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tv   American Morning  CNN  October 5, 2011 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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getting actually said you're getting a downgrade in service, they admitted that? >> they're changing my checking accounted. i had a unique account. the one they're changing it into is now the lower level account. and it costs more. >> fantastic. >> nice. >> and i mean that s sarcastically. carter evans, thank you. "american morning" continues right now. good morning. amanda knox returns to america after four long years in prison. you'll hear her emotional message he'd. terrifying moments in new york city. i'm ali velshi. a helicopter crashes into the east river killing a passenger. what went wrong? we're live at the scene just ahead. and spending your money will now cost you even more money. i'm carol costello. another big bank about to slap customers with know fear hike? on this "american morning." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
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and good morning, everybody. it's wednesday, october 5th. a very cool, crisp day here in the northeast. welcome to "american morning," everyone. >> lots of news to tell you about today. first, amanda knox is back on american soil. what a homecoming it was. knox touched down in seattle shortly after 8:00 last night, p.m. she thanked everyone who supported drew griffin was there. what was it like? >> reporter: before she even spoke, before anyone spoke, you could just see the relief on their faces. first the attorney addressed the crowd. if the if there were questions. mom and dad addressed the crowd? any questions for them? no. everybody just wanted to hear from her. amanda knox, and when she came to the podium, she said she had to remember, i have to speak in english now. >> i'm really overwhelmed right
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now. >> reporter: after spending four years in an italian prison, amanda knox could hardly believe she was back home in seattle. >> i was looking down from the airplane and it seemed like everything wasn't real art arriving tuesday night, knox was greeted by cheering crowds and surrounded by her family. she struggled to hold back tears as she addressed the crowd. >> what's important for me to say is just thank you to everyone who's believed in me, who has defended me, who has supported my family. >> reporter: her parents joined her in thanking all the supporters. >> it's because of the letters and the calls and just amazing support that we received from people all over the world, especially here in seattle, that we've been able to endure and that we've been able to make sure amanda had the support she needed. >> reporter: convicted in 2009 of killing her roommate meredith kercher and sentenced to 26
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years in prison, an appeals court set her free on monday. >> this decision unmistakably announces to the world that amanda knox was wrongry convi i convicted and absolutely not responsible for the murder of mayor di meredith kercher. >> my family is the most important thing right now and i just want to go now and be with them. so thank you for being there for me. >> reporter: and the big question now, ali, is, will she be able to be with her family in peace? the tabloid press, the paparazzi are all over this town waiting to get glimpses of her now that she continues on with her new normal life back here in seattle.
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>> thanks for that, drew griffin. good morning. now to that deadly chopper crash in new york city. a private sightseeing helicopter with four passengers plunged into the east river. one of the passengers was killed. three others injured. the ntsb is now investigating the crash. cnn's jason carroll live on new york's east side. do we know what caused the crash yet? >> reporter: that's what the ntsb will be looking into. their investigation is well under way. carol, they've already interviewed the pilot, paul dudley. they will interview the pilot again today, we're told. they have also retrieved that helicopter, that jet ranger, able to retrieve that helicopter yesterday evening. a review of what happened. this according to witnesses and rescuers here at the scene. yet afternoon, about 3:22, the pilot, paul dudley, had just taken off when the trouble began. he radioed he was having problems. unable to keep altitude. witnesses say the chopper spun
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around in the air, crashed into the east river. it turned on its side, and then it sank. all of this happening with just a few moments. three of the passengers and the pilot were able to be rescued, but one woman, sonya mara a 40-year-old from syd any australia was trapped in the back seatshe did not survive. i want to bring in two of the first people on the scene. this happened yesterday. let me bring you in. both at the office of emergency management. i'll start with you, frank. both of you were in the area. you heard what had happened. got here at the scene. tell me what you saw and what happened. >> we arrived on the scene, and when we arrived, there was a helicopter with two men holding on to the skids. one was the pilot and the other a passenger up floont wront in aircraft. wes and i grabbed a life vest with the crew onboard and rescued them, was able to tie
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off -- >> reporter: wes, term about that. >> i was able to run out to the helipad, and get what was, deploy it out to the individual about 20 yards out and then i had to climb down to the pylons and lay down on my chest to bring them in and get underneath him so he wouldn't sink. his jacket kept coming off. myself, the deputy commissioner and a police officer were able to hoist him out of the water and give him to ems and begin assisting nypd as they arrived to the scene with rope rescues of the other people. >> a few minutes later, the diver showed up and able to pull out -- >> one of the critical information we got, the fact there were three other people onboard. we were able to give that information to the dispatchers coming in. >> reporter: right. i know you guys train for things like this, but when it happens
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i'm sure the adrenaline is pumping. i'm sure those passengers are very grateful for what you were able to do. >> our hearts go out. a life was lost yesterday, and our hearts of the city go out to them. we did our best to try to save them. >> reporter: once again, the victim they were both mentions, sonya mara, here visiting with her partner who survived. also her mother and her stepfather who also survived. they were all friends with the pilot, paul dudley, who, again, survived as well. i spoke to an ntsb representative. this morning she tells me once again they'll be able to interview the pilot, paul dudley, again this morning. she also said they're going to review the videotape and also at this point this morning start taking a look at the helicopter itself trying to figure out exactly, carol, what went wrong. the ntsb is going to have some sort of a briefing out here. that's going to begin at 11:00 a.m. carol? >> curious, jason. the woman who died.
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sh she was trapped inside the helicopter. of course, the helicopter was upside-down. where those other two inside the helicopter as well and those guy you talked to, did they manage to communicate to the divers to pull those people out? >> reporter: they were. able to communicate there were others also inside the helicopter. they were able to pull them out as well. when they pulled them out, they were suffering from respiratory arrest. they are in serious condition at this point. once again, quick thinking on the behalf of the first responders who were here at the scene, able to relay information to the divers about those that were still stuck inside. >> jason carroll, thank you very much. jason carroll reporting live from the east side of new york city. a deadly dust storm triggering several multicar pileups north of tucson, arizona. zero visibility when this storm kicked up just after 3:00 in the afternoon yesterday. at least 30 vehicles were involved in accidents. one person killed and at least
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14 other injured. in the michael jackson death trial, the world is getting a very intimate look at the private life of dr. conrad murray. prosecutors calling three women to the stand yesterday trying to prove jackson's personal physician was more concerned with his love life than with michael jackson. of those women, a houston waitress testified she was on the phone with the cardiologist when he suddenly realized jackson had stopped breathing. tensions heating up over a security resolution for a bloody crackdown on protesters yesterday china and russia vetoed the resolution. susan rice stood up and walked out of security council chambers when syria's ambassador began blasting u.s. policies in the middle east. fees keep on coming and, boy, you're mad about it. citibank announced it will charge $20 a month if they don't have a combine $15,000 on all
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accounts. last night on "out front" with erin burnett, tim geithner hit back. >> the banks are blaming the government for everything, including for what they themselves are responsible for causing. there's no surprises. nothing spraining about the fact that banks are resisting it, pushing back. trying to weaken reforms and we're going to push back harder, and in the end we're going to prevail. >> yesterday senator dick durbin suggested people should switch banks if they keep getting nailed with fees. he spent months insisting he wouldn't run, and chris christie was true to his word. he ended all speculation yesterday announcing he will not seek the presidency in 2012. >> oh, that is nothing! >> the statement sent a chill through countless republican supporters. >> now is not my time. i have a commitment to new jersey that i simply will not
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abandon. >> reporter: now, christie says he was tempted to run and did have the support of his wife, but he just couldn't see himself abandoning the state of new jersey after just 20 months of governor. a lot of implications which we'll talk about during the course of the show. including where his say porters a supporters are going to go. >> who gets the money they were promising? and came up from the dive and said, where's the boat? a charter boat ditched them. so how did they get back to shore? plus unions join the wall street protest. is it about benefits and work rules? what exactly now is the message of the occupied wall street movement, and does it have new heft? it's 11 past the hour. and a choice. take advil now and maybe up to four in a day. or choose aleve and two pills for a day free of pain.
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chase sapphire preferred. a card of a different color. apply now at chasesapphire.com/preferred [♪...] >> male announcer: now, for a limited time, your companion flies free, plus save up to 65%. call 1-800-sandals. conditions apply. welcomes back to "american morning." they came up from the dive and their boat was gone. two scuba divers lucky to be
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alive after the boat left them at sea. they hung on to a buoy until a nearby boat spotted them. >> i wasn't going to give up. we managed to find a buoy. that way if somebody came to look for us, we would be in one spot. there's a famous movie scene of people left in the ocean and it doesn't end well. >> off the coast of miami. the boep's captain told the "miami herald" he's happy everyone was okay. it's not clear how they lost track of the divers. >> supposed to count heads. >> when i'm diving i have 0 write my name -- >> you're there and they check. you don't move off. >> movies were made about that. >> true. very scary. very scary. rob marciano in the extreme weather center. good morning, rob. >> good morning, rob. it you're diving off the east coast today, things are a little bit more tranquil, although chilly.
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temperatures are cooling off and rain is moving out, finally, across the northeast. the stubborn weather pattern that created the unsettled weather conditions for really two week, it's not so cool and showery. from boston to new york and philly, looking good. north of boston, peabody through essex and middlesex county, showed you radar yesterday. anywhere from three to five inches of rainfall in a couple hours. the end result. a lot of this rainfall moved up in through parts of new hampshire. seeing rain and mountain snow out west. a very powerful storm system heading into not only the pacific northwest but california prop and higher elevation snow is happening here. winter storm warnings poechted for the sierras back through parts of nevada and the wasatch of utah to see a foot to a foot and a half of snow. above the 8,000 foot mark. an early start to the winter season.
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aspen just peaking the color. temperatures way up there. south dakota yesterday, up and over 90. 86, high expected today in minneapolis. there's your indian summer. 17 degr 71 degrees, dry in new york city. guys, back to you. >> thank you, rob. this morning the wall street protesters geared up for what they claim will be their biggest move yet. expected to march. it's growing to include community groups, teachers and now unions. susan candiotti joins us now live. susan, good morning. >> reporter: christine, at this hour, as you can see behind me, not surprisingly, all the protesters are asleep, under tarps, and sleeping bags. they've set up mattresses here and they've got food lines set up for later. that much hasn't changed, what is changing about today is that, yes, they have another march, but they're expecting far more people here. why? because for the first time
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having additional support from tradition unions who say they will be marching with them this particular day. still, this protest, largely against corporate greed, as they put it, is also still leaderless, and without any particular goals in mind. nevertheless, they say that's the way they like it for now, as they continue to organize, and one of their biggest supporters is michael moore. documentary maker. here's how he sums up about what this protest is about today. >> i just said people have just had it. what's so beautiful about this, is that this is -- no one has organized this. there is no leader here. everyone is a leader. everyone is -- everyone's who's a participant in this, this is real true grass roots democracy. >> reporter: and the march today is, again, going to be near city hall and then it will end up back here in the financial
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district. how many people will come? well it's not clear how many they will attract but they are hoping for a lot more people than usual because of the large number of unions coming in to help them on this particular day. an early morning hour, but one guy that's going to do a lot more business than usual. a lot of these food vendors, a lot of them line up to help these people out throughout the day. christine, back to you. >> there you go. susan candiotti. a little capitalism is there. i don't know if anti-capitalism is part of this, but they are dedicated. i've seen dozen of protests never one that's lasted this long or slept under the tarp. >> no question, and also somewhat unfocus. getting help from other people. >> that's the topic on "talk back." one of the big questions, could occupied wall street be the dawn of a liberal tea party?
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ever since the dawn of the tea party, activists have yearned for a revolution of their own. example, michael moore, hungry for a mass movement. how better to get that than raling against wall street. >> this is the end result of these bankers overplaying their hand. they were already filthy rich, but filthy rich wasn't enough. >> moore is lending his celebrity to the movement, and paying to help protesters expand the use of social media with the help of twitter and facebook, the movement spread to other cities. hundreds arrested here in new york city. though we see them dressed like zombies and often with confusing messages, often attracting powerful allies including a half dozen unions who will march on city hall in new york today. when you combine clout, money and anger with the powers that be, sounds like the start of something, although protesters don't see themselves at political animals.
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>> we don't want to be you know, a left political group. we don't want to be a political group at all. we want to be a group that calls for activism. ideally, if this continues to grow, more people get involved, suddenly people will have the same power that, you know, lobbyists have. >> heads up, wall street. even fox news dotcom says it could be more than a loony protest movement from the left. the "talk back" question of the day -- could occupy wall street be the dawn of a new tea party? facebook.com/americanmorning. facebook.com/americanmorning. i'll read your comments later this hour. coming up on "american morning," a real thorn in the side of rick perry. who is this milwaukee man who spent four years tangling with the texas governor trying to get limb to hand over his office e-mails. it's a very, very interesting story. we'll bring it to you on the other side of the break. we're making tomorrows like clockwork. ♪
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25 minutes after the hour. welcome back. "minding your business." right now u.s. stock futures are trading higher ahead of the opening bell, and nearly a 400-point swing on wall street helped bring the s&p back from the brink of entering a bear market yesterday. the rally fuelled in part by europe's new efforts to prevent a global banking crisis, but a global recession can't be ruled out next year. that's the new warning from the international monetary fund. the group is also urging europe this morning to boost stimulus spending. in another example of the tough financial conditions in europe, italy was downgraded by the credit rating agency moody's. despite the drop in rating, moody's reported italy the risk of default remains remote. new york city and the state attorney general are suing bank of mork mellon for fraud claiming they acquired nearly $2 billion from the city's police, fire and teachers funds over the course of a decade.
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victims of bernie madoff getting their first checks today. the man in charge of recovering the funds an estimated $312 million will be distributed to investors representing less than 5 cents on the dollar, but irving piccard says more money will eventually be returned. and apple unveiling the new iphone 4-s. it's faster, a new feature allowing user to ask the phone questions and get answers. it goes on sale in nine days at sprint, verizon and at&t stores. "american morning" will be back right after the break. ♪ a refrigerator has never been hacked. an online virus has never attacked a corkboard. ♪ give your customers the added feeling of security a printed statement or receipt provides...
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welcome back to "american morning." good morning, everyone. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time for your top stories. amanda knox back home in seattle after spending four years in an italian prison. her plane touched down last night shortly after 8:00 p.m. eastern. 30 hours after a jury overturned her murder conviction. knox appeared overwhelmed and tearfully thanked everyone who supported her family. you're looking at live pictures as thousands protest in greece. striking against a new wave of tax hikes pension cuts and layoffs. the cuts are needed to avoid bankruptcy. a disaster in new york city. a helicopter plunging into new york's east river killing a tourist and injury three others,
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one seriously. the helicopter appeared to be have the trouble before the crash. the ntsb is now investigating. joining us, an expert and helicopter pilot, well known for his eyes in the skies. welcome. thank you for being with us this morning. >> good morning. >> as we're trying to make sense why this helicopter went down. we're hearing the helicopter spun around as it crashed. does that sound to you like a specific type of mechanical problem? >> indeed it does. it sounds like a loss of tail rotor effectiveness or a loss of the tail rotor which would cause the aircraft to spin around, as been described by witnesses. >> so that certain type of mechanical accident oh kir ccur anything the pilot could have done? >> that aircraft could have been landed safely and this whole disaster avoided. >> we understand that the person who died in this crash was
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trapped inside the cabin of the helicopter. of course, the helicopter landed in the water upside-down. is there any way to get out of a helicopter as it does that? i mean, are there safety precautions put into place? >> yeah. if i can describe what the training that we go through. military training or civilian training. intense training. you go over all of these emergency procedures. for example, losing your tail rotor and spinning around, there is an easy fix for that, using collective cyclic controls that control the aircraft. you use them to gain air speed, as about 50, 60 knots are offload the tail rotor, the fin in the back offloads that, you're able to fly straight and level, you fly to a airport where there's a large field or pavement area, and you slow down at about five feet, you roll off the power. you lose the torque. you stop spinning and you do a
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hovering auto. it's a simple procedure. so that is number one. that's the number one mistake that was made. number two, we see the pilot hanging on the skids screaming out to people onshore. there's three people trapped inside. well, he's there. he's familiar with that aircraft. you can get down, unlatch that door and unlatch seat belts. so -- that's another error. the pilot lost his head. so what we're really talking about is a lack of proper intense training, and that's something that pilots need to do on a regular basis. it's expensive, but as you can see in this particular incident, it's necessary. >> of course, the ntsb is still investigating this crash. we don't exactly know what made that helicopter go down. so this is on conjecture at this point, but we hear you. you know this pilot, don't you? he was an experienced guy? >> i've met him. he's been around for a long time flying tours. he's been doing it, best i know,
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since 2007, 2008. so he has a lot of experience, a lot of experience flying in the new york area. however, it's the emergency training that's really required. this was a terrible accident, and it looks like it's mechanical in nature. how, the training that we get really works through these emergency procedures. it's really -- you've got to be on top of your game. the fact that the aircraft didn't have floats is another factor. had it had floats, the aircraft could have stayed above water allowing emergency workers to get to the victims sooner. >> what do you mean by "floats"? >> aircraft that fly over the water, generally you want emergency floatation devices. what i'm talking about on the skids, there are these tubes, which are -- you can't really tell that they're floats, but when the pilot hits an emergency trigger, these huge floats pop out allowing the aircraft to stay upright on top of the surface of the water. just like big balloons. >> ah. and you didn't see those.
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i peemean, the helicopter -- >> they weren't there. >> oh, they weren't there. simply weren't there. >> if you want to the go back to the videotape you have, check to see if the blades are still there. one was there. i couldn't tell from the video, but there are signs and symptoms, you know, that you can look at and get a good handle about what happened. >> right. >> but, really, we're talking about a loss of control of the aircraft by the pilot. that's what happened here. that's -- 10,000 hours of flying, emergency procedures, doing a number of rescues, that's what i see. >> appreciate you joining us. >> anytime. someone is watching rick perry carefully these days and it's not mitt romney. john washburn, a private citizen tangling with the texas governor for the better part of four years. he thinks that rick perry is trying to keep too many secrets. a very interesting story, and our ed lavandera joins us live from atlanta with the story. ed?
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>> reporter: good morning, ali. this is actually one of the more interesting political dramas that has followed governor rick perry in texas over the last few years. one man's quest to open up the governor's e-mails. to find the man whose become an unlikely thorn in the side of rick perry, drive more than 1,200 miles from the texas governor's mansion to milwaukee, wisconsin and meet john washburn. washburn is a computer programmer, open records advocate, self-described ron paul republican be and the lead character in a battle over forcing rick perry to save thousands of government e-mails. >> doesn't like the idea of people looking over his shoulder, seeing where he's going, what he's doing. the whole idea is you watch people in the government. >> reporter: four years ago he watched his staff destroy e-mails after seven days saying this is an unusually short time. so from his home computer, washburn create add program that
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sent automated open records requests to the governor's office every four days. >> this is the -- >> reporter: all the back and forth it too just to get those e-mails. >> yes. >> reporter: it was the price that perry's office charged that stunned washburn. >> $568 for four days of e-mails. >> reporter: what did you think? >> i laughed. i did. i laughed out loud the first time i saw it. >> reporter: did you ever come across a response like this? >> no. certainly not for this kind of money. >> reporter: it wouldn't be the first time he was shocked. rick perry defended his e-mail destruction policy like in this. he memorable interview. >> why not have them stay around longer. for the purpose of records? >> how long? >> i'm asking you. >> i'm telling you, it's seven days. >> do i get to pick?
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>> i think it ought to be 30 days. >> i don't. >> and that's the end of the conversation? >> reporter: governor perry didn't want state employees organizing open records requests for people going on fishing escapad escapades. >> the most obstruction of the by far. no one in his league in that regard. >> reporter: after announcing he was running for president, john washburn fired up the open records against. the latest bill just sent. it's how much now? >> $2,300. >> reporter: for four days of e-mails? >> correct. >> reporter: if he ever want to see them all it will add up to more than $10,000 for e-mails. a heavy price, but john washburn says it's the principle of his battle that's priceless. ali, interesting is the governor's office says they're following the rules in place and following the rules currently in place in texas when it comes to retaining these e-mail records.
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weren't of the things the governor's office has to do is either print off the e-mails that need to be saved, that fall under open records situations. and they say those e-mails are printed off and saved accordingly. of course, john washburn in many other open record advocates simply do not believe this is going on. really no way to prove this unless someone's able to pony up that money. john washburn doesn't have the money to keep paying for the open records request. we'll see how it pans out. >> is there something he believes he's going to find if somebody were to pay for those records? >> reporter: we don't know what's there or what could be there. no way to know if there's a smoking gun in the e-mail. he's done almost 20. he did this back in 2007, there was a story emerging from the e-mails they got about state cuts in funding for foster care homes and they'd found in the e-mails there were stories of state employees talking about foster care children sleeping in state offices. so a story that was told simply
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because of the e-mails that he requested. >> ed, very interesting story. thanks for joining us with it. >> reporter: you got it. still to come on "american morning," restoring the greatness of america. what will it take for a new approach in fitness in government? and talking about greece. how dangerous europe's problems or, perhaps for the u.s. it's 40 amp the hour. live pictures of the protests against salary cuts, layoffs -- 40 minutes past. we'll be back. ♪ ♪ kingdoms and queens ♪ they all bow down to you ♪ ♪ branches and ranch hands ♪ are bowin', too ♪ and i've taken off... [ man ] we could have gone a more traditional route... but it wouldn't have been nearly as memorable.
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welcome back to "american morning." you're looking at live pictures now of thousands of people protesting on the streets of greece. part of a 24-hour strike against a new wave of salary and pension cuts, tax hikes, layoffs. the government says the cuts are needed to avoid bankruptcy. now, the u.s., of course, is no greece, you know what? we're talking about public sector belt tightening as well and things have gotten tough for the average american. unemployment high, home prices down, 401(k)s crushed and our government struggling to
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respond. a new book out how to turn the country around. "the price of civilization." jeffrey sachs. welcome. >> thanks for having me. >> you talk about civic virtue and the importance of restoring civic virtue and the people, elites, need to demonstrate this. does that mean very rich people maybe need to pay more taxes? may companies shouldn't be charging me to use my own money, the banks, for example? what are the things they need to do? >> the people at the very top have run april wway with the pr this country. over the last 30 years those with a lot of capital were able to make good on ta, and those who were competing against foreign competition started to suffer. then our government got taken over more and more by powerful lobbies, tax cuts were cut for the top, and social services cut
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at the bottom, and the income and wealth gap rose dramatically in this country. that's not civic virtue, when the people at the top say we want more, more, more. when you have a political party, unfortunately, the republicans, whose only motto these days seems to be give even more benefits to the corporations and to the rich, and the democrats, they're pretty much divided. going along with it, because the rich also pay their campaign contributions. so i don't see this as a very virtuous situation right now, and what's also alarming is, how much criminality there has been among our leading companies. >> criminality? >> criminality. the banks breaking financial laws. banks now paying fines to the securities and exchange commission. people going to jail for insider trading. what happened on wall street over the last ten years was not just bad behavior. it was illegal behavior as well.
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that's why people occupying wall street, another movement gaining attention all over the country vts a movement we're watching in the streets of greece. you can see the live pictures this morning. what is happening in europe right now and how dangerous? i use the word dangerous on purpose. how dangerous are europe's problems for the united states? for the american banking system and for the american economy? >> we have a crisis on both sides of the atlantic. this is almost unprecedented since the great depression, that the u.s. is in crisis and western europe is in crisis. in europe, there's a big divide. in the north of europe, places like sweden, denmark, netherlands, germany, things are pretty good. in the south of europe, especially greece, italy, portugal, spain, the crisis is very tough. and so there's a big division with europe, and the question for europe is, can they get together and actually cooperate enough to get out of the crisis? it's the samish u we face in this country. can the rich and those struggling get together and cooperate finally rather than the rich trying to run away with
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everything and the poor just left holding the bag for all this bad behavior on wall street. >> let me give you a couple warnings, if you will. the executive director of the imf says recession in 2012 can't be ruled out. ben bernanke, chairman of the federal reserve says the economy is close to faltering, and he yesterday told the joint economic committee, ben bernanke did, he's kurned about sluggish jobs growth. it's just not moving forward well enough. are we at risk of a double dip recession in the united states? another recession in the united states? and maybe around the world? >> we are at risk right now, and unfortunately, the plans of this administration have been short-term stimulus plans, give another jolt to the economy. not longer term reform. >> you're critical of all leadership? of republican, also of this white house? >> basically the political system got taken over by corporate lobbies. the rich are benefiting. everybody else is suffering and neither party is giving a proper
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long-term answer. they don't want to go against their campaign contributors. that's the biggest problem. >> wasn't everybody in on it, though? as the housing market was booming, stock market be booming, this is a 25-year in the making -- >> great point. >> unholy alliance where everyone was making money, but at its core, the numbers were showing it was harder to stay, stand still, if you were middle class or below? >> exactly. where were the grow notes in all of this? we know that the federal reserve was pumping in liquidity as wall street was going for that subprime housing bubble, and the regulators weren't watching. the bankers were making enormous amounts of money. of course, taking home tens of thousands in bonuses. not just salaries but bonuses and people felt their housing prices were up so their net worth was getting bigger. of course, that was all the bubble, the illusion, but i really do blame those at the top most. because a lot of them knew what
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was going on. they were gaming the system. they wanted those quick profits and they walked away, to this point still, with huge wealth and huge income, and we have to get together as a society again with sacrifices at the top finally to help make good for everybody. if we don't do that we're just pulling ourselves apart. >> there could be sacrifices for everyone. you're seeing that on the streets of greece. hope we don't see that there. a good point about wall street. showing displeasure. the book is called "the price of civilization." nice to see you again. 49 past the hour. be right back. when an investment lacks discipline, it's never this obvious. introducing investment discipline etfs from russell. visit russelletfs.com r a prospectus, containing the investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses and other information.
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51 past the hour. what you need to know to start your hour -- amanda knox is home. a jury overturned her murder in italy, she broke down, thanking friends and supporters for believing in her. protesting a new wave of salary and pension cuts, tax cuts and layoffs. right here. the government says cuts are needed to avoid bankruptcy. 18 people died from eating cantaloupe tainted with listeria. at least 100 listeria cases in 20 states. they expect the number to grow. another round of evacuations in texas this morning pap wildfire burned 1,000 acres. comes a month after another fire destroyed 1,500 homes.
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west virginia's acting governor is acting no more. democrat earl ray tomlin won a full term to replace former governor now senator joe manchin. he narrowly beat bill maloney in yesterday's special election. and national cathedral opens in less than five weeks. closed since early august. the total restoration will take years and cost in the tens of millions of dollars. that is the news you need to start your day. "american morning" is back right after this.
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just about seven minutes
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before the top of the hour. the question of the day, could occupy wall street be the dawn of a new liberal tea party? it's not the dawn of a liberal tea party, the dawn of america. finally waking up and smelling what its elected official on both sides are shoveling. from amy, yeah if they believed in the constitution. those people just don't want to go back to work and i bet it won't be long until they throw trash everywhere and start to destroy the place. a riot is pending. that's a dark view of the wall industry protests. i hope a riot doesn't break out, amy. from aaron, it's people from all walks of life protesting the plutocracy that's become our government. i wish it was the dawn of a labor or people's party. this from autumn, no, the left is far too unorganized and not sure what they're fighting for. maybe if they had a cool name or something like the pot party. >> had to throw in a funny. >> i like the concept of a cool name.
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>> yeah. >> you know, tea party was effective. >> occupy wall street isn't cool? >> takes too much time on a twitter hash tag. >> people tweeting, why does he blame the rich? it's not just about blaming the rich. it's a very interesting polarization happen right now about what happened here in america, and who's to blame for it, and it comes along clear ideological lines. >> in the middle of class wear faire. to me, no doubt about that. keep the comments coming. facebook.com/americanmorning. we'll read more later on the show. coming up next, amanda knox back on american soil shedding tears of joy. more on what her first full day back in the u.s. is going to be like as a free woman. it's 55 minutes after the hour. ch day was fueled by thorough preparation for events to come. well somewhere along the way, emily went right on living. but you see, with the help of her raymond james financial advisor, she had planned for every eventuality.
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home. it is amanda knox's first full day back with her family in the u.s. her first emotional words and the questions she left behind. a deadly chopper crash in new york city. amazing pictures of east river rescues. we're talking to first
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responders and renewed questions about safety after another sightseeing trip ends in tragedy. the first thing you kind of think about is there's a famous movie about divers that get left in the middle of the ocean. >> scuba divers ditched left paddling for their lives. find out who finally picked them up. and greece grinds to a halt. live pictures from the streets of athens. more on the growing outrage over tax hikes and pay cuts on this "american morning." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com and good morning to you. it is wednesday, october 5th. time to get up. i know -- welcome to "american morning." >> you're late! i felt the same way this morning. >> all right. up first, amanda knox back on american soil, and what a homecoming it was. knox touched down in seattle shortly after 8:00 p.m. eastern last night. she was crying, appeared overwhelmed. thanked everyone who supported her during her four-year ordeal
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in that italian prison. drew griffin joining us live from seattle. drew, you know the story better than anyone else. this family must be just so pleased she is finally home? >> reporter: you could just see the relief on their faces before anybody spoke a single word as they came out. the mother, the father, the sister, the two stepsisters, uhl relieved. none more relieved and emotional than amanda knox, who, by the way, christine, had to be reminded just before she went up to the podium, speak in english. >> i'm really overwhelmed right now. >> reporter: after spending four years in an italian prison, amanda knox could hardly believe she was back home in seattle. >> i was looking down from the airplane, and it seemed like everything wasn't real. >> reporter: arriving tuesday night, knox was greeted by cheering supporters at the airport. and surrounded by her family. she struggled to hold back tears as she addressed the crowd. >> what's important for me to say is just, thank you, to
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everyone who's believed in me, who's defended me. who's supported my family. >> reporter: her parents joined her in thanking all the supporters. >> it's because of the letters and the calls and just amazing support that we've received from people all over the world. especially here in seattle that we've been able to endire and we've been able to, you know, make sure amanda had the support she needed. >> reporter: convicted in 2009 of killing her roommate, meredith kercher and sentenced to 26 years in prison, an appeals court in italy overturned her conviction monday setting her free. her u.s. attorney applauded the ruling. >> this decision unmistakably announces to the world that amanda knox was wrongly convicted and that she was not, absolutely not, responsible for the tragic loss of meredith kercher. >> reporter: while celebrations are under way for amanda knox,
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for her, family is the priority. >> i just want my family -- my family's the most important thing with me right now and i just want to go and be with them, so, thank you for being there for me. >> reporter: the family spokesperson asked all the people in the media to respect the knox family privacy. the knox family has said they want to quote/unquote, go dark for about six weeks to decide what to do next. christine, the big question, we all want to know what is next in amanda's life? somewhere a house in seattle. one question today of amanda knox. what do you want for breakfast? >> the kercher family this morning, they're accepting this decision? right? they're hurt but accepting this decision? >> reporter: i think they're coming to grips that the court really took a deep look at evidence and decided that, you know what? that first prosecution looks like it was wrong. maybe they were led astray bip
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the prosecutors and the police in perugia and are willing to accept what has happened now. >> drew griffin, thanks for all your reporting on this story over the months. this morning federal investigators are on the scene of a deadly helicopter crash in new york city. the helicopter with four tour t tourists and the pilot onboard plunged into the east river seconds after takeoff yesterday afternoon. three are the passengers rescued, a fourth found dead in the sunken wreckage witnesses were stunned. >> the thing went up and down. i thought i would see people bobbing up and down in the water. nothing. just those two struts pointing towards queens. then they popped up. i honestly think they went down and tried to rescue the others and, look, they're -- >> investigators will now try to determine what went so horribly wrong? joining us on the scene on the east side of manhattan, a board
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member with the national transportation safety board. mark, thank you for joining us this morning. investigators have been working since they arrived yesterday to try and find out what happened. what have you learned so far? >> it's really in the early stages of the investigation. we were fortunate to have two people on scene very shortly after the accident. full team arrived today. really, the full activities going on today, we have learned and been able to confirm this was not an air tour operation. it was not a revenue operation or a flight. this was a private aircraft, a private flight. >> let me ask you, and i know -- i know the ntsb and part of why the ntsb does a great job. you don't go on preconceived notions what happened. here's the reporting we've heard, though. that the helicopter had problems immediately after takeoff. spun around before it crashed into the river. does that give you a starting point with looking at the types of problems that you might be focusing on? are there things that are obvious when this kind of a crash happens?
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>> thank you. you're right's we won't speculate. we're going to collect the factual information. we're fortunate in this situation that the aircraft is mostly intact. so we'll be looking at the wreckage. ality the pilot survived. another source of information critical for us. all important aspects that we're just getting started today looking at all the facts. >> obviously that's very helpful, that the pilot will be able to cooperate in this and tell you what he experienced. a lot of the helicopter was taken out of the water, recovered from the water, but there were some pieces missing, like the main rotor. i assume they're diving for that, will get that out and those kind of things become very important to the investigation? >> that's part of today's activity. so our investigators are planning to go to brooklyn, a secure facility, where the wreckage is currently stored. they're going to be able to look at the engines, rotors, all aspects to understand what kind of shape it's in right now. >> a member of congress that represents the east side said in the last three year, 28
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helicopter accidents in new york. we don't have those numbers. haven't been able to add up to 28. the bottom line a number of them. we've obviously covered them over the last few years. is there some sense that there have been an unnatural number of helicopter accidents? and how do you see that as a national trend? >> the ntsb is going to focus not only on what happened but why, because our mission really is to determine why so we can issue safety recommendations so it doesn't happen again. we're going to focus on this investigation but in that context look for similar accidents that occurred. if we see something sthats an issue now we will issue urgent recommendations to try and address that. >> it is very early, as you say, in the investigation. you do have good information to work with. mark, we'll follow the investigation closely and get the information, the news out, as you say, if there are recommendations out to the public as soon as possible. mark rosekind, board member with
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the ntsb joining us from the crash site on the east side of manhattan. thank you, mark. happening now in greece, parts of greece grinding to a halt this morning as thousands of people take to the streets. you're looking at live pictures from athens where a 24-hour strike is under wway. grounding flights, closing schools and tourist attractions. the anger is directed at a host of new tax increases and spending cuts. our zain verjee is live in london with more. zain, the whole point, for greece to secure a bailout from the european union, it has to start living within its means meaning paycuts for people in public unions, higher taxes for people of all walks of life. a higher retirement age and all of this is still making the greek public very, very angry. isn't it? >> reporter: they are hopping mad. 10,000 people there, more have gathered in the square there in athens.
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they're really furious basically saying this is just going to make thek poorer, all these austerity cuts and it's going to drive greece into a deeper recession. the riot police are out there in full gear. there were clashes between them and a small group of protesters. they've also been fired tear gas. students and teachers are mostly comprised of a lot of the people here out on the streets, but, yeah. you've got, like, air traffic controllers that have walked off the job. ferries aren't working. state schools shut down, even hospitals shut down except for emergency services. the government, though, guys, as you know, is between the acropolis and a hard place here. they just need it avoid bankruptcy. so they just have to cut, cut, cut. the imf and the european union are basically looking at greece's finances and they need to just do a check on them before releasing anymore money so greece can pay its bills. but this is the scene on the streets of athens right now and this isn't just about athens. this reverberates around globe markets. they've been in turmoil because
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of fears greece may default on its debt. most of which, you know, held by european banks, in countries like france, germany and belgium are exposed to this. we'll see what happens. no the ma matter how much they protest, greece has to make the cuts. >> and people are upset what's going to happen to their living standards. except if there is an unmanageable default, or they can't qualify for the bailout loan, the living standards will be even worse. stuck between a rock and hard place. very nice turn of phrase, zain. thank you very much, zain verjee in london. at the michael jackson death trial, the world is getting a very intimate look at the private life of dr. conrad murray. prosecutors calling three women to the stand trying to prove that the king of pop's personal physician was more concerned with his love life than with jackson. weren't of those women, a houston waitress, testified she was on the phone with the cardiologist when he suddenly realized jackson had stopped
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breathing. tensions heating up over security council resolution aimed at the syrian regime for its bloody crackdown on protesters. yesterday russia vetoed this. susan rice stood up after the vote and walk out of the council chambers when syria's ambassador began blasting u.s. policy in the middle east. he spent months insists he would not run for president. everybody thought he would run for president. yesterday afternoon in this tension-filled press conference, he said -- he's not running for president. the new jersey governor ended all of the speculation yesterday announcing he will not seek the president any 2012 saying, this is not my time. the statement sent a chill try countless republican senators. >> now is not my time. i have a commitment to new jersey that i simply will not abandon. >> christie says he was tempted to run and had the support of his wife, whom you see there, but he couldn't see himself abandoning the state of new
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jersey after just 20 months as governor. at least that's what he said. maybe he couldn't see himself winning the presidency or maybe as we often like to say said to himself, why would anybody actually want to be the president of the united states right now? >> that's what i always say. nobody would want to inherit the mess this country is in. >> i'm sure there have been times when it's the best job mountain world to be the president of the united states. i'm not sure this is it. >> he said no, no, no way before this and republican donors and supporters would not accept that he was not going to do it. >> right. >> he had voices in his ear telling him -- >> one key supporter, franklin, has moved off. he's moved along. soon as this thing was announced, he moved on and said he's supporting mitt romney and other of those donors and apparently mitt romney's people spent the afternoon yesterday -- >> doing a happy dance? >> well, waiting for happy dancing calling the bunglers, people raising money for christie and get them on with romney saying we are now your best chance. come and join us.
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>> nice trivia aside, when the speech yesterday christie gave, said no 17 times. there you go. >> on the record as "no." she just want add mega millions ticket. that's all she wanted. the clerk at the shell food mart in decatur, georgia, mistakenly sold her a powerball ticket, too. she's not complaining. not at all. kathy scruggs -- >> hit the powerball jackpot. a cools 25ds million. didn't want that ticket. the 44-year-old scruggs is has been out of work since last spring. plans to buy a car, travel, help occupy other members of her family. >> good for her. >> wow. >> all we ever heard about, the people who didn't play that week, didn't put into the pool. >> someone stole their ticket. >> haven't heard this. >> i give that clerk a kiss and $50,000. >> goodness me. that is a great, great story. wow. >> anyway, congratulations, ms. scruggs. spend it, have a good time, but save a lot if you can.
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>> invest some of it. tune into christine's show, 9:30 a.m., "your bottom line," and "your $$$$$" also saturday and sunday. coming up ahead on "american morning," watch during the commercial break for whatever. they came up from a dive and said, where's my boat? two divers stranded off the florida coast after they say a charter boat ditched them. how did they get back to shore? we'll tell you on the other side. a race car driver trapped in his burning car and running out of time. wait until you hear who pulled him to safety with just seconds to spare. our 4 new rich & hearty soups really have people talking... [ guy ] ring, ring. hold on a sec... progresso... i love your new loaded potato with bacon.
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new this morning -- they came up from a dive, and the dive boat was gone. two scuba divers lucky to be alive this morning after they say a charter boat left them stranded at sea. forced to tread water more than two hours and held on to a buoy until a nearby yacht spotted
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them. >> i wasn't going to give up. we managed to find a buoy. were hanging on to that. if somebody came to look for us, we'd be in one spot. there's a famous movie as divers that get left in the middle of the ocean that doesn't end very well. >> happened near miami. >> it's driving me crazy, the name of that movie? >> i think it's called -- "open water." >> show up, no boat. >> anyway, a boat owned by r.j. ventures. the owner said he's happy everybody is okay. >> i bet he s. so is the insurance company. when i've gone on diving companies, you check out with your own signature. >> doesn't make sense. something that just shouldn't happen and that's one of them. >> i'm glad you remembered the name of that movie. >> the guys in the crew yelling t. you're so honest. race car drivers, being called a hero. in a stock car on saturday when
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a fellow competitor terry muskrat crashed and became caught in his car. he was running out of time, it looked like, he stopped his car in the middle of the race, jumped out and pulled that driver to safety. it was personal for hughes. his father was also a race car driver and badly burned in a similar crash in 1991. he said if he ever saw that happen again, he would stop whatever he was doing and run to the rescue and he did. >> got a chance to actually do it. fantastic. >> absolutely. carol, i'll read the next story. three baseball teams had a chance to advance last night. only one did. the texas rangers, thanks to three home runs by herd baseman adrian beltre, they won the game 4-3. won the series three games to one knocking the tampa bay rays out. take a look at this. during one of those adrian beltre home run, a cameraman saw him, got a little tangled up. >> oh, no. >> look at this. trips and faums trafalls traili
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runner down the baseline. >> get out of the way! >> why do we laugh when people fall? >> at baseball game, the best stuff to watch. all right, meantime -- this is it. not distracting carol anymore. gong to the bronx. >> this isn't coffee. something quite stronger. >> a box of tissues. >> playing a deciding game five. carol wasn't here yesterday when we kept reading, yankees, last chance not getting knocked out. yankees won the game -- won game four last night 10-1 last night. were they playing -- an actual team or actually just playing the tigers? >> that's just mean! >> catch this -- check this out. game-saving catch in the sixth. >> who do you have to thank for this, by the way? the detroit tigers. >> that is true. all right. that means there's a game five
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tomorrow night. >> right. >> carol. i'm hoping that you and christine are going to get good rest tomorrow night to be here bright and early on friday morning. >> ali's made me cry. take it away. >> tell you what, ali's going to make me cry with joy if he can get me a ticket to the game. i'll be up there in a heartbeat. i'm taking friday off. already arranged for that. either reynolds or jacqui will be in here. i'll be watching the entire game. carol, feel free to wear your yankees' garb friday morning, even if i'm not here. either friday morning or monday morning. >> i got your boston outfit ready to go, baby. >> yeah. you know, if i wear -- i do end up wearing the boston, i'll do nothing but ridicule boston and people will get upset. i don't want to do that. >> they're nasty. >> rob is the -- >> he represents everybody. >> i don't want to upset anybody. actually let's go to boston. their baseball season ended, what? seems like a month ago.
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we don't have the video. torrential rains yesterday. we showed them to you. middlesex and suffix county, yesterday. finally we've broken the unsettled weather. look at west coast. getting slammed. it looks more like a november or december event here, with a powerful jet stream. all of this access spiraling into the sierra nevada. winter storm posted, another one. maybe a foot, a foot and a half across utah and through parts of the colorado rockies. dry, windy and warm across the plains. a good thing, a lot of resources left overand able to fight the fires. warm and windy conditions. temperatures in the upper plains, 86 in minneapolis. some spots hit over 90 degrees.
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feels like summer back when boston was still playing. good luck, everybody. it's the playoffs and that's the way it goes. >> the twitter board will go nuts. for everything else we've been complaining about, we're going to hear about, talking about the red sox. a lot of fights this morning. >> now's your chance to "talk back" on one of the big stories of the day. the question this morning, could occupied wall street be the dawn of a liberal tea party? ever since the dawn of the tea party, liberal activists geared up for a revolution of their own. example, michael moore, hungry for a mass movement. how better to get that going than raling against wall street. >> this is the end result, these bankers overplaying their hand. they were already filthy rich, but filthy rich wasn't enough. >> moore is lending his celebrity to the movement and paying to help protesters expand the use of social media with the help of twitter and facebook, the movement has spread to other cities. hundreds have been arrested. though we see many of them dressed like zombies and often
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with confusing messages, these protesters are also attracting powerful allies including a half dozen unions who will march on new york city hall today. so when you combine clout, money and anger with the powers that be, kind of sounds like the start of something. although protesters don't see themselves as political animals. >> we don't want to be, you know, a left political group. we don't want to be a political group at all. we want to be, you know, a group that calls for activism. ideally, if this continues to grow or people get involved, suddenly people will have the same power that, you know, lobbyists have. >> heads up, wall street. even foxnews.com says this could be more than another loony protest movement from the left. so the "talk back" question for you today -- could occupy wall street be the dawn of a liberal tea party? facebook.com/americanmorning. facebook.com/americanmorning. i'll read your comments later this hour.
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take a quick break and be back. ♪ [ multiple snds ng melodic tune ] ♪ [ malennounc ] at northrop grumman, makthworld a feplace. th's value performance. northr gruan.
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o0 welcome. kristin. kasey. come on in. kasey, kasey! kasey, what about the new edge drew you to it? the look of it. i love the sleek design. i like the rounded edges. what does the technology in your edge make you think of ford? it just makes me think that ford is in it to win it. ford is trying to get to the next level. you really have to make yourself stand out, and i think ford has done that. looking over there, how does your car look? is this my car? (laugh) (laugh)
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welcomes back to "american morning." "minding your business" right now. u.s. stock future, trading higher ahead of the opening bell and nearly 400-point swing on wall street helped bring the s&p back from a bear market yesterday. the rally fuelled in part by europe's new efforts to prevent a global banking crisis. a global recession, though, can't be ruled out next year. that's the new warning from the international monetary fund. the group is also urging europe this morning to boost stimulus spending. also new this morning, more evidence europe's financial crisis is widening. dexia, weren't ever the biggest banks in europe is on the verge
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of being dismantled meaning higher costs for u.s. cities who received cheap financing by this bank. and a lot of folks weren't impressed by the new iphone 4s. stocks closed. the new phone looks the same but is faster. a new voice command feature that can do everything from texting to taking notes. "american morning" will be right back after this break.
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30 minutes past the hour. welcome back to "american morning." happening now, thousands are protesting in greece. a 24-hour strike against a new wave of salary and pension cuts, tax hikes and layoffs. the government says the cuts are needed to avoid bankruptcy. the ntsb is beginning its investigation of a deadly helicopter crash in new york city. the chopper carrying four tourists and a pilot plunged into the east river just after takeoff. one of the passengers killed. earlier on "american morning" we spoke with the ntsb's mark
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rosekind. >> we're fortunate in this situation that the aircraft is mostly intact so we'll be looking at the wreckage. also the pilot survived. he's another source of information critical for us. all of these will be very important aspects that we're just getting started today looking at all of the facts. >> he says ntsb investigators will inspect the chopper wreckage today at a secure facility in brooklyn where it's now being stored. a ed deadly dust storm blamed for a series of car crashes north of tucson, arizona. police say drivers had zero visibility on interstate 10 when the storm kicked up yesterday afternoon. look at the pictures. at least 30 vehicles involved in the accidents. one person was killed. 14 others were injured. another round of evacuations in texas this morning pap wildfire already burned 1,000 acres. it come as month after another fire destroyed 1,500 homes in the town. and 30 hours after her murder conviction was overturned in italy amanda knox arrived
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home in seattle last night tearfully thanking everyone who believed in her during her four-year ordeal in prison. >> what's important for me to say is just thank you to everyone who's believed in me, who's defended me, who's supported my family. >> knox went on to say she just wants to spend time with her family now. >> and i guess her family, what, spent $1 million on this whole process? mortgaged their home to the hilt? we'll see if there's a book deal. what happens next to amanda knox? i'm sure we haven't seen the last. and someone's watching rick perry these days and it's not mitt romney. a private citizen trang tanglin the texas govern the past four year. he thinks the texas governor is keeping tooing secre many secre >> reporter: dating back to 2007 in texas. john washburn has become a
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relatively well-known name in texas circles because a guy from wisconsin who's been a thorn in his side, rick perry. to find the man who's become an unlikely thorn in the side of rick perry, drive more than 1,200 miles from the texas governor's mansion to milwaukee, wisconsin and meet john washburn. a self-described ron paul republican and the lead character in a battle over forcing rick perry to save thousands of government e-mails. >> he doesn't like the idea of people looking over his shoulder, seeing what he's doing, where he's gone, but the whole idea of american government is you don't trust people in power. you watch them. >> reporter: four years ago, washburn learned rick perry's staff destroys many of its e-mails after seven days. open records advocates say this is an unusually short time. from his home computer, washburn create add computer that sent automated open record requests to the governor's office every four days. >> this is --
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>> reporter: all the back and forths to get the e-mails? >> yes. >> reporter: this stunned washburn. >> $568 for four days of e-mails. >> reporter: what did you think? >> i laughed. i did. i laughed out loud the first time i saw. >> reporter: had you ever come across a response like this? >> no. certainly not for this kind of money. >> reporter: it wouldn't be the last time governor rick perry's office would shock john washburn. as word spread through texas of his fight, rick perry defended his e-mail destruction policy like in this memorable interview with the texas tribune website. >> why not have them stay around longer for the purpose of open records? >> how long? >> you tell me. >> i've asking you. i've said, seven days. >> okay. goorcher, do i get to pick? how about a month? >> no, you don't get to pick. >> i think it ought to be 30 days. >> okay. i don't. >> and that's the end of the conversation? >> reporter: governor perry went on to say he didn't want state employees wasting time
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organizing open records requests for people going on fishing escapades. >> obstructionist by far. no one in the league in that regard. >> president of the united states. >> reporter: after perry announced he's running for president, john washburn fired up the automated opens records request again. the governor's office just sent washburn the latest bill. >> reporter: the bill for that for in our four days is how much? >> $2,300. >> reporter: for four e-mails? >> correct. >> reporter: if he ever wants to see them all, it will add up to $ 210,000. a hefty price tag, but john washburn says it's the principle. in all, he's filed close to 20 open records request and only followed through and paid for one, one of the early batches in 2007. obviously, the price tag on these latest batches of e-mails is much too hefty for him. the governor's office say they
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are following the rules in place for some time in texas, and that they instruct their staff to properly save all e-mails and print them off if need be. not all e-mails are destroyed. many open records say the background in the past ten years, simply lost. >> ed lavandera, thanks so much. still ahead, protests on wall street showing widening appeal. is this the beginning of a real movement? it's 36 minutes past the hour.
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good morning, new york. sunny outside. 57 degrees pap beautiful day, actually. 70 degrees outside later today. isn't that gorgeous? >> sunny in new york? >> oh! >> like a big kiss from god. >> it is. >> women put, ali velshi. >> yes.
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>> and the fact that they won last night and -- >> stop that. ignore them. shall we? >> i had a feeling it wasn't the weather making you so happy. okay, ignore them and move on. at first glance many did not take the wall street protesters seriously. i mean, the movement started as a bunch of unemployed college kids. how comedian jon stewart summarized it. >> i guess that is what it looks like. also what bonnaroo looks like. to be fair. >> okay. they looked silly, but they have been protesting now for three weeks and the movement appears to be growing. it now includes community groups and unions. celebrities are even joining the cause. so what does it all mean? joining me to talk about that is michael kazon, professor of history at georgetown university. welcome. >> thank you. >> so you've just written a book about activist on the left. so when you look at this group on wall street, what does it say
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to you? >> it says there's a lot of people angry in this country about the damage banks and investment houses have done it the economy, and this is the first attempt by progressives, really, to generate grass roots mobilization, grass roots discontent to yell and express their unhappiness. >> it wasn't so long ago that the tea party was formed and everybody said that was a grass roots organization. remember how people dressed, revolutionary costumes. some brought weapons to political events and everybody saying, this is just a bunch of crazy people, but it turned out to be a very powerful political force. so, can you compare the two groups at all? >> the difference in the tea party and this wall street protest, the tea party from the first was well connected to republican party circles. to conservative business people, like the coke brothers.
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the first tea party groups, freedom works, run by dick armey, who's a former house majority leader. so the tea party was already connected, i think, into the republican party, almost from the beginning. whereas, these folks occupying wall street, both political parties and much closer to liberal democrats than conservative republicans. this in many ways is a true grass roots, pavement side of the movement -- i'm sorry? >> so the big difference with the tea party is it had money. money backing it, and it had a political force backing it as well, because even though the tea party doesn't like government so much, it knew it had to use government to evoke change. >> right. >> this group needs that big money backer, which could come, we don't know. what sdp. say to you that the unions, at least the local unions here in new york are joining the cause? might that be a sign that groups with money are starting to back
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these protesters? >> maybe. if you have a lot of numbers, you don't need quite it's a much money, and unions have actually been demonstrating on wall street since 2009, since the aig bailouts but not getting much attention, because you don't think the unions demonstrations anymore, think of young people having demonstrations. it shows that, i think, there's a lot of pent-up energy with working class america, as there is with sort of young college age america. we're doing something about the economy, and trying to regulate wall street. >> we've asked our viewers how they feel about these protesters on wall street, and many of them say, i know they seem unfocused, but at least they're out there and they're doing something. at least they're expressing anger, and people kind of enjoy seeing that these days, because there is a lot of anger and frustration out there in the country. if someone, like a strong
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leader, would become the voice of this movement, i guess i'll ask it to you this way -- who would that strong voice be who could focus these protesters and turn it into a real powerful movement? >> i'm not sure. no particular leader has emerged. but then there's no one leader in the tea party movement either. what really you need for this movement to grow is a much stronger sense of what they want, what changes they want, more regulation in corporations, whether they want unions to have an easier time organizing. this kind of thing. right now, what comes out in your reporting from folks and your reporting as well is a sense of tremendous unhappiness of what's going on. that's shared very widely. they need more coherence than leadership. nor clarity about what they're demand are, and where they want to go. >> michael kazin from georgetown university. author of "american dreamers:
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how the left changed the nation." >> well said. good conversation. as he pointed out, the tea party, a leader in congress, leader of various group, tea party express, but remarkable cohesion in their march. >> one message. they're focused. >> probably more than one. probably go it three, maybe even five, but right now, last alison kosik was saying, last time she was there, there were about 50. >> shorter workweek, anti-banks what were some of the other ones? so some ron paul supporters legalization of marijuana. made a lot of disparate, i would say left -- some left, but -- >> supporting ron paul. interesting. >> again what we're hearing from viewers, they understand that, and they think that's kind of strange, too, but the fact that these people have been out there for three weeks, in large numbers. >> yeah. >> that says something. at least somebody's doing something. >> that makes it different than the anarchists of the g-20
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meeting. the same sort of message but disappear. >> true. morning headlines coming up next, including why one company is trying to stop the iphone from hitting shelves. and $1,754,386, the "romans' numeral." it's money lost per gain. a hint. >> wow. think about that. >> 46 past the hour.
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it is 48 after the hour, the morning headlines. thousands protesting in greece, against a new wave of salary and pension cuts, tax hikes and layoffs. the government says the cuts are needed to avoid bankruptcy.
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u.s. stock futures pointing to a higher open despite a new warning from the international monetary fund a global recession can't be ruled out next year. samsung is taking legal action to try and block the new iphone 4 ass from going on sale. they've sued each other in nine countries in over 20 cases since april. the nba cancelled its entire preseason. nba commissioner david stern said a monday deadline to save the start of the regular season. citibank announcing it will charge mid-level account customerses 20ds a month if they don't keep at leasts 15ds,000 in their combined bank accounts. the bank blames fees on recent regulations saying they changed the economics of offering debit cards. johnny depp is making stupid money for the "pirate of caribbean" movies. not me saying it. johnny depp saying it. saying he's being overpaid and only doing the franchise for his
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kids. reportedly earned more than $300 million from the film. that's the news to start your day. "american morning" back right after the break. yet they're closing thousands of offices, slashing service, and want to lay off over 100,000 workers. the postal service is recording financial losses, but not for reasons you might think. the problem ? a burden no other agency or company bears. a 2006 law that drains 5 billion a year from post-office revenue while the postal service is forced to overpay billions more into federal accounts. congress created this problem, and congress can fix it.
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your nutritional needs can go up when you're on the road to recovery. proper nutrition can help you get back on your feet. three out of four doctors recommend the ensure brand for extra nutrition. ensure clinical strength has revigor and thirteen grams of protein to protect, preserve, and promote muscle health. and immune balance to help support your immune system. ensure clinical strength... helping you to bounce back. ensure! nutrition in charge! the number is $1,754,386 per
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game. that's how much money the nba will lose each canceled preseason game. this is according to commissioner david stern. a total of 114 preseason games that works out to $2 million lost for the nba. >> what is amazing about that. they can lose to afford that. that means they're making too much money. >> i worry about the staffs of some of these places and the businesses that go around them that now all of a sudden everything is stalled for them. >> parking guys, parking vendors, stuff like that. so, we'll continue to follow it for you. that's romans' numeral for today. 18 people have died from eating listeria tainted cantaloupe. at least 100 cases of listeria have been reported in 20 states. a colorado cantaloupe grower issued a recall last month.
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jensen farms. the number of listeria cases may continue to grow because it may take up to two months to develop. a new cdc study says there were more than 100 million drunk driving incidents last year. four out of five drivers were men. 85% of the incidents involved binge drinking. the states with the highest number of drivers under the influence, north dakota, nebraska, missouri and michigan. in the michael jackson trial, jurors and the entire world are getting a look into the personal life of dr. conrad murray. the king of pop's personal physician. prosecutors called three women to the stand trying to prove that dr. murray was more concerned with his love life than with his patient. one of those women, a houston waitress, testified she was on the phone with the cardiologist when he suddenly realized jackson stopped breathing. >> more about the powerful anesthetic, propofol. dr. sanjay gupta joins us in new york. you have been following this and
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i know you did a lot of work on propofol. what stands out in this testimony? >> just how much he was accumulating. in the first couple days, you heard he's trying to wean michael jackson off the propofol. look, he had been on propofol for a long time and this new doctor sin the pi doctor is in the picture and he's going to get him off the stuff. those two things didn't correlate. by the way, i also thought it was interesting just as a doc that you could get that much tof and have it delivered to a private residence in nevada it's not a controlled substance, which people don't realize. the fact that you mentioned that this waitress was on the phone with him and trying to establish at what point did conrad murray figure out that things have gone wrong. >> you said it's not a controlled substance and often those type of drugs that are prone to abuse. are there a lot of things that
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wouldn't be meant supfor somebo to be taking at their home. >> since 2009 we were talk about this because i never heard about this sort of thing. you do find out that it is sometimes abused, although rarely. that abuse often takes place in hospitals and is often by anesthesiologists who would give them selves a quick fix of this propofol. you get a little euphoria. if it's a small dose, a little euphoria and that's the attractiveness of it. the idea that it is abused outside the home and in some control fashion like this where doctors are prescribing it night after night. we found another anesthesiology from a couple years ago that used to tour with michael jackson. used to tour with michael jackson and the quote was, you know, he used to put him down at night and bring him up in the morning, which sort of fits with what dr. murray also -- >> like he's a robot or
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something. >> told dr. murray's girlfriend he would return at 9:00 at night and return in the morning because he would be with michael jackson. was he doing the same thing? >> he was ordering that much propofol, shouldn't some sort of red flag go up somewhere? >> carol, i think in the future it probably will. a campaign to make propofol a controlled substance, but a lot of substances that are not controlled that maybe you think should be. doctors order these things sometimes for clinices and for large medical practices and with the idea that it's going to be used for many patients, not just for one. >> you may not know. what an interesting story. >> propofol doesn't put you to sleep, as well. that's the other part of it. it's a general anesthetic inducer. the fact that michael jackson was continuously still tired makes perfect sense because he wasn't getting the sleep that makes you feel restored in the morning. >> sanjay, thanks. now, your chance to talk back on one of the big stories
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of the day. the question for you this morning, occupy wall street be the dawn of the liberal tea party? here are some of your responses. this is from mark. i think it could be. surprisingly, you don't see the difference between the two. they both have their roots and libertarian ideas and both see the root of the problem as corporatism. they just direct their anger in different directions. it's wall street and the government's fault. that's what corporatism is. >> the democrats need some kind of political rebirth. we all know these things start at the grassroots level. destroying our weakened economy, believe me, somebody has to stand up to the glass bully. this from roger, i think the country is so divided and angry and if things don't get better quickly, we'll face a revolution or civil war. in the past, i never thought this could be possible but after watching things to unravel and looking at the way we disrespect each other, i'm afraid we're closer than anyone realizes.
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this from nick, see what's happening in athens this morning, coming soon to a city near you. keep the comments coming. facebook.com/americanmorning. 57 minutes after the hour. top stories when we come back. so if i didn't know better i'd say you're having some sort of big tire sale. yes we are. yeah. how many tires does ford buy every year? over 3 million. you say you can beat any advertised price on tires? correct. anywhere? yes. like this price? yes. riously? yes what about this one? i'll beat it. this one? s we will. right, i only have one more question for you...this one? (laughing) yeah. get $100 rebate when you buy four tires. 100 bucks! only at your ford dealer. 3 million tires. 11 major brands, fiona's kind-of-nice. i don't know why you're not here.
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two of the most important are energy security and economic growth. north america actually has one of the largest oil reserves in the world. a large part of that is oil sands. this resource has the ability to create hundreds of thousands of jobs. at our kearl project in canada, we'll be able to produce these oil sands with the same emissions as many other oils and that's a huge breakthrough. that's good for our country's energy security and our economy.
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a chopper goes down in the east river. what went wrong? i'm ali velshi. as the ntsb investigates the deadly crash in new york, we'll meet the cops who dove in to
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rescue the survivors. i'm carol costello. now that chris christie is officially out of the picture, many republican leaders say it's time to rally around one candidate. can the gop agree on who that candidate should be. piggy banks. one of the nation's biggest banks is hitting customers with a higher fee, just so you can use your own money. how you can beat the fee on this "american morning." good morning to you, it is wednesday, october 5th. up first thisern morning, investigators will exam every inch of the helicopter that crashed into the east river. the chopper was carrying three passengers, three rescued from the water and one did not make it. >> there have been numerous crashes in new york waters in recent years. earlier we asked the ntsb's mark rosekind if they will be looking at that. >> well, not only on what
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happened, but why. because our mission really is to determine why so we can issue safety recommendations so it doesn't happen, again. we'll focus on this investigation, but in that context we'll look for similar incidents that occurred. if we find something that is an issue now, we will issue recommendations to address that. >> jason carroll joins us live from the scene on manhattan's east side. a couple dozen of these accidents over the past 20 or 30 years and, jason, this one just the latest here. hi. >> and good morning to you, christine. the ntsb have already begun their investigation. they will reinterview him again today. another point that will help them with their investigation, yesterday early evening they were able to retrieve the helicopter. we have some shots of that. that jet ranger pulled from the east river mostly in tact. that's going to help with the
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investigation, as well. want to recap exactly what happened. the trouble starting just before 3:30 at about 3:22 yesterday afternoon. that's when the pilot, paul dudl dudley, had just taken off. he almost immediately reported that he was having trouble with the aircraft and trouble with altitude. the chopper spun around and within moments it crashed into the east river, turned on to its side and sank. three passengers and the pilot, paul dudley, were able to be rescued, but one woman, sonya martin was trapped in the back seat and she did not survive. she was killed in the crash. this morning, christine, i spoke to two representatives from the office of emergency management. they just happened it be in the area and they were two of the first responders who got here on the scene and they described what they saw and what they did. >> when we arrived, there was a helicopter with two men holding on to the skids.
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>> i was able to run out to the helipad and deploy some of the safety devices. i was able to deploy it out to the individual who was about 20 yards out and then i had to climb down to the pylons and lay down on my chest to try to bring the man in so i could get underneath him so he couldn't sink. he had lost all the fight to try and save himself. so, myself and the deputy commissioner and a police officer were able to try to hoist him out of the water and give him to ems. >> number of first responders that just happen to be in the area who were helping with the rescue. want to talk a little bit more about the victim. sonya was here with her partner, who was also in had helicopter and her mother and stepfather, as well as the pilot. they knew the pilot. they were here for a tour of the city, obviously, that ended in tragedy. this morning, i also had the opportunity to speak with a
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representative from the national transportation safety board to talk a little bit more, christine, about what will be happening today with the investigation. in addition to reinterviewing the pilot, videotape of what happened and they'llining the helicopter of what went wrong. >> the congresswoman that represents that district, that part of manhattan she says, frankly, too many of these accidents and she'd like a big investigation. jason, thanks so much. as soon as that helicopter went down in the east river, a group of new york's finest and bravest sprung into action. our next guests among the first on the scene from the left of your screen, lieutenant lawrence sirus officer jason gregory and detective bain. thank you for being here, thank you for your fast work. this is the stuff that we all hope happens, you know, you
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sprung into action while there was a tragic outcome to this. you sprung into action. you were there conducting a counterterrorism exercise nearby. tell me what happened. >> we were actually over on the west side conducting hurriercul when we heard the call transmitted over the radio. >> how far are you from where the accident happened? >> we were in an equivalent location north and south, but over on the west side. >> you sped over, what happened then? >> when we arrived on the scene we saw people pointing to the exact location and we had to shed all our tactical gear and secure it safely and we made it to the water's edge and it was clear that we had to go in. >> detective connelly, you did the same thing. what was your sense when you got there? you saw the helicopter? >> we saw the helicopter and we saw the victims in the water. as previously mentioned, there were life rings already deployed
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in the water, so we just took our boots off, our gun belts off and we used that equipment that was already provided because we had none of our equipment there with us. >> something had started. by the time you got there, there were some people evolved. you saw some boats gathering in the area. >> sure. >> officer gregory, you are with the scuba unit. tell me how you got to the scene and what first happened? >> i first got to the scene and i was with the aviation unit and me and my partner we swam and found a pretty good location. when the rest of the scuba team came, we deployed a pattern line and two divers before us found the helicopter and me and my partner, detective fane went down and recovered the victim. >> what was the water like at that point? was it, looked pretty murky when you just look into the east river? >> anywhere from zero to four feet of visibility. it was pretty dark for about 40 feet down. not much ambulant light gets
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down. >> the others that have gotten out have gotten out. you found the victim that didn't make it out in the helicopter. >> that is correct, yes. >> what were your thoughts, obviously, at that point. you knew you were looking for one more person. >> before we went in we were told there was one more person, a female. of course when you're looking for somebody who has passed, it's nerve wracking but you want to get the job done as quickly as possible. when we found out the helicopter was already found, it made our job easier. we went to the door and found the victim floating upside down on the floor. >> when you went in at that point, did you know the last person you were looking for wasn't alive? >> generally speaking, yes. i have been doing this for quite a while. having been down that long, i would say so, yes. >> officer gregory, on one hand we're grateful for the first response from the first
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responders that were there, but it gives you mixed feelings at some point that a few of them got saved and somebody lost their lives. >> yeah. i mean, we're always hoping that one chance they had a spare air or something down there. >> but you go in looking, you got to do what you got to do. lieutenant serras, you've been hearing it on the forces, we have on the news, the helicopter incidents that have happened over the years. does it strike you as unusual or averaging one a year for the last 30 years. >> unfortunately in borough manhattan it's becoming not too unusual. >> you have a particular thing that goes through your mind when you hear it's a helicopter down in a river? is there a course of action? something that you specifically do? >> we respond to it just like every other job. obviously, this is going to be a larger scale, but we operate and we deploy the same as we would if it was just one person in the water. >> even though we have particular specialties like these two guys over here.
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you guys got there and just sort of took off your belts and got down and got into the water. >> exactly. they just experienced a helicopter crash and they're struggling in the water. no time to wait. we impros have what we had and we went out and did what we could do. >> you're heroes all of you. thank you for continuing your hard work. thank you to all of you. still ahead, they have no fear. a pair of 200-pound mountain lions get too close for comfort. >> that is scary. apple's new iphone news. is it a revolution or bitter disappointment? the tech buzz for you. singer hank williams jr. has more to say about his hitler/obama analogy. it's nine minutes after the hour. we're america's natural gas
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wow pup talk about your gorgeous day. good morning, washington, it's
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fair and 56. just when it looked like americans couldn't be more disgruntled and disturbed with their officials, they have. take a look at the latest "washington post"/abc poll. 82% of americans disapprove. the highest disapproval for congress in two decades of polling by the network and newspaper. they also noticed the mail and the phone calls to washington are up hundreds of percent because people are weighing in. >> good for them. they should express their anger. >> i don't know how you two feel but tech geeks across the country are disappoint would apple's announcement yesterday. the apple iphone 4s as opposed to the 5. it looks exactly like the current iphone and it is faster and a new feature that allows users to ask the phone questions and get answers. the boys of late night were a little underwhelmed, as well. take a look.
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>> the apple corporation had a major media event from the headquarters in northern california this morning to introduce their brand-new iphone4s. it basically has a better camera, a faster processor and the coolest new process is the app that helps you forget that two months ago you spent $500 on a phone that is now obsolete. >> president obama revealed that steve jobs gave him an ipad last year before it was released. it broke when biden thought it was an etch-a-sketch and started shaking it. >> i was expecting the iphone 5, but, no. it's the upgraded version of the iphone 4 called the iphone 4s and the think the s stands for suckers. >> couldn't they have just called it the 5. >> if they called it the 5 and it had these few improvements, then you'd have the tech geeks
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of the world saying -- >> 60% more pixels and the personal assistant. >> it talks to you, ali. >> what do they want it to cook you breakfast and find you a date? >> the iphone 3 cooked you breakfast and got you a date. actually, i think the iphone 1 got you a job. >> the iphone 5 will get you a job. >> that would be cool. >> the iphone 4s goes on sale in nine days. sprint will have it, verizon will have it and at&t stores, as well. let's talk about hank williams jr. he's saying, hey, i'm sorry. he's saying i'm sorry, again, if he offended anyone. now apologizing for that hitler/president obama analogy he made on fox news. >> the last one was not an apalg just an explanation. >> it was done by the pr department and he wanted to put it out himself. espn yanked his aconnick "are you ready for some football"
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opening. let's play, again, what got him into so much hot water. >> do you remember the golf game they had, ladies and gentlemen? >> yeah. >> that was one of the biggest political mistakes ever. >> why? >> that turned a lot of people off. you know, watching -- it just didn't go over. >> you mean when john boehner played golf with president obama sph. >> oh, yeah. yeah. and biden and kasich, yeah. >> what did you not like about it? seems to be a really pivotal moment for you. >> come on, like hitler playing golf with netanyahu. they're the enemy. >> who's the enemy? >> obama and biden, are you kiddi kidding? the three stooges. >> i can't get over he said three instead of two. >> he apologized for the first two, he hasn't apologized for his bad math. >> he has not issued a statement to the stooges apologizing for
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any reference to them. >> seriously he issued a personal apology and i'm going to read it. >> the thought of the leaders of both parties jukin on a high fiven on a golf course while so many families are struggling to get by simply -- >> that's the best line. >> you have to put that on the bottom because the assumption is that it's all written -- >> the first statement he put out did seem a little finessed and sometimes these things are better to say, i didn't mean to say that. it came it mind, live interview. i'm still a little hung up on the three stooges thing. >> interesting to see if espn sticks to its guns. >> a lot of things are made better, they're improved by an apology. >> look, america loves redemption. apologize and move on.
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people make mistakes all the time and people get caught up in the moment. he's a celebrity, not a political analyst. rob marciano doesn't make mistakes in his weather forecast. >> never. come on. come on! good morning, again, guys. one thing we're not going to make a mistake on, the weather pattern changed for the noes. that's a good thing. two weeks of almost showery, cool, unsettled stuff across the northeast and now starting to get rid of that and get into parts of the ohio river valley and the southeast has been dealing with. fire threat in the midsection of the country and we're looking at, well, a decent amount of rain out west. 85 in memphis and 86 degrees in minneapolis. pierce, south dakota, got over 90 degrees. toasty air there and some of that will eventually get out towards the east coast. but the winds will keep travel some delays across the northeast. but san francisco is really going to be the hot spot for seeing travel delays today. very strong system rolling into northern california, the pacific northwest and all the way down
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to southern california, as well. some of this is bringing with it a decent amount of rain and snow above the 6,000 foot mark and winter storm warnings that are now issued for parts of colorado and utah. could see a foot and a half in some of these spots and as mentioned the warm, dry winds across the midsection of the country, potential for seeing a fire threat there today. the fire in texas kind of reignited yesterday, but a lot of resources left over from the original fire where they're able to get a decent handle on it there. by the way, the cool air will be filtering in across the northeast. temperatures tomorrow in the 20s and 30s. we take you to southern california. sierra madra where these two felines were found in somebody's back yard. how would you like to wake up to that in the middle of the night and see these two 180 pounders staring right at you. >> i would not like that. >> they're cool looking cats. that's for sure. >> cool cats. >> they can be dangerous. police came and shooed them back up the mountain where they
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belong. >> shooed them, not shoot them. >> shooed them. >> we'll see you tomorrow, guys. >> bye, rob. now is your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day. could occupy wall street be the dawn of a liberal tea party? ever since the dawn of the tea party, liberal activists have yearned for a revolution of their own. example, michael moore, who is hungry for a mass movement and how better to create that by railing against wall street. >> this is the end result of these bankers overplaying their hand. they were already filty rich, but filthy rich wasn't enough. >> moore is lending his celebrity to the movement and paying to help protests expand the use of social media, with the help of twitter and facebook, the movement has spread to other cities. hundreds of people have been arrested. and though we see them dressed like zombies and often with confusing messages, they're also attracting some powerful allies,
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thecluding a half dozen unions who will march on new york city hall today. when you combine clout, money and anger at the powers that be it sounds like the start of something, although protesters don't see themselves as political animals. >> we don't want to be, you know, a left political group. we don't want to be a political group at all. we want to be, you know, a group that calls for activism. ideally if this continues to grow and more people get involved suddenly people will have the same power that lobbyists have. >> heads up, wall street. even foxnews.com says this could be more than just a looney protest movement from the left. the talk back question of the day. could occupy wall street be the dawn of a liberal tea party? facebook.com/americanmorning. i'll read your comments later this morn. >> costumes are very different at this one than the tea party costumes. the zombies. >> more of a variety. >> the tea party ones they had a
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lot of colonel-type costumes and then a bunch of guys that looked like they were militia. they used to have those. >> the civil war reenactors. those guys, too. more bank fees. fresh off the news bank of america adding a $5 monthly fee on debit card transactions. citibank is upping their charges. so, how do you avoid this if you're a smart consumer? christine has some ideas. some tricks and tips for beating the new bank fees. look, every day we're using more and more energy.
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the world needs more energy. where's it going to come from? ♪ that's why right here, in australia, chevron is building one of the biggest natural gas projects in the world. enough power for a city the size of singapore for 50 years. what's it going to do to the planet? natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel there is. we've got to be smart about this. it's a smart way to go. ♪
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it's 26 minutes after the hour. minding your business this morning, in athens, greece, police are out right now in full
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riot gear as thousands take to the streets. it's part of a 24-hour strike against a new wave of salary and pension cuts, tax hikes and layoffs. the government says these cuts are needed to avoid bankruptcy. a global recession can't be ruled out next year. this is the new warning from the international monetary fund. the group is also urging europe this morning to boost stimulus spending. u.s. stock futures are pointing to a higher open morning. bring the s&p back from the brink of a bear market yesterday. that rally fueled in part by europe's new efforts to prevent a global banking crisis. victims of bernie madoff are getting their first checks today. the man in charge of recovering the funds says an estimated $312 million will be distributed to investors today. that represents less than 5 cents on the dollar but he said more money will eventually be returned and there are a lot of madoff victims who need that money right now.
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the bank fees keep on coming and the latest from citibank that will announce it will start charging customers with mid-level accounts $20 a month if they don't have a combined $15,000 in all of their accounts. here's some tips to beat the fees. you can switch to a credit union. 75% of them don't have any fees at all. you can find small local banks and consolidate your accounts like citi says you can and always use in-network atms only. never bounce a check, pay on time or pay cash if it really ticks you off. here's a deal, earlier this morning, india unwrapped what has been dubbed the world's cheapest computer, while it's a tablet, the price tag just 35 bucks. 35 bucks. the indian government hopes to one day make this computer available to every student in the country. still ahead, the state of the 2012 presidential race now without chris christie. "american morning" back right after the break.
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top stories now. the ntsb is beginning its
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investigation of a deadly helicopter crash in new york city. the chopper crashed into the east river just after takeoff. we spoke with mark rosekind. >> we're going to collect the factual information we're fortunate that the aircraft is mostly in tact. we'll look at the wreckage. also, the pilot survived, so, he's another source of information really critical for us. all of these very important aspects that we're just getting started today looking at all the facts. >> he said the ntsb investigators will inspect the chopper wreckage today. a deadly dust storm being blamed for a series of car crashes north of tucson, arizona. police say drivers had zero visibility on interstate 10 when the storm kicked up yesterday afternoon. at least 20 vehicles were involved in accidents. one person was killed, 14 others hurt. and 30 hours after her murder conviction was overturned in italy, amanda knox arrived home in seattle last night.
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tearfully thanking everyone who believed in her during a four-year ordeal in italy in izprn. . >> just thank you to everyone who has believed in me, who has defended me, who has supported my family. >> knox went on to say she just wants to spend some time with her family now. new jersey governor chris christie has been telling everyone for month that he is not running for president in 2012 and a lot of people just didn't believe him, so yesterday he made it official. >> i explored the options and i listened to so many people and considered whether this was something that i needed to take on. but in the end what i always felt was the right decision remains the right decision today. now is not my time. >> so, with christie opting out of the 2012 presidential race a lot of republican leaders say it's time for the party to rally
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around one candidate. herman cain has been rising in the polls and mitt romney a steady frontrunner but is the gop ready to commit to either of them. what about rick perry? let's ask our guests. maggie haverman senior political writer for politico and jeff zellani. thanks for both of you for being here. jeff, let's start with you. with christie out of the race, what is your sense of the field? is it firmed up now? is this who we're going to see and how is it going to play from here? >> i think the field is set, it's certainly unsettled but it's hard to imagine the field is not set with the candidates who are already on stage here. look, it's -- we're talking fewer than 100 days before the iowa caucuses open this process early next year, followed quickly by the new hampshire primaries. so time, in fact, is running out to put together an organization. in some respects, the decision
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resets the conversation and mitt romney is really trying to scramble to move to occupy this space here in terms of fund-raisers and donors, but activists and voters out there are just now beginning to pay attention and pick their favorite. so, you know, i think it's far too early to say that mitt romney is going to sort of have this lead going forward for the next three months, but he's certainly in a position to consolidate some strength here at this moment. >> let's talk about consolidating this. first of all, he's trying to, suggest that he is now the logical choice for fiscal conservatives who, you know, don't want to go down this road too far of social conservatism. his people have actively been wooing those bundlers, those people who were going to get money for chris christie. one of chris christie's sort of biggest supporters and one of the guys pushing him towards the idea of running and wasted no time this afternoon and he moved
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over to romney and some other moves. >> he's looking to lock up support in early states. he's looking to get florida endorsements, new hampshire endorsements. you know, major elected officials on board. whether that translates into votes is the other issue. you have the ceiling that mitt romney has had in all of these polls. you also had rick perry announce that he raised $17 million in this quarter. that is going to beat mitt romney. a lot of money going into the poll race with. so, you can't totally count rick perry out and mitt romney actually has to move to show that he can break through that ceiling. >> in fairness, you know, jeff, a lot of people sort of waiting around. if chris christie was getting in, he might get their money and they might make a move. now, take a look at the polls. maggie was talking about polls. let me show you from one "washington post" abc news. romney at 25, cain at 16 and perry at 16. talk about herman cain. how real is this and is herman
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cain topped out or room to grow? >> maggie is right that mitt romney has a ceiling and we see this ceiling in this poll. mitt romney really hasn't changed in this support. i would be surprised if that's not a temporary shift. herman cain has the moment or has the opportunity to take advantage of this moment here, but he seems just as interested in selling his book, as he does actually campaigning for president. his campaign largely exists to a media strategy. he does a lot of interviews but in terms of talking to voters, he's not doing that very much. he has no campaign organization to speak of on the grounds. so, if he is to take off, it's going to be an unusual type of campaign, you know, that's unlike any other that we've seen before that not really involv g involving, actually, seeing voters and doing hand-to-hand things that most campaigns do. >> he does do a good interview, no question about that.
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>> jeff, good to see you. national political correspondent maggie is the senior political writer with politico. be sure to watch cnn on october 18th when the republican candidates for president gather in las vegas for the western republican presidential debate. that is tuesday night, october 18th right here 8:00 p.m. eastern on cnn. now, up next, ever kngo onle to self-diagnose a sickness. turning or devices into mobile medical labs and that's not necessarily a good thing. our friend dr. sanjay gupta is here in new york with an in-depth look at our mobile society including facebook depression. 37 minutes after the hour. knowr i'd say you're having some sort of big tire sale. yes we are. yeah. how many tires does ford buy every year? over 3 million. you say you can beat any advertised price on tires? correct. anywhere? yes. like this price? yes. riously? yes what about this one? i'll beat it. this one? s we will.
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right, i only have one more question for you...this one? (laughing) yeah. get $100 rebate when you buy four tires. 100 bucks! only at your ford dealer. 3 million tires. 11 major brands, fiona's kind-of-nice. i don't know why you're not here. but they also go beyond banking. we installed a ge fleet monitoring system. it tracks every vehicle in their fleet. it cuts fuel use. koch: it enhances customer service. it's pretty amazing when people who loan you money also show you how to save it. not just money, knowledge. it's so much information, it's like i'm right there in every van in the entire fleet.
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good day overall. yeah, i'm good. come on in. let's go. wow, this is fantastic. ge capital. they're not just bankers. we're builders. they helped build our business. until i tried this. nothing helped me beat arthritis pain. we're builders. it's salonpas. pain relief that works at the site of pain... up to 12 hours. salonpas.
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look at that. like a record album. >> sanjay lives in atlanta, but not there to enjoy it this morning. >> going to be 83, that's the great part. >> sunny and 83 ask we're only
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going to be 70 here in new york. >> no humidity. low humidity anyway. >> my hair is going to have a great day. >> as it always does. welcome back. odds are you probably have done it, consulted dr. google when you're under the weather. while there is helpful information out there, also easy to diagnose yourself with something you don't have. >> joining us now with an in-depth look at our mobile society and how it changes the way we approach medical issues, sanjay. you see a big demand in medical questions from people on your twitter account. you have 1.13 million followers. what's the lure? >> well, i think a lot of it is the immediacy about it. it takes too long to see your doctor and get advice. this could be immediate and when it comes to public health things, you guys were talking about the cantaloupe thing earlier. people want to know what cantaloupe they shouldn't buy.
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things like that makes it really fast and i think important to people. i think the thing it fills in in terms of gaps is that the peer-to-peer stuff. if carol and i have both have some sort of ailment, we know this because we're going through it so i want to hear from people like carol who are suffering or have the same sort of thing. the doctor to the patient relationship and now the peer to peer thing is really important. >> good to communicate directly with a doctor, somebody you know who is a doctor and good to communicate with somebody you kind of know because how you can be sure if that person has suffered the same as you? >> i think, i've been doing this a little while now, it's not perfect by any means. one is the crowd is pretty good at vetting out people who are not really legitimate or offering something substantive. and you see that in terms of the comments and how often something is being tweeted and things like that. i think there are more reputable sites out there, if you're specifically going to search for
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information. 80% of people do. they go online to look for things. things that have a gov or edu in the domain name, less likely to have conflict of interest. not to say that -- your mother is having memory problems. i want to know everything there is to know about alzheimer's disease. you won't find it at a news station but pub medwhich is the latest articles. >> all these helpful resources and also the helpful connections you can make with other people you are suffering that you may not be able to but also the people who google and self-diagnose and led by crazy posts from people who have no idea what they're talking about. >> everyone has done this at some point. what is interesting along those lines is the big concern among the medical community, would it start to replace, you know, going to see your doctor, an actual doctor's appointment and what they found is that it's not doing that. people are more prepared, they
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say, for those doctors appointments, which is not accurate or legitimate but also better at recovering from an operation because they're talking to people who have gone through this. so, i sent a patient home after some sort of operation, i think i've got everything sort of checked off the list, but the reality is, i've never gone through this operation. something that may seem minor may be a big deal to that patient and communicating with other people and they say, here's what you do about that. >> they could find out it's normal. >> a little incisional pain on the scalp, for example. i do not think that is as big a deal but now they can find that information online. >> the big problem, though, i google all the time before i go to the doctor just so i can show i'm up sometimes. >> that is true. that i know about, carol. >> but the problem is some of the stuff you find on google isn't true. and it scares you more. >> that's right. and i think that's the
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imperfection of it. but we were talking about this on the break, that ship has sailed a bit. that is not going to come back. that information is going to be out there, but i think it's going to get better. the crowd does a pretty good job of vetting out what is legitimate and what is not. but i also think that you're starting to see more and more reputable sites out there that people, you know, talk about and recommend to their friends and everything from, you know, a new mom to you just had major tumor surgery. it's pretty good some of the stuff out there, i have to say. some of it is not, but some of that is -- what's the term? buyer beware. >> you just described the internet. sanjay, thank very much. >> there's a reason why it's free. morning headlines are next, including no preseason. the start of the nba regular season is in danger. a critical deadline now approaching. it's 45 minutes after the hour.
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47 minutes past the hour. here are your morning headlines. u.s. stock futures pointing to a higher opening this morning despite a new warning from the global monetary fund that a global recession could not be ruled out next year. federal investigators on the scene of a deadly helicopter crash in new york city. the chopper plunge under to the east river killing a passenger and injuring three others. it could take months to determine exactly what caused the crash. another round of evacuations in texas this morning. a wildfire has burned 1,000
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acres and comes just a month after another fire destroyed 1,500 homes. the nba has now canceled its entire preseize. nba commissioner david stern also set a monday deadline to save the start of the regular season. johnny depp telling "vanity fair" that he's making stupid money for "pirates of the caribbean" and only doing the franchise for his kids. he reportedly earned $300 million from the films. and it was the film that made aubrey hepburn a star. fans will make the occasion in little black dresses and sunglasses at anniversary events at some of the iconic new york locations in the film. that's the news you need to start your day. "american morning" back after a break.
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civil rights and tribal rights are on a collision course 3,000 descendants of slaves known as the cherokee friedman. >> by the cherokees themselves. the freed men are fighting for citizenship in the cherokee nation. >> cnn special correspondent soledad o'brien explains what happened when both sides recently headed to federal court. >> reporter: sam ford is a cherry friedmaee freedman. >> my great-grandmother was a slave of the cherokees. >> reporter: it's a little known chapter in american history, the cherokees were one of five indian tribes whose members own
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slaves. so what were those slaves doing for the cherokee nation? >> they were agricultural lab laborers and also individuals who worked as domestic slaves. >> reporter: in 1866 they freed their slaves. they signed a treaty guaranteeing that all freedman and descendants would have all the rights. today it is at the center of a controversy involving nearly 3,000 african-americans. on august 22nd, cherokee nation kicked them out of the tribe. >> the treaty of 1866 did not give citizenship to the freedman or their descendants. >> reporter: the attorney general for cherokee nation. >> the heart of the issue is whether or not an indian tribe can describe, can determine who is eligible to be a member of that tribe. >> reporter: in 2007, cherokee nation passed the law requiring proof of indian blood to be a member. the proof is based on a record that was created a century ago.
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the freedman say the roles are wrong because they were based on how you looked. >> if you looked black, they wrote cherokee freedman. if you looked not black, they wrote cherokee. >> reporter: many freedman were of mixed cherokee and african blood, but on the rolls they were listed with no indian blood. last month it all went to federal court. >> i was restored as a member of the cherokee nation. >> reporter: a settlement has let the freedman back into the tribe for now. the descendants can vote in the election for the cherokee chief, but no guarantee they'll get to stay in the tribe. silicone valley ingenuity but racial diversity is almost nonexistent. black entrepreneurs risking the next big thing. this once in a lifetime
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opportunity to change the game in the new promisedland. that's sunday night, november 13th, 8:00 eastern right here on cnn. we won't miss it. coming up next, our talk back question of the day and your responses. the question is, occupy wall street the dawn of a liberal tea party. read your responses next. it's 53 minutes past the hour. [ echoing ] hurt! hey, wha-- [ camera clicks ] oh, state farm bank's pocket agent. it lets you deposit checks right from your phone. you just shoot, send, done! boom. give it up! [ male announcer ] another reason more people stay with state farm. get to a better state.
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good morning, new york. wake up! got to be at work in 3 1/2 minutes. it's 61 degrees and sunny. going to get up to 70 and sunny in new york. >> those wall street protesters, they're still there. they're still there after i think almost three weeks and now today they're gearing up for what they claim is going to be their biggest move yet. expected to march this afternoon and this time joined by community groups and even some uni unions. while still a lot of questions about the movement's message.
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warren buffett told poppy h harlow, he understands the group's pain. >> i think a lot of it is underinformed but the feeling is real and there's enough basis in that feeling that we ought to get rid of that basis. i mean, you want enormous diversity and results in this world. you want people to get very, very rich to develop something their fellow man needs. steve jobs, whatever money he makes, you could name one after another. there should be all kind of opportunity. but, there also should be a taxation system that is fair and i think when people are giving vent to these emotions, they're unemployed, their families are struggling and they may have lost houses, they're going to look out for some visible sign that they can strike and wall street is a natural thing. >> and that brings us to our talk back question of the morning. we asked the question, is occupy wall street the dawn of a liberal tea party? could this be a new political
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party? this from joey, it's occupation party. and, yes, it's class warfare, finally. from james, let's take the term tea party and liberals out and call it what it is, we the people. who have gotten tired of wall street destroying and we the people have had enough this from sean, i'm not sure if it's the dawn of a new political party, but if it brings americans together, i'm all for it. i'd prefer to see less fighting and more unity in the united states of america this from amber, i don't think so. all i hear from tea party is mow more taxes and state's rights. occupy wall street is a collective movement of several ideologies from people against corporate welfare to people who want health care reform. unite in a common cause and make a common set of demands. those are the two basic principles of protest. what are you here for and what do you want? >> in marketing, in business.
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you have to come out with some focus and business, as we've seen, expanded to other areas but, ultimately, people have to know what you are. the critique that we don't know what they are isn't necessarily a cruteak of their movement or their ideals or what they are. >> it will be interesting to see if someone comes in and is their voice. someone with money and political clout that comes in and takes over this movement and sort of whips it into shape. now, the protesters don't want that. that's what they say. we don't want to become a political movement. we're just expressing our anger and frustration at the system and that's all of america's institutions, not just wall street. >> the tea party did a good job of we don't have one leader, but we're still a movement that has power. >> but they did have a message and they did have political backers with money and it might not have been just one of them, but there were several and they created this political force that we now have in politics. >> i think buffett is

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