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tv   The Situation Room  CNN  September 1, 2014 2:00pm-4:01pm PDT

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apple discovered that i cloud accounts could be compromised through the find my iphone feature. the company said we take user privacy seriously and actively investigating this report. how about not taking naked photos for people in the public eye. that's it for the lead. i'm dana bash. jake tapper returns tomorrow. i turn you over to brianna keilar sitting in for wolf blitzer in "the situation room." >> thanks, dana. happening now, detain americans eke out. north korea pulls aside its veil of secrecy and gives cnn rare can toes to three americans it's holding. and britain's prime minister wants tougher anti-terror laws to block jihadists from traveling to and from iraq and syria. and militia pool party. libyan fighters frolic in the pool at the abandoned u.s. embassy compound. what are they doing there in the
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first place? wolf blitzer is on assignment. i'm brianna keilar. you're in "the situation room" . our top story, three americans held by north korea issue a plea for help. north korea eased its extraordinary secrecy enough to give cnn's will ripley unprecedented access to the three detainees one of whom is serving hard time at a labor camp. will ripley was working on several stories when officials suddenly gave him the chance to meet with the americans. here's his report. >> mr. bae, will ripley with cnn. >> this is a moment we never expected during a cnn trip to north korea, officials take us to a secret location for a surprise interview with kenneth bae, the american missionary is serving 15 years hard labor for what north korea call achristian plot to undermine the government. >> can you tell me about the conditions at the labor camp in.
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>> condition in labor camp is i'm working eight hours a day, six days a week and working agricultural work to other hard labor, that is required to do every day. >> do you think you're being treated humanely. yes. >> and your message to your family? >> well, i'm sure they're very worried about my health at this time and even though right now, last month and a half my heart's been not -- it's been failing. so right now, what i can say to my family and friends is to continue to pray for me and also ask them to continue on effort on getting me released here. >> bae's been. north korea for almost two years. two other americans were arrested separately in april. we were pulled off our regular schedule and brought here to a building in pyongyang where we
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would told we had precisely five minutes with each of the detainees. they're held in separate rooms and have no contact with each other. american matthew miller admitted to tearing up his visa and seek asylum in north korea. now he wants out. >> what's the bottom line bomb your situation here and your message that you want to put out? >> that my situation is very urgent that will very soon i'm going to trial and i would directly be sent to prison. i think this is -- this interview is my finally chance to to push the american government into helping me. >> jeffrey fowle confessed to leaving' bible behind during a tourist trip, considered a covert act by the north korean government. he was arrested on his daughter's birthday. >> and your message to your family. >> message is i'll come home as soon as i can. my family is the biggest thing on my mind right now.
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i've got the wife and three school age kids that depend on me for support and my mother-in-law is staying with us, too. there's six in our household. and when i'm gone. >> right now foule is in a hotel but that could quickly change if he's found guilty later this month. >> i'm good for the time being but need to let people know i'm getting desperate for help. >> each man says they're getting humane treatment. they're pleading for the united states to send a special envoy to secure their release. three americans held in north korea, waiting and hoping that some day, they'll go home. will ripley, cnn, pyongyanging >>ing will ripley is pulling together more of his material and we'll be hearing more details from him in the days ahead. what's in it for north korea? why is the rigidly communist nation now letting cnn and the world hear from these american prisoners? brian todd has been looking into that. what have you found?
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>> analysts say the north koreans view these three menace bargain chips, that it's in their interests to make these cases high profile and try to extract concessions from the u.s. government. we have to warn viewers some of you may find some images in this story disturbing >> kenneth bae ask his family to pray for him, says he, would six days a week in a labor camp. in an interview with cnn's will ripley, he spoke about his failing help. >> i do have sleep disorder right now and severe back pain and also poor is circulation is not doing so well. i get -- i get numb and i have tingling in hands. and it's been very difficult sleeping at night. and also working in the field every day. >> bae's family says he has high blood pressure, diabetes, kidney stone. jeffrey edward fowle speaking fast said he was desperate to be released and matthew todd miller
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looked robotic and said he deliberately committed his crime when he tore up his visa and asked for asylum this year. >> dil prepared to violate the laut of the dprk before coming here. >> why not? why put them out for interviews now? >> first of all, their motivation behind the interview has always been to gatter u.s. attention and try to pave a way for the higher level dialogue with washington. >> while the north koreans may view the three americans as criminals, experts say they likely also see them as important bargaining chips. >> as an american there, you can be considered a very high value target if detained by the government. >> analysts say the north koreans are likely angling for an envoy with huge stature to come to north korea and take the men out, much like bill clinton did in 2009 when he won the release of two journalists. could bae's case prompt such an event? he's been held almost two years and sentenced to 15 years hard labor. he says he goes back and forth
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between a hospital and labor camp. conditions in north korean prison camps thought to house more than 100,000 people were unveiled in a hoom rights report in february. drawings depicted starving people eating snakes and rats. emaciated human remains left for rats to eat. kenneth bae may not be in one of those facilities. he says he's the only prisoner the camp where he's held. >> i've been the only prisoner the camp for the last year and a half. >> analysts say kim jong-un's regime doesn't want bae to the die in their custody. what's their goal? >> they're negotiating ploy with the u.s. is to try to get to us agree to nuclear arms control, to accept them as a nuclear weapons state which we can't do. >> but the white house and the state department have responded to cnn's interviews with the three men, both entities saying they're doing all they can to secure their release. the state department requesting the north koreans actually
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pardon kenneth bae and grant him amnesty and release so he can seek medical care. they separated bae's case from the other two. >> that is fascinating. you see these interviews and you parse every word. something that i think struck many people was that fowle and miller said something bae didn't. >> very significant there. bae has been sentenced but jeffrey edward fowle and matthew miller warn in the interview they have trials coming up and both hinted if nothing's done after tear trials things could get much worse for them. fowl avenue said he's in a desperate situation right now. after these trials, you downtown note what's going to happen to me. >> let's get reaction now. joining me by phone is terry chung, the sister of detained american kenneth bae. terry, i know you are so concerned about your brother. what was your reaction as you
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saw this interview with him? >> it was you know, it was a big concern to me. you know, he doesn't look like himself. he is -- he doesn't look well and he looks like he's under a considerable amount of strain. so we're really worried about him. >> it looked as if perhaps he's lost weight even just in some of the pictures that we've seen less than a year ago. detail some off your health concerns about him. >> yes, i think just in the last month, he says he lost 15 pounds. just even from the pictures we've seen, he looks like he's lost a significant amount of weight and so we're worried about that. >> he has diabetes. is that right? he has high blood pressure. he's talking about tingling. obviously in his extremities that would relate to the diabetes? >> yes. diabetes and i think he has -- he's talked about lung and liver
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problems in the last letter. those are completely new ailments. i think those are all really alarming to us. his health is the first and foremost concern for us. his health is poor, yet he's doing eight hours of hard labor every day. i think that's the biggest concern. >> one of the things that is noticeable about the u.s. government response is the singling out of your brother here. what do you think about that? and do you think the american government is doing enough to secure your brother, kenneth bae's release? >> we are thankful for the on going efforts. i know they're working hard behind the scenes. the fact remains kenneth is still there and he's the only one to have served a significant amount of time in labor camp. he has already been sentenced to 15 years of hard labor and you know, besides his poor health, he's back in the labor camp for the third time. as you heard him say in the
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interview, is he completely isolated and his health is failing. i think there's a renewed kind of urgency to had his situation. i how much that is warranting some of that attention. >> your brother and jeffrey fowlee both referenced sending over a special envoy, jeffrey mentioning specifically bill clinton like with the two american puerto rican journalists. he also mentioned george bush. should the government send over a high profile special envoy as north korea so clearly wants them to do? >> i don't think i'm in a position to debate who or what it's going to take. i do know the message has been consistent that kenneth cannot be pardoned on his own. he needs u.s. government intervention and that the united states needs to request a pardon by the north korean government. i'm not really in a position to say or what that's going to take.
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but i do hope that it is time to seek that kind of pardon and that's our desperate plea to our government officials and to the dprk officials to accept the plea and pardon him. >> what else is your message to the north korea government to kim jong-un? what do you want them to consider as they are currently holding your brother? >> we would plea for mercy. he has confessed his crimes. he has served two years of a sentence. he has acknowledged his crime. we've apologized. he's apologized. please show mers a and let him come home to his family and let him seek medical attention that he needs. >> terri chung, thank you so much for being with us. we know this is a very, very difficult time for you and your family. >> thank you. >> terri chung, the sister of kenneth bae held in north korea.
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and next, what is behind north korea's extraordinary move to let cnn talk with the three detained americans? i'll be speaking with someone who's played a keel role in contacts with the communist north and also a crackdown on isis. britain's prime minister wants to let police seize passports and take other measures to stop jihadists. should the u.s. do the same? the soul. s to but in the case of the lexus ls... ...which eyes? eyes that pivot with the road... ...that can see what light misses... ...eyes designed to warn when yours wander... or ones that can automatically bring the ls to a complete stop. all help make the unseen... ...seen. and make the ls perhaps the most visionary vehicle on the road. this is the pursuit of perfection.
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expertise in the area and worked behind the scenes to facilitate a number of u.s. missions to north korea. thanks for being with us. i think the biggest question here and we're all wondering, what's the motivation for the north koreans here? why orchestrate the interviews in the first place and why now? >> i think we have to focus on what's going on in the real arena which is not the arena of public television but the arena of back channel negotiations and talks for many years now, the two sides have been communicating with one another, the two sides meaning an the u.s. and north korean governments trying to make some head quai on the nuclear issue from the u.s. and north korean standpoint, trying to execute a peace tretty with the u.s. and other parties as well as reach a more normal relationship through at that time exchange of embassies and ambassadors. and so forth. and in that arena, the u.s. has
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repeatedly offered to send its special human rights coordinator or envoy from north korea, robert king, to go and fetch kenneth bae. going back to before the other two were detained earlier this year. north korea will have nothing of that unless it's tied to the resun assumption of officials talks where the two sides' agendas can be addressed. >> do you think there will be a resumion of official talks and what would be the order of release? is this something that the u.s. is even amenable to or should pursue? >> well, i think the u.s. needs to be nudged just a little bit. it's gone --'s been quite forward leaning actually in this respect. but if it would go a little bit further and in these channels indicate that the official talks indeed will resume if these three prisoners are released, now, obviously, that's a very sensitive position to take. you don't want to take it too
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lightly. but if that action can be taken, i think that we would see not only the prisoners being released but we would see the resunion of officials talks and hopefully some way to address the nuclear problem north korea posed. >> is an you watched the three interviews with the three men, must have been looking through every word they were saying. no doubt they were coached as to what to say and certainly the question is was restricted as our will ripley told us. what struck you from what they all said in their interviews? >> well, i think they indeed were coached and given gynes as to what to talk about that their conditions are good. . fowle even mentioned his quarters are suite like in his hotel. they've got medical assistance and being fed well. kenneth bae unfortunately has lost a lot of weight, probably because he's out working the
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fields every day. what struck me is that in addition to that, the authorities want the three detainees to let the u.s. government know that their release hinges on the resumption of officials talks between the two governments. >> and they want obviously a high profile enjoy to come. kenneth bae in particular, the u.s. government seems to be treating him a little differently in their reaction. he's clearly loft weight. his family is concerned about his health. he has a history of diabetes they tell us. what is the calculation for north koreaful his health were to get worse, how much is that a concern to north korea? >> one reason for having medical assistance nearby is to ensure that that does not happen because of course, that would spoil the whole scenario of using these detainees as political negotiating pawns. so i don't believe that that
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will happen. the special enjoy does not need to be at a presidential level or a former presidential level. we have to remember the ambassador king, the north korean human rights envoy himself rescued a pricher a couple of years ago when he went to pyongyang. so he would fit the bill. >> yeah. >> the key to it is really can the official talks resume or not? >> all right. we'll be watching for that. tony nam kong, thank you so much for being with us. >> thank you. >> coming up, a new plan to fight isis. britain's prime minister calls for tougher anti-terror laws and i an crackdown on travel by jihadists. should the u.s. follow suit? plus, fierce fighting and a reported tank attack on an airport. ukraine's leader is now warning of a full scale war with russia. you're in "the situation room."
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that is foreign fighters will return home from iraq and syria and launch terror attacks. now, just days after britain boosted its threat level, prime minister david cameron wants a major new crackdown aimed at isis and other jihadist groups. cnn justice correspondent pam brown has details. pam? >> as concern about isis grows, british prime minister david cameron laid out a new measure today to combat the problem giving police more power to seize pass powers of british-born extremists. british prime minister david cameron calls for a sweeping new anti-terror measure. >> passports are not an automatic right. >> cameron told lawmakers he
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wants police to have temporary power to seize the passports of british citizens trying to travel to support isis. >> we will introduce specific and targeted legislation to fill this gap by providing the police with a temporary power to seize a passport at the border during which time they'll be able to investigate the individual concerned. >> reporter: the uk government raised its terror threat level on friday from substantial to severe. that means a terrorist attack is highly likely, but there's no intelligence to suggest an attack is imminent. as for britain's closest ally, u.s. officials say there are no plans to issue a terror alert. >> the most detailed intelligence assessment that i can offer from here is that there is no evidence or indication right now that isil is actively plotting to attack the united states homeland. >> but the fear is that westerners including brits and americans could return home to launch attacks after fighting for isis in iraq and syria. >> it is abhorrent that people who declare their allegiance
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elsewhere are able to return to the uk and pose a threat to national security. >> british authorities estimate 500 brits have joined islamist terrorist groups in syria and iraq a statistic brought home when a man with a british accent took part in james foley's execution. >> the threat is much greater in the uk. that's why you're seeing a raft of new measures to trien attackal this problem. they're very, very worried isis may try and retaliate in some form of way. >> and u.s. officials say about 100 americans have joined islamist militants in syria. about a dozen of them joining isis. in a statement, the national security council wouldn't comment on the specific new domestic measures in the uk announced today but says the u.s. is in constant touch with the uk about any threat. >> pam, thank you so much. joining me now cnn london correspondent max foster. cnn national security analyst and former cia officer bob baer
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and tom rogan a contributor to the national review and columnist for london's "daily telegraph." max, let's listen to more of what prime minister cameron said today about the new measures that he's proposing. >> we will introduce new powers to add to our existing terrorism prevention and investigation measures including stronger locational constraints on suspects under -- either through enhanced use of exclusion zones or through relocation powers. >> first off, max, what are do the measures mean? also, you're hearing a lot of verbal pushback there. what is that all about? >> yeah, there's some history here. he's talking about control orders. if you've got a suspected jihadi within the uk, how would you deal with it? how do you stop them engaging in jihadi practices and speaking to other jihadis? well, what you do is you restrict their movements, restrict their access to communications. and in the past, whenever they
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tried to do that, the british government, the courts have blocked them saying you have to have grounds in order to do this to someone. and they won't give the evidence because it's intelligence. so that's been blocked by the courts before. but they feel that there's got to be some restriction on movement. otherwise you're not going to stop the problem. you've got the passports issue. what they're saying is what cameron wants to do is say you can't go to certain areas and actually, we can relocate you, as well. that's all he's saying there, but it's very controversial. you can see the reaction in parliament there to that. >> it's interesting, tom, we've been talking about this a bit. there is sort of i guess some disinterest in a way among a lot of the public in britain. are they as concerned? i mean, you hear the prime minister really sounding an alarm, but is that resonating with people? >> i think the issue here is that the british people have for a long time, whether it's terrorism coming from ireland, the ira and islamist extremism
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become accustomed to the rhetoric from government about threats. the problem is now with isis the rhetoric reflects reality and that as days go on and the threat grows, pileople have to come to grips with the fact that having british nationals fighting with this group poses a real security challenge. >> what does it take to convince people this is a real serious threat? >> obviously the media reporting reflects that threat. james foley was a shock to a lot of people. at the same time, what isis is doing across the region, the obvious destabilizing impact does impress on to people. now i think with the british government really reflecting pretty stringent measures are putting it to the front of the agenda as soon as parliament comes back. over time, people will begin to take notice of this and are realizing this is a serious issue. >> bob, a number of stringent measures here, pulling passports. is this something that the u.s.
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might ma replicate? >> i don't think we'll do that, but we can do more for a start, we need turkey to start giving us is lists of all-american who's enter that country and disappear for long periods of time. that's the major ingress noose syria and iraq. same thing with lebanon. i think the fbi should give it more authority and more people to look at data analytics, cross reference those with travel, start bringing people in. let's not forget the boston bombing which fell between the cracks. he was clearly a suspect and the fbi didn't bring him in. we should learn from those lessons and we have to do more. problem as noted is we've cried wolf so many times about al qaeda is that the american public is a bit jaded. what scares me is there would have to be an attack before they wake up. >> that seems to be the case, as well with the british public. i wonder though, to that point, how big of a threat?
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is this an imminent threat? is this something that is a ways off? is it impossible to tell at this point? how big of a threat do you think it is to the u.s., these isis fighters western isis fighters. >> well, is brianna, let me pass on what i hear from people doing tactical intelligence on grond, on the border with mexico, at the airports. they keep on telling me over and over again, isis is here. they're capable of attacking. no, we don't know of an imminent planning for a specific attack but it's here. and they could hit us at any time. this is a warning i've been hearing for the last couple months. they're very serious about it and keep repeating it. i realize in washington that's not the party line. but on the ground, people are worried. >> yeah, and as you said, it's sort of in a way it's become maybe the boy who cried wolf and people aren't responding to it as much. bob baer, thank you so much. max foster and tom rogan, thank to all of you.
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labor day marks the beginning of the fall campaign season. in kentucky, u.s. republican leader mcconnell's effort has been rocked by the sudden departure of his campaign manager. man's name is jesse benton. he issued a blistering denial of what he calls unfair and politically motivated rumors about his role in past campaigns. benton was chairman of former congressman ron paul's 2012 race for president. last week an iowa politician admitted taking money from the paul campaign in exchange for his endorsement. and there is breaking news in ukraine. amid the damage, blood shed and grief, its president now is warning of a full-scale war with russia. we'll have a live report on that next. and later, these people are supposed to be guarding an abandon ed u.s. embassy. doesn't really look like guarding, does it?
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why pay more for less? call today for a low price on speeds up to 150mbps. and find out more about our two-year price guarantee. comcast business. built for business. we're following breaking news in ukraine whose lead ser warning a full scale war with russia is getting nearer. the u.n. says at least 25900 people are dead in the fighting between government forces and russian supported separatists. today we are seeing reports of a russian tank attacking a major ukrainian airfield. another report -- another airport i should say in donetsk already is silent and abandoned with damage everywhere.
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diana magnay is in southeast ukraine with the latest. diana? >> reporter: hi, brianna. we heard from nato today that it plans to set up a very high readiness force in the words of the secretary-general which will consist of a few thousand soldiers who can deploy at very short notice should there be any threat presumably to nato's east european member states. we're very concerned about russia's military aggression in ukraine and the possibility the same thing might happen on their soil. we've just heard from the national security spokesman kaitlin hayden that the u.s. is behind this move, supports this move but it's stressing that this is simply a defensive posture and not a provocation. we'll have to see whether russia sees it that way. i am in the city of donetsk today and so i want to move away from the battlefield and the military discussions and show you a bit of the human suffering that i bore witness to today.
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petro poroshenko will have a hard time winning back hearts and minds in this city as the people of donetsk sweep up the debris of their homes, they are hardened against a president they say is i canning their own people. we are ukraine yanbu they kill us, this man says so we probably need our own country because these people in kiev are not brothers for us. the shells hit these homes days ago, but the tears are still fresh. [ speaking foreign language ] >> translator: we live on the ground. it was so hard for two weeks, especially for 27, 28, 29th. but only today it's quiet. sorry, sorry, i need to go. >> two people were killed outside this block of flats last
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wednesday. one of them a 50-year-old woman, the other a 34-year-old woman. her husband who says he's in shock managed to make it down to the cellar with their little child. she just didn't have the time. this is a story that repeats itself over and over in dozens of apartment blocks with civilians being killed by the constant shelling around donetsk. the city's trauma hospital is filled with the civilian wounded, shrapnel embedded in the flesh and bone, the broken limbs of pensioners far too old to run. there was one war and this is the second war, this old lady tells me. i was born in 1940 in world war ii and i will probably die before this war is over. val tina lost her leg and her arm to indiscriminate artillery shells. switching to the ukrainian language, she makes a heart rending plea to the president. we used to dance, sing, do
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everything in ukrainian, she says. poroshenko, mr. poroshenko, please isen to us. why don't you understand your people? be a man, be human. please some your aggression, stop this war. >> but there is little sign of that this once thriving city is now half empty, it's railway station bombed. the forces unleashed by the conflict greater perhaps than poroshenko control. today the 75th anniversary of world war ii. ukraine's defense minister said today a great war was coming to europe, the likes of which have not been seen since world war ii. i would categorize that really as hyperbole, very exaggerated. we see this kind of language from both sides, russia comparing the siege of donetsk where i am now to the siege of leningrad during world war ii. i'm here. you've seen the pictures and
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however terrible it is, it is, of course, nowhere near that. an indication kgs really brianna, of how the language, the heated rhetoric used on both sides is almost as dangerous as what is going on on the battlefield. brianna? >> diana magnay, thank you so much for your voreporting. >> joining us is the spokesman for the organization for security and cooperationing in europe. and you're hearing, michael, both sides in this evoking the memory of world war ii. we heard diana reporting there that it is some hyperbole but you tell us how bad things are on the ground there. >> things are very bad on the ground. thanks for having us again. we had monitors today throughout the region and lohansk and donet donetsk. you know, as much as diana said about the human cost in donetsk which we have observed, there's a very, very bad situation
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evolving in hugh hansk closer to the russian border. there ukrainian government officials are warming of a humanitarian catastrophe due to the lack of water and electricity. about half of the 420,000 people have fled the city because conditions are so bad. very bad situation throughout the region. >> vladimir putin said the talks wpgs ukrainian president poroshenko were positive. you also have him calling for statehood for eastern ukraine. how do you i guess figure out these mixed messages? >> well, we're on an observation mission and report exactly what we see on the ground. there was a meeting of the so-called try lateral contact group in minsk k today with the participation of the osc. these are important venues for the representatives of the different countries to talk to the rebel groups and try to find a peaceful solution. but you know, the situation as we've been observing as you know
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well over the past weeks has been deteriorating day by day by day. we're asking for checkpoints to be removed, for arms to be put down and most importantly, for people to get together and discuss a peaceful solution because as i said earlier, the humanitarian cost on this is very, very high. >> we're starting to hear from western nations talking about arming ukrainian rebels. the u.s. is not committed to this. others have. from what you have seen on the ground, how does that change the equation, if at all? >> well, a couple quick things there. indeed we have seen as recently as saturday that the ukrainian army is very, very unarmed compared to the rebels. also, we observed a protest in kiev on the weekend where mothers said their sons were fighting haven't had leave since way back in april. i met with senior canadian
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government officials last week. it's clear ukraine has moved quite up on the policy agenda. they're looking at translating their support by adding more monitors to our mission. canada is a pay thing member and it might be a way for the u.s. to translate its support, as well. >> the u.s. will be meeting with nato nations. president obama we'll be seeing if he takes that message, as well. michael, thank you so much. just ahead, how members of a lynnian mission apparently are passing the time while they're supposed to be guard agan abandoned u.s. embassy. and the interview, three americans being held in north korea. what if there was a credit card where the reward was that new car smell and the freedom of the open road? a card that gave you that "i'm 16 and just got my first car" feeling. presenting the buypower card from capital one. redeem earnings toward part or even all of a new chevrolet,
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u.s. officials are trying to clarify a video posted by a libyan militia. its members are supposed to be guarding the abandoned u.s. embassy in tripoli but guarding isn't the first word that comes to mind. cnn's senior correspondent nic roberts is joining us from london. break this down, nic. what's going on here? >> reporter: clearly a party. clearly having fun. this is an islamist militia pretty much in control of tripoli took control of the international airport recently. from what we understand, these are either the guards or friends of the guards who were allowed into the compound. we've also seen photographs inside some of these residential embassy compound buildings. we've seen bedrooms. we've seen living areas.
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we've seen a gymnasium. some windows are broken. a few books have been moved around. what we're being told from a spokesman for the libyan national congress is this isn't an attack and it's not a ransacking. the u.s. ambassador, deborah jones, she has also said this is not ran sacked chancery or embassy, but we're told by somebody familiar with this compound that this swimming pool area, these houses and the residential area are also used as office-type areas so it really begs the question, we're not seeing what's happening every day. what's going on the rest of the time and what really are these militias able to find inside the rest of the buildings. >> certainly if it's that secure, maybe not an attack. thank you very much. coming up an extremely rare look at three americans depertained in north korea hear what they're saying about their
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plight. the fighting inside syria as the u.s. pounds isis targets in iraq. we also have a new high tech tool that police will be using in ferguson, missouri. ♪ eenie. meenie. miney. go. more adventures await in the seven-passenger lexus gx. see your lexus dealer. but they have to use special care in keeping the denture clean. dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can multiply. polident is designed to clean dentures daily. its unique micro-clean formula kills 99.99% of odor causing bacteria
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with our snapfix app. visit angieslist.com today. ♪ happening now. plea for help. cnn obtains the only television interview with three american men being held in north korea, and they used this very rare opportunity to send a message to
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president obama. massive assault. government bombs fall on a civilian neighborhood while nearby the u.s. launches new airstrikes on isis terrorist forces. body cams. dozens of recording devices donated to a force reeling after a controversial shooting. how will they change policing in ferguson, missouri. we'll welcome our viewers around the world. i'm brianna keeler. you're in "the situation room." you're about to see extremely rare interviews with three american men being held by one of the most secretive and brutal regimes in the world. north korea let each of them speak to cnn in their only television interviews and each of them made a dramatic plea from help from the u.s. government. we are following that along with major new developments in the battle against isis using cnn's global resources on those stories and more. correspondent will ripley begins
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our coverage from inside north korea. >> reporter: will ripley with cnn. this is a moment we never expected. during a cnn trip to north korea, officials take us to a secret location for a surprise interview with kenneth bae, the american missionary serving 15 years hard labor for what north korea calls a christian plot to undermine the government. >> reporter: can you tell me about the conditions at the labor camp? >> condition at labor camp is i'm working eight hours a day, six days a week and working agriculture work to other hard labor that is hard to do every day. >> reporter: you are being treated humanely? >> yes. >> reporter: and your message to your family? >> well, i'm sure they are very worried about my health at this time, and even though right now last -- last month and a half i
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have been -- or so it's been fairly. what i can say to my family and friends, continue to pray for me and also ask them to continue an effort on getting me released here. >> reporter: bae's been in north korea for almost two years. two other americans were arrested separately in april. we were pulled off our regular schedule and brought here to a building november pyongyang where we were told we had five minutes with each of the detainees. they're held in separate rooms and have no contact with each other. american matthew miller admitted to tearing up his visa and seeking asylum in north korea. now he wants out. >> reporter: what's the bottom line about your situation here and your message that you want to put out? >> that my situation is very urgent, that very soon i am going to trial and i would directly be sent to prison. i think this is -- this interview is my final chance to
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push the american government into helping me. >> i'd like to thank you guys for being here. >> reporter: jeffrey foul, a father from ohio, confessed to leaving a bible behind considered a covert act. he was arrested on his daughter's birthday. >> reporter: your message? >> i'll come home as soon as i can. i have a wife and three elementary aged students that depend on me for support. my mother-in-law is staying with us, too. there are six of us in our household. and i am gone. >> reporter: right now foul's in a hotel, but that could quickly change if he's found guilty later this month. >> i'm good for the time being, but i need to let people know that i'm getting desperate. i'm getting desperate for help. >> reporter: each man says they're getting humane treatment. they're pleading for the united states to send a special envoy to secure their release. three americans held in north
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korea waiting and hoping that some day they'll go home. will ripley, cnn, pyongyang. all reporting from inside of north korea as you can imagine is carefully controlled by officials there. will ripley is on his way to beijing where he'll be able to give more details about what he saw saw and we'll bring them to you as soon as we get them. experts say these were no goodwill interviews. barbara starr is working that part of the story for us. barbara, what are you picking up? >> reporter: well, brianna, the question is why did the north korean regime allow these interviews to happen? do they want sanctions lifted so they can buy food for their people or do they have something else in mind? north korea's leader kim jong-un has shown no sign of releasing the three americans, but kim clearly wanted to use the interviews to get a message out. accepted him a u.s. envoy.
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jeffrey fowle was detained earlier this year. >> this is an opportunity maybe for bill clinton to come back and he has released a couple of journalists a couple of years back. maybe george bush, his term as an elder statesman to try that. >> reporter: kenneth bae, held the longest, nearly two years, for hostile acts. he's serving 15 years at a labor camp. >> i do believe that special envoy need to come to resolve the situation that i'm in right now. >> reporter: matthew todd miller made a plea. >> first off i'll just state a message to my government. i've been requesting help for a long time and there's been no movement from my government. >> reporter: why would the violent and unpredictable leader of north korea now maybe be ready to deal? >> they're sding a message saying they're ready to bargain. the united states, you need to start talking to us. >> reporter: the state department only saying we continue to work actively to secure these three u.s. citizens
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release, but there may be a long way to go. kim wants food for his starving people, but there are no signs he's willing to stop developing nuclear weapons, a crucial demand by the u.s. recent commercial satellite imagery in fact shows continued activity at the nuclear site where reactor may be able to make plutonium for nuclear warheads, and the regime continues developing ballistic missiles and mobile launchers, a trifecta of the ultimate threat. a nuclear tipped missile moving around north korea, impossible for u.s. satellites to track. the behind the scenes weapons development, a crown jewel for leader kim who intelligence analysts believe continues to consolidate his grip on power even killing an uncle who may have grown too powerful. it's all a contrast to the
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public face the regime wants the world to see. events like welcoming american wrestlers and hosting dennis rodman for basketball with the harlem globetrotters. some of the video that will ripley's crew shot in north korea really is just fascinating, brianna. if you look at some of it in the background, even in the reflections in the mirrors in that hotel room, you see other people, security personnel, other north koreans who are there watching. clearly the regime knows that the u.s. intelligence community is going to be watching every frame of this cnn broadcast for any clues that the u.s. can get what is really going on there. >> so closely orchestrated. very good point there. barbara starr at the pentagon. thank you. we want to hear more from today's interviews from u.s. detainees. here is malhottthew todd miller. he is 24 years of age.
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>> reporter: can you tell me about the charges you're facing in north korea? >> i will not find out until i go to trial, but i will say that i prepared to violate the law of the dprk before coming here and i deliberately committed my crime. i have already admitted my guilt and apologized to the governments of the tprk and i have been asking for forgiveness. >> reporter: did you tear up your visa and seek asylum? is that accurate? >> the previous interview that is what i said so i am not here to discuss -- >> reporter: tell me about your conditions here. how are you being treated? >> i'm with good health and i've received medical checks and provided with humanitarian treatment. >> reporter: and what is your message to your family? >> first i'll just say my message to my government. i've been asking help for a long time and there has been no movement from my government. the american government is known
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for having a strong policy of protecting its citizens yet for my case there is still no movement. i've also written a letter to my president with no reply. >> reporter: while you're in north korea? >> yes, about one month ago. so for this reason i am disappointed in my government, however, i want to believe that my government or someone is trying their best to help me and i would be very glad to meet the person that saves me. >> reporter: why did you come here seeking asylum? >> during my investigation i have discussed my motive and for the interview it is not necessary. >> reporter: what's your message to your family? >> i've had the opportunity to phone call them so i've already spoken to them. >> reporter: what's the bottom line about your situation here and your message that you want to put out? >> that my situation is very urgent. that very soon i'm going to
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trial and i would directly be sent to prison. i think this is -- this interview is my final chance to push the american government into helping me. >> reporter: so if it's your final chance, what do you want to tell them that you haven't already said? >> that i need help and they need to quickly make movement because there's not much time. we are listening to parts of today's extraordinary interviews with americans detained in north korea. this is jeffrey fowle. he is an american tourist accused of leaving a bible in a hotel where he was staying. >> reporter: sit down. >> okay. >> reporter: all right. give me -- give me a cue when we're ready to start. >> we are rolling. start now. >> start now. >> i'd like to thank you guys being here. i appreciate you taking your time to get my message out to
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the world. >> reporter: good to see you. first of all, can you tell us about the charges you're facing as you've been told. >> the charges are violation much dprk law which stem from me leaving a bible at a senior a's club at the dprk. it was a covert act and i admitted my guilt to the government and signed a statement to that effect and i've also put in a request for forgiveness to the people and representative of the dprk. and the legal process is ongoing right now. it's in the final stages of the preliminary investigation. the prosecutor's office and they say the trial will be forthcoming soon. time is getting urgent. within a month i should be facing trial and sentencing will be right after that. so i'm -- you guys need to convey my desperate situation
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which i'm 56. i'm from the dayton, ohio, area. >> reporter: we know your background. i will ask you, how are you being treated here? >> very -- reasonably well. i have no complaints. the food has been very good. daily walk with the guides. even medical care has been furnished a couple of times and quarters good. so i don't have any complaint about the treatment. it's been very good so far. i hope and pray that it continues whether i'm here two more days or two more decades. whatever the case is. >> your message to your family? >> message is, a, i'll come home as soon as i can. my family is the biggest thing on my mind right now. i have my wife and three school-aged children that depend on me for support. my mother-in-law is staying with us, too. there's six of us in our household. and i am -- when i'm gone my wife's trying to operate the household by herself. it's a chore to do with two people let alone one.
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she's depending on almost a single salary household. my wife has a small part-time job as a hairstylist. she doesn't bring in much money. money will be tight. if this goes beyond the end of september, then i'm in grave danger of losing my job. that's when my vacation benefits run out. i'll be out of a job, she'll be out of income. our house is paid for but there are all kinds of expenses going on with operating a mini farm, which is what we've got. chores. the kids are helping the best they can. jobs are piling up. i need to get back to doing what i do around the house there. getting back to work. hopefully that job will be open when i get back soon. today's the 1st. in three more days my oldest is going to be turning -- having a birthday. i missed my middle kid's birthday back in june. the minute i found out i was in deep trouble it was my daughter's birthday. i've missed a lot of birthdays
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since i've been in detention since the 7th of may. >> jeffrey fowle there, one of three american men being detained by the north korean government. i want to dig a little deeper on this with victor chaw. he is a top bush governor. he's a chief advisor at the center for strategic and international studies and he's the author of the book the impossible state, north korea past and future. so, victor, thanks for being with us. also, you listened. you're hearing from kenneth bae and you hear from jeffrey fowle and they both bring up this idea of having a u.s. special envoy come. in fact, fowle says maybe bill clinton who we've seen go before female american journalists or george bush. do you think this is a possibility and would it be effective if it's not someone as high profile as a former president? >> well, i think they were probably fed those lines first of all because a lot of that -- a lot of their interview looked like it had been doctored in
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some format. the history of this has been that some envoy, not necessarily foreign presidents, that's the most recent case, but there have been envoys that have gone over to bring back these americans that have been detained. so i'm sure in that sense they see that as the proper precedent but, again, in perspective, brian brianna, these are average americans and they're taken and held as though they're subversive spies or terrorists. this is ridiculous behavior. >> when you say their interviews are doctored, do you mean very prompted and orchestrated. >> i think they were briefed very carefully on what they should and should not say in the five minutes they had. for many of them they wanted to get out their story, be able to say something to their families and then to try to offer a solution of some sort to get them out of there. so i think that's what they were basically limited to saying and that's what they tried to do. >> we just listened to the speech or the interview of matthew miller and it sort of struck me that given an opportunity to talk to his
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family, he essentially declined. he didn't want to talk about the charges against him even though we've heard from will ripley that that actually was within bounds. was there anything in particular about this interview with this youngest man here, the 24-year-old that really stood out to you? >> i think he's very scared very clearly. i don't think they do have a good sense of what the charges are against them until they face trial and that's not a fair trial. i think all of them are in the way over their heads.
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more alarmed as his health suffers? >> in all the machinations, take an american and for the american to die in their hands. so i think that is something that's a concern for them. that's why the doctor's there. it also gives them a way out if the united states government is set for humanitarian reasons. for medical reasons he needs to be released. that's as good a way as any for the north koreans to get rid of this guy and still save some face. >> so what then, we look at the u.s. response. they seem to allow kenneth bae for health reasons. what are the logical outcomes here and do you see them being different for the different men because we know that fowle and miller have not yet gone to trial. >> i mean, i don't know what's going on behind the scenes right now in terms of the diplomacy. my guess is the fact that all three of them were put on tape for an american audience on labor day as a signal from the north koreans that they're looking for some sort of package deal to try to get them all out. whether they're trying to connect this to the long style
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nuclear negotiations is anybody's guess. i know from a u.s. perspective they don't want these two things to be linked because this is a humanitarian issue and the u.s. for two decades has been a very difficult discussion. if the north koreans are trying to leverage this, i don't think it will work. it's largely a humanitarian issue. the u.s. needs to keep those separate. >> victor chaw, thank you poor your insight. appreciate it. still ahead, new details of u.s. air strikes on isis forces in iraq. also a new statement from the family of joan rivers plus one of the critically ill kmeetd yans. they talk to her at cnn.
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american attacks on isis terrorists in iraq. u.s. central command is reporting that three new strikes damaged vehicles near a major dam that a group is fighting to control. u.s. forces have now conducted a total of 123 airstrikes on isis and they do appear to be making a difference. anna coren is in irbil. what are you picking up there, anna? >> brianna, certainly the u.s. air strikes are making a difference out at mosul dam. it's a massive operation, not just by the united states but the kurdish forces on the ground. providing much needed cover to obviously reclaim mosul dam which is what they did last week but also the surrounding towns and villages. the problem, however, is that
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isis is digging in. we were there over the weekend and we were surprised, brianna, to see that the militants are really claiming these villages and townships. we got confirmation and the rules sustained. it was a truck with explosives and drove it in to the front line of peshmerga blowing it up killing many of those soldiers. obviously a huge blow and peshmerga are the ones taking the fight to isis on the ground but it also just shows the risks that these soldiers are up against when they face isis militants. >> certainly does, anna. tell us a little bit about this and there's been a big victory for isis. a what can you tell us about this. >> the township of amerli, the
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township under siege for more than 2 months, which is hard to believe. the militants have food, water and power to this township of less than 20,000. massacre. we did see the u.s. over the weekend with the u.s. air strikes providing the cover to allow the humanitarian aid drops by the u.s., the u.k. as well as france and australia. the ground offensive that was led. it's on the ground. the enemies are coming there against isis.
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the syrian opposition coalition as well as isis in syria and you certainly want to see president obama order airstrikes in syria, right? >> absolutely. we believe that it is both an american national security interest and an interest of the syrian people who are actively fighting isis for the u.s. government, for the white house to actively make a decision to immediately begin airstrikes against isis positions and their headquarters in syria. >> how can the u.s. do that without -- as a side effect really improve the situation for the assad regime? >> well, it's going to take a parallel policy by this white house. on one hand the u.s. needs to work with partners on the ground that are already fighting isis. you've got the free syrian army fighting isis in northern al lep poe province.
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they are fighting isis in syria. crucial strategic area that allows isis to move from syria into iraq. the planning effort is required here so that the u.s. sits down with the free syrian army and establishes a strategy to not only launch airstrikes against these positions that isis has in syria but to enable and to arm and significantly increase the capacity of the free syrian army to take over isis positions. many believe that american airstrikes against isis would help the assad regime. the reality is you speak to syrians on the ground and field commanders on the ground, they don't believe that. they believe that airstrikes, american airstrikes against isis will ultimately help the syrian people and the syrian opposition forces better defend the syrian people against both the atrocities of the extremists and the atrocities of the assad regime. >> what do you think is different, president obama showed a year ago that he was loathe to do airstrikes in syria against the assad regime after
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chemical weapons were used. why do you think this will be any different especially with americans being so weary of involvement? >> i think we've seen a remarkable shift in terms of the popular mood when it comes to u.s. military action in syria because of isis. recent polls actually indicate that 60% of the american public would support airstrikes against isis positions in syria. now no one is asking for boots on the ground. that's off the table. no one is asking for an american invasion like what we saw in iraq. we're seeing many senior members in congress saying for the first time that isis is an existential threat. the assad regime is part of that problem. that the assad regime enabled isis to grow and that it is time for the u.s. to seriously take a look at military intervention and military power in syria against isis and in support of the free syrian army. >> i want you to take a look at some video that we have. this is video of bashar al assad and his forces bombing
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civilians. should president obama pursue airstrikes against isis, should he also pursue them against the assad regime? >> well, interestingly enough, we saw the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. samantha powers state that assad regime is dropping 260 barrel bombs a month on civilians. this is an assad regime that's dropping barrel bombs on civilians and not fighting isis. i think that any military action against isis needs to take into consideration the assad regime is doing this type of thing and these type of attacks, these attacks against civilians, against apartment buildings, bakeries, schools only fuel the chaos and will only enable isis to grow in power so any military action really needs to be comprehensive in scope. >> aside from airstrikes, what do you want to see the u.s. do to help the syrian rebels? >> the u.s. can significantly increase military aid, both in quantity and quality.
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now we've seen some success stories on that front. the toe missiles which are originally from u.s. talks. they're anti-tank guided missiles. they have helped the moderate syrian revolutionary forces, the freedom fighters on the ground and defending the civilian populus from the u.s. the u.s. needs to take a serious look at that policy and expand the scope of not only the type of military equipment but the quantity. very similar to what the u.s. did in northern iraq with the kurdish security forces. when it came time to come to their support the kurdish security forces received emergency american military aid. that's exactly wa we need in syria today for the free syrian army to fight sis sis. >> thank you so much for being with us. advisor to the free syrian army. really appreciate it. brittain's prime minister calls for help to combat the isis threat. is president obama being too
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cautious? plus a huge change for an embattled police department. officers in ferguson, missouri are about to start wearing body cams.
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president obama is facing bipartisan criticism over his response to the isis terrorist threat, but now brittain's prime
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minister is calling for sweeping antiterror legislation to prevent militants from entering the u.k. cnn's senior white house correspondent jim accosta has details. what's the latest. >> reporter: president obama has ordered an expansion of airstrikes on isis. he did that over the weekend. despite all of that second guessing coming from political parties of the presidential party for dealing with isis. under growing pressure to escalate the u.s. battle against isis, president obama tried to make a labor day pivot to mid-term election politics. >> milwaukee brats are delicious and republicans in congress love to say no. those are just facts. the facts of life. >> reporter: but in brittain there was yet another plea from prime minister david cameron to get tough on isis. >> we will in the end defeat this extremism and we will secure this way of life for the way to come. >> reporter: targeting jihadis.
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he's ramping up airline no fly zones to keep militants out of the skies. back in the u.s. some lawmakers worry the isis threat will make the jump across the atlantic. >> i believe strongly that isis does plan on attacking the united states. >> over the weekend the president ordered an expansion of the u.s. mission in iraq with new airstrikes aimed at halting another humanitarian crisis. this time isis militants attacking ethnic turkman around the city of amerli. in a letter to congress the president said the new strikes will be limited in their scope and duration. they want president obama to hit isis harder. his comments on targeting the group in syria. >> we don't have a strategy yet. >> reporter: are now dividing democrats. >> i think i've learned one thing about this president, and that is he's very cautious. maybe in this instance too cautious. >> it's not just the united states. we can't be sheriff of the whole world. >> republicans, including some who are looking ahead to 2016,
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accuse the president of showing weakness. >> isis says they want to go back and reject modernity, well, i think we should help them. we ought to bomb them back to the stone age. >> reporter: and president obama's heading to a nato summit later this week that was supposed to be nearly all about ukraine and russia but that is changing fast as the president is looking for allies for a long fight against isis. brianna? >> jim accosta, thank you. let's get more with cnn's chief political analyst gloria borger, and cnn military analyst retired lieu ten nentd general mark hertling. former commander of the u.s. army europe. he served as director of war plans on the joint staff during the 9/11 attacks. peter, you first. you heard dianne feinstein, maybe too cautious she said of president obama.
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do you agree with that? >> no, i don't. i think before we launch attacks in syria, which is far different than doing it in iraq because we have a hostile government and our allies on the ground are much weaker and harder to discern, we have to be able to answer the question if we bomb isis from the air, who's going to take the territory on the ground. can we be sure it won't be bashar assad's forces? can we be sure it won't be other jihadist forces? al qaeda has another affiliate in syria. that's the el nusra front. the moderate rebels are very weak. if someone can make a good case that our bombing will empower the people we want it to empower, that's great. i haven't heard very many people making that case compellingly yet. >> what you do i think, general hertling. >> i don't think indiscriminate bombing is a good idea in any event, but i think there's a belief that we can just drop bombs and things will get better. the question is what are the targets? we know we would like to destroy
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or defeat isis, but where are they? would we like to go after the town of alraka. we have to remind our selves that's a city of 250,000 people the majority of which do not believe in what isis is doing also. it's very difficult and i think the simplistic approach to this of just dropping bombs is very wrong sided. >> and there you have it. peter and the general laying out a lot of what president obama is getting counsel on and you see him not really wanting to put a decision out there. >> well, you know, he's got a cabinet that's clearly conflicted about this. he personally is clearly conflicted about this. >> definitely. >> we see that play out. then you have an american public that's also conflicted about it. you know, more than half of the american public, brianna, says that this president is not a strong leader when it comes to foreign policy. on the other hand, more than half of the american public does not want to get involved in any kind of situation with iraq so,
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you know, the american public is conflicted too. so it's a very difficult decision for the president. i think now in the nato meeting he's going to have to take a leadership role, not only on ukraine but also on isis. we've heard david cameron talking about isis now and i think the president, david cameron, ought to have a meeting of the minds here about just what they're willing to do in terms of airstrikes as well as the nato allies. >> what do you think, general hertling. the president will be speaking to nato leaders. how important is it for him to come out of that summit with some sort of commitment from his allies? >> there are going to be some interesting discussions at the nato summit, brianna. there's going to be the discussions of ukraine and russia. there's going to be the question of eastern versus western europe. there's going to be the discussions of rebels coming through the rat lines back into europe, the things the u.k. is most concerned about. this is going to probably be the most intense and interesting
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nato summit in the last 20 years. >> and it's pretty fascinating, peter. before the president goes to the nato summit he goes to estonia. this will be his place to in a sense speak to neighbors of ukraine who are looking at ukraine worrying that they may be next. what does his message need to be on then we are on the hook to defend the border between estonia and russia.
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how do we get on the border to defend it. we have to do a good job so we don't see happening in nato countries what we see happening in ukraine. >> the president has been stumbling on foreign policy and he has so many issues to deal with now. when you look, gloria, at the week ahead, how important is it to get the foreign policy on track? >> he can't get the messaging on track until he has a strategy that he can talk to the american people about as peter was saying. so before, you know, he has to figure out what he wants to do. tell the american people why it is important for our own national security interests and then he's got to do it and hopefully he'll have some allies with him along the way. he's made it very clear, brianna, as you know from listening to him. he's not going to do something alone. >> we'll see him fighting to win some people over and then we'll see if he's actually able to this week. gloria, thank you so much. general hertling, thank you for being with us.
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peter, thank you as well. just ahead, ferguson police begin wearing body cameras while they're out on patrol. will that change things in a town devastated by a deadly shooting. we have a panel standing by to discuss that. comedian joan rivers is in serious condition. her daughter melissa keeping her fingers crossed. we'll get an update. saw significant symptom relief. and many achieved remission. [ female announcer ] humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened;
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call liberty mutual for a free quote today at see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. two companies have donated about 50 body cameras to the police department in ferguson, missouri, still reeling from the shooting death of unarmed black teenager michael brown. let's get more from tom fuentes. he's a former fbi assistant director and as well democratic attorney state senator maria chappelle. give us a sense of how these
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body cameras work and how common these are. >> they're becoming so. i think it's very similar to the dashboard cameras in police cars and originally when these devices were being proposed for law enforcement, a lot of uniformed police officers thought we don't want this. we don't want people watching every move we make, misconstruing that. now they're starting to realize, i think, gradually that there's been a tipping point to where they want people to see what they go through and that they would like their communities to know that it is just about an impossible job. it's not just the minority communities or african-americans or hispanic or asian. a uniformed officer, a cop, i did it for 6 1/2 years before i was in the bureau, you can't believe how big of a jerk, family audience here, people are. i don't care if they're a ceo of
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a fortune 500 company or a family, when they're on the street drunk, high, whatever it might be, they can be almost impossible to reason with. thes to show what the officer dealt with at the time at the point of arrest on the street because court date 60 days later, that person's there in their shiny new beautiful suit and tie, the pillar of the community. everything else. and the officer says, i want you to see what we went through or i went through on the street. it's a different story and camera can be help prove it. >> i bet it can. i wonder, maria, if you also think it helps with accountability? not just the perspective of the police officer but it may be the perspective of the person in say ferguson, missouri, who is dealing with the police officer. >> well, absolutely what i would have to tell you is my constituents want to have full transparency. we don't want to be part of a guessing game. so as your last speaker said,
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it's good for the officers who are having to deal with individual who have some issues but it's also good for the community that has complete unrest because they feel as though they have been many times either abused or harassed. so i think it's good for both parts to have this kind of video and audio on every single officer. >> what's the mood like in ferguson right now? >> well, i have to tell you, i've been on the streets today protesting and there was a wonderful person who came out to barbecue. we're just planning for the future. i've brought two staff members from dwrefr son city and we're about to do some aggressive constituency services. there are a lot of issues coming to bay and we have to address those issues. we are moving forward. we are trying to empower young people which is the most important thing right now as we're trying to create a calm and prepare ourselves for a grand jury. >>en an mark, you know, obviously, the farther away we
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get from the death of michael brown, you start to really look forward and think about not just ferguson but other communities and what needs to be done top overcome this real disconnect that we're seeing. i want to talk about over the weekend, we saw an op-ed from nicolas christophe. it highlighted really staggering figures about some of the economic disparities between whites and blacks in the country. he noted the u.s. currently has a larger wealth gap by race than south africa during apartheid. what do you make of that? and can the events of ferguson somehow help people kind of coalesce and try to deal with this? >> no, it's an interesting statistic. there are other statistics we could draw between apartheid, south africa and the united states, for example, mass incarceration numbers, as well per capita. you realize that ferguson is not just an isolated incident and not just a tragic shooting but a window into urban america and the gross forms of social
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inequality we see everywhere when you talking about poor police community relationships, lack of employment opportunities, a gap in power and imbalance of power and overrepresentation of one group over another in the city council and so forth, lack of access to housing, health care and education. when people say i am michael brown, they're not just talking about being young, black and outside but they're talking about the social circumstances that produced this. moving it forward, i'm excited to see dash board cameras and body cameras because it holds police accountable in a different way. but i also want to see voter registration drives and cop watch programs, employment possibilities. i want to see cities is begin to reinvest in urban areas and not insenty advice people to leave. ferguson was an outgrowth of white flight. ferguson is the site of possibility. >> it certainly is. and the beginning of a conversation that needs to
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happen. mark, thank you so much. maria, appreciate you being with us. tom, thank you to you, as well. >> a pleasure. >> her daughter melissa is keeping her fingers crossed. we'll get an update on the condition of comedienne joan rivers. i'm on expert on softball. and tea parties. i'll have more awkward conversations than i'm equipped for, because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there. how can i ease this pain? (man) when i can't go, it's like rocks piling up. i wish i could find some relief. (announcer) ask your doctor about linzess-- a once-daily capsule for adults
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a long time friend and collaborator of joan rivers is speaking to cnn about the comedienne's health crisis. the 81-year-old rivers stopped breathing during throat surgery last week and hospitalized ever since. alexandra field is working the story in new york. what can you tell us? >> so many people have been
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hoping to hear news that joan rivers is beginning to recover. right now, all we know is that her daughter melissa rivers acknowledged that joan's condition remains serious. she says her mom is getting the best care possible. now she's speaking to fans around the world who have been offering their support to joan. here's what she says. thank you for your continued love and support. we are keeping our fingers crossed. a hopeful message there. joan rivers has been at mount sinai hospital near 234 new york city since thursday taken there in critical condition after she went into cardiac and respiratory arrest during a throat procedure at at outpatient clinic near the hospital. friends have been going to visit joan "she's surrounded by close inner circle. i spoke to jay reddick, friends with joan for 40 years. they worked together on a number of projects. he told me if yoen could hear him he would just say he loves her. he knows her comedy can be polarizing but that truly she is a great person.
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that's why so many people, fans and other celebrities have been sending out support and best wishes to joan. >> we sure are rooting for her to pull through this. alexandra field, thank you so much. that is it for me. thank you so much for watching. really appreciate you being with us. i'm breeaianna keilar. this is situation room". anthony bourdain, parts unknown" anthony bourdain, parts unknown" starts right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com chances are you haven't been to this place. chances are this is a place you've never seen. other than maybe blurry cell phone videos, old black-and-white newsreels from world war ii.

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