in the future and the corporation tax rise, which we know has paused. that will come in at a later date. does that get your approval?— in at a later date. does that get your approval? actually, it seems like the major _ your approval? actually, it seems like the major tax _ your approval? actually, it seems like the major tax break - your approval? actually, it seems like the major tax break the i like the major tax break the government announced yesterday was necessary because of what has happened over the last ten years with corporation tax. we have seen their rates reduced over time by conservative led governments. they said it would increase investment growth. it has not done that. the prime minister said it would increase revenue regarding corporation tax. it has not done that. we saw a change of heart yesterday from government. because of their rapid change they are needing to engage in to get us back to a more sensible position, they
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are needing a tax break so businesses do not postpone investment. i�*ll be pleased we are getting to a more sensible situation in relation to corporation tax? yes. has it been disappointing the government trailed for some time they would be imposing the tax changes in the middle of a pandemic? yes, it has been put at the corporation tax is what we are talking about that council tax is being increased right now, hammering family incomes. that being increased right now, hammering family incomes-— family incomes. that timing you are questioning — family incomes. that timing you are questioning in _ family incomes. that timing you are questioning in relation _ family incomes. that timing you are questioning in relation to _ family incomes. that timing you are questioning in relation to furlough l questioning in relation to furlough and corporation tax but essentially they are decisions you back. let�*s move on to the issue of freezing of thresholds. more people will pay tax, although technically tax has not gone up. is tax, although technically tax has not gone up-_ not gone up. is it something you a- rove not gone up. is it something you approve of? _ not gone up. is it something you approve of? we _ not gone up. is it something you approve of? we were _ not gone up. is it something you approve of? we were concerned | not gone up. is it something you i approve of? we were concerned again that there were some rumours over the weekend government might be
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imposing that immediately. that would have been the wrong decision. in the long term, we were aware that these kinds of thresholds, when they are increased like most of the benefit of that has gone to batter of people. we are not opposed to that in principle. —— better off. we are concerned it will interact with potentially much bigger council tax bills in the future. they are already being increased right now by 5% billing families. also what the government is doing around social security. for low income families we could be seeing a very challenging time in the future. bud could be seeing a very challenging time in the future.— time in the future. and i ask you, candidl , time in the future. and i ask you, candidly. had _ time in the future. and i ask you, candidly. had he _ time in the future. and i ask you, candidly, had he been _ time in the future. and i ask you, candidly, had he been chancellor| candidly, had he been chancellor right now, these are extraordinary and challenging times? —— can i ask you? there has been criticism of the chancellor that he has not been more forthright to say, not now but in
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the future that you will pay more tax. would you have said that directly and clearly at this stage? this stage is the time when every government, in fact every other major economy, has not been focused on tax changes and instead has been focused on securing the economic recovery will stop the significant thing we saw yesterday was the obr assessment that the uk has had their worst economic crisis and then linking back to what has happened with public health, the fact we have had mismanagement of the health situation. for example lockdown to impose later, it lasted longer, had been stricter. in that context, the chancellor should instead have focused on securing economic recovery. he should have been buttressing family incomes, not hammering them with the council tax rise. he also should have been
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honest and open about the need to rebuild our nhs. this budget included a reduction in funding for our nhs in subsequent years. that is not being open with the public about the kind of demands that exist on our nhs in the future after we come out of this pandemic. back our nhs in the future after we come out of this pandemic.— out of this pandemic. back to my oriainal out of this pandemic. back to my original question, _ out of this pandemic. back to my original question, you _ out of this pandemic. back to my original question, you talk- out of this pandemic. back to my original question, you talk about | original question, you talk about being open with people. would you have been more open in terms of telling people you would pay more tax in order that you can spend the money now?— tax in order that you can spend the money now? actually, i don't think that is how — money now? actually, i don't think that is how modern _ money now? actually, i don't think that is how modern economies i that is how modern economies operate. the most important thing to take place right now is for the uk to get back to growth, for people to be back in work, for businesses to be back in work, for businesses to be operating, not going to the wall, for people to be spending. then you do that you grow their tax base. you stop the reduction in tax income we
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had seen during this period because of that drop—off in economic activity. securing that economic base in the first place really is the most important thing for the chancellor to be focused on. it seems like much of the discussion of taxation at least that we have seen over recent weeks, it is very clear, it has been reported in the press time and again that the chancellor has said he wants to get tax changes out of the way quickly, like council tax, so there can then be reductions in tax before the next general election. that is driven by party politics and not driven by the needs of our economy. of course they will need to be changes in tax into the future. setting out those changes, like the changing council tax, imposing it right now, so potentially that tax can be cut before the general election is not an economically sensible way to be going about this. we an economically sensible way to be going about this.— an economically sensible way to be
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going about this. we are speaking to the chancellor _ going about this. we are speaking to the chancellor in _ going about this. we are speaking to the chancellor in 80 _ going about this. we are speaking to the chancellor in 80 minutes. i going about this. we are speaking to the chancellor in 80 minutes. at i going about this. we are speaking to the chancellor in 80 minutes. at the| the chancellor in 80 minutes. at the end of the answer you said, there will be changes to tax in the future. ~ . . future. what did he mean? there need to be changes- — future. what did he mean? there need to be changes. for _ future. what did he mean? there need to be changes. for example, _ future. what did he mean? there need to be changes. for example, around i to be changes. for example, around business rates. the government has kicked the can down the road on that yet again. there was meant to be a fundamental report on business rates. without fixing that system we will see economic activity and growth compromised because of high street businesses are really struggling. they saw nothing in the budget yesterday about how we would secure our high streets in the future, make sure high street businesses can keep going in the teeth of such a big economic crisis. analyst dodds is the shadow chancellor. we will be speaking to the chancellor in a few minutes�* time. so who are the big winners and losers from rishi sunak�*s second budget, and what does it mean
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for the money in your pocket? let�*s find out now from personal finance analyst, sarah coles. also from vic derby. here are the winners and who are the losers? �* , ., , ., losers? anyone relying on the government _ losers? anyone relying on the government to _ losers? anyone relying on the government to get _ losers? anyone relying on the government to get through i losers? anyone relying on the| government to get through all losers? anyone relying on the i government to get through all this has had good news. if people are relying on furlough or the self—employment grant, it was about how it would end. would it start to taper away? how it would end. would it start to taperaway? now how it would end. would it start to taper away? now we know it has been extended till the end ofjune and it will be tapered after the economy is open, which will come as a relief to lots of people. there has been helpful for people stuck in the house buying process, encouraged to take advantage of the stamp duty holiday and had become overwhelmed. they have a three month extension to the stamp duty holiday. after that the stamp duty holiday. after that the nil rate band will rise. he will not pay any stamp duty on the first
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£250. -- not pay any stamp duty on the first £250. —— you will not pay. brute not pay any stamp duty on the first £250. -- you will not pay. we were talkin: to £250. -- you will not pay. we were talking to the _ £250. -- you will not pay. we were talking to the shadow— £250. -- you will not pay. we were talking to the shadow chancellor. l talking to the shadow chancellor. how do you think people are feeling in terms of how prepared they are in terms of what comes next? that question has been put to the chancellor as well. taxes will stay at this level or will they rise eventually?— at this level or will they rise eventuall ? �* ., , eventually? before the budget ever so much talk _ eventually? before the budget ever so much talk about _ eventually? before the budget ever so much talk about what _ eventually? before the budget ever so much talk about what might i so much talk about what might happen. there was a threat of a wealth tax which is other people. the threat of the income band, etc, it has a knock—on effect. actually we will pay £19 billion more in tax. it will make a big difference. it will make more difference to people on higher wages. the top 50 people
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will pay £826 a year more in tax. we can expect further down the road, there is building a level of expectation by taking out these potential changes and possible options, it is building into expectations that something will change and further down the line we will get more things to hit us in the pocket. will get more things to hit us in the pocket-— will get more things to hit us in the ocket. �*, ., ~ ., . , _ the pocket. let's talk to vic derby. the big news _ the pocket. let's talk to vic derby. the big news was, _ the pocket. let's talk to vic derby. the big news was, it _ the pocket. let's talk to vic derby. the big news was, it was _ the pocket. let's talk to vic derby. the big news was, it was leaked i the pocket. let's talk to vic derby. the big news was, it was leaked in| the big news was, it was leaked in advance, stamp duty extension. that is good news for some people about to go through that process, could not make the timeline, presumably good news for estate agents trying to sell houses. what that means his property values go up, which is not necessarily good for people trying to get onto the housing market. good morninu. to get onto the housing market. good morning- there _ to get onto the housing market. good morning. there is _ to get onto the housing market. good morning. there is no _ to get onto the housing market. (emf. morning. there is no doubt to get onto the housing market. (ems morning. there is no doubt we are looking at a very buoyant and healthy market at the moment, not
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entirely due to the stamp duty holiday also as the result of the nation living through a pandemic. people are thinking differently about how they want to live their lives, whether that is leaving big cities, looking for a bigger garden, creating the right environment working from home or doing what we are doing, working via video conference. it is creating more demand for housing. stamp duty is not the only reason prices have gone up. anything that reduces the cost of moving home will make the market more active. did of moving home will make the market more active-— more active. did you see instantly a chance? more active. did you see instantly a change? do — more active. did you see instantly a change? do you _ more active. did you see instantly a change? do you see _ more active. did you see instantly a change? do you see more - more active. did you see instantly a change? do you see more people i change? do you see more people putting their houses on the market or looking at buying places almost immediately?— or looking at buying places almost immediately? pretty much say. the market reopened _ immediately? pretty much say. the market reopened last _ immediately? pretty much say. the market reopened last may. - immediately? pretty much say. the market reopened last may. we - immediately? pretty much say. the| market reopened last may. we were very grateful for that and very grateful for the introduction of the stamp duty holiday injuly. people
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are rethinking housing needs and living out of cities. they are looking for property up to 70 miles away from their offices. we have already heard that very clearly in a lot of research we had done. they are thinking very differently about how we live our lives. that has created a lot of stimulus for people putting houses onto the market. a potential saving of up to £15,000 on stamp duty, which has a ways been a tax on aspiration. that has been very compelling to consumers. == very compelling to consumers. -- alwa s very compelling to consumers. —— always been. what do you think was messed out of the budget? fine always been. what do you think was messed out of the budget? one thing was an announcement _ messed out of the budget? one thing was an announcement on _ messed out of the budget? one thing was an announcement on the - messed out of the budget? one thing was an announcement on the lifetime i said _ was an announcement on the lifetime i said in_ was an announcement on the lifetime i said. in spring, the government realise _ i said. in spring, the government realise people who had money saved in their_ realise people who had money saved in their lifetime isa, money and that is— in their lifetime isa, money and that is means tested. in order to access_ that is means tested. in order to access that — that is means tested. in order to access that money they had to pay a penattx _ access that money they had to pay a
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penalty. because of the way the penalty — penalty. because of the way the penalty works, you do notjust use the government bonus great you lose the government bonus great you lose the money— the government bonus great you lose the money you put in yourself. the government realise that and said we will cut— government realise that and said we will cut the _ government realise that and said we will cut the penalty so you just use the bonus — will cut the penalty so you just use the bonus. we were hoping to see that continues. that stops in april. we were _ that continues. that stops in april. we were hoping for it to be made permanent. so far that looks like it will end _ permanent. so far that looks like it will end in— permanent. so far that looks like it will end in april and people will be punished — will end in april and people will be punished for saving for their future _ punished for saving for their future. ., ~' , ., time now to get thank you. the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. plans aimed at bringing visitors back to the west end after lockdown are being unveiled later. westminster council's due to announce a £150 million project to try to create more jobs and boost business, including al fresco dining areas as well as a pledge to build almost 2000 affordable homes by 2023.
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a murder investigation's been launched after a teenager was stabbed in croydon yesterday afternoon. the 19—year—old was attacked on alpha road just after midday. no arrests have been made. amazon is to open its first food shop in the uk today in west london, but there won't be any checkouts. the store, in ealing, will use technology that allows shoppers to choose their items and then walk straight out. it's a few more weeks until gyms and fitness centres might be able to reopen and many people have of course been finding alternative ways to stay healthy. one organisation called ability bow, which says it tailors activities for disabled people has moved online. some londoners who've been shielding say it's been a lifeline. when you've got a neurological condition like i have you spent 2a hours a day thinking about your condition. so being able to keep moving is so important to me.
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firefighters have had to help rescue a minibus in tottenham, after it got trapped in a sink hole. crews say it was parked up at the time when the tarmac collapsed underneath it. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the hammersmith and city line has minor delays due to some train cancellations, that's affecting services. blackwall tunnel is slow northbound from blackwall lane — you can see the long queues there. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. once again, poor visibility to start the day across the capital. some mist, some patches of fog and lots of low cloud around. it will all lift into low cloud as we head through the morning. there's some early rain around,
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we're starting off with five or six celsius, so it's a little milder than it has been of late. that rain is set to peter out, it will be easing and it will move gradually south eastwards as we head through the morning. so there'll be lots of dry weather around today but always plenty of cloud. quite a cool and brisk north—easterly wind setting up, too. you'll notice the drop in temperature, it's going to feel colder today — highs between six and 8 degrees celsius, perhaps a little more patchy rain as we head through the afternoon but lots of dry weather too. overnight tonight then, it should stay dry, there'll be some clear spells at times, temperatures will drop very close to freezing, it's a colder start to friday. but on friday it should be dry, or mostly dry, small chance of a shower and some spells of sunshine, we'll keep that cool, north—easterly wind. it's looking dry over the weekend. i'm back in an hour, plenty more on our website.
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hello this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. chancellor rishi sunak says his budget is about sustaining ongoing crisis support for businesses and families during the pandemic, but warned that repairing the long—term economic damage would "take time". mr sunak is visiting the north east of england this morning, and nina is with him now. good morning. good morning, this is one of the sites that was part of the announcement in the budget that will become a free port. what will happen is goods that are made will not be subject to uk tax and then can be exported. being the wealth trickles into the wider economy. let's talk to the chancellor, rishi sunak. good to see you this morning. questions around the budget yesterday, you said you would be open and honest about the problems
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ahead and you said are take—home pay would stay the same. but as inflation goes up, the money in our pocket will be less? the inflation goes up, the money in our pocket will be less?— inflation goes up, the money in our pocket will be less? the budget did a few different _ pocket will be less? the budget did a few different things _ pocket will be less? the budget did a few different things and _ pocket will be less? the budget did a few different things and the - pocket will be less? the budget did a few different things and the most| a few different things and the most important bit is for people to be reassured that we are making good on our promise to do what it takes to take the country through this crisis. there was announcements yesterday for businesses and individuals as we battle coronavirus this year. i wanted to be honest about the challenges that coronavirus has caused our public finances. i wanted to be upfront about that and set out a plan to address those. crucially, the steps in that plan don't come into force straightaway and i think it is a fair way to address the problem and support our recovery in the short term. �* , ., , support our recovery in the short term. �* , .,, term. but we will be worse off, so the analysis _ term. but we will be worse off, so the analysis is _ term. but we will be worse off, so the analysis is we _ term. but we will be worse off, so the analysis is we will— term. but we will be worse off, so the analysis is we will be - term. but we will be worse off, so the analysis is we will be £1200 i term. but we will be worse off, so the analysis is we will be £1200 a | the analysis is we will be £1200 a year worse off in the coming years ljy year worse off in the coming years by the middle of the decade and that is levelling with people, being honest about that?—
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is levelling with people, being honest about that? your personal threshold, _ honest about that? your personal threshold. it _ honest about that? your personal threshold, it is _ honest about that? your personal threshold, it is important - honest about that? your personal threshold, it is important to - threshold, it is important to understand what this is and i wanted to be clear and explain. people's current take—home pay will not be affected by this policy, but you are right and i was clear yesterday, this does mean the incremental benefit they would have experienced, had those thresholds continue to rise with inflation, will not be there. we will keep putting up the thresholds next year as he promised and then they will be frozen at the higher levelled of the resolution foundation said this is a good way to raise money we need to because it is a progressive measure. it means those on higher incomes contribute more to those on low incomes and thatis more to those on low incomes and that is what most people would accept is a fair way to do what we need to do. but accept is a fair way to do what we need to de— accept is a fair way to do what we need to do. �* ., ., ., , need to do. but tax on high earners means less — need to do. but tax on high earners means less on _ need to do. but tax on high earners means less on it _ need to do. but tax on high earners means less on it does _ need to do. but tax on high earners means less on it does on _ need to do. but tax on high earners means less on it does on lower - means less on it does on lower earners. carly, who we met yesterday has to stop working to look after her daughter who has disabilities and a husband is a delivery driver, on lower earnings. so potentially in a couple of years they will move
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into that higher tax bracket, they will be thousands of pounds worse off every year and they cannot afford that? i off every year and they cannot afford that?— afford that? i don't think as a result of this _ afford that? i don't think as a result of this policy _ afford that? i don't think as a result of this policy they - afford that? i don't think as a result of this policy they will| afford that? i don't think as a l result of this policy they will be thousands of pounds worse off and their take—home pay will not be affected. but we want to help people on lower incomes. that is why what is happening from april, the national living wage is going up. low incomes are going up in excess of inflation and we are doing that in the midst of this difficult time. on average, about £350 pay rise for someone working full—time on the national living wage next year. carly said to meet the £20 uplift in her universal credit mean she can buy her children close as they grow, only be keeping it? lhe’ll buy her children close as they grow, only be keeping it?— only be keeping it? we'll keep it for another— only be keeping it? we'll keep it for another six _ only be keeping it? we'll keep it for another six months. - only be keeping it? we'll keep it for another six months. will - only be keeping it? we'll keep it for another six months. will you j for another six months. will you kee- for another six months. will you kee it for another six months. will you keep it beyond _ for another six months. will you keep it beyond that? _ for another six months. will you keep it beyond that? no, - for another six months. will you keep it beyond that? no, we - for another six months. will you | keep it beyond that? no, we put for another six months. will you - keep it beyond that? no, we put this in lace to keep it beyond that? no, we put this in place to help _ keep it beyond that? no, we put this in place to help people _ keep it beyond that? no, we put this in place to help people in _ keep it beyond that? no, we put this in place to help people in the - in place to help people in the national lockdown. obviously the restrictions have gone on longer
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than we would have liked, but this uplift will be in place beyond this national lockdown. it is one of the things we are doing to help people. i don't know about carly�*s rent situation but we have invested £1 billion in something called local housing allowance. low income people will have help with their rent and also council tax bills. we are giving people the opportunity is to get the skills they need to get betterjobs get the skills they need to get better jobs with get the skills they need to get betterjobs with apprenticeships and kick—start initiatives. {line betterjobs with apprenticeships and kick-start initiatives.— kick-start initiatives. one of the criticisms yesterday, _ kick-start initiatives. one of the criticisms yesterday, in - kick-start initiatives. one of the criticisms yesterday, in trying i kick-start initiatives. one of thej criticisms yesterday, in trying to please everybody, you have please nobody. overall, the estimates, around £19 billion will be raised. but the people i have spoken to in newcastle have said we are not comfortable with this level of debt, we no more tax is coming further down the road and we will have less in our pockets. you will be playing and when?—
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and when? business groups were su ortive and when? business groups were supportive of _ and when? business groups were supportive of the _ and when? business groups were supportive of the budget - and when? business groups were supportive of the budget because they recognise it did support business and the economy in the short term. supported families to help get through the remaining stages of this crisis. but it is right we are upfront and i want to be upfront with people about the challenges and that is why i was transparent about the things we need to do to fix the problem. but that only comes into force over time and in a fair way. £19 only comes into force over time and in a fair way-— in a fair way. £19 billion, you talked about _ in a fair way. £19 billion, you talked about £400 _ in a fair way. £19 billion, you talked about £400 billion . in a fair way. £19 billion, you | talked about £400 billion that in a fair way. £19 billion, you - talked about £400 billion that has been invested in crisis recovery. the numbers don't add up? the shock that coronavirus _ the numbers don't add up? the shock that coronavirus has _ the numbers don't add up? the shock that coronavirus has done _ the numbers don't add up? the shock that coronavirus has done to - the numbers don't add up? the shock that coronavirus has done to our- that coronavirus has done to our economy has been significant. as i said yesterday, this will not be fixed overnight, it will be the work of many decades in government to pay that money back. but it is important we get our borrowing and debt under control. so it stops going up after we have recovered. that is what the measures were announced yesterday will help stabilise things. the full
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cash only stop the problem from getting worse and then improve it over the medium term. [30 getting worse and then improve it over the medium term.— getting worse and then improve it over the medium term. do we not leave ourselves — over the medium term. do we not leave ourselves in _ over the medium term. do we not leave ourselves in a _ over the medium term. do we not leave ourselves in a precarious . leave ourselves in a precarious position, if interest rates go up by 1%, for example, we face £20 billion a year on the debt already accrued. if there is another curve ball like the pandemic or interest rates go up? the pandemic or interest rates go u . ? ., , , the pandemic or interest rates go u n ? ., , , ., , the pandemic or interest rates go up? that is why it was important to be honest with _ up? that is why it was important to be honest with people _ up? that is why it was important to be honest with people about - up? that is why it was important to be honest with people about this i be honest with people about this problem. you are right about the sensitivity of interest rates, they could change and it will have an impact on the money we need to spend. we would rather spend that money on public services. but we have had two crisis in a decade, each one of them was meant to be a once in a century event. you each one of them was meant to be a once in a century event.— once in a century event. you might be lucky and _ once in a century event. you might be lucky and there _ once in a century event. you might be lucky and there might _ once in a century event. you might be lucky and there might be - once in a century event. you might| be lucky and there might be three? you might have to build in the resilience and i was able to build strong public finances and i want to make sure if this happens again, can
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act in the way i did and that is why we need to get our borrowing and debt... but we need to get our borrowing and debt... �* , ., ., debt... but the question from even some conservative _ debt... but the question from even some conservative ministers - debt... but the question from even some conservative ministers is - some conservative ministers is whether or not it went far enough and you should have looked at people like amazon, who made a fortune over this crisis and said, this is time to pay more now.— this crisis and said, this is time to pay more now. corporation tax is aid on to pay more now. corporation tax is paid on company — to pay more now. corporation tax is paid on company profits. _ to pay more now. corporation tax is paid on company profits. those - paid on company profits. those companies doing well and making profit, by definition will do more. you are right about technology companies because global technology companies, it is hard to attack them properly. which is why i introduced the digital services tax, which is a tax on their revenue, their business activities in the uk. we have put that in place already for businesses who have online marketplaces. what i'm doing this she is working with my finance minister colleagues around the world to reach an international agreement on how to tax global technology companies. it
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is complicated and it requires us to do it together. 50 is complicated and it requires us to do it together-— is complicated and it requires us to do it together. so that is coming? i want to talk — do it together. so that is coming? i want to talk to _ do it together. so that is coming? i want to talk to you _ do it together. so that is coming? i want to talk to you about _ do it together. so that is coming? i want to talk to you about the - do it together. so that is coming? i want to talk to you about the town | want to talk to you about the town is fun, £1 billion of investment, 47 of the 56 constituencies are conservative stop in loughborough, one of the towns that will benefit from this, child poverty is at 11%, unemployment at 3.7%. compare to salford, child poverty is at 20% and unemployment at 8%, or criteria where you are looking at? indie unemployment at 8%, or criteria where you are looking at? we need to rerenerate where you are looking at? we need to regenerate places _ where you are looking at? we need to regenerate places in _ where you are looking at? we need to regenerate places in need. _ where you are looking at? we need to regenerate places in need. that - where you are looking at? we need to regenerate places in need. that is - regenerate places in need. that is how these decisions are made. we are in to say today... how these decisions are made. we are in to say today- - -_ in to say today... twice as many children living _ in to say today... twice as many children living in _ in to say today... twice as many children living in poverty- in to say today... twice as many children living in poverty in - children living in poverty in salford and twice as many unemployed?— salford and twice as many unemlo ed? , ., ., ., unemployed? there is a range of criteria taken _ unemployed? there is a range of criteria taken into _ unemployed? there is a range of criteria taken into account. - unemployed? there is a range of criteria taken into account. the l criteria taken into account. the same weight when we were thinking about freeport locations. the area of unemployment rate, for example. we look at the deliverability of the
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bid. eight different regions benefit from freeport, liverpool, southampton or teesside, where we are. we want to level up opportunity, that is what we promised to do when we were elected a couple of years ago. we are making good on that promise, whether it is in teesside or elsewhere, whether people are living and growing up, opportunity is coming to them and investment is coming to them. the eo - le investment is coming to them. the people who — investment is coming to them. the people who will not feel it is true, are the people who have been excluded. ivan, a driving instructor returned his book for the last year. he said i have got survive a's gill because i will be getting some take, but 2 million people will not be getting anything, they have worked hard and in everything by the book. we have done everything we can. he mentioned ivan, iam we have done everything we can. he mentioned ivan, i am delighted has been able to benefit from our grants. been able to benefit from our rants. �* , grants. but he said he is traumatised. _ grants. but he said he is traumatised. the - grants. but he said he is traumatised. the way i grants. but he said he is| traumatised. the way we grants. but he said he is - traumatised. the way we can grants. but he said he is _
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traumatised. the way we can make chances, traumatised. the way we can make changes. we _ traumatised. the way we can make changes, we will, _ traumatised. the way we can make changes, we will, we _ traumatised. the way we can make changes, we will, we didn't - traumatised. the way we can make changes, we will, we didn't have i changes, we will, we didn't have ivan's tax returns a year ago, but we have them now. we can bring 600,000 other people like him into the system. if you take a step back and look at the figures that were published yesterday, over the course of this crisis we will spend over £30 billion supporting those people in self—employment. i am confident that will stand as one of the most generous approaches of any country anywhere in the well. he generous approaches of any country anywhere in the well.— anywhere in the well. he thanked mothers for _ anywhere in the well. he thanked mothers forjuggling _ anywhere in the well. he thanked - mothers forjuggling home-schooling mothers forjuggling home—schooling and working, does that mean your wife has been doing the home—schooling? wife has been doing the home-schooling?- wife has been doing the home-schooling? wife has been doing the home-schoolinu ? ,, ., , , wife has been doing the home-schoolinu ? ,, . , , ., ~ home-schooling? she has been taking the brunt with — home-schooling? she has been taking the brunt with that _ home-schooling? she has been taking the brunt with that but _ home-schooling? she has been taking the brunt with that but now _ home-schooling? she has been taking the brunt with that but now the - the brunt with that but now the budget is behind me, i will spend more time with my kids. you have time that well, _ more time with my kids. you have time that well, the _ more time with my kids. you have time that well, the kids _ more time with my kids. you have time that well, the kids go - more time with my kids. you have time that well, the kids go back. more time with my kids. you have| time that well, the kids go back to school on monday. i time that well, the kids go back to school on monday.— school on monday. i will be doing the school _ school on monday. i will be doing the school run. _ school on monday. i will be doing the school run. typical. _ school on monday. i will be doing| the school run. typical. teesside, one of 80 — the school run. typical. teesside, one of 80 freeport _ the school run. typical. teesside, one of 80 freeport is _ the school run. typical. teesside, one of 80 freeport is being - the school run. typical. teesside, i one of 80 freeport is being invested in, but as the chancellor was saying there is a reality that more will
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have to be paid in the long term to deal with the borrowing that has been taken to deal with this enormous crisis. it's very much. let's talk to mike and find out what is happening. tell me england has figured out how to manage this pitch? someone has, ben stokes. don't want to shout it too loudly. yes, your curse. england captainjoe root, said before this morning, his players shouldn't fear the difficult conditions, in ahmedabad and they chose to bat first, having won the toss. but they might be regretting that decision. england's nemesis axar patel took 18 wickets in the last two tests, and he took two quick ones this morning. dom sibley and zak crawley both out cheaply, then possibly
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the biggest blow of all, captain joe root out lbw for just five. so real trouble, but ben stokes and jonny bairstow repaired some of the damage, stokes taking the attack to india shortly after lunch though bairstow went — just like root lbw to mohammed si—raj. england 101—11. rangers are getting close to ending all the hurt of the last decade, by being crowned scottish premiership champions. and stopping celtic making it ten in a row. rangers manager, steven gerrard, is on the brink of his first title, was sent off at half time for comments he made to the referee who'd booked alfredo, morelos earlier. and it was morelos who came up with the only goal, to secure the win, that means they need just four more points now, for the title. elsewhere hamilton drew 1—1 with stjohnstone. manchester united are lacking their usual spark at the moment, according to their manager. they were held to a goaless draw by crystal palace on a foggy night, in south london. and indeed the hosts, came close to scoring the only goal of this draw, nearfull—time.
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united are 1a points behind leaders manchester city. leicester city, in third are also dropping points. but they did salvage a draw at burnley, thanks to a wonderful finish from kelechi iheanacho. the point means burnley are six points clear of the relegation zone now. bottom club, sheffield united, managed a fourth win of the season. beating aston villa 1—0, david mcgoldrick scored the only goal. and united, held on for the win, despite having philjagielka sent off. despite their heroics, they're still 12 points from safety. manchester city can start thinking about, the women's champions league quarterfinals, after beating fiorentina 3—0 nil, in the home leg, of their last 16 tie. city scored twice in the first four minutes through lauren hemp and ellen white, before sam mewis added another late on. it was a good night for chelsea in their first leg. their keeper, ann katrin berger, saved two penalties before fran kirby wrapped up the 2—0
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win against atletico madrid, at kings meadow. when you've been at the top, and now you're, 123rd in the world, it can be tough to deal with, and, andy murray, says he's struggling to adjust. after losing on his, tour comeback, in montpellier last week, he was beaten in straight sets last night in rotterdam, and his frustration was clear. he is returning from a serious hip injury, and was up against, fourth seed andre rublev. but says he can't help, but over analyse the mistakes he's making. i'm not used to making those errors in those moments and i'm finding that quite frustrating and mentally... ..finding myself kind of looking back on those moments are a little bit too much which may be affected me a bit in the second set. you can understand it, he's such a perfectionist. goes home and thinks about the mistakes he didn't make in the past. it is good to hear him talk about it as well because anybody who hero
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worships, he can talk about it. also, he missed the australian open because he had coronavirus. also, he was playing one of the best tennis players in the world. thank you, mike. from one of the best tennis players, to one of the best tennis players, to one of the best forecasters. i bet you didn't know where i was going with that, carol. i was holding my breath. i mean every word. it is chilly outside? it is. as we go through the next few days, if anything we will hang on to a lot of cloud and there will be some fog to start the day, like we have this morning. it will be mainly settled and dry and high pressure will take over the weather. isolated showers and turning colder. today we have weather from producing showers
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which will eventually clear. high pressure will sink south across us all bringing colder conditions. we have a weather front producing rain across parts of scotland, snow on the mountains, showers ahead of it across parts of north—east england and we have heavier showers across the southeast. through this morning, they were clear away and a weather front sink south. in doing so, it will brighten up behind it and we will brighten up behind it and we will see some sunshine. a brighter day across parts of north—east england and we have seen for this week. it will not feel as cold as either. the fact we have across southern counties will eventually live but some of it will lift into some low cloud. temperatures, between four and 10 degrees. clinging onto double figures by the skin of our teeth in south—west england. but that is going to change. through this evening and overnight there goes a weather front as a weak fixture taking its rain towards the south—west. behind it there will be areas of cloud and clear skies and another is clear skies it will be cold. cold enough
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for temperatures to full 2—4 and a frost across parts of scotland. across the board, it is going to feel cold. fortomorrow, high feel cold. for tomorrow, high pressure feel cold. fortomorrow, high pressure is across the uk. a weak weather front fizzling so things are going to be more settled. it is going to be more settled. it is going to be another cold start to the day, but there will be some sunshine, more of a single sunshine tomorrow morning and we have done for quite a while. but through the day we will start to see the cloud build and that will extend across many areas but it will be a bright day and some of us will hang onto that sunshine. at temperatures between five and 7 degrees. we have said goodbye to the double—figure temperatures we have been used to. it is notjust by day, that also by night. look at the extent of the blue on saturday morning, indicating it will be cold. some parts of east anglia getting down to minus four, but we start with a fair bit of sunshine and cloud building once again as we go through the course of the day. out towards the west, a
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weather front trying to come in from the atlantic. temperatures during saturday ranging from five to about 8 degrees. as we head into sunday, more atlantic fronts are trying to nudgein more atlantic fronts are trying to nudge in from the west. they are also trying to bring in some milder air and some also trying to bring in some milder airand some rain also trying to bring in some milder air and some rain with them as well. we could see some snow on the mountains, so if i quickly run the sequence, you can see how the high pressure is squeezed further south. income the weather front under pressure from the atlantic and as we head into next week it is looking pretty and settle. at the moment especially so on tuesday. thanks, carol. hundreds of thousands of children should be dressing up as their favourite literary characters today, to mark one of the biggest events in the school calendar, world book day. but, with most students learning from home, teachers have been coming up with some creative ways to make sure
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everyone is included. breakfast�*s jayne mccubbin reports. if ever we've needed a bit of escapism, it's now. this last 12 months been a bit, we had? yes. a bit rubbish- — months been a bit, we had? yes. a bit rubbish. yes. _ months been a bit, we had? yes. a bit rubbish. yes. what _ months been a bit, we had? yes. a bit rubbish. yes. what has - months been a bit, we had? yes. a bit rubbish. yes. what has been - months been a bit, we had? yes. a| bit rubbish. yes. what has been the most rubbish? _ bit rubbish. jazz what has been the most rubbish? we needed bit rubbish. i2; what has been the most rubbish? we needed to take ourselves out of our grim reality, it is now. it ourselves out of our grim reality, it is now. ., , , ourselves out of our grim reality, it is now. . , , ., , it is now. it has been really borina. it is now. it has been really boring- i — it is now. it has been really boring. i can't _ it is now. it has been really boring. i can't go _ it is now. it has been really boring. i can't go anywhere it is now. it has been really - boring. i can't go anywhere else, i can't go to see my nan.— boring. i can't go anywhere else, i can't go to see my nan. news is in, we really are _ can't go to see my nan. news is in, we really are escaping _ can't go to see my nan. news is in, we really are escaping into - can't go to see my nan. news is in, we really are escaping into books. | we really are escaping into books. book sales rose to an eight year high in 2020, despite many book shops being closed. have you read a bit more this year?— bit more this year? yes. a lot more than i used — bit more this year? yes. a lot more than i used to. _ bit more this year? yes. a lot more than i used to. it _ bit more this year? yes. a lot more than i used to. it is _ bit more this year? yes. a lot more than i used to. it is nice _ bit more this year? yes. a lot more than i used to. it is nice when - bit more this year? yes. a lot more than i used to. it is nice when i - than i used to. it is nice when i can sit down — than i used to. it is nice when i can sit down and _ than i used to. it is nice when i can sit down and read - than i used to. it is nice when i can sit down and read a - than i used to. it is nice when i can sit down and read a book l than i used to. it is nice when i - can sit down and read a book because it feels— can sit down and read a book because it feels like _ can sit down and read a book because it feels like i— can sit down and read a book because it feels like i am away from the drama — it feels like i am away from the drama of— it feels like i am away from the drama of covid. it feels like i am
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in nry— drama of covid. it feels like i am in my own — drama of covid. it feels like i am in my own world. get drama of covid. it feels like i am in my own world.— drama of covid. it feels like i am in my own world. get your mind off loads of things _ in my own world. get your mind off loads of things happening - in my own world. get your mind off loads of things happening at - in my own world. get your mind off loads of things happening at the i loads of things happening at the moment — loads of things happening at the moment l— loads of things happening at the moment. ., , loads of things happening at the moment. . , ., ., moment. i have been reading two books. moment. i have been reading two books- diary _ moment. i have been reading two books- diary of — moment. i have been reading two books. diary of a _ moment. i have been reading two books. diary of a wimpy _ moment. i have been reading two books. diary of a wimpy kid i moment. i have been reading two books. diary of a wimpy kid and i books. diary of a wimpy kid and diary of a wimpy kid the second one. and just to clarify, there is no covid in these books? that is a good thing? covid in these books? that is a good thin ? , covid in these books? that is a good thing? yes. do you think this year, readin: thing? yes. do you think this year, reading has — thing? i2; do you think this year, reading has taken on more importance?— reading has taken on more importance? reading has taken on more imortance? ~ , , i. ., importance? absolutely, you hear them talking _ importance? absolutely, you hear them talking it _ importance? absolutely, you hear them talking it is _ importance? absolutely, you hear them talking it is complicated i importance? absolutely, you hear them talking it is complicated andj them talking it is complicated and chaotic at the moment. it is so difficult for them. it is lovely to have our reading and we have story time at three o'clock every day and they can see their friends at home and they can share a bit of news and enjoy a good book together as well. and then there is is. i enjoy a good book together as well. and then there is is.— and then there is is. i spy, cinderella. _ and then there is is. i spy, cinderella. you _ and then there is is. i spy, cinderella. you have i and then there is is. i spy, cinderella. you have heard and then there is is. i spy, i cinderella. you have heard of the masked singer, _ cinderella. you have heard of the masked singer, here _
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cinderella. you have heard of the masked singer, here they - cinderella. you have heard of the masked singer, here they are i cinderella. you have heard of the i masked singer, here they are trying to figure out who are the masked readers. litgl’e to figure out who are the masked readers. ~ ., to figure out who are the masked readers. ~ . .. , to figure out who are the masked readers. ~ . , ., readers. we have three teachers and su ort readers. we have three teachers and support touch _ readers. we have three teachers and support touch every _ readers. we have three teachers and support touch every day _ readers. we have three teachers and support touch every day with - readers. we have three teachers and support touch every day with a i support touch every day with a snapchat filter on and the children are finding it hilarious getting. someone shouted, you were definitely the lemon. , ., someone shouted, you were definitely the lemon. , . ., , the lemon. they are really en'oying it. i love that. i the lemon. they are really en'oying it. i love that. kids i the lemon. they are really en'oying it. i love that. kids get i the lemon. they are really enjoying it. i love that. kids get stared i the lemon. they are really enjoying it. i love that. kids get stared at i it. i love that. kids get stared at wherever they — it. i love that. kids get stared at wherever they go. _ it. i love that. kids get stared at wherever they go. the - it. i love that. kids get stared at wherever they go. the next i it. i love that. kids get stared at i wherever they go. the next reader will be much _ wherever they go. the next reader will be much easier _ wherever they go. the next reader will be much easier to _ wherever they go. the next reader will be much easier to recognise. i wherever they go. the next reader. will be much easier to recognise. we are will be much easier to recognise. 2 are going to steal the cow. children's authorjulia donaldson reading her contribution to world book day. one of £15,000,001 box available to mark the day. iieiia available to mark the day. hello everyone- _ available to mark the day. hello everyone- if— available to mark the day. hello everyone. if ever _ available to mark the day. hello everyone. if ever we _ available to mark the day. hello everyone. if ever we have i available to mark the day. hello i everyone. if ever we have needed a bit of escapism? _ everyone. if ever we have needed a bit of escapism? that's _ everyone. if ever we have needed a bit of escapism? that's right. it i everyone. if ever we have needed a bit of escapism? that's right. it is l bit of escapism? that's right. it is so important _ bit of escapism? that's right. it is so important that _ bit of escapism? that's right. it is so important that books _ bit of escapism? that's right. it is so important that books can i bit of escapism? that's right. it is so important that books can keep| so important that books can keep them in touch with all the other places they could be, all the other
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people they could meet, stimulate the imagination. it is people they could meet, stimulate the imagination.— the imagination. it is a little bit of a break _ the imagination. it is a little bit of a break from _ the imagination. it is a little bit of a break from being _ the imagination. it is a little bit of a break from being online i the imagination. it is a little bit of a break from being online all day _ of a break from being online all day so— of a break from being online all day. so many children are on their screens— day. so many children are on their screens all— day. so many children are on their screens all day.— screens all day. speaking of screens... _ screens all day. speaking of screens... this _ screens all day. speaking of screens... this past - screens all day. speaking of screens... this past 11 i screens all day. speaking of l screens... this past 11 months screens all day. speaking of i screens... this past 11 months has given us an insight into people's reading habits. the modest book shelves, messy book shelves, grand book shelves, royal book shelves. these are lydia's shelves. where have you guys escape to during lockdown? i have you guys escape to during lockdown?— have you guys escape to during lockdown? . . , ., lockdown? i read anything tudor -based. these _ lockdown? i read anything tudor -based. these are _ lockdown? i read anything tudor -based. these are julia's - lockdown? i read anything tudorl -based. these are julia's shelves. the last book _ -based. these are julia's shelves. the last book was _ -based. these are julia's shelves. the last book was in _ -based. these are julia's shelves. the last book was in ian _ -based. these are julia's shelves. the last book was in ian mcewan i the last book was in ian mcewan book _ the last book was in ian mcewan book it — the last book was in ian mcewan book. it had some people cutting up a dead _ book. it had some people cutting up a dead body. not book. it had some people cutting up a dead body-— a dead body. not one for the kids! anywhere. — a dead body. not one for the kids! anywhere, whether _ a dead body. not one for the kids! anywhere, whether you _ a dead body. not one for the kids! anywhere, whether you are i a dead body. not one for the kids! anywhere, whether you are a i a dead body. not one for the kids! anywhere, whether you are a kid i anywhere, whether you are a kid enjoying world book day in school or
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home schooling kid enjoying it at home, it doesn't matter where you are if your head is in a good book. oh, are if your head is in a good book. 0h, mrs walsh is not the lemon. i spy, bo peep. oh, mrs walsh is not the lemon. i spy. bo peep- lots _ oh, mrs walsh is not the lemon. i spy, bo peep. lots of— oh, mrs walsh is not the lemon. i spy, bo peep. lots of children i spy, bo peep. lots of children lookin: spy, bo peep. lots of children looking forward _ spy, bo peep. lots of children looking forward to _ spy, bo peep. lots of children looking forward to good i spy, bo peep. lots of children looking forward to good book| spy, bo peep. lots of children i looking forward to good book day. if you are at home or at school, get in touch with us in the usual ways. we are going to speak to terry deary, the creator of the horrible history series. ., ., ., , _ ., series. good morning and happy world book da to series. good morning and happy world book day to you- _ series. good morning and happy world book day to you. we _ series. good morning and happy world book day to you. we were _ series. good morning and happy world book day to you. we were referencing | book day to you. we were referencing somethin: book day to you. we were referencing something we — book day to you. we were referencing something we do _ book day to you. we were referencing something we do a _ book day to you. we were referencing something we do a lot. _ book day to you. we were referencing something we do a lot. we _ book day to you. we were referencing something we do a lot. we see i book day to you. we were referencing something we do a lot. we see into i something we do a lot. we see into peoples homes and when we interview peoples homes and when we interview people like you we often look behind and many times it is book shelves. i see you have a book cabinet behind you? i see you have a book cabinet behind ou? ., see you have a book cabinet behind ou? . . . . , see you have a book cabinet behind ou? . . , . see you have a book cabinet behind ou? . ., , ., , see you have a book cabinet behind ou? . . , . , . you? i have a cabinet and they are all my books- _ you? i have a cabinet and they are all my books. how _ you? i have a cabinet and they are all my books. how embarrassing l you? i have a cabinet and they are | all my books. how embarrassing is
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that. �* , , all my books. how embarrassing is that. �* _.,, ,., all my books. how embarrassing is that. ., that. are they copies of your own books? i have — that. are they copies of your own books? i have written _ that. are they copies of your own books? i have written and - that. are they copies of your own i books? i have written and published over 320, books? i have written and published over 320. so — books? i have written and published over 320. so i— books? i have written and published over 320, so i need _ books? i have written and published over 320, so i need a _ books? i have written and published over 320, so i need a new _ books? i have written and published over 320, so i need a new cabinet. i over 320, so i need a new cabinet. you know better than anyone else, the importance of books. notjust especially for young people, but it is important at a young age that they get into reading, isn't it? it is. once they have got into it, it tends to stick with them for life. i was unfortunate being bornjust after the war, i didn't get into books until i was 13, but i have made up for it now.— books until i was 13, but i have made up for it now. indeed. there are different _ made up for it now. indeed. there are different ways _ made up for it now. indeed. there are different ways of _ made up for it now. indeed. there are different ways of learning, i made up for it now. indeed. there are different ways of learning, in i are different ways of learning, in terms of books and tv which leads me onto horrible history, which has had a revamp? ii onto horrible history, which has had a revam? , ., onto horrible history, which has had a revam? ,, . onto horrible history, which has had a revam? i. ., ., ., a revamp? if you are a learner driver and _ a revamp? if you are a learner driver and you _ a revamp? if you are a learner driver and you get _ a revamp? if you are a learner driver and you get into - a revamp? if you are a learner driver and you get into your. a revamp? if you are a learner. driver and you get into your dads car, a fiesta 28 years ago, when you come to buy your car, you want a new one. the parents were reading
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horrible histories that looked like that 28 years ago, so now the children once a revised edition. we are revising it for new generations. have the words changed? thea;r are revising it for new generations. have the words changed?— are revising it for new generations. have the words changed? they are the same, but have the words changed? they are the same. but we — have the words changed? they are the same. but we do _ have the words changed? they are the same, but we do update _ have the words changed? they are the same, but we do update them - have the words changed? they are the same, but we do update them if i have the words changed? they are the same, but we do update them if we i same, but we do update them if we made ours. even the best authors in the world make mistakes. but pretty much the same. talk the world make mistakes. but pretty much the same.— the world make mistakes. but pretty much the same. talk to me about the latest one, about _ much the same. talk to me about the latest one, about flight? _ much the same. talk to me about the latest one, about flight? flight, - latest one, about flight? flight, this is called _ latest one, about flight? flight, this is called up _ latest one, about flight? flight, this is called up in _ latest one, about flight? flight, this is called up in the - latest one, about flight? flight, this is called up in the air. - latest one, about flight? flight, this is called up in the air. it i latest one, about flight? flight, | this is called up in the air. it has got some brilliant stories about some of the people who did incredibly courageous things like jumping off high places so you and i can fly safety today. a guy called percy pilcher, who said i am going to be the first person to fly powered planes. 1000 people turned
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up powered planes. 1000 people turned up on the day and the weather was too bad. he said never mind, i will show you my glider. he jumped too bad. he said never mind, i will show you my glider. hejumped off the hill in his glider, a gust of wind caught him, brought him to earth and he died. it is only because of courageous people like him, it is horrible histories, but a revealing story about human courage which is where we are today. what which is where we are today. what are ou which is where we are today. what are you reading — which is where we are today. what are you reading at _ which is where we are today. what are you reading at the _ which is where we are today. what are you reading at the moment? i | which is where we are today. what. are you reading at the moment? i am readin: a are you reading at the moment? i am reading a murder _ are you reading at the moment? i—h reading a murder mystery. i are you reading at the moment? ién reading a murder mystery. ijust love murder mysteries. i have very low brow taste in literature. i should say i am reading dickens, of course, but i am not. it is should say i am reading dickens, of course, but i am not.— course, but i am not. it is good you sa it course, but i am not. it is good you say it that — course, but i am not. it is good you say it that way- _ course, but i am not. it is good you say it that way- i — course, but i am not. it is good you say it that way. i den _ course, but i am not. it is good you say it that way. i den think - course, but i am not. it is good you say it that way. i den think you - say it that way. i den think you have to categorise it as a low or high brow. murder mystery is a delight, just get stuck into one of those, do you always get it right?
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never. the only one i got right was one i wrote myself about 20 years ago. is that in the bookcase? it is in the bookcase, yes. i won't get it out now, but it is in the bookcase. it is interesting, history is always being made. today, we were taking a look at the story of space—x, the shuttle taking off and it being a disaster. the prototypes rocket exploded, no one was hurt. but it reminded me, your book a flight, you will always have something to write, the pandemic itself, you must have some ideas about that? horrible history, there is one? it is some ideas about that? horrible history, there is one?— history, there is one? it is like bein: in history, there is one? it is like being in a _ history, there is one? it is like being in a world _ history, there is one? it is like being in a world wind - history, there is one? it is like being in a world wind in - history, there is one? it is like i being in a world wind in kansas, history, there is one? it is like - being in a world wind in kansas, you cannot see kansas. it is only when you get to all is that you look back and say, there is no place like
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home. invite me on your programme 100 years from now and then i will be able to give you some perspective. unique perspective for history. i cannot talk about a pandemic now while it is happening. you have got to invite me back in 100 years. i you have got to invite me back in 100 yeara— you have got to invite me back in 100 ears. , ., ., 100 years. i will pop the invitation in the post- _ 100 years. i will pop the invitation in the post. you _ 100 years. i will pop the invitation in the post. you look _ 100 years. i will pop the invitation in the post. you look out - 100 years. i will pop the invitation in the post. you look out for - 100 years. i will pop the invitation in the post. you look out for it - 100 years. i will pop the invitation | in the post. you look out for it and save the date, yes? i in the post. you look out for it and save the date, yes?— in the post. you look out for it and | save the date, yes?- thank save the date, yes? i will do. thank ou, save the date, yes? i will do. thank you. appreciate _ save the date, yes? i will do. thank you, appreciate it. _ save the date, yes? i will do. thank you, appreciate it. headlines - save the date, yes? i will do. thank| you, appreciate it. headlines coming up you, appreciate it. headlines coming up injust a moment.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today... paying for the pandemic, the chancellor says freezing income thresholds is a fair way to raise money but accepts it will take the uk's tax burden to its highest level since the 1960s. it isa it is a progressive measure, meaning those on higher incomes contribute a lot more than those on lower incomes. most people would accept thatis incomes. most people would accept that is a fair way of doing what we need to do. the duchess of sussex accuses the royal family of "perpetuating falsehoods" about her and prince harry i don't know how they could expect
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that after all of this time, we would stilljust be silent if there is an active role isa is playing in perpetuating falsehoods about us. —— the the firm is playing. this latest extract from the us tv interview with oprah winfrey, comes as the palace investigates claims that the duchess bullied royal staff. stokes, fires england up again. they're fighting back in the final test, against india, thanks to big hitting ben stokes, but they are still four wickets down. the dramatic moment an unmanned spacex rocket explodes after a test flight. good morning. another chilly day ahead and anotherfairly good morning. another chilly day ahead and another fairly cloudy one. mist and fog across southern areas and there is rain in the forecast. i will tell you where in about ten minutes. it's thursday, 11th march. our top story...
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rishi sunak has told this programme freezing personal tax thresholds is a progressive and fair way to raise money. the chancellor defended his plans to raise overall taxation to the highest level since the 1960s, saying no chancellor since has had to deal with a pandemic. 0ur chief political correspondent, adam fleming, joins us from westminster. adam, what else did that chancellor have to say? we were waiting for the budget, expecting pretty much what we had got, because a lot of it had been leaked. what else did the chancellor had to say? the leaked. what else did the chancellor had to sa ? ., , had to say? the important thing is to realise how _ had to say? the important thing is to realise how the _ had to say? the important thing is to realise how the budget - had to say? the important thing is to realise how the budget is - to realise how the budget is structured. the first chapter is continuing support for people through the pandemic, billions of pounds have been given to individuals and businesses. that carries on till september. chapter two is boosting the economic recovery the chancellor is hoping for, which will see a big tax break
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for, which will see a big tax break for businesses investing in staff. step three is raising more money in taxes by raising profits on companies making more than a quarter of a million pounds in profits. there will be a freeze on thresholds for the different rates of income tax. that will mean 1.3 million of the lowest paid will probably start paying income tax and about a million people will go into the higher 40p rate of income tax. the chancellor rishi sunak has been depending why that is a fair way of him raising some money in the next three years. him raising some money in the next three years-_ three years. people's current take-home — three years. people's current take-home pay _ three years. people's current take-home pay will- three years. people's current take-home pay will not - three years. people's current take-home pay will not be i three years. people's current i take-home pay will not be affected take—home pay will not be affected by this_ take—home pay will not be affected by this policy. you are right and i was clear— by this policy. you are right and i was clear yesterday, it does mean the incremental benefit they would have experience had their thresholds continue _ have experience had their thresholds continue to— have experience had their thresholds continue to rise with inflation will not be _ continue to rise with inflation will not be there. we will keep putting up not be there. we will keep putting up thresholds next year as promised but then— up thresholds next year as promised but then they will be frozen at the higher— but then they will be frozen at the higher level. the resolution
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foundation has also said it is a good — foundation has also said it is a good way— foundation has also said it is a good way to raise money we need. it is a progressive measure, meaning those _ is a progressive measure, meaning those on _ is a progressive measure, meaning those on high incomes contribute a lot more _ those on high incomes contribute a lot more than those on lower incomes _ lot more than those on lower incomes. that is what most would accept _ incomes. that is what most would accept is — incomes. that is what most would accept is a — incomes. that is what most would accept is a fair way of doing what we need — accept is a fair way of doing what we need to— accept is a fair way of doing what we need to do. he accept is a fair way of doing what we need to do.— we need to do. he also talked certain towns _ we need to do. he also talked certain towns in _ we need to do. he also talked certain towns in england, i we need to do. he also talked i certain towns in england, favouring towns with certain conservative mps. he said a lot of metrics where used. i think there is a lot of uncertainty around this budget. what happens with the pandemic is to mark what happens with the economy? reading between the lines, when the chancellor next goes to parliament to talk about the spending review, thatis to talk about the spending review, that is when it will be quite tricky because there is not a lot of money to allocate. the duchess of sussex says she's not afraid of the consequences of speaking out in her and harry's interview with oprah winfrey,
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saying "a lot has been lost already." a second extract from the heavily anticipated interview has been released overnight, in which meghan said she could not be expected to stay silent if the royal family played a part in "perpetuating falsehoods" about the couple. it comes as buckingham palace launched an investigation into claims the duchess bullied former royal staff. simon jones has more. meghan is making it clear she will not be afraid to speak out in a second trailer for the interview released overnight. how do you feel about the palace hearing you speak your truth today? i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time we would stilljust be silent, if there is an active role that the firm is playing in perpetuating falsehoods about us. if that comes with risk of losing things, there's a lot that's been lost already. this is a second clip released by cbs but the first in which we have heard
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the duchess speak. the interview was recorded before buckingham palace began an investigation into claims meghan had bullied former royal staff. the times newspaper has obtained an e—mail, written in late 2018, by the couple's communication secretary, to simon case, he is now the cabinet secretary. in it, he is reported to have written... buckingham palace said it was very concerned about the allegations. former members of staff are being invited to participate in its investigation. in a statement, it added... but a spokesperson for meghan said...
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she will keep striving to set an example for doing what is right and good. the latest interview clip will do little to heal any apparent rifts between the sussexes and the palace. simon jones, bbc news. we're joined now by our royal correspondent sarah campbell. let's be straight about this. we know what the us network is doing, putting out bits of an important interview to get us all interested. there is no denying that part of the interview, oprah talking to the duchess on her own, there is language and sensibility around this which feels like it is taking on another step. which feels like it is taking on anotherstep. i which feels like it is taking on another step.— which feels like it is taking on another ste. ~ ., another step. i think you are right. if an one another step. i think you are right. if anyone questioned _ another step. i think you are right. if anyone questioned whether i another step. i think you are right. if anyone questioned whether in i another step. i think you are right. i if anyone questioned whether in this interview meghan was likely to criticise the royal family in any
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way, this answer that question. oprah said the two of them said some shocking things and this appears to be one of them. it is meghan really going to accuse the firm of actively spreading lies about the couple? when she says that is she talking about the royal household, the palace machine or is she referring to members of the family itself? we will have to wait till sunday to put it into context of the two our interview, unless more clips are released before then, which i would say is extremely likely. this is a day after the palace started this investigation into allegations of bullying by the duchess. that is due to start soon. past and present members of the royal household will be invited to give their accounts in confidence of their dealings with the couple, in the palace's words, to see if any lessons can be learned. we must remember this is
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all happening as the duke of edinburgh is spending his third week in hospital. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has insisted she had no motive, intention or desire to "get" her predecessor alex salmond. giving evidence to the inquiry into her government's handling of harassment allegations against mr salmond, she described claims of a plot against him as "absurd." our political correspondent nick eardleyjoins us now. i know you had been out there for a couple of days, outside holyrood. it is cold. it was frosty examining the relationship between nicola sturgeon and alex salmond yesterday with her comments. we spoke to alan smith in the snp as well, here is holding up in terms ofjudgment are breaking the ministerial code. that in terms ofjudgment are breaking the ministerial code.— the ministerial code. that is absolutely _ the ministerial code. that is absolutely spot _ the ministerial code. that is absolutely spot on. - the ministerial code. that is absolutely spot on. it i the ministerial code. that is
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absolutely spot on. it was i the ministerial code. that is absolutely spot on. it was a | the ministerial code. that is i absolutely spot on. it was a really long session yesterday. seven hours of evidence nicola sturgeon gave to msps. a lot of stuff trying to counter what alex salmond said about her government. she denied there had been a plot against them, denied she had ignored legal advice to go ahead with a case involving alex salmond in the supreme court. she denied there had been any cover—up of evidence. i think nicola sturgeon's team think she did pretty well, there was not a killer blow and think she answered all the questions pretty comprehensively and she came out of it pretty unscathed. i do not think this story will go away. we have first minister's questions here today. there are still big questions about what nicola sturgeon knew and when. she gave comprehensive answers. speaking to some people around parliament, not overnight but last night and early this morning, they still think there are some
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questions they want answered. there is an investigation into whether the first minister broke the ministerial code. that is kind seen as unimpeachable by people around her. after the drama of yesterday, i still think there could be twist and turns in this story. you still think there could be twist and turns in this story.— turns in this story. you stay warm while ou turns in this story. you stay warm while you are _ turns in this story. you stay warm while you are following _ turns in this story. you stay warm while you are following it - turns in this story. you stay warm while you are following it for i turns in this story. you stay warm while you are following it for us. i some incredible pictures now. and ambitions to send humans to mars have suffered another setback, after a prototype rocket exploded. the unmanned space—x rocket blew—up after what appeared to have been a successful test flight in the united states. russell trott has the story. three, two, one... ignition... ..we have liftoff. it was all running so smoothly. the starship prototype rocket launch from boca chica, in cameron county, texas. five minutes in and the space—x craft begins its tricky descent back to the landing zone, ten kilometres —
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or 30,000 feet below. a near—perfect landing, or at least that's how it looked and despite some flames needing to be put out, it was all systems go for a second flight. whoa, whoa, whoa. this time, not so good. thankfully, no—one was on board and there were no injuries among the safety crews on the ground. two previous tests also had failed. space—x, founded by the tesla electric car entrepreneur, elon musk, hopes to eventually send a reusable rocket to mars. it may need more testing. russell trott, bbc news. they are certainly pictures that have made us sit up and watch this morning. here's carol with a look at this
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morning's weather. now we have turned to sheep. a lovely flock of sheep. a lot of cloud around. this picture was sent in from the scottish borders this morning. thank you for it. this is the kind of sky you can expect the next few days. there will be sunshine at times that it will also be chilly. this morning a lot of low adequate mist and fog, especially in the south, the midlands and east anglia. at the same time there is a weather front anglia. at the same time there is a weatherfront sinking anglia. at the same time there is a weather front sinking sad bringing patchy rain. behind this band of rain it will brighten up. not as cold as it has done across parts of north—eastern england. a fair bit of cloud around, some mist and fog lifting into low cloud. in plymouth, temperatures hanging on into double figures, to 10 degrees. that will
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not last. the weather front is a weak feature producing patchy rain. behind it there will be clearance in the skies. still a fair bit of cloud around. where the sky is clear, that is where we will have the lowest temperatures. tomorrow we start with a brighter note. some cloud around but sunshine more widely than we have seen. as we go through the day, some cloud will build and it will extend across the uk. it will still be bright. temperatures five to 7 degrees. there we have had double figures, they are going down. over the past few months, we've been bringing you the story of two amazing friends, who've managed to raise £200,000 for the hospital treating one of them for leukaemia.
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10—year—olds hughie and freddie set out to raise £1,000 to buy a slushie machine for the children on hughie's ward, and patients at the royal manchester children's hospital have just had their first drinks delivered. josh parry reports. healy had a simple goal, to help others like him, through the powers of slushies. the others like him, through the powers of slushies. ., ., ., of slushies. the manager said to get a slushie machine _ of slushies. the manager said to get a slushie machine because _ of slushies. the manager said to get a slushie machine because they i of slushies. the manager said to get| a slushie machine because they want cold things. a slushie machine because they want cold thins. ., , cold things. back in november, he had a challenge _ cold things. back in november, he had a challenge to _ cold things. back in november, he had a challenge to run _ cold things. back in november, he had a challenge to run two - had a challenge to run two kilometres a day, reaching 100 on christmas day. i kilometres a day, reaching 100 on christmas day.— christmas day. i thought i would hel to christmas day. i thought i would help to do _ christmas day. i thought i would help to do something, _ christmas day. i thought i would help to do something, help i christmas day. i thought i would help to do something, help to i christmas day. i thought i would i help to do something, help to get him through it because it is really hard to get him through. each step he smashed _ hard to get him through. each step he smashed through _ hard to get him through. each step he smashed through his _ hard to get him through. each step| he smashed through his fundraising goal. he he smashed through his fundraising coal. , ., he smashed through his fundraising oal, , ., , . he smashed through his fundraising coal. , ., , . . he smashed through his fundraising coal. , ., ,. . . he smashed through his fundraising oal. , ., , . ., ., .,, goal. he is doing such a great 'ob. i could not —
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goal. he is doing such a great 'ob. i could not thank i goal. he is doing such a great 'ob. i could not thank him i goal. he is doing such a great 'ob. i could not thank him any i goal. he is doing such a great job. i could not thank him any more. . i could not thank him any more. ready, steady, gay. just like ready, donations showed no sign of slowing down. —— go. donations showed no sign of slowing down- -- go— donations showed no sign of slowing down. -- go. when we went on air, it was £16,000. _ down. -- go. when we went on air, it was £16,000, now _ down. -- go. when we went on air, it was £16,000, now it _ down. -- go. when we went on air, it was £16,000, now it is _ down. -- go. when we went on air, it was £16,000, now it is over - down. -- go. when we went on air, it| was £16,000, now it is over £17,000. with the extra unexpected funds, the boys have even managed to buy the hospital some life—saving equipment. it is basically a piece of kit that can warm up blood really quickly. $5 can warm up blood really quickly. as soon as me and freddie head, it was soon as me and freddie head, it was so bad _ soon as me and freddie head, it was so bad can— soon as me and freddie head, it was so bad can definitely. we got a big box of— so bad can definitely. we got a big box of fruit— so bad can definitely. we got a big box of fruit as well.— box of fruit as well. while the 'ourne box of fruit as well. while the journey to _ box of fruit as well. while the journey to recovery _ box of fruit as well. while the | journey to recovery continues, box of fruit as well. while the i journey to recovery continues, it has been made that bit easier thanks
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to the power of friendship. i will drink to that. we'rejoined now by hughie and his dad keiron, and freddie and his mum, sarah. morning to all of you. i had to ask you, how are you doing today? i am you, how are you doing today? i am doinu you, how are you doing today? i am doing good- — you, how are you doing today? i am doing good- i _ you, how are you doing today? i am doing good. i was _ you, how are you doing today? i am doing good. i was not _ you, how are you doing today? l5n doing good. i was not feeling you, how are you doing today? l55n doing good. i was not feeling very well for the past couple of days. i had a nice sleep last night and i am feeling better this morning. i will feeling better this morning. i will tell ou feeling better this morning. i will tell you something, _ feeling better this morning. i will tell you something, you - feeling better this morning. i will tell you something, you are going through treatment at this moment in time and that is tough. when you see how much freddie is doing and how much money he has raised so far, we are looking at the total on the fund raising page. the getting what gift aid will add to it, that must help, mustn't it? it aid will add to it, that must help, mustn't it?— mustn't it? it put a smile on my face. mustn't it? it put a smile on my face- when _ mustn't it? it put a smile on my face- when i— mustn't it? it put a smile on my face. when i gave _ mustn't it? it put a smile on my face. when i gave a _ mustn't it? it put a smile on my face. when i gave a slushie i mustn't it? it put a smile on my face. when i gave a slushie to l mustn't it? it put a smile on my face. when i gave a slushie to aj face. when i gave a slushie to a little child in the hospital, she
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had a smile on herface and put a smile on mine. i had a smile on her face and put a smile on mine.— had a smile on her face and put a smile on mine. i see you smiling on there. smile on mine. i see you smiling on there- you — smile on mine. i see you smiling on there. you must _ smile on mine. i see you smiling on there. you must be _ smile on mine. i see you smiling on there. you must be so _ smile on mine. i see you smiling on there. you must be so proud i smile on mine. i see you smiling on there. you must be so proud of i smile on mine. i see you smiling on | there. you must be so proud of your son and of course freddie as well. it is remarkable what is going on. yourfamily has faced it is remarkable what is going on. your family has faced a lot of challenges but this is something really special, isn't it?— really special, isn't it? super roud really special, isn't it? super proud of _ really special, isn't it? super proud of healy, _ really special, isn't it? super proud of healy, showing i really special, isn't it? super- proud of healy, showing strength through— proud of healy, showing strength through all his treatment. —— proud through all his treatment. -- proud of through all his treatment. —— proud of freddie — through all his treatment. —— proud of freddie. doing such an amazing thing _ of freddie. doing such an amazing thing leading up to christmas. so good _ thing leading up to christmas. so good to— thing leading up to christmas. so good to see the actual... the money going _ good to see the actual... the money going to _ good to see the actual... the money going to use — good to see the actual... the money going to use now. seeing it moving on to— going to use now. seeing it moving on to the _ going to use now. seeing it moving on to the board. through the whole process, _ on to the board. through the whole process, there are so many positive things— process, there are so many positive things coming out of a tough situation. �* , ., ., things coming out of a tough situation. �* , ., ., . situation. let's go to freddie and man, situation. let's go to freddie and man. sarah- _ situation. let's go to freddie and man, sarah. this _ situation. let's go to freddie and man, sarah. this is _ situation. let's go to freddie and man, sarah. this is amazing. i man, sarah. this is amazing. £160,000 buys a lot of slushie
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machines. £160,000 buys a lot of slushie machines-— £160,000 buys a lot of slushie machines. , . , ., £160,000 buys a lot of slushie machines. , ., , . , machines. yes, for sure. just to see healy helping _ machines. yes, for sure. just to see healy helping out — machines. yes, for sure. just to see healy helping out with _ machines. yes, for sure. just to see healy helping out with the _ machines. yes, for sure. just to see healy helping out with the slushies, j healy helping out with the slushies, it puts a smile on my face, to see it puts a smile on my face, to see it is helping. brute it puts a smile on my face, to see it is helping-— it is helping. we should explain, the idea was _ it is helping. we should explain, the idea was to _ it is helping. we should explain, the idea was to raise _ it is helping. we should explain, the idea was to raise money i it is helping. we should explain, the idea was to raise money for| it is helping. we should explain, | the idea was to raise money for a slushie machine but because of health and all sorts of stuff like that, sanitation, you are giving out slushies in separate containers, so it is safe for everyone. yes. i had to ask you, two kilometres a day, how are you feeling? i to ask you, two kilometres a day, how are you feeling?— to ask you, two kilometres a day, how are you feeling? i am all right now. on christmas _ how are you feeling? i am all right now. on christmas day, _ how are you feeling? i am all right now. on christmas day, i - how are you feeling? i am all right now. on christmas day, i was i how are you feeling? i am all right now. on christmas day, i was a i now. on christmas day, i was a little bit sore. is now. on christmas day, i was a little bit sore.— little bit sore. is it falling onto ou, to little bit sore. is it falling onto you. to say. — little bit sore. is it falling onto you. to say. you _ little bit sore. is it falling onto you, to say, you are _ little bit sore. is it falling onto you, to say, you are doing i little bit sore. is it falling onto you, to say, you are doing a l little bit sore. is it falling onto i you, to say, you are doing a really good thing, you can pay off the homework for a bit, you can relax a bit more. how do you manage that? he
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has been really good. he is getting to school— has been really good. he is getting to school work. he is looking forward — to school work. he is looking forward to getting back to school next week and getting back to that kind of— next week and getting back to that kind of life. there was no letup on the homework.— kind of life. there was no letup on the homework. ., ., , , ., , ., the homework. how many days do you have left for — the homework. how many days do you have left for running? _ the homework. how many days do you have left for running? i _ the homework. how many days do you have left for running? i have _ have left for running? i have completed — have left for running? i have completed it _ have left for running? i have completed it now. _ have left for running? i have completed it now. ok. i- have left for running? i have completed it now. ok. ifeelj have left for running? i have i completed it now. ok. ifeel like an a , completed it now. ok. ifeel like anyway. we _ completed it now. ok. ifeel like anyway. we are _ completed it now. ok. ifeel like anyway, we are slightly - completed it now. ok. ifeel like anyway, we are slightly in i completed it now. ok. ifeel like anyway, we are slightly in the i completed it now. ok. i feel like i anyway, we are slightly in the way doing this interview. you chat a lot. anything you want to chat to huey about? he lot. anything you want to chat to huey about?— huey about? he had a little chat last night. _ huey about? he had a little chat last night, didn't _ huey about? he had a little chat last night, didn't he? _ huey about? he had a little chat last night, didn't he? it - huey about? he had a little chat last night, didn't he? it is i huey about? he had a little chat last night, didn't he? it is good l last night, didn't he? it is good two i will tell— last night, didn't he? it is good two i will tell you _ last night, didn't he? it is good two i will tell you i _ last night, didn't he? it is good two i will tell you i will- last night, didn't he? it is good two i will tell you i will say, i last night, didn't he? it is good | two i will tell you i will say, may be hughie, this is one for you. we
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have featured this on bbc breakfast day few times. each time the audience response has been brilliant. are you aware of the impact it has on people.- brilliant. are you aware of the impact it has on people. even the smallest donations _ impact it has on people. even the smallest donations count, i impact it has on people. even the smallest donations count, it i impact it has on people. even the smallest donations count, it goes impact it has on people. even the i smallest donations count, it goes to big courses, helping to save lives, putting smiles on two children's faces. it is really happy. i am really happy to be part of this. brute really happy to be part of this. we are delighted to have been part of it as well alongside you. congratulations. i know you carry on with their work. good luck with your recuperation. we wish you well. mums and dads, all welcome this morning. did you ever have those slushies?
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not really. they give you a brain freeze. i think that is what ijust had. forsome freeze. i think that is what ijust had. for some reason, freeze. i think that is what ijust had. forsome reason, ithink freeze. i think that is what ijust had. for some reason, i think it is because that hotel is going up and up, i thought he was still running, but he finished on christmas day. something tells me, those two between them, something will hatch... de remember when they did the reporting? watch that space? ! —— do you remember? do you remember mushy? he was the boy from the tv show educating yorkshire, who captured the hearts of the nation after overcoming a stammer with the support of his teacher matt burton. well now, nine years on, mushy has decided he also wants to be an english teacher. before we catch up with them, let's remind ourselves of the moment mushy found his voice.
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it is only because i have watched the king's speech recently. one thing he does, right? it's a very similar thing to you in that you can't get the words out. one thing he does do — he makes him listen to some music, right. and when he's listened to the music, gets him to do it again. have you got your phone with you? yeah. right, plug it into mine, i'll put you some awful music on. right. are you ready? yes. 0k. one, two, three. is it too loud? loud. that i own this is the same moment when the trees unloose their soft arm from around you, the birds take back their language. the cliffs... fissure. ..fissure and collapse. the air moves back from you like
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a wave and you can't breathe... mushyjoins us now along with matt burton, headteacher of thornhill community academy in dewsbury. lovely to see you both this morning. mushy, first of all, what an incredible journey. mushy, first of all, what an incrediblejourney. nine years mushy, first of all, what an incredible journey. nine years down the line. incredible 'ourney. nine years down the line. ., ., incredible 'ourney. nine years down the line. ., . , , . the line. now what is the plan? hopefully. _ the line. now what is the plan? hopefully. in — the line. now what is the plan? hopefully, in september, i- the line. now what is the plan? hopefully, in september, iwill| the line. now what is the plan? i hopefully, in september, iwill be hopefully, in september, i will be starting my pgce in english and hopefully becoming an english teacher, which i am really looking forward to. it teacher, which i am really looking forward to-— teacher, which i am really looking forward to-_ forward to. it is an amazing thing ou have forward to. it is an amazing thing you have done. _ forward to. it is an amazing thing you have done. i— forward to. it is an amazing thing you have done. i remember- forward to. it is an amazing thing you have done. i remember that| forward to. it is an amazing thing i you have done. i remember that scene very well with all the struggles he had then. you are studying journalism now, you are at
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university. does that feel like a completely different person? yes. university. does that feel like a completely different person? yes, of course. completely different person? yes, of course- every — completely different person? yes, of course. every time _ completely different person? yes, of course. every time i— completely different person? yes, of course. every time i do _ completely different person? yes, of course. every time i do watch - completely different person? yes, of course. every time i do watch that i course. every time i do watch that clip, it makes me realise, like how hard it was at school, and howl clip, it makes me realise, like how hard it was at school, and how i was so fortunate enough to actually receive the help which i did at burton. {iii receive the help which i did at burton. u, , ., receive the help which i did at burton. _, , ., i. receive the help which i did at burton. , ., ~ ., , burton. of course, now you know 'ust what a difference, �* burton. of course, now you know 'ust what a difference, mushy, * burton. of course, now you know 'ust what a difference, mushy, your h what a difference, mushy, your teacher had on you. that is what i suppose you want to get back. yes. suppose you want to get back. yes, of course- — suppose you want to get back. yes, of course. after _ suppose you want to get back. yes, of course. after having _ suppose you want to get back. 1a: of course. after having that first time experience of knowing how it feels to actually overcome something which i never thought i would ever overcome. after the educating
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yorkshire series, i got into keynote speaking. it is amazing to actually see howjust the little bit of help, which was hearing what i had to say, basically, it was a way to getting my words out. hopefully, i will also be able to have that impact as well. i am sure you will. you will not doubt it —— we do not doubt it for a second. mushy�*s story is amazing. he is an inspirational character, isn't he? in
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is an inspirational character, isn't he? . , ,, ., he? in all seriousness, i could not be more proud- — he? in all seriousness, i could not be more proud. i— he? in all seriousness, i could not be more proud. i work— he? in all seriousness, i could not be more proud. i work with - be more proud. i work with colleagues now at thornhill, i am very lucky to do so, who attended the school as students themselves. it is wonderful. when former students go on to be teachers, working in schools, it is lovely. i could not be more proud of mushy. we did not see educating yorkshire at the end of his journey. this did not see educating yorkshire at the end of hisjourney. this is something he carries with him and something he carries with him and something we have spoken about a lot. what he will do without a shadow of doubt in the classroom is have a fantastic relationship, a wonderful bond with students. he knows what it is like to work incredibly hard to overcome something at school. sometimes it is not a stammer, it can be a range of things. all of us have a things at times on thatjourney. i could not
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be more proud of him. fix, times on that journey. i could not be more proud of him. a different wa of be more proud of him. a different way of looking _ be more proud of him. a different way of looking at _ be more proud of him. a different way of looking at things. - be more proud of him. a different way of looking at things. you - be more proud of him. a different| way of looking at things. you have been really impressed, i know, with how mushy has handled the intention and how he has related back to the community you are in. $5” and how he has related back to the community you are in.— and how he has related back to the community you are in. as i sit here, he is probably _ community you are in. as i sit here, he is probably about _ community you are in. as i sit here, he is probably about a _ community you are in. as i sit here, he is probably about a mile - community you are in. as i sit here, he is probably about a mile away . community you are in. as i sit here, he is probably about a mile away as| he is probably about a mile away as the crow flies. in the middle of a pandemic, hopefully towards the end of a pandemic, pandemic, hopefully towards the end ofa pandemic, it pandemic, hopefully towards the end of a pandemic, it can be worlds away. mushy has been to school a few times. we have conversations and we will keep in touch. as somebody who worked incredibly hard on the series. he came out, there was a huge... he got huge national attention. with support from the production company, it has been phenomenal. very proud of him for being a role model for his family
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and how proud his family are of him as well. . ., ., ., , ., as well. there are a lot of young --eole as well. there are a lot of young people who _ as well. there are a lot of young people who are _ as well. there are a lot of young people who are struggling - as well. there are a lot of young people who are struggling quite | as well. there are a lot of young | people who are struggling quite a bit. you will be well aware of this. some of your contemporaries. your former head teacher said a moment ago, a lot of people had challenges along the way. the pandemic and the way education is at the moment has added extra on to the problems young people are facing. it added extra on to the problems young people are facing-— people are facing. it has been really hard- — people are facing. it has been really hard. i— people are facing. it has been really hard. i have _ people are facing. it has been really hard. i have just - people are facing. it has been really hard. i have just been l really hard. i have just been thinking about how hard it would have been for somebody like me he was not able to get that help first hand. it is really hard for teachers
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and students. if i can have a little bit of an impact and hopefully it should help. so i am just hoping that the kids that i do teach i can show them that no matter how hard it actually gets, you can and will overcome the adversities that you do face. be overcome the adversities that you do face. �* ., ., , i. overcome the adversities that you do face. �* ., ., , ., face. be in no doubt you have already had — face. be in no doubt you have already had an _ face. be in no doubt you have already had an impact - face. be in no doubt you have already had an impact on - face. be in no doubt you have already had an impact on lotsj face. be in no doubt you have i already had an impact on lots of people. i am sure you will in the future. good luck with teacher training. i hope it all goes well. good luck next week because she will have a busy time with the schools opening next week and i will be new pressure. opening next week and i will be new ressure. ., ~' opening next week and i will be new ressure. ., ~ , .,
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opening next week and i will be new ressure. ., ~ i. opening next week and i will be new ressure. ., ~ ., ., pressure. thank you. looking forward to it. pressure. thank you. looking forward to it- cannot — pressure. thank you. looking forward to it. cannot wait _ pressure. thank you. looking forward to it. cannot wait to _ pressure. thank you. looking forward to it. cannot wait to see _ pressure. thank you. looking forward to it. cannot wait to see everybody. l time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. plans aimed at bringing visitors back to the west end after lockdown are being unveiled this morning. westminster council's announced a £150 million project to try to create more jobs and boost business— including al fresco dining areas, as well as a pledge to build almost 2000 affordable homes by 2023. a murder investigation's been launched after a teenager was stabbed in croydon yesterday afternoon. the i9—year—old was attacked on alpha road just after mid—day. no arrests have been made. amazon is to open its first food shop in the uk today, in west london, but there won't be any checkouts. the store, in ealing, will use technology that allows shoppers to choose their items and then walk straight out.
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it's a few more weeks until gyms and fitness centres might be able to reopen and many people have of course been finding alternative ways to stay healthy. one organisation, called ability bow, which says it tailors activities for disabled people has moved online. some londoners, who've been shielding, say it's been a lifeline. when you've got a neurological condition like i have you spent 2a hours a day thinking about your condition. so being able to keep moving is so important to me. firefighters have had to help rescue a minibus in tottenham, after it got trapped in a sink hole. crews say it was parked up at the time, when the tarmac collapsed underneath it. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the hammersmith and city line has minor delays due to some train cancellations, that's affecting services. we have some delays on edwgare road this morning — here's how it looks at the moment.
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there are some works at seymour street — it's slow at times between marble arch and the marylebone flyover. and on the m25 anticlockwise traffic is still slow from junction 16 for the m40, there's been an accidentjust before junction 15 for the m4. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. once again, poor visibility to start the day across the capital. some mist, some patches of fog and lots of low cloud around. it will all lift into low cloud as we head through the morning. there's some early rain around, we're starting off with five or six celsius, so it's a little milder than it has been of late. that rain is set to peter out, it will be easing and it will move gradually south eastwards as we head through the morning. so there'll be lots of dry weather around today but always plenty of cloud. quite a cool and brisk north—easterly wind setting up, too. you'll notice the drop in temperature, it's going to feel colder today — highs between six and 8 degrees celsius, perhaps a little more patchy rain as we head through the afternoon but lots of dry weather too. overnight tonight then, it should stay dry, there'll be some clear spells at times, temperatures will drop very close to freezing, it's a colder start to friday. but on friday it should be dry,
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or mostly dry, small chance of a shower and some spells of sunshine, we'll keep that cool, north—easterly wind. it's looking dry over the weekend. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website, but now it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. morning live is on bbc one at 9.15. let's find out what's on today's programme with kym and gethin. good programme with kym and gethin. morning both. {3 coming good morning both. good morning. coming up. — good morning both. good morning. coming up. we _ good morning both. good morning. coming up. we get _ good morning both. good morning. coming up, we get our— good morning both. good morning. coming up, we get our take - good morning both. good morning. coming up, we get our take on - good morning both. good morning. coming up, we get our take on the| coming up, we get our take on the announcement that an extra £1.56 billion is going towards the vaccine roll—out. but even more good news? l
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roll—out. but even more good news? i will be talking about the positive predictions the uk's death rate could _ predictions the uk's death rate could be — predictions the uk's death rate could be back to normal by easter. as always. — could be back to normal by easter. as always, he will be answering your questions. so get in touch. $1150. as always, he will be answering your questions. so get in touch.— questions. so get in touch. also, we know lots of— questions. so get in touch. also, we know lots of people _ questions. so get in touch. also, we know lots of people are _ questions. so get in touch. also, we know lots of people are looking - know lots of people are looking forward — know lots of people are looking forward to _ know lots of people are looking forward to the _ know lots of people are looking forward to the end _ know lots of people are looking forward to the end of _ know lots of people are looking | forward to the end of lockdown, know lots of people are looking - forward to the end of lockdown, but many _ forward to the end of lockdown, but many feel— forward to the end of lockdown, but many feel anxious _ forward to the end of lockdown, but many feel anxious about _ forward to the end of lockdown, but many feel anxious about it, - forward to the end of lockdown, but many feel anxious about it, too. - many feel anxious about it, too. including — many feel anxious about it, too. including former— many feel anxious about it, too. including former emmerdale - many feel anxious about it, too. | including former emmerdale and casualty— including former emmerdale and casualty star, _ including former emmerdale and casualty star, rick _ including former emmerdale and casualty star, rick macklin. - including former emmerdale and casualty star, rick macklin. he l including former emmerdale and . casualty star, rick macklin. he will tell us_ casualty star, rick macklin. he will tell us how— casualty star, rick macklin. he will tell us how caring _ casualty star, rick macklin. he will tell us how caring for— casualty star, rick macklin. he will tell us how caring for his _ tell us how caring for his vulnerable _ tell us how caring for his vulnerable mum - tell us how caring for his vulnerable mum during. tell us how caring for his . vulnerable mum during the tell us how caring for his _ vulnerable mum during the pandemic has been _ vulnerable mum during the pandemic has been his— vulnerable mum during the pandemic has been his most— vulnerable mum during the pandemic has been his most challenging - vulnerable mum during the pandemic has been his most challenging role i has been his most challenging role yet. has been his most challenging role et. �* ., ~ has been his most challenging role et. �* ., ,, ., ., ., ., yet. and we talk to the woman who has survived _ yet. and we talk to the woman who has survived a _ yet. and we talk to the woman who has survived a five _ yet. and we talk to the woman who has survived a five life-threatening | has survived a five life—threatening heart attacks. she tells us her amazing story and how we can help the nhs by being the perfect patient. the nhs by being the perfect atient. �* ., ., the nhs by being the perfect atient. �* . ., . ~ ., patient. and we have a chef anna, talkin: patient. and we have a chef anna, talking about _ patient. and we have a chef anna, talking about a _ patient. and we have a chef anna, talking about a favourite _ patient. and we have a chef anna, talking about a favourite food, - patient. and we have a chef anna, talking about a favourite food, the potato _ talking about a favourite food, the potato she — talking about a favourite food, the potato. she will— talking about a favourite food, the potato. she will show— talking about a favourite food, the potato. she will show hers - talking about a favourite food, the potato. she will show hers how. talking about a favourite food, the potato. she will show hers how to| potato. she will show hers how to make _ potato. she will show hers how to make home—made _ potato. she will show hers how to make home—made christmas. - potato. she will show hers how to make home—made christmas. wej potato. she will show hers how to make home-made christmas. we will also be having — make home-made christmas. we will also be having a _ make home-made christmas. we will
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also be having a chuckle _ make home-made christmas. we will also be having a chuckle with - make home-made christmas. we will also be having a chuckle with dj - also be having a chuckle with dj scott mills and chris stark. they will tell us how to get the nation laughing out loud for comic relief. and kathyjones is here putting us through— and kathyjones is here putting us through our— and kathyjones is here putting us through our paces _ and kathyjones is here putting us through our paces during - and kathyjones is here putting us through our paces during the - through our paces during the strictly— through our paces during the strictly fitness— through our paces during the strictly fitness work—out. - through our paces during the strictly fitness work—out. it. through our paces during the| strictly fitness work—out. [it is through our paces during the strictly fitness work-out. it is all about upper _ strictly fitness work-out. it is all about upper body, _ strictly fitness work-out. it is all about upper body, so _ strictly fitness work-out. it is all about upper body, so start - about upper body, so start stretching.— about upper body, so start stretching. about upper body, so start stretchinr. ., , ., , ., . stretching. you seem to be matching the set today. _ stretching. you seem to be matching the set today, which _ stretching. you seem to be matching the set today, which is _ stretching. you seem to be matching the set today, which is lovely. - stretching. you seem to be matching the set today, which is lovely. the i the set today, which is lovely. the lants are the set today, which is lovely. the plants are getting all the attention.— plants are getting all the attention. we plants are getting all the attention. ~ . ., ., we will attention. welcome to it. we will see ou attention. welcome to it. we will see you at _ attention. welcome to it. we will see you at 9.15. _ attention. welcome to it. we will see you at 9.15. there _ attention. welcome to it. we will see you at 9.15. there is - attention. welcome to it. we will see you at 9.15. there is more i see you at 9.15. there is more foliare see you at 9.15. there is more foliage every _ see you at 9.15. there is more foliage every time _ see you at 9.15. there is more foliage every time we - see you at 9.15. there is more foliage every time we throw i see you at 9.15. there is morej foliage every time we throw to see you at 9.15. there is more - foliage every time we throw to you. they are growing every day, charlie. it is impressive, i like it. i like it. we arejealous. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has promised another £65 billion of economic support in his budget, which he says will help businesses and people through the pandemic. he also explained how he plans
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to start paying the bill, which will push britain's tax burden to its highest level since the 19605. nina's in redcar this morning and has been getting reaction from people there. good to see you. you have got the beach behind you. it looks less windy, but it is still nippy and you have been talking to the chancellor and lots of people to get some reaction to his budget?- reaction to his budget? good morning- _ reaction to his budget? good morning- it _ reaction to his budget? good morning. it has _ reaction to his budget? good morning. it has been - reaction to his budget? good morning. it has been a - reaction to his budget? good morning. it has been a busy| reaction to his budget? (lime morning. it has been a busy morning. here i am, bedraggled, but buoyant, still. windy on the coast. behind me is the famous redcar steelworks. it used to be thriving and it used to employ thousands of people locally. not any more, but may be soon? just behind it, the plan is to build what's called a free port. it is a place where goods that are manufactured will not have to pay duty coming into the uk, they can be exported and sold. the idea being that wealth is shared around the wider economy. just up the road from
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here in darlington, there will be a new treasury office, set to bring hundreds ofjobs to the region. over the past couple of days, people i have spoken to have said there is something for the north—east in the budget yesterday. they believe there might be something in it for them. every town and every city has thousands of stories of what should happen now. bailey deserves a break, he train for three years as a rail engineer before cancer treatment because of his career before it had chance to start. i because of his career before it had chance to start.— chance to start. i was trying to get a 'ob with chance to start. i was trying to get a job with amazon, _ chance to start. i was trying to get a job with amazon, but _ chance to start. i was trying to get a job with amazon, but 700 - chance to start. i was trying to get| a job with amazon, but 700 people applied for the samejob a job with amazon, but 700 people applied for the same job as i applied for the same job as i applied for.
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applied for the same 'ob as i applied font applied for the same 'ob as i a--lied for. ., , ., , applied for the same 'ob as i a- lied for. .,, ., , ., , ., applied for. kobe dreams of being a sinner. but applied for. kobe dreams of being a singer. but times _ applied for. kobe dreams of being a singer. but times are _ applied for. kobe dreams of being a singer. but times are tough - applied for. kobe dreams of being a singer. but times are tough for - applied for. kobe dreams of being a singer. but times are tough for his. singer. but times are tough for his mum. she used to be a special needs nurse but stopped to look after her daughter who has complex disabilities. theyjust about get by on universal credit and her husband's income. it on universal credit and her husband's income.- on universal credit and her husband's income. , ., , husband's income. it has been a bit of a struggle- _ husband's income. it has been a bit of a struggle. during _ husband's income. it has been a bit of a struggle. during the _ husband's income. it has been a bit of a struggle. during the first - of a struggle. during the first lockdown it was people who were quite happy to get takeaways and things, because my husband is a takeaway driver. obviously, that is not there. it has been up and down, but we get by. bo not there. it has been up and down, but we get by-_ but we get by. do you worry about what comes _ but we get by. do you worry about what comes next _ but we get by. do you worry about what comes next and _ but we get by. do you worry about what comes next and what - but we get by. do you worry about what comes next and what things | but we get by. do you worry about i what comes next and what things will be like for the kids?— be like for the kids? absolutely. the kids need _ be like for the kids? absolutely. the kids need a _ be like for the kids? absolutely. the kids need a future. - be like for the kids? absolutely. the kids need a future. it i be like for the kids? absolutely. the kids need a future. it is i be like for the kids? absolutely. the kids need a future. it is not| the kids need a future. it is not just about education, it is about mentally. you talk about covid—19, when will he see his friends and meet people.
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when will he see his friends and meet people-— when will he see his friends and meet .eole-�*g. . , , ,, meet people. joanna runs three pubs and is desperate _ meet people. joanna runs three pubs and is desperate to _ meet people. joanna runs three pubs and is desperate to get _ meet people. joanna runs three pubs and is desperate to get customers i and is desperate to get customers back through the doors. but she is worried about what happens if tax goes up and punters cannot splash out. she is glad vat has come down and thinks it should stay down. {line and thinks it should stay down. one thin i and thinks it should stay down. one thing i would _ and thinks it should stay down. que: thing i would like to see is something they do in europe and that is a fixed vat percentage for the hospitality trade. a country like spain and france that does rely heavily on tourism and hospitality, we are in that boat now in the uk. a fixed rate that is lower than the standard rate that everybody else paysis standard rate that everybody else pays is what they do in spain. i think it is about 11%. for something like that to be brought to the uk would be a great asset. but gary's hair salon is _ would be a great asset. but gary's hair salon is not _ would be a great asset. but gary's hair salon is not far _ would be a great asset. but gary's hair salon is not far from - would be a great asset. but gary's hair salon is not far from joanne's| hair salon is not far from joanne's cup. he was hoping he might have had a surprise vat cut from the chancellor.— a surprise vat cut from the chancellor. ~ :: , ~
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chancellor. we pay 20% vat were hos - itali chancellor. we pay 20% vat were hospitality pays — chancellor. we pay 20% vat were hospitality pays 5%. _ chancellor. we pay 20% vat were hospitality pays 5%. we _ chancellor. we pay 20% vat were hospitality pays 5%. we are i chancellor. we pay 20% vat were hospitality pays 5%. we are not i chancellor. we pay 20% vat were hospitality pays 5%. we are not a | hospitality pays 5%. we are not a service _ hospitality pays 5%. we are not a service we — hospitality pays 5%. we are not a service we can put online, when we are close. — service we can put online, when we are close. we — service we can put online, when we are close, we are close. the service we can put online, when we are close, we are close.— are close, we are close. the theory is, when are close, we are close. the theory is. when things _ are close, we are close. the theory is, when things are _ are close, we are close. the theory is, when things are back— are close, we are close. the theory is, when things are back to - are close, we are close. the theory| is, when things are back to normal, everyone will want a haircut so your industry will bounce back? we everyone will want a haircut so your industry will bounce back?- industry will bounce back? we will be bus . i industry will bounce back? we will be busy- i worry — industry will bounce back? we will be busy. i worry for _ industry will bounce back? we will be busy. i worry for salons - industry will bounce back? we will| be busy. i worry for salons because they will_ be busy. i worry for salons because they will have taken out extra debt and loans — they will have taken out extra debt and loans and deferred payments. those _ and loans and deferred payments. those payments will have to be paid back eventually. it is added pressure _ back eventually. it is added pressure on businesses. who back eventually. it is added pressure on businesses. who are the real winners? — pressure on businesses. who are the real winners? who _ pressure on businesses. who are the real winners? who will _ pressure on businesses. who are the real winners? who will be _ pressure on businesses. who are the real winners? who will be the - pressure on businesses. who are the real winners? who will be the long i real winners? who will be the long term losers? we won't truly know how successful the chancellor's support has been for months, even years. for now, everyone isjust trying has been for months, even years. for now, everyone is just trying to make it to tomorrow. promises come good for the region? professorjoanne berry, the durham business school, born and bred and is wearing several fewer layers than
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i am. good is wearing several fewer layers than iam. good morning. you no nonsense when you hear it, is this true, this levelling of the investment in freeport and the treasury office just up the road, is it going to mean something to people who live here? we mean something to people who live here? ~ ., , , mean something to people who live here? ~ , mean something to people who live here? , :: here? we absolutely hope so. 750 new 'obs and a here? we absolutely hope so. 750 new jobs and a treasury _ here? we absolutely hope so. 750 new jobs and a treasury campus _ here? we absolutely hope so. 750 new jobs and a treasury campus in - jobs and a treasury campus in darlington is hugely exciting. what we absolutely do is welcome with open arms, the idea. 750 treasury tourists coming up for three or four days a week and then going back down to the south again. that would not go down well. while we would welcome them into our community, we will be watching and we very much hope to welcome the entire treasury community up here as part of the north—east. not as visitors. you north-east. not as visitors. you want the move _ north-east. not as visitors. you want the move to _ north-east. not as visitors. you want the move to be _ north—east. not as visitors. you want the move to be meaningful and move hear properly? what about the free talk, it was devastating for the micro—economies when the
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steelworks shutdown and also the supply chain. what would a free port due to communities here? i supply chain. what would a free port due to communities here?— supply chain. what would a free port due to communities here? i echo the excitement about _ due to communities here? i echo the excitement about the _ due to communities here? i echo the excitement about the free _ due to communities here? i echo the excitement about the free port. i excitement about the free port. there is room for more than one but the freeport announced yesterday was hugely exciting for the freeport itself, for the supply chain and the complex supply chain that surrounds it. it will mean morejobs, better jobs, high—qualityjobs. notjust in the immediate area, but the ripple effect around the north—east will be massive hugely exciting. you optimistic — massive hugely exciting. you optimistic about _ massive hugely exciting. you optimistic about that and there were also measures for small and medium—sized businesses yesterday to stimulate growth and also promote investment, encourage them to spend with tax deductions?— with tax deductions? absolutely. there are ways _ with tax deductions? absolutely. there are ways in _ with tax deductions? absolutely. there are ways in which - with tax deductions? absolutely. there are ways in which there i with tax deductions? absolutely. | there are ways in which there will be a effect in the measures that the chancellor announced. ways in which business schools can help to grow skills within small and medium
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businesses and upscale, layers of management and digital transformation within small and medium businesses, which i'm very excited to be part of. the medium businesses, which i'm very excited to be part of.— excited to be part of. the super deduction. _ excited to be part of. the super deduction, 11394. _ excited to be part of. the super deduction, 11396 reduction i excited to be part of. the super deduction, 11396 reduction in i excited to be part of. the super| deduction, 11396 reduction in tax deduction, 113% reduction in tax when you spend on equipment, do you think manufacturers will be taking advantage of that? l think manufacturers will be taking advantage of that? i am think manufacturers will be taking advantage of that?— advantage of that? i am sure they will. advantage of that? i am sure they will- while — advantage of that? i am sure they will. while they _ advantage of that? i am sure they will. while they seem _ advantage of that? i am sure they will. while they seem to - advantage of that? i am sure they will. while they seem to be i will. while they seem to be localised measures, the ripple effect of these measures across the whole of the north—east is going to be something, for the next few years, will be exciting. in a years, will be exciting. in a nutshell. — years, will be exciting. in a nutshell, a _ years, will be exciting. in a nutshell, a good _ years, will be exciting. in a nutshell, a good budget i years, will be exciting. in a nutshell, a good budget for you and communities here? i nutshell, a good budget for you and communities here?— communities here? i think so, yes. good to hear. _ communities here? i think so, yes. good to hear, but _ communities here? i think so, yes. good to hear, but it _ communities here? i think so, yes. good to hear, but it will _ communities here? i think so, yes. good to hear, but it will be - communities here? i think so, yes. good to hear, but it will be days, i good to hear, but it will be days, possibly months to see how this transpires for communities. rishi sunak saying £400 million has been borrowed for the economy against this pandemic. it is a lot of money and they will be incremental taxes coming for now over the next few years but people saying that will
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hit those hardest hit are lower earners. that is the criticism. that is it from me for the north—east, i'm going to take advantage of this beautiful coastline and get my trainers on and go for a wander. charlie and mager, feast your eyes on that view. it is really dramatic. it is blustery, carol? it is, a cold north—easterly wind. but it has been brighter than it has been. we will see more in the way of sunshine today and areas of cloud. it is a cold start whatever you are. at the moment the temperature in edinburgh is 6 degrees. in london and cardiff it is 5 degrees and in belfast it is three degrees. it will go belfast it is three degrees. it will 9° up belfast it is three degrees. it will go up through the course of the day but not by a huge amount. the next few days, while we are looking at a lot of cloud with sunshine at times,
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mainly settled and dry. a few showers but turning colder where we have seen temperatures in double figures of late. we have got this weather front still to clear in the southeast with showers, high pressure starts to build in. this is what is bringing the north—easterly wind into the north—east of england and other areas as well, and that is what will make it feel rather chilly if you are exposed to it. the weather front sinking south producing rain with showers ahead of it. we have got the showers in the south east which will clear. as this front sink south, behind it will brighten up and we will some sunshine come through with snow flurries on the tops of the hills. ahead of it, we have a lot of low cloud, fog and mist. some of that lifting into low cloud but nonetheless, we will see some brighter breaks temperatures just hanging on in double figures in the south—west but elsewhere, looking at five to about 7 degrees. this evening and overnight, the week by the front continues into the south—west. there will be some cloud
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behind but clear skies. under the clear skies, the temperature will fall and could fall as low as minus fourin fall and could fall as low as minus four in the highlands, so there will be some frost if the cloud remains broken across east anglia, temperatures will also fall below freezing. as we head through friday, this is the high pressure being established. dry unsettled conditions. the cold start to the day but they will be a fair bit of sunshine. still some cloud here and there. the cloud will start to build as we go through the day and it will extend to many areas so it will be bright rather than blue skies. we will see a few showers coming in across the north—east of england. over the tops of the hills as they come in and, you may find they are wintry but nothing significant by any stretch. temperatures five to 7 degrees. we have lost the double figures and getting into the colder air. notjust by day, but also by night. friday night into saturday morning, look at this, widespread frost. brighterto morning, look at this, widespread frost. brighter to start with on
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saturday before the next weather front starts to come in from the atlantic. it heralds a change in our weather into the early part of next week as it becomes more unsettled, but not quite as cold. minus four? we are not in the meteorological winter, but technically still in winter. but it is meteorological spring, so some warm should tell it. you know you have got the power, thank you, carol. the bafta rising star award is a prestigious honour, previously won by a—listers james mcavoy, kristen stewart and john boyega. among this year's nominees are kingsley ben—adir, who plays malcolm x in "one night in miami" and conrad khan, who plays the lead in "county lines".
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before we speak to them, let's see them in action. if you got a job? it is a bit lazy, isn't it? i if you got a 'ob? it is a bit lazy, isn't it? , ., ., ~' if you got a 'ob? it is a bit lazy, isn't it? , ., ., ~ ., isn't it? i used to work for someone- _ isn't it? i used to work for someone. doing - isn't it? i used to work for someone. doing what? i isn't it? i used to work for i someone. doing what? just isn't it? i used to work for - someone. doing what? just running errands on things _ someone. doing what? just running errands on things like _ someone. doing what? just running errands on things like that. - someone. doing what? just running errands on things like that. did i someone. doing what? just running errands on things like that. did he l errands on things like that. did he -a ou? errands on things like that. did he pay you? yes. _ errands on things like that. did he pay you? yes, enough _ errands on things like that. did he pay you? yes, enough to - errands on things like that. did he pay you? yes, enough to help i errands on things like that. did he pay you? yes, enough to help my| errands on things like that. did he i pay you? yes, enough to help my mum out. she pay you? yes, enough to help my mum out- she wasn't — pay you? yes, enough to help my mum out. she wasn't working, _ pay you? yes, enough to help my mum out. she wasn't working, so _ pay you? yes, enough to help my mum out. she wasn't working, so i _ pay you? yes, enough to help my mum out. she wasn't working, so i had i pay you? yes, enough to help my mum out. she wasn't working, so i had to i out. she wasn't working, so i had to be the _ out. she wasn't working, so i had to be the man— out. she wasn't working, so i had to be the man of the house. | out. she wasn't working, so i had to be the man of the house. i am out. she wasn't working, so i had to be the man of the house.— be the man of the house. i am the man of the — be the man of the house. i am the man of the house. _ be the man of the house. i am the man of the house. is _ be the man of the house. i am the man of the house. is it? _ be the man of the house. i am the man of the house. is it? you i be the man of the house. i am the i man of the house. is it? you should aet a 'ob man of the house. is it? you should get a job then. _ man of the house. is it? you should get a job then. as — man of the house. is it? you should get a job then, as an. _ man of the house. is it? you should get a job then, as an. there - man of the house. is it? you should get a job then, as an. there is i man of the house. is it? you should get a job then, as an. there is no i get a 'ob then, as an. there is no more get a job then, as an. there is no more room _ get a job then, as an. there is no more room for _ get a job then, as an. there is no more room for anyone, _ get a job then, as an. there is no more room for anyone, not i get a job then, as an. there is no more room for anyone, not you, | get a job then, as an. there is no i more room for anyone, not you, not me, notjimmy, not sam, not now want to be standing on the fence any more. our people are literally dying in the every day. black people are dying. every day! and a line has got to be drawn in the sand. good
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morning, conrad khan, how are you doing? good thank you, i am calling in from sunny manchester. celebrate with us, the — in from sunny manchester. celebrate with us, the people _ in from sunny manchester. celebrate with us, the people who _ in from sunny manchester. celebrate with us, the people who have - in from sunny manchester. celebrate with us, the people who have been l with us, the people who have been nominated won this award, there are some serious names, congratulations. congratulations. is it some serious names, congratulations. congratulations-— congratulations. is it a bit of an odd one. _ congratulations. is it a bit of an odd one. it _ congratulations. is it a bit of an odd one, it is— congratulations. is it a bit of an odd one, it is a _ congratulations. is it a bit of an odd one, it is a title _ congratulations. is it a bit of an odd one, it is a title to - congratulations. is it a bit of an odd one, it is a title to be i congratulations. is it a bit of an l odd one, it is a title to be looked at as a rising star?— at as a rising star? yes, at first i thourht at as a rising star? yes, at first i thought they _ at as a rising star? yes, at first i thought they must _ at as a rising star? yes, at first i thought they must have - at as a rising star? yes, at first i thought they must have put i at as a rising star? yes, at first i thought they must have put my| at as a rising star? yes, at first i i thought they must have put my name in the wrong hat. yeah, i was over the moon when i first heard the news and i am still coming to terms with it. . ., and i am still coming to terms with it. p ., ., , and i am still coming to terms with it. ., ., , ., and i am still coming to terms with it. what does it mean? even being nominated is _ it. what does it mean? even being nominated is life _ it. what does it mean? even being nominated is life changing - it. what does it mean? even being nominated is life changing in i it. what does it mean? even being nominated is life changing in so i nominated is life changing in so many ways. as of the people been in
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touch with you, has it sunk in yet? because the news was only yesterday, the announcement was only yesterday i think it will take a while for the repercussions, the positive repercussions, the positive repercussions to materialise. but, yeah, like you said, really life changing. yeah, like you said, really life changing-— yeah, like you said, really life chanarin. ., ., , , yeah, like you said, really life chanarin. ., ., i, , changing. could potentially be. did ou think it changing. could potentially be. did you think it could _ changing. could potentially be. did you think it could be _ changing. could potentially be. did you think it could be with _ changing. could potentially be. did you think it could be with county i you think it could be with county line when you started that project? no, it wasn't even the faintest idea in the back of my mind when i was filming. these awards are fantastic, they are amazing accolades to receive, but it is not the reason why i would go into a certain project or do a certain film. and i think with county lines, the script was so honest and so real, it was such a beautiful story and that is what drew me to it. these kinds of
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awards and stuff, i am seeing afterwards, it'sjust awards and stuff, i am seeing afterwards, it's just the awards and stuff, i am seeing afterwards, it'sjust the icing on the cake. afterwards, it's 'ust the icing on the cake. ~ �* , afterwards, it's 'ust the icing on the cake. ~ 2 ., ., the cake. well said. let's go to kinrle the cake. well said. let's go to kingley ben-adir, _ the cake. well said. let's go to i kingley ben-adir, congratulations to kingley ben—adir, congratulations to you as well. kingley ben-adir, congratulations to ou as well. ., ., ., , ., you as well. hello, how are you doin: ? you as well. hello, how are you doing? good. — you as well. hello, how are you doing? good, thank— you as well. hello, how are you doing? good, thank you, i you as well. hello, how are you doing? good, thank you, how. you as well. hello, how are you l doing? good, thank you, how are you as well. hello, how are you - doing? good, thank you, how are you? i am doinr doing? good, thank you, how are you? i am doing good. _ doing? good, thank you, how are you? i am doing good. i— doing? good, thank you, how are you? i am doing good, i have _ doing? good, thank you, how are you? i am doing good, i have just _ doing? good, thank you, how are you? i am doing good, i have just got - doing? good, thank you, how are you? i am doing good, i have just got my i i am doing good, i have just got my cup of— i am doing good, i have just got my cup of coffee and looking forward to speaking _ cup of coffee and looking forward to speaking to you guys. a lot of people — speaking to you guys. a lot of people maybe wouldn't have seen it, but it _ people maybe wouldn't have seen it, but it is _ people maybe wouldn't have seen it, but it is a _ people maybe wouldn't have seen it, but it is a terrific piece of work and _ but it is a terrific piece of work and i_ but it is a terrific piece of work and i am — but it is a terrific piece of work and i am just curious, we asked conrad. — and i am just curious, we asked conrad, how did you find out and who did you _ conrad, how did you find out and who did you tell_ conrad, how did you find out and who did you tell first about getting a nomination? my publicist. they called _ nomination? my publicist. they called me — nomination? my publicist. they called me weeks ago. they told me and they— called me weeks ago. they told me and they said, you are not allowed to tell_ and they said, you are not allowed to tell anyone for about a month. i have _ to tell anyone for about a month. i have been— to tell anyone for about a month. i have been keeping it to myself. he has have been keeping it to myself. hrs. has had have been keeping it to myself. has had the have been keeping it to myself. he: has had the biggest response, have been keeping it to myself. he has had the biggest response, is it family? how have they reacted? i family? how have they reacted? i have had to put my phone on silent
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this morning because i have been getting _ this morning because i have been getting a — this morning because i have been getting a lot of text messages and there _ getting a lot of text messages and there is_ getting a lot of text messages and there is a — getting a lot of text messages and there is a lot of activity going on. people _ there is a lot of activity going on. people messaging me saying, you don't _ people messaging me saying, you don't have — people messaging me saying, you don't have social media so you will probably— don't have social media so you will probably lose. the nomination feels like a _ probably lose. the nomination feels like a huge — probably lose. the nomination feels like a huge win for me anyway, just to be _ like a huge win for me anyway, just to be included in this. it is such a prestigious— to be included in this. it is such a prestigious honour to be nominated. i am prestigious honour to be nominated. tam otd _ prestigious honour to be nominated. i am old enough to remember when james— i am old enough to remember when james mcavoy won it in 2016, it was the orange — james mcavoy won it in 2016, it was the orange bafta rising star. 0ver the orange bafta rising star. over the orange bafta rising star. over the years— the orange bafta rising star. over the years i— the orange bafta rising star. over the years i have seen so many of my favourite _ the years i have seen so many of my favourite actors and actresses who have treen— favourite actors and actresses who have been nominated in this category _ have been nominated in this category. it is pretty special, it is pretty— category. it is pretty special, it is pretty special. nice, warm feeting — is pretty special. nice, warm feeling yesterday. it was nice to meet _ feeling yesterday. it was nice to meet everybody virtually and have a chat _ meet everybody virtually and have a chat it _ meet everybody virtually and have a chat it witi— meet everybody virtually and have a chat. it will be nice to be connected to these guys over the next few — connected to these guys over the next few weeks. i have watched all
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of their— next few weeks. i have watched all of their work. i have been blown away— of their work. i have been blown away because they are so young and i can't imagine leading a movie years old. can't imagine leading a movie years otd~ i_ can't imagine leading a movie years otd~ ithink— can't imagine leading a movie years old. ithink it can't imagine leading a movie years old. i think it is really special to be in _ old. i think it is really special to be in this— old. i think it is really special to be in this group and everyone has 'ust be in this group and everyone has just done — be in this group and everyone has just done really well and the work is such— just done really well and the work is such a — just done really well and the work is such a high level. everyone is british— is such a high level. everyone is british this _ is such a high level. everyone is british this year and i think all the films— british this year and i think all the films as well, apart from mine, are british — the films as well, apart from mine, are british. it is a nice feeling and _ are british. it is a nice feeling and i— are british. it is a nice feeling and i ant _ are british. it is a nice feeling and i am glad to be talking about it this morning. fire and i am glad to be talking about it this morning-— this morning. are you going to get on social media _ this morning. are you going to get on social media now? _ this morning. are you going to get on social media now? no. - this morning. are you going to get on social media now? no. good i this morning. are you going to get| on social media now? no. good for ou, wise on social media now? no. good for you, wise decision. you are saying some lovely things, have you got anything to say to conrad, you can congratulate each other. i anything to say to conrad, you can congratulate each other.— anything to say to conrad, you can congratulate each other. i can't see ou. i congratulate each other. i can't see you i think— congratulate each other. i can't see you- i think you _ congratulate each other. i can't see you. i think you grew— congratulate each other. i can't see you. i think you grew up _ congratulate each other. i can't see you. i think you grew up where - congratulate each other. i can't see you. i think you grew up where i - you. i think you grew up where i live right now. i you. i think you grew up where i live right now.—
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you. i think you grew up where i live right now. i am kentish town, used to work _ live right now. i am kentish town, used to work at _ live right now. i am kentish town, used to work at grafton _ live right now. i am kentish town, used to work at grafton road. - we we re we were probably at school at different times. i was probably as a portmanteau when you are in year seven _ portmanteau when you are in year seven. :, portmanteau when you are in year seven. . ,:, , portmanteau when you are in year seven. . , . portmanteau when you are in year| seven-— -- seven. that sounds about right. -- su ort seven. that sounds about right. -- sunport mental- — seven. that sounds about right. -- support mental. the _ seven. that sounds about right. -- support mental. the first _ seven. that sounds about right. -- support mental. the first image i seven. that sounds about right. -- support mental. the first image of| support mental. the first image of you, support mental. the first image of you. the _ support mental. the first image of you, the first close—up of your face and the _ you, the first close—up of your face and the intensity, the emotional world _ and the intensity, the emotional world you — and the intensity, the emotional world you created was stunning. yeah, _ world you created was stunning. yeah, i— world you created was stunning. yeah, i have been blown away by your work _ yeah, i have been blown away by your work it _ yeah, i have been blown away by your work it is _ yeah, i have been blown away by your work. it is going to be a lovely four— work. it is going to be a lovely four weeks to be connected with you, brother _ four weeks to be connected with you, brother. ~ . four weeks to be connected with you, brother._ conrad, _ four weeks to be connected with you, brother._ conrad, you - four weeks to be connected with you, brother._ conrad, you can i brother. likewise. conrad, you can do a bit better— brother. likewise. conrad, you can do a bit better than _ brother. likewise. conrad, you can do a bit better than that. _ brother. likewise. conrad, you can do a bit better than that. i - brother. likewise. conrad, you can do a bit better than that. i thoughtj do a bit better than that. i thought our do a bit better than that. i thought your performance _ do a bit better than that. i thought your performance was _ do a bit better than that. i thought your performance was amazing. i l your performance was amazing. i watched you also on graham norton
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and i thought he really held your own and youth speak really touching me about the film and affectionately about the director. yeah, i admire you a lot and great company and the rest of the nominees to be amongst. young, british actors is amazing. listening to you two talking it is like you have your winning speech is ready to go. can i ask you, kingsley, he said a moment ago you were at bath that when the nominations were giving out and everyone else was working, what about the nomination situation, how are things with you? iikla about the nomination situation, how are things with you?— are things with you? no complaints. i haven't are things with you? no complaints. i haven't been _ are things with you? no complaints. i haven't been unset _ are things with you? no complaints. i haven't been unset since _ are things with you? no complaints. i haven't been unset since one i are things with you? no complaints. | i haven't been unset since one night in i haven't been unset since one night in miami _ i haven't been unset since one night in miami i_ i haven't been unset since one night in miami. i have been reading a lot, there— in miami. i have been reading a lot, there have— in miami. i have been reading a lot, there have been a lot of scripts conring — there have been a lot of scripts coming through and a lot of meetings with directors and i am just taking my with directors and i am just taking nry tinre — with directors and i am just taking my time it — with directors and i am just taking
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my time. it is the first time in ten orii— my time. it is the first time in ten orii years— my time. it is the first time in ten or 11 years where there has been a few options. i am trying to enjoy it and not _ few options. i am trying to enjoy it and not rushing to the next project. just enjoy— and not rushing to the next project. just enjoy this part of it. this is the dream, _ just enjoy this part of it. this is the dream, i have always streamed atrout— the dream, i have always streamed about being able to read really wonderful, independent movies that are trying _ wonderful, independent movies that are trying to come at things from a different— are trying to come at things from a different angle and have a different perspective. that has been the last year. _ perspective. that has been the last year. i_ perspective. that has been the last year. i have — perspective. that has been the last year, i have been cooped up in my apartment. — year, i have been cooped up in my apartment, reading and meeting directors— apartment, reading and meeting directors on zoom and hopefully over the next _ directors on zoom and hopefully over the next couple of weeks things will tie up _ the next couple of weeks things will tie up and _ the next couple of weeks things will tie up and i— the next couple of weeks things will tie up and i will be back on set in a few— tie up and i will be back on set in a few months. i am excited. if you took— a few months. i am excited. if you took so _ a few months. i am excited. if you took so stick _ a few months. i am excited. if you look so slick. it a few months. i am excited. if you look so slick.— look so slick. it could be the big one, the offer _ look so slick. it could be the big one, the offer that _ look so slick. it could be the big one, the offer that has - look so slick. it could be the big one, the offer that has come i look so slick. it could be the big one, the offer that has come in | one, the offer that has come in right now. probablyjust a gas bill. kingsley, lovely talking to you. kingley ben—adir, conrad khan as
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well, congratulations and it has been lovely to see you both support each other and be across each other�*s work. good luck and enjoy it. april the 11th of the awards. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines the duchess of sussex has accused the royal family of "perpetuating falsehoods" about her and prince harry. i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time, we would stilljust be silent if there is an active role that the firm is playing in perpetuating falsehoods about us. the chancellor defends his plans to raise overall taxation to the highest level since the 19605 as he faces criticism for doing too little to tackle inequality. this is a good way to raise money that we need because it's a progressive measure, it means those on higher incomes contribute a lot more than those on lower incomes.

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