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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  July 16, 2013 11:00am-1:01pm PDT

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soon as they learn where home is. this story has played big in the swedish media and now some swedes are coming forward saying, hey, i knew this man in the 1980s. plus, according to the desert sun who says he's michael boatwright's sister. >> thanks very much for that. that's it for me. i'll be back at 5:00 p.m. in "the situation room." brooke baldwin takes it from here. here. brooke -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com for weeks americans debated what the jurors were thinking in the george zimmerman trial, and now we know. you're about to hear a juror's candid revelations about the legal teams, about the turning point and why this decision left them in tears. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. the prosecution's star witness talks to cnn about race, slurs, and facing down six jurors. >> the jury's so shocked what i said, and they're acting like
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the generation now don't say that. >> plus, fears of escalating violence after one of the world's most notorious gang leaders is captured. and -- >> i'm pretty sure she was afraid of the lake. >> really? >> she didn't want to come near it. she didn't want to touch it. she didn't want to have anything to do with it. >> the hardest part of recovering from the boston marathon bombings. life at home. and here we go. good to see you on this tuesday. i'm brooke baldwin. you know the zimmerman verdict is in. the key players are talking. we have heard candid words from both prosecution and the defense and for the prosecution's controversial star witness, rachel jeantel. then there's this. there are revelations from juror b-37 about just what went on in the lead up to that not guilty verdict late saturday night.
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we will play that full interview, that exclusive interview coming up for you. we also know this, attorney general eric holder who just reaffirmed that the department of justice is resuming an investigation into the fatal shooting of trayvon martin is set to speak this afternoon at the naacp's annual convention. so far he has been pretty quiet on the prospect of additional charges against george zimmerman. and protests, they have continued. they are happening across the country. you see these folks, this is atlanta. these folks are chanting no justice, no peace. reverend al sharpton reaffirming his calls today for vigils to be held in 100 cities across the country this coming weekend. before we break all of this down, also developing this hour, a north korean freighter has caused a major to do in the panama canal. authorities say the crew turned violent during a drug inspection
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and the captain had a heart attack and tried to commit suicide. and then buried amid stacks of sugar, authorities found undeclared weapons, possibly missiles which north korea is barred from buying under u.n. sanctions. that ship, by the way, was heading to north korea from cuba. edward snowden has reportedly asked russia for temporary asylum as he seeks a way to settle in one of the latin american countries known for opposing washington. the leaker of national security secrets voided an earlier plea for asylum after russian president vladimir putin said he'd have to stop harming america. one of his contacts says that snowden is still sitting on secrets that would dachbmage th u.s. government if released. and if you are sitting outside watching this, sorry for you, folks. you are feeling the heat today. temperatures along the northeast through parts of the midwest are climbing into the mid 90s.
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combine that fun with the high humidity and it feels saunaesque out there. new york city hotter than parts of texas today. ouch. but back to this verdict here, not guilty. this juror, b-37, mother of two adult children, married for 20 years. she has now reversed one decision, writing a book on her experience, deliberating the zimmerman case. we're hearing she's choosing against that and she changed her mind in the hours after she gave cnn's anderson cooper an exclusive sit-down interview. here's one of the most telling moments of that night. >> his life was going to be taken away from him or he was going to have bodily harm. he had a right. that's how we read the law. that's how we got to the point of everybody being not guilty. >> whether it was george zimmerman getting out of the vehicle, whether he was right to get out of the vehicle, whether he was a wanna be cop, whether he was over eager, none of that
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in the final analysis mattered, what mattered was those seconds before the shot went off, did george zimmerman fear for his life? >> exactly. that's exactly what happened. and that is just one piece of an incredibly compelling interview that anderson conducted. we'll replay the entire sitdown interview with juror b-37 for you next hour. do not miss that beginning at the top of the hour. first i want to get to some legal analysis here based on what the juror told anderson last night. joining me now, two legal minds. criminal attorneys darryn kavinoky and tanya miller. darren, you get to kick things off because all of this talk of zimmerman getting out of the car and following this teenager. it sounds like what it came down to was the final moments when zimmerman felt threatened. do you think that was because the case or evidence was weak or because the defense did a really great job? >> well, i think both of those things were a factor. i think the prosecution made some critical missteps in their
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presentation of the case. the most grievous of which was choosing to play zimmerman's interviews early on relatively speaking in their case which removed the need for zimmerman himself to take the stand and removed any opportunity for them to do a vigorous cross examination which would have cleaned up some of the mistakes that happened early on in the investigation. you know, this was a case with so many opportunities, so many times i should say when the prosecution snatched defeat from what could have been the jaws of victory. >> i want to get back to this point you're making also just about multiple witnesses. it seemed like the defense continued to win even though they were state witnesses. want to play a little bit more sound in a moment. tonya, what was your biggest take away? >> my biggest take away was that she seemed to completely identify with george zimmerman. she was completely sympathetic to george zimmerman and really
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didn't express very much sympathy toward trayvon martin. i was surprised to hear her say that trayvon martin was just as responsible for his own death as george zimmerman was when trayvon martin was an unarmed teenager walking home and it was george zimmerman who got out of the car, confronted him, and ultimately shot him in the heart with that .9 millimeter handgun. >> it was anderson who asked, do you feel sympathy -- did you feel sympathy for trayvon martin? she never said yes, she said both. i feel sympathy for both. >> that was shocking. >> shocking, i know to a number of people. i think a lot of this gets down to the jurors, darren to your point, believing zimmerman with the police interrogation interviews they played at the crime scene walk through, as you mentioned, he never took the stand over much of the prosecution evidence. >> right. >> let me play another snippet. again, this is juror b-37. >> i think george zimmerman is a man whose heart was in the right
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place but just got displaced by the vandalism in the neighborhoods and wanting to catch these people so badly that he went above and beyond what he really should have done. >> so let's continue. you hear her say, you know, i feel like there's this acknowledgment that what he did was wrong. you know, he should perhaps not have followed trayvon martin but ultimately it came down to self-defense. >> but, look, brooke, when she says his heart was in the right place, let's be clear because twitter has actually blown up on me on this one point. >> yeah. >> i believe what she is referring to is the neighborhood watch activity, that his heart was in the right place in terms of wanting to keep his neighborhood safe, but one of the most -- to my mind one of the really glaring legal errors is that she boot strapped that to detective serino's testimony
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that she found him credible, that serino found george zimmerman believable and truthful, and that was something the judge specifically told the jurors to disregard and yet that came out in her interview as being something important about zimmerman and the juror's findings about his credibility. >> here you have this lead detective in this case, right, and this person ultimately in the end seemed to be testifying more on behalf of the defense. we were all watching, right, the state's witness that day and we were sort of blown away. the idea that the jurors could go home and scrub that from their minds is kind of impossible. >> yes. that's why you always say, it's very difficult to unring a bell once it's been rung. you ask the jury to disregard what they heard, but that was really egregious testimony on behalf of this detective who should have, frankly, known better than to vouch for the credibility of the defendant. detectives can't ordinarily say i believe the defendant is a
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liar. they certainly know that they can't say i believe the defendant is telling the truth. >> darren kavinoky, we'll see you at the end of the next hour after we play the entire interview. we can post game that. tanya miller, thank you very much. coming up next, another cnn exclusive interview. this has a lot of you talking. prosecution star witness. rachel jeantel. we watched her as a state witness. last night, huge get, piers morgan talked exclusively to cnn. we'll bring in a panel to talk about use of racial slurs and her thoughts on the jury. do not miss this. i don'without goingcisions to angie's list first. with angie's list, i know who to call, and i know the results will be fantastic! find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. ♪ hooking up the country whelping business run ♪
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but at coca-cola, we know when people come together, good things happen. to learn more, visit coke.com/comingtogether saving time by booking an appointment online, even smarter. online scheduling. available now at meineke.com. she is the prosecution witness who got almost as much attention as george zimmerman. from her phrase creepy ass cracker to her visible frustration with don west in the courtroom, she was definitely not a wall flower witness. >> i had told you -- are you listening?
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>> yes, ma'am. >> i had told you what happened to me in the crump interview. are you listening? >> maybe we can break until the morning. >> no. i'm done today. i'm leaving today. >> what's that? are you refusing to come back tomorrow? >> to you? >> so that was rachel jeantel in the courtroom a couple weeks ago, but last night in an interview with piers morgan, some say we saw a different side of jeantel, more animated, more relaxed, but just as controversial. >> don west gave you a very hard time, the defense attorney. >> don west. >> what is your -- what is your view of him? >> i'm going to have to say he lucky i'm a christian. weed, you say marijuana. in my area we say weed.
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my area weed for trayvon, i can explain one thing, weed don't do, make him go crazy, it just make him go hungry. look at the picture. there is blond females. mind you, where we live, where everybody live, blonds are dumb. they say dumb things so that's some dumb blonds. and i really don't care. to me, i want to -- >> joining me now, robert franklin, former president of moore house college. emily miller, senior opinion writer of the washington times and lauren ashburn, founder and daily beast contributor. welcome to all of you. before we chat, we saw a glimpse of this. one of the things people were talking about was rachel jeantel's casual use of rachel language. here she was. >> nigger. >> why?
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>> people -- the whole word i say is a racist word. mind you, around 2 -- 2 -- 2000 they change it around. they start spelling it n-i-g-g-a. >> what does that mean to you, that way of spelling it? what does that word mean to you? >> that mean a male. >> a black male? >> no, any kind of male. >> black or white? >> any kind. chinese can say nigga. that's my chino nigga. >> rappers use it? >> they use it, yes. >> that's what they mean? >> but nigger, i advise you not to be by black people because they not going to have it like that. >> why? >> because that's a racist word. >> they're two different words? >> yeah. >> have different meanings in your community? >> no, in a generation, 2000.
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>> to young people? >> not young people. all people use that, too. just want to have a discussion with this language. dr. franklin, i want to begin with you. you've been a president of a college for a number of years. you've worked with a lot of young people. her casual use of the racial slurs. what does society make of this? what do you make of this? >> well, i find it interesting that this young woman who in many ways is very naive but also at times sophisticated as she tries to explain the use of language in her cohort. >> she's earnestly trying to explain? >> indeed. i think she's reaching out so that others will understand what she means as she employs this language. ultimately i think this really signals the need for all of us to have a different kind of conversation and we need a national dialogue about race and about culture because we're rapidly approaching the time when there will be no majority in america and all of these young people will be the
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citizens leading our communities forward. >> we are trying. hopefully this is the beginning of something larger. lauren ashburn, you hear rachel jeantel. look, this is a generational thing. she says, no, young folks, old folks use the n word. the n word ending in a describes a male of any race. should society just accept that? >> i think what she is trying to do and -- is really explain, as you said, what is happening on her level. however, that word has such negative connotations and white people, people of other races have been vilified for using it. when someone is allowed to say it and someone else isn't allowed to say it. i think that you're right, the dialogue in america has to happen. if you google race in america, you get hundreds and hundreds of articles, symposiums from the
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university of pittsburgh to the aspen institute all of which are trying to make this issue go away. >> in terms of race, i know emily, you disagree with rachel jeantel. she says race was, of course, a factor in this case. listen to this. >> racial. let's be honest. racial. if you were -- if trayvon was white and he had a hoodie on, would that happen? because that was around 7:00 or something. people walk their dogs. people still outside. all that. >> the jury never really discussed race as being a major factor here. >> imagine. they're white. one hispanic. >> was that a common belief on the jury, that race was not -- that race did not play a role in this? >> i think all of us thought
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race did not play a role. >> so nobody felt race played a role? >> i don't think so. >> none of the jurors? >> i can't speak for them. >> that wasn't part of the discussion in the jury room? >> no. no. we didn't have that discussion. >> it didn't come up, the question of did george zimmerman profile trayvon martin because he was african-american. >> i think he profiled him because he was the neighborhood watch and he profiled anyone coming in acting strange. i think it was just circumstances happened that he saw trayvon at that exact time that he thought he was suspicious. >> so, emily, you and many, many other americans agree with what we just heard from juror b-37. this was a case of simple self-defense. you say and many others say, this should never even have gone to trial, correct? >> that's right. let's just look at the facts of the case. the lead detective on the case, the police, the fbi did an investigation last year whether this was related to race. the lead detective said it had nothing to do with race. when zimmerman called 911 he didn't report this being a black
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person, he said he's someone wearing a hoodie and the emergency caller said, can you tell race? he said, i think black. i mean, there's absolutely nothing to do with this. this is being fanned by people like jesse jackson or charlie rangel or at times barack obama by saying trayvon martin looked like the son i never had. the justice department under attorney general holder saying we're going to look into this. it's being fanned, but the facts of the case as the jury decided them, as the prosecution pursued the case, no one has ever said race came into it. >> what is it about the case, when you look at the folks on the street, listen, we have this conversation, a lot of people on both sides i think saw the headlines initially, had a preconceived notion going into t. didn't get into the weeds and follow this trial and came out believing what they believed initially. are you following me? i feel like there is clearly -- it's not always simmering. there is such anger, rage, frustration in this country. if you look at either trayvon martin or george zimmerman, they
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represent so much more than just two individuals. >> but, brooke, let's talk about profiling for a minute. you have six people who are white on this jury and people are saying if there had been african-americans on this jury, that the result would have been differe different. is that profiling? >> that's hypothetical. the president of the united states has said the jury has spoken. let's not question that hypothetical. however, are you saying that by putting a black person on the jury we would have found him guilty even though he was not? i mean, do you really want to screw with the justice system? >> let me stop both of you ladies. with all due respect, let me stop you there. there are lots of hypotheticals that have been thrown around. i am glad you brought up the president because this is something actually dr. franklin and i were tweeting about this last night. many people have spoken about
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this. the president 12estepped into t. one of his sons would look like trayvon martin. should the president lead a national conversation that we're talking about when it comes to race? we're going to talk about that next. is the better choice for him, he's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. i was okay, but after lunch my knee started to hurt again. and now i've got to take more pills. ♪ yup. another pill stop. can i get my aleve back yet? ♪ for my pain, i want my aleve. ♪ [ male announcer ] look for the easy-open red arthritis cap.
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can you find it hard at times to understand what she was saying? >> a lot of the times because a lot of the times she was using phrases i have never heard before and what they meant. >> when she used the phrase creepy ass cracker, what did you think of that? >> i thought it was probably the truth. i think trayvon probably said that. >> and did you see that as a negative statement or a racial statement as the defense suggested? >> i don't think it's really racial. i think it's just everyday life. the type of life that they live and how they're living in the environment that they're living in. >> that was the voice of juror b-37 speaking in shadow with anderson cooper talking about what she thought of the prosecution witness here, rachel
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jeantel. back with me, robert franklin, former president at moorehead college. emily miller, senior opinion writer for the washington times and a daily beast contributor. the issue of race clearly struck a chord with people in this country. i want to talk about where we go from here. let me play this sound bite. this was from president obama last year. >> if i had a son, he'd look like trayvon. and, you know, i think they are right to expect that all of us as americans are going to take this with the seriousness it deserves and that we're going to get to the bottom of exactly what happened. >> dr. franklin, i defer to you first. you came on the show yesterday and we continued the dialogue through the rest of the evening. when it comes to one idea that can take us forward, you suggested possibly president obama could lead a conversation on race. how could that happen? >> i think president obama should seize this moment and
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begin a conversation about race. the attorney general's already told the naacp and the deltas in washington, d.c., that we need a national conversation on race. and i think who better to lead the conversation. go back and listen to the march 2008 speech that president obama, then senator obama, delivered titled a more perfect union, and he talks about the generosity and decency of americans. he holds together his white grandmother and reverend jeremiah wright. he's engaged in some very important work that as a nation we need to do as we move to reconciliation. >> how does he do that? as the first african-american president, not take a side but almost rise above? >> he can rise above. president clinton did it with the race initiative. appointing credible people to lead that forward. dr. john hope franklin did it before. dean chris edley. all sorts of great people who can do that today for him. in addition, i just returned from south africa where i paid homage to president nelson
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mandela standing outside that hospital. look at what that one president did for south africa. he created truth and reconciliation commission and led a national conversation. and i have to tell you, brooke, there were white former security guards who protected mandela who were out in the street alongside young black people and others grieving and hoping for mandela's restoration. so president obama can do this. he's very skillful, very smart and has a personal biography that the nation needs now. >> as i listen to you, emily miller, i'm curious of your thoughts. i was reminding myself reading about that summit in 2009 and the uproar over the racial profiling in henry lewis gates and the cambridge police officer and, you know -- >> and he was wrong. obama jumped into that case, threw down the race card and once again he was wrong. this is the second time he's done it. i don't know why we're talking about nelson mandela and a prar tied. we do not have apartheid.
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we do not need reconciliation. we have not had laws like this. this is the president fanning these flames. >> young people are being killed because of the inability to empathize with young black males. >> that is totally irresponsible of you to say. trayvon martin was killed because he turned around and started beating the crap out of zimmerman. >> why did he turn around? he was being pursued. >> he was being followed. he was not hurt -- >> i think we're -- >> sir, this is -- >> an important conversation about race. aren't we supposed to be having a conversation about race and not fighting about what happened in the past? >> well, brooke -- >> the conversation is supposed to be about race, then we need to have it in a civil way, emily. we can't be yelling at people. that's what gets us in trouble in the first place. >> brooke, my point is that there shouldn't -- i don't know why the media, why the naacp is making this case about race. >> it's not the media. it's not the media. you are -- forgive me. it's my show. hang tight there. there are people across the
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country who are clearly angry on both sides of the issue. i think there clearly is a need for some kind of reconciliation. we need to move forward. my question, i wish i had the answer, is the how. one idea would be the president, but to your point, emily, you know, it wasn't as successful from a lot of perspectives, that beer summit. donna brazile tweeted me, political strategist, cnn. she says should the president focus on a discussion on race? no, focus on jobs and opportunities for all. >> i agree. >> if it's not the president, then who does? >> i love donna, but i disagree. i think the president restores the conversation. >> he has already done this. he has done it by being the first african-american president. he has other things he needs to do. and i think what needs to happen is that people like me, like emily, like others in the media and others who are grassroots politicians need to start it
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from the bottom. these are conversations. in this book barack obama says one conversation can change a life, and it's people who are out there who are preaching for people to be sympathetic and for people to be understanding of other people. >> emily miller, i'm going to give you the last word. >> i want to go back to the point that the prosecution, the jury, and the fbi have all said that race played no role in the facts of this case, so anything that comes out of this that is race related is not coming from the jury, the prosecution, the fbi or the police. >> okay. we've got some work to do. robert franklin, emily miller, lauren ashburn, thank you all for the candid conversation. >> thank you. >> i love it, i invite it. let's do it again. coming up next, a story you cannot miss. a woman who lost her leg in the boston bombings tells cnn her challenges at home dealing with her husband, her daughter all the while recovering. her emotional story after this. [ mortazavi ] i'm definitely a perfectionist.
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three months after the attacks on the boston marathon finish line, we're now taking you inside one woman's emotional recovery. her name is mary daniel. she had just arrived at the finish line to cheer on the fellow runners when those bombs exploded. daniel was critically injured. she lost her leg in the blast and now she's learning to walk again, learning to live again. poppy harlow is following daniel's progress for us and to keep us updated throughout the year. first, here is her report. >> reporter: how are you feeling? >> excited. >> reporter: excited because may mary daniel is getting something she's waited and waited for. >> i'm going to bring this back a little bit. >> reporter: at just 31 she's been to hell and back. >> the moment i got there, that's when i heard the blast. >> reporter: her heart stopped twice while doctors were amputating her left leg. >> i just woke up and my leg
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wasn't there anymore. >> reporter: the blast nearly took the life of someone who embodies the american dream. mary came here from haiti at 17 and went to medical school abroad, got married, and gave birth to a beautiful little girl. now she's learning to live again. >> how are you? >> reporter: comforting her daughter who has a hard time understanding. >> at first she was afraid of the leg. >> really? >> yes. she didn't want to come near it. she didn't want to touch it. she didn't want to have anything to do with it. >> reporter: how has it changed your relationship with your husband? >> i think it brought us closer. he's more understanding now and i think i'm more understanding, too. we fight less. >> reporter: support has poured in. online a fund started to raise money for mary's mounting medical bills. at the school where her father drives a bus, children walk in mery's honor. >> i'm almost there. >> reporter: she takes each step
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with determination after losing her left leg and part of her right calf. >> i don't mind people staring. that's the new me now and i have to be comfortable. >> reporter: she's found an inner strength that even surprises her. >> sometimes you don't know the limits with how far you can go until you're tested. >> reporter: it's that mental strength that's critical in recovery. as she puts her new leg on it hurts, feels heavy and awkward. >> is something hurting you? >> my knee. >> reporter: she has trouble bending the knee and is scared of falling, but she doesn't. >> it's hopeful, like i'm going to be able to walk and do things that i want to do. >> i describe myself as the last responder. >> reporter: dr. crandel is leading mery's rehabilitation. there's also the realization that there's actually a lot of hard work and that they really need continued rehabilitation. >> reporter: that rehabilitation lasts a lifetime. >> this is the most stable.
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>> reporter: and that's how long dr. crandell plans to be by mery's side, as does fellow amputee and pair a olympian, bonny saint john. >> she's an american hero. >> reporter: who's helped mery see that losing a leg doesn't mean losing your life. >> i look at things for how they are and the positive in things. when you get to do that, you get to see the beauty in life. >> reporter: around her, a reminder from a fellow survivor. never, never, never give up. >> it's like that survival mechanism that we have as humans, like we have to go forward. i think that's what's awakening in me right now. >> poppy harlow, i'm so glad you're following her story. what an amazing woman. what is next for her? >> she is an amazing woman. she puts everything in perspective. so she just sent me a message today, brooke. she's still working on walking. it's tough. the leg is heavy.
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she has a long way to go. it's time to study. remember, she just graduated medical school. she's determined to pass the boards and become a family practice doctor. she wants to do something different now. she wants to help motivate people, be a motivational speaker just like bonnie saint john because she was so helped through this by her. she also told me a story that really stuck with me. she said, i love to wear dresses. i wear them. then people stare at my leg and they stare at my injuries but i don't care and i'm not going to stop wearing them. i'm going to stand up and be who i am. you never know how strong you are until you have no choice but to be. and that is something to remember. we're going to keep going to boston, keep visiting her all year. >> please do. i was just on my day off walking down boylston street sunday morning. we will never, ever forget. poppy harlow, thank you very much. coming up next, hln's vinnie politan got a story with the prosecutors in the george
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zimmerman trial. >> i've had a little bit of time to reflect. was that your a. game? was that your best? how did you feel about your own performance? >> how did they answer? that's coming up next with vinnie. huh...fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. mmmhmmm...everybody knows that. well, did you know that old macdonald was a really bad speller? your word is...cow. cow. cow. c...o...w... ...e...i...e...i...o. [buzzer] dangnabbit. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know.
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. there is no arguing with some of the most emotional moments for the past couple of weeks. the parents of 17-year-old trayvon martin listening to witnesses, sitting there in the courtroom, seeing the evidence presented. so why weren't his parents inside that courtroom in sanford, florida, when that verdict was read? host of hln after dark vinnie asked angela cory that question. >> trayvon martin's parents weren't there. did you know they weren't going to be there? >> yes. i had talked to is a bresabrina that day. they had been so strong
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throughout the entire thing. they sat in the courtroom and showed very little emotion, and i don't know how they did that, but i could feel her breaking point when the defense attorney got up and showed a picture of her young, very thin son trying to make him look like a muscle bound monster and i could felt her behind me get up and leave the courtroom and basically after that i don't think she could take much more of them assailing her son, trying the victim in a case where he was an unarmed teenager just walking home. >> vinnie politan joins us now. you sat down. angela corey, bernie de a rionda. this was before cnn got the interviews with juror b-37, with rachel jeantel, so they didn't have that in their minds when you were asking them about what they thought of the witnesses, what they thought of the jurors. >> right. >> what did they tell you? >> well, you know, one thing
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that kept coming up from bernie de a rionda was we don't get to pick our witnesses. and, you know, i asked him about, you know, investigator serino, the lead investigator whose testimony clearly helped the defense. >> yeah. >> and they were very tactful in the way they answered the questions, but the bottom line kept coming back to we don't pick our witnesses. >> it's what he didn't say that sort of answered the question. >> i think so. i think so. whatever's happening internally. we know bernie de a rionda, angela corey's office takes over the investigation. so serino and local people were pushed out. serino had given it to the state attorney in his jurisdiction. the bottom line is people who usually help you weren't necessarily helping you. >> right. especially the lead investigator. >> right. i believe him. that's the end of the case. >> right. >> if you believe george zimmerman, end of the case. >> right. what about how bernie de a rionda talked to you about how he feels like his team did in this trial?
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let's watch that. >> you've had a little bit of time to reflect. was that your a game? was that your best? how did you feel about your own performance? >> i thought i did a good job. i'm not, quite frankly, used to losing, and so i'm going to -- over my mind i'm going to critique this over and over. i'm still doing that probably, but i thought we did the best we can. >> not used to losing. critiquing. >> here's the thing. this is before, right, anderson spoke with the -- >> juror. >> -- with the juror. he is -- what is going on? he says, you know, he wanted to know, have you heard from the jury. he wanted to know. he wanted to understand why they didn't understand his case. he usually wins. didn't win this one, you know. >> so he's still sitting there perplexed running it over in his head. i know there's more from that, after dark, 10:00 p.m. eastern. vinnie politan, we'll be there. >> thanks so much. coming up next, we will go to mexico. military helicopter corners a small pickup truck.
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inside this truck, eight weapons, hundreds of rounds of ammunition, $2 million in cash. one of mexico's most wanted men, the ruthless leader of a drug cartel trapped. what happened next? we'll tell you in two minutes. and now there's a new way to do the same for your dog. introducing new purina dog chow light & healthy. it's a no-sacrifices, calorie-light way to keep him trim, with a deliciously tender and crunchy kibble blend he'll love. and 22% fewer calories than dog chow. discover the lighter side of strong. new purina dog chow light & healthy.
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big news in new mexico. they caught the zetas. this is in mexico city early monday morning. the end of a frenzied operation
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to get this guy under wraps. he's known as z-40. he's wanted for all kinds of crimes in mexico, including hundreds of murders. z-40 also is known in the united states. his given name is miguel angel trevino morales. coming up, more of the exclusive interview from juror b-37 including how the jurors interacted with one another. one of the girls said -- asked if you can put all the leading things into that one moment where he feels it's a matter of life or death to shoot this boy or if it was just at the heat of passion at that moment. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
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the hottest stories in a flash. rapid fire. roll it. at this hour the u.s. senate is preparing for debate on one of the president's cabinet nominees after a deal was reached this morning to preserve the filibuster declaring the senate, i'm quoting, broken because of the repeated filibuster 60 vote threshold. senate majority leader harry reid had threatened an end run by simple majority vote. scientists now have evidence that the tie ran na sawyer russ rex really was the scary hunting predator like we all saw in the movie "jurassic park." kind of obvious to you and me, perhaps, but scientists thought
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t rex was too big, too slow to hunt. nice little t rex. maybe not. scientists found a t rex tooth in the fossilized tail of a smaller dinosaur. it conclusively puts the t rex at the top of the dino food chain. a space walk on the international space station cut short after one astronaut found a problem with the space suit. the italian astronaut found water floating inside his head inside his helmet. they made it safely back inside the space station. nasa will reschedule the space walk. coming up next, a heat wave rocking the northeast. that includes times square. that includes anna who apparently drew the short straw today covering the heat. we're coming to you, anna, in two minutes.
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that's why i like glucerna shakes. they have slowly digestible carbs to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna. helping people with diabetes find balance. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for him, he's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. i was okay, but after lunch my knee started to hurt again. and now i've got to take more pills. ♪ yup. another pill stop. can i get my aleve back yet? ♪ for my pain, i want my aleve. ♪ [ male announcer ] look for the easy-open red arthritis cap.
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if you are one of the unlucky ones at the moment heading outside, you'll be feeling the heat. anna corin in the heat of things in times square. how are people coping? how are you, my friend? how are you dealing with this heat? >> reporter: thank you, brooke. yeah, no, we are only just coping. it is exceptionally warm out here. i'll tell you, the heat is stifling. i can literally feel it coming
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off the pavement for the several hours that we have now been out here reporting on the heat wave. the people behind me i feel very sorry for them. they are cuing up for a broadway play they desperately want to see. we appreciate when the clouds come away. as you say, a heat wave advisory has been issued to the northeast of the country as well as the midwest. right now in times square it's about 93 degrees although with the humidity it probably feels like triple digits. we spoke with a couple of people and this is what they said with how they're coping with the heat. >> there is sweat on just about every inch of my body. so it's pretty gross. pretty disgusting. >> we're from minnesota so we're used to extremes. >> some like it hot. i like it hot. maybe not all of us, but some of us. >> reporter: now, brooke, we've done the right thing. we've moved into the shade which is very logical, as these people have. as you can see, behind me in times square, it's a lot cooler here. we have to use common sense.
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drink lots of water. keep out of the sun. wear sun screen. look out for the elderly. they are obviously the most vulnerable. but power companies, brooke, say that we should try and conserve on electricity. very difficult to do today considering air conditioning units will be working well and truly overtime as they try to escape the heat, including me. >> good luck with that. i must say you look lovely. you are glistening. i on the other hand would not be cute sweating. >> reporter: i think that's called something else. >> thank you very much. and now this. >> thank you. top of the hour. i'm brooke baldwin. in just moments you will hear the interview from the first juror to come forward in the george zimmerman trial and let me tell you, she gets candid. she sat down with cnn's anderson cooper exclusively, talked about how she and five other women reached the verdict late saturday night. her revelations may surprise you. meantime, what does the future hold for george
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zimmerman? well, that might come down to one man, eric holder, who just r refirmed that the department of justice is still looking into the fatal shooting of trayvon martin. he's set to speak at the naacp's convention. they have almost a million signatures now in this online petition which insists that george zimmerman racially profiled trayvon martin and that there are grounds for civil rights charges. other news now, edward snowden has reportedly asked russia for temporary asylum as he seeks a way to settle in with one of the latin american countries known for opposing washington. the leaker of national security secrets voided an earlier plea for asylum after russian president vladimir putin said he'd have to stop harming america. one of his contacts says he's still sitting on secrets that would damage america if they were released.
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a north korean freighter has caused damage in panama. the crew turned violent during this drug inspection. the captain had a heart attack, tried to commit suicide and then buried amid sacks of sugar, authorities found undeclared weapons, possibly missiles, which north korea is barred from buying under sanctions. that ship was heading to north korea from cuba. now to that cnn exclusive that answers what the nation has been asking. what were those six jurors thinking when they found george zimmerman not guilty? juror b-37 spoke to cnn's anderson cooper in shadow. we're following her wishes keeping her identity secret. the only question she left unanswered in her interview. for the next hour she explains the deliberations that ultimately left her and the other five jurors in tears. here's anderson cooper. >> when you first sat down on the jury, when you first
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gathered together, what was it like? did you know how big -- >> it was unreal. it was unreal. it was like something that -- why would they want to pick me, you know? why would i be picked over all these hundreds of people that they interviewed? >> and when the trial started, what was the first day like? there were the opening statements. don west told a joke. what did you think of that? >> the joke was horrible. i just -- nobody got it. i didn't get it until later, then i thought about it. i'm like, i guess that could have been funny, but not in the context he told it. >> going into the trial, did you have an idea in your head about what happened? >> no, because i hadn't followed the trial at all. i mean, i had heard bits and pieces of what had happened and the names that were involved, but not any details. i -- >> so take me back, if you can, to that first day, the opening statements. what do you remember about them?
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what stood out to you? >> not a whole lot because it seems like it's been years ago that it happened. >> really? >> it seems like it's been a very long time that we were there. >> was there a particular witness that stands out to you? who did you find to be the most credible? >> the doctor and i don't know his name. >> the doctor for -- the defense called? >> yes. yes. >> all right. what about him? >> i thought he was awe inspiring. the experiences he had had over in the war and i just never thought of anybody that could recognize somebody's voice yelling in like a terrible terror voice when he was just previously half hour ago playing cards with him. >> this -- this was the witness that -- the friend of george zimmerman's who had military experience. >> this was the defense. >> the defense medical examiner? >> yeah.
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yeah. >> okay. >> what was it like day by day just being on that jury? >> day by day was interesting. there were more interesting things than others when they got into the evidence, it was a lot more interesting than just testimony. some of the witnesses -- some of the witnesses were good. some of them not so good. >> did you feel -- a lot of the analysts who are watching the trial felt that the defense attorneys, mark o'mara, don west, were able to turn prosecution witnesses to their advantage. chris serino, for instance, a lead investigator. did he make an impression on you? >> chris serino did. he -- but he -- to me he just was doing his job. he was doing his job the way he was doing his job and he was going to tell the truth regardless of who asked him the questions. >> so you found him to be credible? >> i did. very credible. >> when he testified that he found george zimmerman to be more or less overall truthful,
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did that make an impression on you? >> it did. it did. it made a big impression on me. >> why? >> because he deals with this all the time. he deals with, you know, murder, robberies. he's in it all the time and i think he has a knack to pick out who's lying and who's not lying. >> the prosecution started off by saying that george zimmerman was on top in the struggle and then later on they seemed to concede, well, perhaps trayvon martin was on top, maybe was pulling away. >> uh-huh. >> do you feel that the prosecution really had a firm idea of what actually happened? >> i think they wanted to happen what they wanted to happen, to go to their side, for the prosecution and the state. there was a lot -- the witnesses that the defense had on plus some of the prosecution witnesses, there was no doubt that they had seen what had
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happened. some of it was taped so they couldn't rebute any of that. >> it was on the 911 tape? >> 911 tape's, john good calling, all of that. >> how significant were the 911 tapes to you? >> the lower tape was the most significant because it went through before the struggle, during the struggle, the gunshot and then after. coming up next what juror b-37 told abdelkader son about the voice heard on that 911 call. also heard thoughts of the testimony of trayvon martin's friend, rachel jeantel next. members of the american postal worker's union
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it was that one 911 call that took center stage in the george zimmerman trial. >> does he look hurt? >> i can't see him. i don't want to go out there. i don't know what's going on. they're sending. >> so you think he's yelling help? >> yes. >> all right. what is your -- >> who was that voice heard crying for help? was it george zimmerman? was it trayvon martin? juror b-37 didn't hesitate when she answered. here again is cnn's anderson cooper.
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>> you had the parents of trayvon martin testifying. you had the -- friends of george zimmerman testifying about whose voice it was in the 911 call. whose voice do you think it was in the 911 call? >> i think it was george zimmerman's? >> did everybody in the jury agree with that? >> all but probably one. >> and what made you think it was george zimmerman's voice? >> because of the evidence that he was the one that had gotten beaten. >> so you think because he was the one who had -- who had had cuts, had abrasions, he was the one getting hit, he was the one call for help. >> well, because the witnesses of john good saw trayvon on top of george, not necessarily hitting him because it was so dark he couldn't see, but he saw blows down towards george. and he could tell that it was george zimmerman on the bottom. he didn't know who it was, but he knew what they were wearing. >> the one -- the juror who didn't think it was george zimmerman's voice, who thought it was trayvon martin's voice,
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do you know why she felt that way? >> she didn't think it was trayvon, she said it could have been trayvon's. >> so she wasn't even sure? >> no. she wanted to give everybody absolute out of being guilty. >> but you were sure it was george zimmerman's voice. >> i was sure it was george zimmerman's through the witness. >> and everybody else? >> i think so. i think they were. i don't think there was a doubt that everybody else thought it was george's voice. >> i want to ask you a -- i want to ask you about some of the different witnesses. rachel jeantel, the woman who was on the phone with trayvon martin at the start of the incident, what did you make of her testimony? >> i didn't think it was very credible but i felt very sorry for her. she didn't ask to be in this place. she didn't ask -- she wanted to go. she wanted to leave. she didn't want to be any part of this jury. i think she felt inadequate toward everyone because of her education and her communication
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skills. i just felt sadness for her. >> you felt like, what, she was in over her head? >> not over her head. she just didn't want to be there and she was embarrassed by being there because -- because of her education and her communication skills, that she just wasn't a good witness. >> did you find it hard at times to understand what she was saying? >> a lot of the times because a lot of the times she was using phrases i have never heard before and what they meant. >> so that term creepy ass cracker that rachel jeantel said trayvon had used, you're saying that's simply how trayvon and rachel talked to each other? >> sure. that's the way they -- they talk. >> and did you see that as a negative statement or a racial statement as the defense suggested? >> i don't think it's really racial. i think it's just everyday life,
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the type of life that they live and how they're living in the environment that they're living in. >> so you didn't find her credible as a witness? >> no. >> so did you find her testimony important in terms of what she actually said? >> well, i think the most important thing is the time that she was on the phone with trayvon. so you basically hopefully if she heard anything she would say she did, but the time coincides with george's statements and testimony of time limits and what had happened during that time. >> explain that. >> well, because there was a -- george was on the 911 call while she was on the call with trayvon and the times coincide and i think there was two minutes between when george hung up from his 911 call to the time trayvon and rachel had hung up so really nothing could have happened because the 911 caller would
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have heard the nonemergency call that george had called, heard something happening before that. >> she said at one point that she heard the sound of wet grass. did that seem believable to you? >> well, everything was wet at that point. it was pouring down rain. >> what did you think of george zimmerman? >> i think george zimmerman is a man whose heart was in the right place but just got displaced by the vandalism in the neighborhoods and wanting to catch these people so badly that he went above and beyond what he really should have done but i think his heart was in the right place, it just went terribly wrong. >> do you think he's guilty of something? >> i think he's guilty of not using good judgment. when he was in the car, he had called 911, he shouldn't have
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gotten out of that car. but the 911 operator also when he was talking to him kind of egged him on. i don't know if it's their policy to tell them what to do, to not get out of the car, to stay in the car, but i think he should have said, stay in your car, not can you see where he's gone. >> do you feel george zimmerman should have been carrying a gun? >> i think he has every right to carry a gun. i think it's everybody's right to carry a gun as long as they use it the way it's supposed to be used and be responsible in using it. coming up next, her thoughts on the infamous reenactment video and the jury's reaction to zimmerman and martin's parents taking the stand. when i first felt the diabetic nerve pain,
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zwroo l let me take you back to this exclusive interview, juror b-37. she decided saturday night that george zimmerman was not guilty of murder or manslaughter when he shot and killed trayvon martin. she spoke to anderson cooper and told him who she thinks started
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the fight that rainy evening. >> george zimmerman obviously did not testify, but his testimony essentially was -- was brought into the trial through those videotapes, a number of videotapes that he walked police through a reenactment of what he said happened. how important were those videotapes to you? >> i don't really know because, i mean, watching the tapes, there's always something in the back saying is it -- is it right? is it consistent? but with all of the evidence of the phone calls and all the witnesses that he saw, i think george was pretty consistent in what -- and told the truth basically. i'm sure there were some fabrications, enhancements, but i think pretty much it happens the way george said it did. >> when george zimmerman said trayvon martin reached for his gun, there was no dna evidence, they had testimony, well, it could have gotten washed off in the rain or the like, do you
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believe that trayvon martin reached for george zimmerman's gun? >> i think he might have. i think that george probably thought that he did because george was the one who knew that george was carrying a gun and he was aware of that. >> you can't say for sure whether or not trayvon martin knew that george zimmerman was carrying a gun? >> no. >> so you can't say whether or not tray vor martin reached for that gun? >> no. there's not a right or a wrong. even if he did reach for the gun, it doesn't make any difference. >> how so? >>well, because george had a right to protect himself at that point. >> so you believe george zimmerman really felt like his life was in danger? >> i do. i really do. >> do you think trayvon martin threw the first punch? >> i think he did. >> what makes you think that? >> because of the evidence of -- on -- on the t, on the sidewalk where george says he was punched, there was evidence of his flashlight and keys there
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and then a little bit farther downhere was a flashlight that he was carrying, and i think that's where trayvon hit him. >> so you think based on the testimony that you heard, you believe that trayvon martin was the aggressor. >> i think the roles changed. i think -- i think george got in a little bit too deep, which he shouldn't have been there, but trayvon decided that he wasn't going to let him scare him and get the one over up on him or something, and i think trayvon got mad and attacked him. >> do you feel like you know for sure what happened in the altercation? and did the other jurors feel for sure that they knew what happened? >> they knew exactly what happened. i mean, it started at one point and ended at another point. witnesses said they heard left to right movement. other witnesses said they heard
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right to left movement, but the credible witnesses said they heard left to right movement so whatever happened, i think the punch came and then they ended up up in front of -- in back of the house. i don't think anybody knows. >> when the defense in their closing argument played that animation of what they believe happened, did you find that credible? >> i found that credible. i did. >> what did you think of the testimony of trayvon's martin and father, do you find them credible? >> i think they said anything a mother and father would say, just like george zimmerman's mom and father. i think they're your kids. you want to believe that they're innocent and that was their voice because hearing that voice would make it credible that they were the victim, not the aggressor. >> so in a way both sets of parents kind of canceled each other out in your mind?
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>> they did, definitely, because if i was a mother i would want to believe so hard that it was not my son that did that or was responsible for any of that. i would convince myself probably that it was his voice. >> how critical is it for you in your mind of whose voice it was yelling for help? how important was that yell for help? >> i think it was pretty important because it was a long cry and scream for help that whoever was calling for help was in fear of their life. coming up next, they discuss the issue of race surrounding this trial. did the jury think it played a role? next. nd chicago, we're revving people up to take a lap around the legendary nascar race track with drivers from the coca-cola racing family. coca-coca family track walks give thousands of race fans the chance to get out, get moving, and have fun... all along the way. it's part of our goal to inspire more than three million people
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interview exclusive with juror b-37. >> the prosecution didn't use the word racial profiling during the case. they used the word profiling. >> uh-huh. >> and that was something that was worked out between the judge and the lawyers when the jury wasn't in the room. >> right. >> do you feel that george zimmerman racially profiled trayvon martin? do you think race played a view of trayvon martin asus spish shus? >> i don't think he did. i think circumstances caused george to think that he might be a robber or trying to do something bad in the neighborhood because of all that had gone on previously. there were unbelievable number of robberies in the neighborhood. >> so you don't believe race played a role in this case? >> i don't think it did. i think if -- if -- if there was another person, spanish, white, asian, if they came in the same
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situation they were trayvon was, i think george would have reacted the exact same way. >> why do you think george zimmerman found trayvon martin suspicious then? >> because he was cutting through the back, it was raining. he said he was looking in houses as he was walking down the road. kind of just not having a purpose to where he was going. he was stopping and starting. but, i mean, that's george's rendition of it. but i think the situation where trayvon got into him being late at night, dark at night, raining, and anybody would think anybody walking down the road stopping, turning, looking, if that's exactly what happened, is suspicious, and george had said that he didn't recognize who he was. >> well, was that a common belief on the jury, that race was not -- that race did not play a role in this? >> i think all of us thought
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race did not play a role. >> so nobody felt race played a role? >> i don't think so. >> none of the jurors? >> i can't speak for them. i'm not their voice. >> that was not part of the discussion in the jury room? >> no. no. we never had that discussion. >> it didn't come up, the question of did george zimmerman profile trayvon martin because he was african-american? >> no. i think he just profiled him because he was the neighborhood watch and he profiled anybody that came in acting strange. i think it was just circumstances happened that he saw trayvon at that exact time that he thought he was suspicious. >> the prosecution tried to paint george zimmerman as a wanna be cop, over eager. did you buy that? >> i think he's over eager to help people. like the lady who got broken in and robbed while her baby and her were upstairs. he came over and he offered her a lock for her sliding glass door. he offered her his phone number, his wife's phone number. he told her that he -- that she
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could come over if she felt stressed or she needed anybody, come over to their house, sit down, have dinner. not anybody -- i mean, you have to have a heart to do that and care to help people. >> so you didn't find it creepy that -- you didn't find it a negative that -- you didn't buy the prosecution when they kind of said he was a wanna be cop? >> no, i didn't at all. >> is george zimmerman somebody you would like to have on a neighborhood watch in your community? >> if he didn't go too far. i mean, you can always go too far. he just didn't stop at the limitations that he should have stopped at. >> so i don't -- is that a yes or -- that you -- if he didn't go too far. is he somebody prone, you think, to going too far? is he somebody that you would feel comfortable -- >> i think he was frustrated. i think he was frustrated with the whole situation in the neighborhood, with the break-ins and robberies and they actually
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arrested somebody not that long ago. i just -- i -- i mean, i would feel comfortable having george but i think he's learned a good lesson. >> so you would feel comfortable having him now because you think he's learned a lesson from all of this? >> exactly. i think he just didn't know when to stop. he was frustrated and things just got out of hand. >> people have now remarked subsequently that he gets his gun back and there's some people said the idea that he can have a gun worries them. does at that worry you? >> that doesn't worry me. i think he'd be more responsible than anybody else on this planet right now. >> next to the question so many of you want answered. how did the jury, how did these six women ultimately reach its not guilty verdict? her answer next. f-f-f-f-f-f-f. lac-lac-lac. he's an actor who's known for his voice. but his accident took that away.
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how exactly did this jury
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come to a final decision? anderson cooper continues his interview with juror b-37. >> if we can, let's talk about how you reached your verdict. when the closing argument was done, rebuttal was done, you go to that jury room. what happened? >> well, the first day we went in. we were trying to get ourselves organized because there's no instructions on what you do, how you do it, and when you do it. so we all decided we'd -- we nominated a foreman so she could have the voice and kind of run the show. if anybody gets, you know, so everybody's not talking over everybody. if somebody starts talking, somebody else starts talking, and then she would say, you know, stop -- we've got to -- one person at a time. we've got to do this. and so the first day we got all of the evidence on the tables and on the walls, then we asked for an inventory because it was just too time consuming looking
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for evidence when it was in no order whatsoever. >> did you take an initial vote to see where everybody was? >> we did. >> so where was everybody? how was that first vote? >> we had three not guilties, one second degree murder and two manslaughters. >> so half the jury felt he was not guilty, two man slaughters and one second degree? >> exactly. >> do you want to say where you were on that? >> i was not guilty. >> so going into it once the evidence -- all the evidence had been presented, you felt he was not guilty? >> i did. i think the medical examiner could have done a better job by preserving trayvon's evidence -- >> you mean the state? >> they should have bagged his hands. they should have dried his clothes. they should have done a lot of things they didn't do. >> do you feel you know truly what happened? >> i have a rendition of what i
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believe happened and i think it's probably as close as anybody could come to what happened. but nobody's going to know exactly what happened except for george. >> so you took that first vote. you saw basically jury split. half the jurors, including yourself thought not guilty, two people thought manslaughter, one person thought second degree murder had been proven? >> uh-huh. >> how do you then go about deciding things? >> we started looking at the evidence. we listened to all the tapes, two, three, four, five times. >> the 911 recordings? >> the 911 recordings, then there's the reenactment tape. there were some tapes from previous 911 calls that george had made. >> the reenactment tape, that's the tape of george zimmerman walking police through what he says happened? >> exactly. exactly. we looked through pretty much everything. that's why it took us so long.
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we were looking through the evidence and then at the end we just -- we got done and then we just started looking at the law. what exactly we could find and how we should vote for this case and the law became very confusing. >> yeah, tell me about that. >> it became very confusing. we had stuff thrown at us. we had the second degree murder charge, the manslaughter charge, then we had self-defense, stand your ground, and i think there was one other one, but the manslaughter case, we actually had gotten it down to manslaughter because the second degree wasn't at second degree anymore. >> so the person who felt it was second degree going into it, you had convinced them, okay, it's manslaughter? >> through going through -- going through the law. and then we had sent a question
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to the judge, and it was not a question that they could answer yes or no. so they sent it back saying that if we could narrow it down to a question asking us if -- what exactly -- nothat about the law and how to handle it but if they could just have -- i guess -- i don't know. >> you sent a question out to the judge about manslaughter? >> yes. >> and about -- >> and what could be applied to the manslaughter. we were looking at the self-defense. one of the girls said -- asked if you can put all the -- leading things into that one moment where he feels it's a matter of life or death to shoot this boy or if it was just at the heat of passion at that moment. >> so that juror wanted to know
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whether the things that had brought george zimmerman to that place -- >> exactly. >> -- not just in the minute or two before the shot actually went off -- >> exactly. >> -- but earlier that day, even prior crime? >> not prior crime, just -- just the -- the -- the situation leading to it. all the steps. as the ball got rolling, if all of that -- >> from him spotting trayvon martin -- >> exactly. >> -- following him, whether all of that could play a role in -- >> determining the self-defense or not. uh-huh. >> did you feel like you understood the instructions from the judge? because they were very complex. i mean, reading them, they were -- they were tough to follow. >> right. and that's -- that was our problem. i mean, it was just so confusing what went with what and what we could apply to what. because, i mean, there was a couple of them in there that
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wanted to find him guilty of something, and after hours and hours and hours of deliberating over the law and reading it over and over and over again, we decided there's just no way -- other place to go. coming up next, she describes to anderson the moment all these jurors broke down in tears. i'm the next american success story. working for a company where over seventy-five percent of store management started as or be an engineer, helping walmart conserve energy. even today, when our store does well, i earn quarterly bonuses. when people look at me, i hope they see someone working their way up. vo: opportunity, that's the real walmart.
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take you back to the final piece of the interview.
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the mother of two grown children told anderson cooper she had no clue what she was getting into when she became part of this george zimmerman trial. i want to take you back to this conversation here with anderson cooper. >> whether he was right to get out of the vehicle, whether he was a wanna be cop, whether he was overeager, none of that in the final analysis mattered. what mattered was those seconds before the shot went off, did george zimmerman fear for his life? >> exactly. that's exactly what happened. >> and you have no -- do you have any doubt that george zimmerman feared for his life. >> i have no doubt george feared for his life in the situation he was in at the time. >> how has this been for you? i mean, how was making that decision when you all realized, okay, the last holdout juror has decided, okay, manslaughter doesn't -- we can't -- we can't hold george zimmerman to manslaughter, there's nothing we can really hold him to, not guilty. in that jury room, emotionally what was that like? >> it was emotional to a point,
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but after we had put our vote in and the bailiff had taken our vote, that's when everybody started to cry. >> tell me about that. >> it was just hard thinking that somebody lost their life. there's nothing else that could be done about it. i mean, it's what happened. sad. it's a tragedy this happened, but it happened. but i think -- i think both were responsible for the situation they had gotten themselves into. i think both of them could have walked away. it just didn't happen. >> it's still emotional for you? >> it is. it's very emotional. >> can you explain the emotion? >> it's just sad that we all had to come together and figure out what is going to happen to this
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man's life afterwards. you find him not guilty, but you're responsible for that not guilty and all the people that want him guilty aren't going to have any -- any closure. >> do you feel sorry for trayvon martin? >> i feel sorry for both of them. i feel sorry for trayvon and the situation he was in and i feel sorry for george because of the situation he got himself in. >> did you realize how big this trial had become? >> i had no clue. no clue whatsoever. >> did you realize there was this much attention on it? >> it didn't to me because i didn't see it as a racial -- racial thing. i saw it as a murder case, as a second degree murder case. it just -- it was just
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unbelievable that it had gotten so big and so political -- not really political, i don't want to say that, but so emotional for everybody involved. and i never would have thought when we went over to the hotel to get all of our stuff from the hotel, we got to the hotel and the parking lot was just a regular parking lot. by the time we came out it looked like disney world. there was media. there were police. there were -- and it really kind of started to sink in. we went to get our stuff and then the state police showed up because they were going to be our escorts home. >> are you scared now? >> i'm not scared. i don't know how to say it. >> you clearly don't want people to see your face. >> no. but i don't want anybody else around me to be affected by anyone else. i mean, i'm -- i'm -- i'm not
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really scared but i want to be cautious, if that makes any sense. >> it's understandable. >> yeah. >> but you want people to know -- why -- why do you want to -- why did you want to speak? >> i want people to know that we put everything into everything to get this verdict. we didn't -- we didn't just go in there and say, we're going to come in here and just do guilty/not guilty. we thought about it for hours and cried over it afterwards. i don't think any of us could ever do anything like that ever again. >> wow. what an interview. now that we have heard from this first juror here exclusively, juror b-37, we'll talk to our legal experts. what do they think of the cases? are they won or lost even before the trial starts in jury selection. we'll discuss next.
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juror b-37 is not finished. she will reveal much more tonight on anderson cooper 360 tonight at 7:00. darren, do you think that the defense won this case before it
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even began back during jury selection? >> brooke, it's a little hurtful that you say you're going to bring in the legal minds but you don't say the great legal minds. >> the great. i salute you, my friend. go. >> i think ultimately jury selection is the most important part of any case. you can have the most compelling case in the world but if you don't have an audience receptive to hearing it, you're not going to get anywhere. and it's an insanely difficult task we ask jurors to take on and this was highlighted in this interview. we take people that generally speak having no legal training because most of the time we weed out the lawyers, we give them no real discussion about legal principles, throw them back in the jury room to fend for themselves and figure it out, stuff that we spent years studying and still needing to refine, it's a losing proposition on so many levels.
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>> we heard her say to anderson the instructions were confusing was the word she used. >> tanya, we were talking in the commercial break, a lot of people are saying these were five white women and one hispanic woman but really it's about the pool you are selecting or perhaps deselecting from, not just who you're picking. >> that's absolutely right. we know from watching jury selection in this case that there were some african-americans who made their way into the pool. they just did not make their way on to this jury. i think this really highlights something that is really kind of critical. the juror said that she did not race as being involved in this case. and of course jurors make decisions about cases based on their life experiences, they filter the evidence in through their life experiences. and so when this juror did not have any life experiences that mirrored trayvon martin's or
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rachel jeantel for that matter, i think it became more difficult for her to identify with them. this question i've asked and people have asked me on twitter and on facebook, if people think that race had nothing to do with this case and we're talking about the jury right now, ask yourself honestly if this jury was made up of six african-american women, five of whom were mothers, do you think the result would have been different? and if your answer to that is, yes, i do, then i think we have to ask ourselves why. and i this i that is probably one of the clearest indications that this case does have absolutely every to do with race. >> darren, do you agree? a lot of other people are looking at the facts and they were saying this was self-defense period. >> without getting into the facts, from a legal standpoint the lawyers were not allowed to
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argue race in the case that, this was criminal profiling that zimmerman engaged in, it want racial profiling. had it been racial profiling, race would have been a legitimate issue in the case. i get how the case has surfaced all kind of racial issues and i'm a huge proponent of having fierce, authentic conversations, but i don't see this case as being about race. and personally i always saw zimmerman as being an equal opportunity buddinski and i could perhaps pick stronger words than that. i don't personally necessarily believe he was motivated by race in profiling trayvon either. >> coming up next, i'm fascinated not on by these three jurors who saw not guilty but there were three others who saw either guilty in the second degree or manslaughter. how did they change their minds? let's talk about that next. angie's list members can tell you
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help cover what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands a year in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. and learn more about the kinds of plans that will be here for you now -- and down the road. i have a lifetime of experience. so i know how important that is. quickly tanya mahll miller, does a juror who walks in feeling guilty of second degree murder change their mind? >> i think they get beat down. if that juror does not have the tools to really make case to the other jurors to persuade them over to her side, she just gets beat down. >> darren? >> group dynamics are a really tricky thing. this is why during jury
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selection you'll see one or both sides saying to the panel, what if it was 11-1 or 5-1, could you be that strong soldier? that's something that lawyers try and suss out during the deliberation process. >> thank you for watching. i'm brooke baldwin. "the lead" with jake tapper starts now. >> if you've only seen the protests on tv, well, they may be coming to a city near you this weekend. the national lead, 100 rallies and vigils, 100 cities. some civil rights leaders announcing ambitious plans to protest the george zimmerman verdict across the country, even while a handful of demonstrations tip over into violence on the west coast. also, what's it like to sit on a jury, deciding one of the most controversial trials in a decade, to have so many questioning your rationality, your judgment? we'll ask a juror who served on