Skip to main content

tv   24 7 Pacquiao Marquez  CNN  November 5, 2011 12:00am-12:30am PDT

12:00 am
another five years probably. >> ten seconds. best investment advice? >> you got to invest. you can't have your money sitting around in a bank account that gets 0.2%. the book will walk you through that too. make investments. >> all right. ali's book. go and get a copy. have a great night. monday, former minnesota governor jesse ventura. >> the statement concludes, quote, my client stands by the complaint she made.
12:01 am
>> how important is the award process to you? >> it's all i do this for. i'm kidding. >> i would love it if that was your honest answer. >> wouldn't that be something? finally be honest. there are certain nights of the cain's sexual harassment accuser sticks to her story that he made she and her husband see no value in revisiting this matter now nor in discussing the matter any further publicly or privately. in fact, it would be extremely painful to do so.
12:02 am
>> as for herman cain, well, he is doing better than ever in the polls and is raising more money than ever. and today he sounded more confident than ever. >> before i get started, i want to know whose teleprompters are these? because i don't need them. >> so how is the cain campaign doing? managing this crisis? joining me now is gloria borger and michael citric. a bizarre day in many ways. we finally get to hear from one of the accusers. but herman cain seems completely oblivous and powers on. >> well, you know, since we didn't really hear specifically from the woman herself, we are -- she remains anonymous to the public and she didn't get more specific about the charges other than saying there were serious -- a series of inappropriate behaviors. it seems herman cain can go on because it doesn't require a
12:03 am
response from him today. and so he's going to power on. he still remains at the top of the polls and people in iowa, which is the first caucus state, really don't seem to care too much about these charges. now, if someone were to get specific and on the record and that could still occur, then i believe it would be a whole different story. >> the most significant thing i heard today was herman cain has now raised i think $1.6 million. >> yeah. >> since sunday when the scandal erupted. and that is nearly as much as he raised the entire previous quarter. that is what talks in washington isn't it? >> yeah. it is. and it's been important to his campaign. and what he's done was, you know, at first he attacked the so-called leak accusing the rick perry campaign of leaking the story. that didn't work. what he's done now is he is attacking the media. in republican primaries that works pretty well for you.
12:04 am
and i think he's hit on something and i think from the republicans that i talked with, i spoke with a conservative woman today who said, look. this is rallying people around herman cain because he can't respond to charges that are anonymous and if he says there was no basis we have no way of knowing anything else. so it's helped him. >> it seems like the more things herman cain hits on the better he does. >> well, that's right. at least at this point. you know, the question is, when is this going to come out? is this going to come out? is this going to come out? at some point somebody is going to leak this. i would leak it. if i were advising cain, i would say, we should leak this. we can give it to a reporter who we can then frame it properly around and get the story out. >> herman cain is probably sitting there going, well, this has been running now all week. s but to date nobody has come out publicly, identified themselves
12:05 am
and said, this is what he did to me. until they do, i don't think this goes anywhere, does it? >> well, that's right. it doesn't. the key issue is, will they identify themselves? how will it come out? sexual harassment can range from making inappropriate comments to engaging in inappropriate acts. and it depends what the settlement says and what the sexual harassment allegation was i think. >> gloria, let me bring you -- >> i was going to say the national restaurant association did its own internal investigation. it did not tell us today what it decided. we do know there was a settlement but that could just be go away money, right? we don't really know. herman cain is on the record saying that the result of that investigation was that they found there was no basis for the sexual harassment claims. if somebody were to come out and tell a story and we, or we would know the result of the internal investigation of the restaurant association, then i think it
12:06 am
becomes a real problem. >> from a political point of view, who is winning here? how does mitt romney figure in all this? he's kept very, very quiet. is this all good for him or is all the attention being laf issued on herman cain good for cain? >> yeah. well, look. i think it's sort of a side show. i think it's good for mitt romney. it's been good in a way for rick perry. i think it's been really good for newt gingrich. and i think that they can sort of sit back and allow this to play out without criticizing herman cain. you can join in and criticize the media if you want. and so i think it works for romney. i do. >> could you imagine despite all this someone like herman cain winning now the republican nomination? potentially becoming president? >> you know, if there is one thing that i've learned that you
12:07 am
can do is you can never predict for sure. bill clinton had very serious accusations and allegations against him. not only did he win the presidency but probably will go down as one of the most popular presidents in our country's history. so there are a lot of factors here that have to be weighed and the real question is, what, how is the american public going to react to his policies, to his vision, to his charisma? he does have charisma. >> would you advise if you were advising herman cain to change his style, because it's definitely not the normal political style, it's not really presidential. it's very much herman cain the people's politician. would you say to him you got to get serious now or continue to ride the storm the way that he's doing? >> i think one of the things that may be appealing is his style, the fact that he is the nonpolitician politician. so i would say don't change yourself. don't change your style. i would go on with the style
12:08 am
that he has now. >> thank you both very much. >> thank you. our other big story tonight is the conrad murray trial, 23 days of testimony and 49 witnesses. the fate of michael jackson's doctor lies in the hands of the jury. he is accused of giving jackson an overdose of propofol and could face four years behind bars if convicted. the jury today were out for the whole day but haven't come up with a verdict yet. ted rowlands is at the courthouse and joins me now. no verdict. what does that tell you? we've had a full day of deliberations. clearly the jury are still thinking about this. why? >> reporter: well, seven and a half hours of work today piers. what we do know is it wasn't a situation where they went back, took a vote, and were all in agreement. now is there major discourse here? who knows? if they are going to come to an agreement, of course there is a good chance or a significant chance there would be a hung jury. likely what they're doing is taking their time. this is a jury we've been
12:09 am
watching over the last six weeks and they've taken notes and they seem like a very serious bunch. not surprising that they would be diligent in their deliberations. >> ted, stand by for a moment. i'm going to bring in somebody who is an absolute jury expert. i've just read these amazing statistics on your career. a thousand trials you've consulted on. you've picked over 600 juries. so i need to ask you the salient questions about this jury. they are the people now deciding the fate of who killed michael jackson. one of the most serious celebrity court cases we've ever seen. six of these jurors say they are caucasian. five hispanic. one african-american. the youngest is 32. the oldest is 57. how much of that kind of detail to you is in favor perhaps to conrad murray or against him? >> well, i think it's more a focus for me on how many of those jurors have actually been
12:10 am
jurors before. we know that four of them have been jurors. one hispanic male has actually been a foreperson in a civil jury. what we know happened this afternoon where they asked for highlighters and i believe copies of the jury instructions to me indicates it is a very thoughtful group, that they are going through the jury instructions very carefully and talking about any components that they may be in disagreement about. and clearly, i think they are in some disagreement at this point. >> two interesting points about the jury collectively. many of them apparently mentioned that they have addiction problems in their own families. and many also mentioned that they have children themselves. clearly michael jackson with his death left three children without a father. you would imagine the jurors with families perhaps may think against conrad murray because of that fact. but on the addiction level, they may have an understanding of how difficult and demanding people with addictions can be. what do you think of those statistics?
12:11 am
>> with regard to the addiction component i think it is a very important factor because what we know is that the prosecution and the defense each had their own propofol expert. and what often happens is that testimony cancels each other out and what the jurors rely on is their own personal experience. so their personal experience with the addiction may be guiding them a little bit more at this point than possibly the experts. if there is some issue about it. the parental issue is certainly something that i think the prosecutor came back to very well in his rebuttal basically talking about the fact that michael jackson was a father. he wasn't just a celebrity. he was a father trying to appeal to that component of the jurors as well. >> ted rolands? when does the jury pick up again? if they do come back monday morning the longer this goes on are you thinking it's better news for conrad murray?
12:12 am
because there was a sense it was almost inevitable he'd be convicted. i would think that the longer this goes on the more you're thinking there is real doubt there. >> yeah. absolutely. and maybe a disagreement within the 12. somebody holding on to one side or another or maybe a significant split between the two sides. the longer this goes on, clearly, it is good for conrad murray. >> and so if we were predicting a time that might come back, are we looking at monday now, ted, do you think? >> well, it really does depend on one of two things. are they just doing due diligence? do they all agree? are they moving forward? if that is the case, then yeah. monday would be a target. if there is disagreement within the jury then all bets are off. they could stretch it out and it could eventually hang but it will take longer if somebody doesn't agree with the majority. >> certainly one thing is for sure. the tension will be mounting with every hour this jury doesn't come back. ted rolands thanks very much. we'll wait and see come monday.
12:13 am
when we come back the country superstar who went from 13-year-old guitar player to entertainer of the year, brad paisley. ♪ talked to my sister in memphis ♪ daddy, come in the water! somebody didn't book with travelocity, with 24/7 customer support to help move them to the pool daddy promised! look at me, i'm swimming! somebody, get her a pony!
12:14 am
[ female announcer ] the travelocity guarantee. from the price to the room to the trip you'll never roam alone.
12:15 am
or will soon, you're starting a whole new journey. and, like many people, you're probably wondering, where do i go from here? consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. call now for a free information kit and guide to medicare to get started. basically, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. a medicare supplement insurance plan helps cover some of those expenses. and that can save you up to thousands of dollars a year in out-of-pocket costs. plus, you can keep any doctor who accepts medicare patients. together with medicare, an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan could be the kind of coverage you're looking for. in fact, it could make a world of difference. call now for your free medicare guide and information kit about aarp medicare supplement insurance plans,
12:16 am
insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. brad paisley the reigning entertainer of the year, up for the same award this year along with top male vocalist and album of the show and hosting the show with carrie underwood performing since he was 13 from the grand ole opry to the white house with a ton of hits. now a new book "diary of a player" and brad paisley joins me now. a player. >> yeah. >> you don't just mean with a guitar do you? >> i mostly mean with the guitar unfortunately. i'd love to qualify for the other but i sort of took up the guitar in spite of my bad luck in the other area. >> a player to me, you know, is not massively i would say different to your current reputation. you're like one of the top dogs in the business.
12:17 am
>> oh, thanks. >> you're young. you're hungry. you're successful. you are a bit of a player aren't you? >> i guess so. i mean if you sort of mean relevant. >> well a player means someone who is just good at playing his own business, his own game. >> it is a game. you do see it as a bit of a game as an artist. it is like what can i do that is going to be interesting to these fans? how do i come up with another song or another music video or what will get their attention again? because that is the struggle i think after ten years. >> do you still enjoy it? >> i love it. that's really what the book is about is about the fact that i was given this gift by my grandfather who said you're going to get through life with this guitar. >> this is christmas day. you were 8 years old. >> 8 years old right. >> and your grandfather gives you this guitar. you end the book by saying i am the realization of my grandfather's dream. i am a player. when he gave you that guitar do you think he had this wild, crazy notion that one day his
12:18 am
grandson brad was going to be performing to millions of people? >> i think he mostly just thought that i would love it like he did. and he loved it. i mean that's what he looked forward to every day was sitting in his chair like archie bunker, you know, in the favorite old chair, and playing songs. and that, to me, is -- has been the greatest thing about it. in spite of it, getting me everything i have in this life as far as being, learning to play the guitar. it is really the source of sort of strength and confidence and it's -- it consoles you, you and it's sort of a battle ax. >> you tour the world and you sell records around the world. what do you make of what's going on with america right now, financially, sort of a battle for its soul for whatever the new american dream is. >> right. >> what do you think of it? >> i think that the key is that
12:19 am
people still -- they still look to us. you know, we haven't lost that. they still in the rest of the world they may feel like we -- there is a great line in a charlie daniels song, this lady might have stumbled but she ain't ever fell. we're stumbling but i'm sort of a hopeful optimistic guy that thinks that we are still the people that set a lot of trends and they look to both america and britain for musical trends and for fashion and you've got paris. but the world has gotten smaller and as long as we're influential, that's really the thing i think that will keep us afloat. >> you tweeted recently i'm dreading the inevitable next year. nothing but politics on television. it seems so early. >> a good thing i'm on your show now because you wouldn't have me this time next year. >> no of course not. running for office? >> i'm not. >> why do you dread that? isn't this a very important time politically for america? isn't it vital now that the right person. >> yeah. >> wins the next election? >> well yeah. i think because although i believe that there are more than
12:20 am
-- there's more than one way to skin a cat. i mean, i don't necessarily think that any political party has it figured out. i think there's probably ways to reduce government, probably ways to lower taxes, to where there are ways to increase taxes. there are areas that has to happen. to just draw these lines and say i'm this or that. that is where we are getting into trouble chlgt i want to play you a clip about what you said about president obama which is quite interesting when he became president. >> very few things have moved me like the way that i was moved on november 4th. i was in times square, second best place to be i think besides grant park. it was unbelievable to see from my vantage point as i stood there and watched the world turn on a dime in the way that it seemed to. >> poetic words. you obviously felt it very deeply that day. >> yes. >> do you feel like many people that it's not really the
12:21 am
president's fault he hasn't lived up to that ridiculously high expectation level? was it always going to be a slight end of the honeymoon do you think? >> oh, yeah. i think that happens for anyone. it's interesting because what got me as someone who is very apolitical, i was in the green room at one of the networks because i played a show that day and watching the people in the street in new york city, blacks and whites hugging that didn't know each other, the hope theful optimism that really for me came from something, there are so many reasons why that seemed like something that just we never thought we'd see it happen. and inevitably right. i mean, you know, a guy gets in there. it's a tough thing right now. i don't know. i mean, we'll see how this all shakes out. it's certainly the story hasn't been completely written yet. >> what you are is a musician. when we come back after break we'll talk to you about two
12:22 am
women in your life. one is your wife. >> right. >> you're very happily married. and the other the carrie underwood. >> right. a great gig. ♪ the way i used to kiss your lips ♪ ♪ remind me remind me over p.f. chang's home menu orange chicken women men and uh pandas... elbows mmm [ male announcer ] wanchai ferry, try it yourself.
12:23 am
12:24 am
12:25 am
i doechbt know. i'm starting to get a bad feeling about the cma hosting trials. >> relax. we got it in the bag. >> great job.
12:26 am
>> feast your eyes on the new host of the cma awards. hum. hum-hum-hum. still here? come on. >> carrie, it's been great. hi, piggy. >> november 8th the country music awards which you will host with carrie underwood. that is a bit of a result isn't it? >> definitely. this is our fourth year and it's so much fun. >> how does your wife feel about the fact you keep cohosting with carrie underwood? >> she is good with that. >> how many times will you do it before doubt starts to creep in? >> we also just had a big hit, a duet called "remind me" which is great. we're both happily married if i'm mrs. paisley i'm like what is going on here? >> thankfully you're not mrs. paisley. i am really happy about that. >> you've won how many cmas then? >> i don't know.
12:27 am
>> literally so many -- >> somewhere around 12 or 13. >> how important is the award process to you? >> it's all i do this for. i'm kidding. >> i would love it if that was your honest answer. >> wouldn't that be something? finally be honest. there are certain nights of the year when it feels like that's what you're doing it for but other than that the next morning you're off to work. >> who is the greatest country singer you've ever seen? >> of all time? of all time. >> george jones. no one would really debate that. >> what made him special? >> unique ability to sound instantly identifiable. he sounds like a steel guitar. his voice has that lilting thing and i just adore him. and currently i would say carrie underwood. >> would you really. >> yeah. >> that good. >> she's -- the beauty of it is she could sing anything she wanted. she could be the biggest pop star in the world but she chose to stay in our format which is very flattering. >> which is great for the country music world. >> totally.
12:28 am
>> is she revered now in that world? >> i think so. >> for that decision? >> i think she is. everybody, you know, you win a big show, you know how this goes, they're skeptical, do you deserve this? and instantly her first song "jesus take the wheel" was a masterpiece and she just followed that up. >> what would your grandfather have made -- did he get to see how successful you've become? >> no. he died when i was 13 but he got to see me open for the judds which as a 13-year-old kid, that is a big deal. they were as big as they got and he would flip out. i mean, when i won the entertainer of the year award last year i talked about him for a good portion of the speech because i remember watching that show with him because he loved music. >> let's watch this clip. >> he said, i want you to learn to play the guitar because this is going to get you through lonely times and you'll never be alone with this. and i don't think he ever
12:29 am
thought that it would draw 20,000 people. >> what were you feeling as you got emotional there? >> i am keenly aware of the fact that the cmas, that's our oscars. there have been 44. this year is 45 of those given out entertainer of the year awards. some people have won it three or four times so that is a really short list of people that have their name at the top of that big award and i was really aware of that going into that. i think that this is not something to be taken lightly. this isn't anything small. this is as big as it could be. award wise. i always really hoped i'd get one of those. >> now you've won one. >> yeah. >> how many more do you want? >> don't need anymore. i'm good. if i win anymore not going to be upset. but it's -- i'm good. >> i mentioned your wife kimberly williams is an actress. what i love about her is if this

17 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on