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tv   CNN Newsroom With Fredricka Whitfield  CNN  September 6, 2014 7:00am-11:01am PDT

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question here, what are the nato allies agreeing to? do we have any specifics? >> reporter: well, christi and martin, basically secretary of state john kerry and defense secretary chuck hagel met with nine our countries or representatives from those countries yesterday afternoon and essentially they agreed to train and supply iraqi force there's on the ground as well as stopping the funding for isis or countering it in some way. president obama said yesterday it will take a long time. returning from talks in europe over how to deal with the isis threat, president obama now faces a returning congress, and lawmakers demanding a strategy. >> there was eu n unimty that i poses a threat to nato members. >> reporter: the president alluding it in the past weeks but becoming clearer. >> what we we can accomplish is
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to dismantle this network, this force, that has claimed to troll this much territory so that they can't do us harm. and that's going to be our objective. >> reporter: but achieving that goal in syria with a government the u.s. doesn't support remains a challenge. lawmakers on both sides of the aisle including republican frank wolf in the house and democrat bill nelson in the senate already are preparing legislation ahead of any presidential request to authorize u.s. air strikes inside syria. so far, mr. obama pledged no u.s. ground troops will enter syria, stressing that the u.s. and an international coalition will prop up partners on the ground there, like the relatively moderate free syrian army to take the fight directly to isis. >> they have been to some degree outgunned, and outmanned, and that's why it's important for us
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to work with our friends and allies to support them more effectively. >> reporter: now, president obama also compared the fight guess isis to the fight against al qaeda. of course, critics say the fight against al qaeda has not gone particularly well and they've had a resurgence in recent years. >> erik mcpike, patieappreciate report. and also fighting isis, joining from the northern iraqi city of erbil. anna, a firsthand look at battle and been on the front lines. >> reporter: yeah, that's right. martin, we went with the peshmerga, kurdish forces, on one of their missions. an overnight mission which started at the crack of dawn. they were taking back a strategic location, a mountainside, and many of the villages around it, which isis had seized control of back in june during their advance
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towards much of northern iraq. we there with several hundred kurdish forces and they pummeled that area with artillery and mortar as well as the u.s. air strikes. we witnessed them firsthand and incredible how they were taking out enemy positions as well as the artillery and the convoys. you know, this is how isis has been able to move around up until now. and in these hoards of convoys and able to take over these townships and small farming villages. that is no more because of the u.s. air strikes. it was quite incredible to see the full impact, and obviously, the cover, then, that they provide to the ground forces, but they managed to retake the strategic location within several hours and really setting them up for the next phase of the operation, which is down the plains into mosul. obviously, mosul itself is a completely different operation. you're talking about an isis stronghold, iraq's second largest city made up up more
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than 1.5 million people. this will be urban warfare and evolve, involve a lot more coordination and cooperation, not just amongst iraqis and kurdish forces but amongst the americans and international allies who have agreed to fight isis. >> all right, thank you very much for that report. >> thanks. talk more about the u.s. strategy against isis now. >> joining us, lieutenant colonel and pentagon consultant bob mcginnis and former cia counterterrorism official phillip mudd. bob, let me ask you this first. when we say nato or talk about some sort of coalition, how do we make sure it isn't just the u.s. almost alone doing whatever needs to be done? >> well, martin, that's always tough and, of course, the president was in nato this week talking with our key allies lie the brits, and germans and managed to garner significant support. they've recognized the threat of isis and, of course, now secretaries hagel and kerry are
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on their way to the middle east trying to recruit arabs so that they can fight on the ground. so together with the nato allies as well as those from the region working together, i think we can put together a reasonable coalition, and it will fit the emerging strategy the president has put together. >> let's talk about that strategy, because we know this week we heard not only from president obama but also from vice president biden and from defense secretary chuck hagel on the threat of isis. let's listen at this first of all, please. >> we will not be intimidated. their horrific acts unite as as a country and stiffen the resolve to take the fight against these terrorists. >> they control half of iraq today. they control half of syria today. we better be taking them serious. >> they should know we will follow them to the gates of hell until they are brought to justice! because hell is where they will reside!
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>> look, the tones are still a bit different here and certainly a lot different than it was when the president was calling isis a jv team some months ago. >> absolutely, yep. >> do you think, philip, this signals some sort of splinter in the administration which it comes to a strategy to deal with isis? >> i don't think it indicates a splinter, to be blunt, i served in administrations broeth republican and democrat. i think the talk got ahead of action and the white house lost some control of the people in the cabinet, in particular secretary of defense. i think the president clearly with the conversation with nato this week and with what prime minister cameron has said, the prime minister talked potentially about strikes in syria as setting up further operations in syria, i would be really surprised if we didn't see strikes in syria. i think in the chaos of washington with so many people speaking about the threat, they just lost the thread in the administration. >> now, there may be some who would argue, this is exactly what the terrorist wants. they want to see the united states and nato forces storming in because this is their way to
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stand up against the mighty u.s. >> well, martin that will help the recruiting effort, clearly. and they already have a very active social media. i would think that at this point that, yes, with the nato coming together, with, you know, kerry and hagel in the middle east getting arab nations and the saudis have said they'll do some of the financing, we've been working, clearly, with a number of more moderate rebel groups inside syria. so i do expect the president to announce in the next few days, i would expect, some sort of decision with regard to bombing headquarters there in eastern syria, where the isis is set up most of its facilities and then, of course, you just heard from the report in northern iraq, we have a number of air strikes that continue to go in. so thing, coming together. yes, perhaps the administration was a bit split, but i think at this point things are coming
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together. we'll have a strategy, but it will be a long fight. something that unfortunately america, we've put up a long time since 9/11. it's going to continue for years yet to come. >> bob, you mentioned the arab nations and a lot of people wondering, where are they and where have they been? with this coalition the president is hoping maybe some arab nationless come onboard here. philip i wanted to ask you about that. when we talk about arab nations, what about iran? if iran was willing to work with the u.s., would it were wise for american officials to welcome that? >> no, i don't think so. superficially this makes sense. the enemy is my friend. the iranians hate the suni militants being a state and bure cross creak. iran is a long standing supporter of assad. they sill support assad. iran a long-standing supporter of lebanese hezbollah, the organization that murdered so
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many americans including marines in a barracks in lebanon 1983. iran's been involved in supplying explosive devices to militia in iraq when american force was there. so before we say, hey, they can get in with us, with isis because they hate isis ace i'd there a -- isis, that's a kettle of fish i don't really want to keel with. >> are wep laying the foundation for what will be another war? >> no think so. look at the terror campaign around the world, talk about dismantling the threat, successes in places like pakistan, yemen, somalia, still an al qaeda presence, but the u.s. using local partners, using intelligence resources and to be blunt, using a tremendous effectiveness of drone strikes has managed to eliminate some of the terror components of the al qaeda organization in these states, even if some of the local groups that support isis,
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that is support al qaeda still operate. >> another war? bob? >> as indicated we'll use our drones, ip tell and air power to suppress them. hopefully the arab community will really come together on this. they recognize the seriousness of the threat. >> thank you gentlemen, both, for joining us this morning, thank you, gentlemen. a cease-fire between ukraine the government and rebel leaders holding for now, despite reports of some shelling in eastern ukraine. streets in the flashpoint city of donetsk appear quiet. the beal went into affect last night following nearly five months of fighting that left more than 2,200 people dead. a top ukrainian official says the situation is calmer since the cease-fire began but there's have been some provocations by rebels. we know this morning rescuers are scouring the caribbean sea after a plane crashed hours after the last word is from the cockpit.
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explaining oxygen deprivation and how pilots fight to survive. i got this. [thinking] is it that time? the son picks up the check? [thinking] i'm still working. he's retired. i hope he's saving. i hope he saved enough. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners,
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following the story yesterday, amazing. a search at sea under way now in the caribbean for that crash after pilots stopped responding to air traffic controllers. >> for more than four hours, no contact. u.s. fighter jets dispatched. cuba granting rare permission for u.s. aircraft to eastern enter their airspace. >> good morning, rene with the latest. >> reporter: krchristi and mart, a pilot flying unconscious. the pilot was in trouble just about an hour and a half after
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takeoff. a search mission underway right now for this small plane after it crashed 14 miles off the coast of jamaica. it took off from rochester, new york, bound for naples, florida. onboard, larry glazer and his wife jane. over north carolina, the pilot told air traffic control, there was a problem. but did not declare an emergency. he was cleared to descend to 25,000 feet, but asked to go lower. >> we need to go down to about 180. we have an indication that is not correct in the plane. >> level 250. >> 250 we immedianeed to get lo >> copy that. >> reporter: an hour and 15 minutes after takeoff the pilot stop responding to radio calls. u.s. military f-15s tracked it along the east coast of florida. one fighter pilot looked through the window. >> i can see rising and falling,
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right before i left, the first time we could see he was actually breathing. >> reporter: the pilot slumped over and the plane's windows frochted. both are signs the pressure may have escaped leaving the pilot without enough oxygen to stay conscious. the aircraft flew over the bahamas and south to cuba, where a cuban fighter jet took oesh p pursuit. 4.5 hour later the plane crashed. >> if the pilot suffers from hypoxia and was unconsideration as the plane continued to fly that is rare, not unheard of. a similar situation last weekend the faa lost contact with a private plane, it flew into restricted airspace over washington, d.c. the pilot was unresponsive to radio calls. from air traffic control. eventually, that plane crashed into the atlantic ocean. and then there's the payne stewart incident in 1999, the famous golfer and five others
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were killed when that plane crashed near aberdeen, south dakota. in that case, the plane traveled about 1,500 miles, most while the pilot, copilot and passengers apparently were unconscious or dead. christi, martin? >> wow. thank you so much for the info. and we spoke earlier with a retired air force pilot about the possibility of losing oxygen in the cockpit and what pilots can do to protect themselves and their passengers. >> there's a gauge in a cockpit that shows pressure altitude. it that's wrong, you know something's up. so the key is to descend immediately, then don your oxygen mask if you thought there was problem. if you delay, by the time the epoxia happens it can be too late. don your mask and then declare emergency. the key, aviate, navigate, then communicate. if air traffic controllers are not giving altitudes you need, take action. they're clear everybody out of your way if necessary. >> let me ask you this.
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we talk about how insidious this is. in other words, it can creep up on you. is there not an alarm inside the cockpit that somehow would be sampling the air saying, wait a minute. there's a problem and alarm bells go off? >> some have, some don't. have have indications, red lights, caution lights. two pilots in the aircraft, obviously they were both pilots. i believe the wife was not officially certified at the time, but especially when flying with a crew. make sure you're aware of the possible symptoms. have something take over. the key is get down and take action very, very quickly. >> all righty. we'll keep you posted on what they find in that regard. listen, if you haven't been paying attention to what happened in michigan this week, if you live in the northeast, you might want to take a look at what they dealt with. >> yeah. a massive storm that swept through there. lightning, heavy rain and thousands without power. could be more of the same this weekend. e's a gap out there.
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smoke, flames and lava. sounds like a schoolboard meeting. it is pouring out from the kilauea volcano in hawaii. >> he was in hawaii obviously. just kidding. threatening to cut off parts of the big island, beach community here, though. officials say the lava could reach homes within five to seven
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days. why this is so much more serious than it usually is, because we know that is an active volcano all the time. >> they have time to prepare. severe weather heading to the northeast. that's after, though, it slammed into the midwest ripping up trees and leaving 365,000 people without power in michigan. hopefully they're working on that. >> hopefully it is not what you can expect in the northeast to happen. jennifer gray? >> yeah. same storm system pushing into the northeast, going to lose a little punch by the time it gets to the northeast. a dreary start. central park. can barely see it on the tower cam. new york city, may be hard to get out of bed for you folks in the city this morning, but severe tomorrows possible a little later this afternoon. let's look at what happened in portions of michigan yesterday. even went into portions of illinois. all of those power outages. martin just talked about. it could take days for power to get restored. we had about 2,000 power lines
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knocked down, so folks could be without power for quite some time. here's a little storm damage in illinois sent in. michael brighton, this is arlington heights in illinois. look at those trees on the house and so a dangerous situation across the midwest yesterday. likely said, though, this is going to track to the northeast. these are all the storm reports we saw yesterday. wind and hail, 152 wind reports. 8 hail reports, 365,000 customers still without power. so right now, nothing severe across the northeast. we are watching the showers develop. warm air is headed up your way. that warm, moist air will help fuel a lot of these showers and storms ahead of the front, and then once the front reaches here we are going to see a slight risk of severe weather. large hail, damaging winds your main concern rolling into the afternoon and evening hours. of course we all know the u.s. open, going on today. 91 degrees your high temperature. some of those storms could impact that. cooler air will move in behind this front. most of the showers and storms
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will hit the new york city/new england area by 10:00 p.m. pushing out by the early morning hours. cool weather a nice change, guys, for much of the northeast and filter down. we'll get it later in the week. even the humidity going down. >> good heavens. love that. jennifer gray, thank you so much. as congress gets ready to return to washington from the summer recess, growing numbers of lawmakers are urging president obama to be tough wler it comes to taking action against isis. so will the president raise touch talk? what about the critics? that's next. over 20 million kids everyday in our country lack access to healthy food. for the first time american kids are slated to live a shorter life span than their parents. it's a problem that we can turn around and change. revolution foods is a company we started to provide access to healthy, affordable, kid-inspired, chef-crafted food.
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right now. so grateful for your company. i'm christi paul, i'm martin savidge. five stories we are watching this morning along with you.
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number one -- there is finally a respite from months of fighting in eastern ukraine. a cease-fire appears to be holding. the deal signed yesterday. ukrainian president poroshenko says the cease-fire is based on a peace plan to be hashed out on a phone call he had with russian president vladimir putin. number two -- russia's foreign minister warned today if the european union imposes new sanctions, russia "certainly will respond." this according to russian state media. eu leaders ay greed on a new round of sanctions against russian interests as well as the rebel leadership in eastern ukraine and the government of crimea. they are due to be adopted monday. number three -- a third american infected with ebola treated in a hospital in nebraska. dr. rick sacra is not likely to receive zmapp, the experiment's drug given to the other two americans, as there are no doses left. delivering babies in liberia when econ tracted the ebola
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virus. number four -- animal control officers corralling a five-foot cobra after it was found slithering around a southern california neighborhood. the albino captured in ventura county, reportedly a day after it bit a dog. they're not sure where it came from or if it's venom glands were removed but the dog is expected to make a full recovery. number five -- the u.s. state department sending a stern message to wannabe terrorists. think again. turn away. the title of a graphic u.s. web campaign that mocks recruiting videos. they're forming a spearhead force that could potentially provide training, weapons and support to iraqi forces. breaking news out of washington this hour. cnn confirmed president obama is going to delay executive action on immigration until after the mid-term elections.
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>> we go now to white house correspondent erin mcpike with more on what you're hearing. erin what do you got? >> reporter: well, martin and christi, we just heard from an administration official, yes, the president will not make an announcement on the executive action he intends to make on immigration reform until sometime after the midterm elections. he'll make the announcement by the end of the year. they say president obama was asked about this yesterday, because democrats say this is going to be a problem for them going into the mid-term elections if something is done on that before. of course, democrats are trying to keep control of the senate and republicans look like they may have an advantage in getting control of the senate, but the president said that because house republicans have not been able to act on immigration reform he's going to have to do something on the executive level. it just won't be until after the mid-terms at this point. >> there's a big switch. >> no kidding. you know who wants to weigh in on that. maria cardona and kevin madden.
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look at those smiles. >> why am i two and she's one? >> just the teleprompter. ladies first. thank you. so -- on that note, kevin, give it to you first. what is the significance of this and how could it impact the democrats in nofr and then maria you'll get to talk about it afterwards. >> sure. >> the big concern that the white house had was that so many of their vulnerable democrats and some of the senate and house races, that are coming up in november, that any action would have spurred a real revolt amongst the republican base. and as we know, in mid-term elections, particularly in this election environment right now, this is really a base turn out election frshg election-of-. from here to november, democrats and republicans trying to get out their base pap reaction from the president would have had folks in republicans show up to
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register. they're disappointed the president would do something like that's probably a smart move bip the white house to help protect some of their vulnerable folks on the ballot in november. >> maria? >> as a latina and activist, i am disappointed. i would have wanted the president to do something two months ago. at a political strategist i completely agree with kevin. it is the smart thing to do. there are a lot of democrats who are struggling in these red states, and frankly right now, democrats are holding their own. five or six months ago, republicans would have let us believe that they were going to take back the senate and then 100% assured that would happen. that's not the case today. democrats really want to fight this to be able to keep the senate, and then to be able to, the president makes this announcement, which he will do. it's a promise he's made. so that the latino activists should not be that disappointed, because it will happen. this has been a do-nothing congress on immigration and frankly i think the american people will understand that this is a problem that needed to be
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fixed, and the hope is that republicans in congress, whether it's in the -- the term after the elections, the lame duck, will actually fix this, because what the president will announce is not going to be a real solution. it needs to be legislative. >> talking about another subject. isis. of course on the top of many people's agenda because of the horrific videos we've seen not to mention the executions of two journalists. i'm wondering now, as we take a look at the tougher talk coming from the president, there, too, a change. starts first talking maybe there was no specific strategy. now there definitely is with nato. what do you make of that, maria? >> i think it is actually within keep wig what the president has said. that one of the key things that he needed to do in terms of an objective moving forward to make sure we're able to degrade and ultimately destroy isis is put together an international coalition of our european allies, of the allies in the middle east, and that's exactly
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what is happening. we saw it in nato. the president said that the nato countries have stepped up, and there has been unanimous support for the kind of coalition needed to defeat isis. the secretary of state, secretary of defense, are going to go to the reagion to get allies in the arab world onboard. jordanians, uia, turk achluie, l have to step up. i think what we're seeing is exactly what the president has said. this coalition is coming together and that is a big part of a successful strategy moving forward. >> okay. kevin, do you think -- we know there's a coalition, but we don't know specks. we don't know who has committed to what. >> right. >> what kind of -- what kind of job is this for the president to try to get these, all of these countries on one track? >> yeah. it's very tough. i think first of all, for all of the critics out there, the
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president's got criticism all around on this. i think many folks wanted to see him understand that this is a very serious threat, and have him have a greater sense of urgency. and then a lot of his political allies, i think one of the reasons they were criticizing him, they're on a political fight this year and want to make sure that the president is offering a more, a more concentrated national security strategy. so i think one of the big challenges that the president has is winning over all of these audiences and building that international coalition. one of the criticisms he's going to continue to face is, why is he only doing this now? we knew that isis was emerging as a threat for over a year. why hasn't the president already built the coalition to deal with this? >> all right. kevin madden, maria cardona, appreciate the insights. thanks. nice to see you both. >> thank you so much. >> you, too. >> thanks, guys. so let me ask you a question that you are probably asking yourself. is using cloud computing safe? like it or not, just about all of us have personal information
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stored on the cloud. whether we created it, whether we didn't, health c.a.r.e. provi -- health care, insurance carriers. details, information about you, yes, yu, lives on the cloud.
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let me ask you something. do you know what the cloud is? keep talking about it, hearing
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about it. people say "the cloud." we know it's there. what does it do, hold? you might be surprised or freaked out to learn how much of your stuff is "in the cloud." >> an example, mobile apps and pc software becoming inseparable from the cloud and forget your personal pictures, there's music, cabinets. if you use popular apps like netflix or facebook, you're on the cloud. >> whether you like it nort. there's personal information stored in the cloud you didn't even create. health care providers, store your medical records in the cloud. insurance companies put your claims there. >> in fact, there are some states that have started storing their records there as well. joining us now for more, cnn.com senior editor bridget. like it or not, we have to accept the cloud's here to stay? >> pretty much. think of the cloud as something as simple as saying i'm saving my data on another company's server, and can access it easily going on the web. we don't always think about that. we just take pictures on our
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phone and go, isn't that magically nice? i can have my photos backed up for me? they're really on apple servers. if it's an iphone, and with other company, the same as well. >> you delete it, think it's gone. oh, not so fast. because i know in the first interview since the icloud photo hacking scandal, ceo tim cook defending the safety saying the hackers were either able to break into the actors' passwords, or used phishing scams. tim cook said when i step back from this terrible scenario and think what could we have didn't, awareness. ratchet that up that's not really an engineering thing. when he says that, how safe is cloud for al of our information, and do you think apple could have done more in that instance? >> in this case, tim cook also said that he was going to make sure that when someone accesses your icloud account on another device, you'll get an alert and
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e-mail, letting you know someone went into your account. that's like saying we'll let you know sooner when you get hacked. that's not an answer. what more needs to be done, changing the way we use passwords to begin with. if we don't change things were we're going to keep getting hacked. for example, you can't think of your password, security questions. not just apple has it. others do. like, what it's your mother's maiden name? what was your favorite dog and superhere joe the stuff our friends know about it, easy to google if we've ever talked about the things we like. we have to think differently how we protect our information. maybe we need two levels of pass 3 words and teach people how to use that. there are things called two-factor verification. you have a second level password. but it's not well known or well understood. >> i saw apple did take a hit, its stock did. what's the long-term impact likely to be? >> we have trust issues to work out with apple on this. especially because you're hearing a lot of talk about their new devices that they'll introduce on tuesday. like the new iphone, or perhaps
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a new iwatch, having things like mobile payments, being able to put your credit card info on the phone and pay with your phone instead of just paying with a credit card. so if you can't trust your photos, will you be able to crust your credit card? that's the kind of conversation apple needs to talk about, needs to tell us how secure things are going to be going forward. >> very good point. all right. so good to have you here. thank you. >> thanks. >> you're saying i can't delete it? hmm. all right. >> i guess. yeah. moving on. friends and family prepare to say good-bye to joan rivers at a private service that will be tomorrow. >> fans of the comedy legend setting up makeshift memorials, though. this is happening from manhattan to hollywood. talking with a friend and comedic colleague of joan rivers, when we come back. i got this. [thinking] is it that time? the son picks up the check? [thinking] i'm still working. he's retired.
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my mother said, only a doctor for you. 5922, all right a lawyer. cpa. 24, said, grab a dentist. 26, she said, anything. >> she got me where -- >> oh, for more than half a century, joan rivers, made the world laugh. she was edgy, she was topical. she was so witty. >> very sharp. think about that.
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comedians and artists of all kinds. rivers never lost step. always able it re-invent herself, and she was good, if not even better, at 81 than, say, at 31. >> you would think that's pretty tough to do. right? might have the offended io obviously, but no question about the impact on women, on comedy and entertainment. >> we invited a friend to come by. the great pleasure of working with joan. something i did not have the opportunity. so i'm wondering, you know, what was it like to work with a woman who we all consider a legend? >> well, you know, she has that acerbic wit and was so edgy, as you said. behind the scene, such a sweetheart. so generous. so lovely. i first met her on her talk show in the early '90s in new york, and i was a little scared, because i was like is she doing to dis me? say something mean?
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no. she was love. i think she embraced female comediennes. had a respect and love for those who also respected her, and so she couldn't have been sweeter, couldn't have been more generous and more a com dating to me and i'll always remember that first meeting and then i met her many times over the years. she's always just been really, just yummy. really yip. >> a juxtaposition to who she was on-screen. >> how kind she was, behind the scenes, kind and wonderful. she did say things that offended people a lot. she clearly wasn't really concerned about political correctness. what did she think about it? did she ever feel she should have apologized for anything? >> i think that her motto, one of her mottos had to be, no apologies. he was performing at the lori beachman theater last year and i
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went to see her closing night, because i was opening the next day. i gave her some love. went backstage. she sent me a huge bouquet of orchids the next day and the note read, go out there and get 'em, girl. you're going to do really well and if they don't laugh, they are wrong. so that spoke to her feeling about, i'm going to be confident about what i say onstage. you should be confident about what you are going to say onstage and believe in conviction that it's funny and that it's good, and so i think she's all about no apologies. i think that was part of her way. >> yeah. >> she never stopped working. i mean, of course, she worked right up into the day before she died. what was it that drove her? why did she feel that need? >> i think that there's something in her childhood that we'll find out as people begin to talk more about her. i think that she just was, a tough cookie, and probably moosh on the inside, which is why i think there was that other exterior we would see, but i think that she's from that old school where you worked and you
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work hard, and you give back, and you share, and you grow, and we need more performers like that. there's a lot of folk whose think they can hit it and hit it quick and make that money. this is a woman who stayed working and she, you're right. she re-invented hers all the time. one of the most admirable things. this is a woman of all the ages, and young folks, you know, related to her, and certainly the older generation related to her. she's one for the ages, no doubt. no doubt. >> let me ask you quickly, do you -- what do you think she would think of the outpouring and of the reaction from people to her death? i mean, if she is in heaven right now looking down what do you think she's thinking? >> up in heaven making god laugh and all the angels, and she and robin williams, no doubt, are holding hands right now. but i'm certain she would be looking down and loving every moment of this, because i think comediennes in the end want love and laughter. i think we choose this because
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we want the approval and the laughter of people and so i'm sure she's up in heaven loving every single minute of this saying, why am i here so early? you're right. she was working the day before she left us, and she'll be with us forever, because we have her work, we have her memory and her jokes. >> kim coles, wonderful insight into your friend, and to a woman we all know and are condolences to you. we all feel we've lost a tremendous treasure. >> best of luck to you. >> a legend. a legend. a legend. >> kim, thank you so much. sure. take good care. >> thank you. so planting more than just seeds in his native new jersey. meet the cnn hero who's bringing fresh fruit and vegetables to inner city 2345ibneighborhoods, he's doing this for free. (vo) ours is a world of passengers. the red-eyes. (daughter) i'm really tired. (vo) the transfers. well, that's kid number three. (vo) the co-pilots. all sitting...
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well... did you know auctioneers make bad grocery store clerks? that'll be $23.50. now .75, 23.75, hold 'em. hey now do i hear 23.75? 24! hey 24 dollar, 24 and a quarter, quarter, now half, 24 and a half and .75! 25! now a quarter, hey 26 and a quarter, do you wanna pay now, you wanna do it, 25 and a quarter- -sold to the man in the khaki jacket! geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. state, new jersey the one of the nation's top proirs of fruits and vegetables. >> the pressure produce doesn't always get to those who need it the most. when this week's cnn hero learned that people in his home state people having trouble
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affording or getting ahold of the healthy food he took a small garden to the next level. >> this is a working-class neighborhood. it's difficult for a lot of us to afford fresh produce. we just have gone to stores basically, corner stores. they don't have a large variety of fresh fruits and vegetables. >> i started the farm with my daughter, and the first year we were able to get 120 pounds of produce, with all the extra produce, we brought it down to the local food pantry. i realized people are hungry for fresh fruits and vegetables. we grow, clean and give. >> we first started the program, basically my family. now we're around 4,000 volunteers. >> excellent. >> it's not just feeding people. >> our goal is really to educate the folks who receive the produce. >> all right. are you ready for some corn? >> yes! >> whew! >> when kids come out for the
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first time from the inner city they immediately are struck by the fact that food grows out of the ground. >> there you go. >> for them to be able to actually harvest it and bring it home to their family, that's huge. >> the first time you ate corn white off the stalk. look that? >> we go to inner city area, and set up a free farm market. >> how are we doing? thank you, sir. >> i have diabetes and high blood pressure. some things i need for my diet a lot of times i can't afford. >> like the corn. good stuff. >> since i've been going to the farmer's market i have lost some weight. my sugar is better controlled, and the food is delicious. >> i leave that everyone deserves to be able to eat healthy. there's no greater reward. >> all right. there you have it. we are out of here. >> yeah. does it for us. >> for the most part. we hope you make great memories
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today. >> state right here and, of course -- stay right -- because the next hour -- >> hi! >> we've got fredricka joining us. >> hello. good to see you, guys. i know you've made lots of memories this morning. you've kept us completely informed. we're going to pick up from where you leave off. you all have a great day. >> you, too. >> it is the 11:00 eastern hour of the "cnn newsroom," which begins right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com president obama making a decision on immigration, and it could stir outrage among immigration reform activists. we'll tell you why, straight ahead. and spreading terror online. the fbi suspects a massachusetts man is a social media guru for isis. >> we take very seriously the threat of american citizen whose join terrorist organizations. we take additional care when
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thinksing a options for taking them off the battlefield. >> hear how the u.s. tried to turn the tables on a fugitive to get him behind bars. and new video this morning of joan rivers' daughter melissa. she reacts to the outpouring of support from the late comediennes friends and fans. welcome, everyone. i'm fredricka whitfield. we begin with major news out of washington. cnn confirmed president barack obama will delay executive action on immigration until after the mid-term elections. let's go straight to the white house with cnn correspondent erin mcpike. erin, what's behind the president's decision and how did it come about? >> reporter: fredricka, president obama was asked about this yesterday, and he said he would be reviewing recommendations from the department of homeland security on the plane back to the united states last night, and would make a decision very soon. obviously, came sooner than we expected. i want to play for you a little
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bit of what he said yesterday. listen. >> i want to be very clear. my intention is in the absence of, in the absence of action by congress, i'm grog to oing to di can do within the legal constraints of my office, because it's the right thing to do for the country. >> reporter: in other words, he still is planning to take some sort of executive action, just not until after the mid-term elections. we got a little more background from a white house official this morning. part of what that official told us, too big an issue to allow it to be used as a tool for people trying to get votes. it isn't about votes for any particular candidate but dealing with this in an environment that avoids the grandstanding we've seen in the past. i remind you, president obama said in the rose garden june 30th he would take action without delay. now he's delaying it. this has seen reactions swift and strong from both sides of the aisle.
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i saw a republican strategist working on the top senate races in the country take to twitter saying the threat of executive amnesty now hangs over the top senate races, the democratic ip come bents in those races for the nept 60 days and threat of executive amnesty essentially political poison. on the other side of the spectrum, seeing groups representing undocumented immigrants essentially and they're saying that the president is cementing his legacy as the deporter in chief, because he's delaying relief for these people, and the deportations could speed up over the next couple of months. so essentially, this is going to still be a big issue in the mid-term elections now, fred. >> erin mcpike. thanks. keep us posted. we'll talk more about this as we get more information from the white house and more reaction. now to the intense search today for a couple onboard a plane that flew for hours unresponsive and then it crashed near jamaica. there's no official word on what happened to larry and jane
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glacier, but their children said last night they are devastated by the sudden loss of their parents. jamaican and u.s. crews were out at 5:00 a.m. local time today trying to find the wreckage. last night he found an oil slick in the area. cnn aviation analyst miles o'brien is live out of boston. good to see you, miles. we'll talk to you in a moment. first, aviation correspondent has details on exactly what happened to this plane. >> under way now for this small plane after it crashed 14 miles off the coast of jamaica. it took off from rochester, new york, bound for naples, florida. onboard, larry grasher and his wife jane. over north carolina the pilot told air traffic control there was a problem, but did not declare an emergency. he was cleared to descend to 25,000 feet, but asked to go lower. >> we need to descend down to about 180. we have an indication that is
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not correct in the plane. >> stand by. >> going to make level 250. >> 250, we need to get lower. >> working on that. >> reporter: about an hour and is a minutes 15 minutes, the pilot stopped responding to radio calls. u.s. military f-15s tracked it along the east coast of florida. one fighter pilot looked through the window. >> i can see right before i left there was the first time we 0 could see he was actually breathing. >> the pilot slumped over and the plane's windows frosted. both are signs the pressure may have escaped leaving the pilot without enough oxygen to stay conscious. the aircraft flew over the bahamas and south to cuba, where a cuban fighter jet took over the pursuit. 4.5 hours after takeoff, the plane crashed near port antonio, jamaica. >> thanks so much, rene marsh, for that report.
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aviation analyst miles o'brien back with us live from boston. miles, what was said and what wasn't said equally glaring in that audiotape while we understand the pilot was saying, i needed to descend, we need to go at a lower altitude, it was unclear as to why. you know, what was missing in that dialogue between those two voices? >> it was a very unfortunate dialogue, fredricka. on the part of the pilot, it was clearly a muddled message. i have an indication of something that is incorrect. it was not a -- he didn't light his hair on fire, put it that way. he didn't say, mayday. he didn't say emergency. and he asked oddly to go down to 18,000 feet, which, if you have a problem with pressurization, that's not going to do you much good. you want down to around 10,000 feet, enough air to breathe. so i'm going to -- my guess would be that this is a person who had been deal wig the
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insidious effects of hypoxia, lack of oxygen. a slow leak of some kind in the pressurization system, and he was already kind of confused when he called in. on the other side of this transaction is the air traffic controversial, busy, and didn't take the time to really probe the pilot on what was going on. what sort of problem do you have would have been a reasonable response. i remember once i was 234r50i flying my airplane, a hiccup. having a problem, like to land and get it checked out. the controller, first thing he said was, do you wish to declare an emergency? now, psychologically, if you're a pilot trying to deny you have a big problem and somebody uses the "e" word it gives you permission to say, wait a minute. i'm in trouble here. so it probably would have been a good idea if the controller had said something to that effect. what sort of problem do you have? is this an emergency? it didn't happen. >> the controller might have even been able to discern. even if the answer wasn't clear,
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that, o, gosh, this pilot might be suffering from high poxy. give us an idea exactly what it is. what it does and how a pilot can get disoriented or maybe lack an ability to reason or think or deliver a message clearly? >> this is one of the most insidious killers you can run into. i've been in an altitude chamber, where they've given me, this is actually at nasa. they made it seem as if it was 35,000 feet. wearing an oxygen mask. they took the oxygen mask off and had me start doing mathematics problems. i couldn't add two plus two. >> really? >> worse, worse, i felt great. i was laughing. >> euphoria. >> a euphoric feeling. pure euphoria. for a pilot not aware of what's going on and really isn't attuned to this, you can get trapped in a situation where you do not realize how much trouble you are in, and that's the real tricky part here and why air traffic controllers when somebody at 28,000 feet says i really need to get lower, a
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little -- response question, a challenge question, do you wish to dough claire an emergency? what soared of problem rt of pre a reasonable. that marching forward, they should play that tape for future controllers saying you know what? when this call comes in, this is what you need to do mile o'brien, thanks for the expertise. of course, it's difficult to know exactly what took place just by hearing the audiotape. they have to find the wreckage. that's under way now in the jamaican waters. thanks so much. all right, now to an unnerving journey for 100 americans on a charter flight from afghanistan to the united arab emirates. the plane was carrying u.s. military contractors from bagram air pfeil too duebai when force to stop in iran. iranian officials ordered the plane to land, claiming its flight plan was not current. the problem began when the jet left afghanistan three hours late putting in in iranian
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airspace after the flight plan had expired. so the plane landed in southern iran, and after an inspection it was cleared for takeoff. back to dubai. all right. now to the fight against isis. the fbi is on the hunt for a man from boston who the feds believe may be involved with the terror group's aggressive media strategy. deborah feyerick tells us who she and why the u.s. is so desperate to capture him. >> reporter: intelligence sources say it makes sense that isis would want to recruit a guy like american ahmad abu saum ra who grew up near boston. holds a syrian and u.s. passport and graduated from northwestern university in boston way degree in the field of computer technology. believed to be in his early 30s,
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afluent in english and arabic. this audio recording released. it's unclear who he's speaking to. >> they don't have the a warrant. tell your mother next time. they might scare her. >> reporter: although authorities won't confirm his role in isis, if any, a law enforward official says they're looking into whether he's involved in a social english media. including facebook, online magazine and twitter recently suspending the group's account. his friend, american tahana accused by the u.s. heading al qaeda in iraq, morphed into isis. currently spending 17 years in the u.s. for providing information to tear lifts. accused of attending terror training camps in yemen for the purpose of traveling to iraq to kill u.s. troops. abusaram last seen in syria with
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a woman and child believed to be his wife and daughter. two years ago the fbi tried using social media, specifically facebook and twitter, to find him. >> obviously we take very seriously the threat of american citizens who join terrorist organizations and take additional care when thinking about options for taking them off the battlefield but citizenship cannot serve as a shield if you take up arms against the united states. >> deborah feyerick, cnn, new york. spent millions to fund its terror organization. what they've been selling on the black market to make all of that cash. plus, an investigation into joan rivers death is underway. how did a routine surgery end this legendary comedienne's life? when folks think about what they get from alaska, they think salmon and energy. but the energy bp produces up here creates something else as well: jobs all over america. engineering and innovation jobs. advanced safety systems & technology. shipping and manufacturing.
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across the united states, bp supports more than a quarter million jobs. when we set up operation in one part of the country, people in other parts go to work. that's not a coincidence. it's one more part of our commitment to america.
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isis may be as well -- may, rather, not be as well organized
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smas other militant groups like al qaeda but it has bun crucial advantage. it created a steady stream of revenue nor terror activities since pushed out of syria and into iraq the group has been selling oil it seized along the way opening a huge revenue potential since iraq is one of the world's top ten oil-producing kuns. john defterios looks at how isis uses the black market to sell black gold. >> reporter: isis popped up on the global radar in june with its attack in mosul. and in a span of just two moss, has created its own black market for iraqi crude. >> the scale is actually sizable in the sense that they're able to export up to $3 million a day of oil. >> reporter: this may about small some by global oil, but if unchecked could earn up to $1 billion a year from its oil
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operations in iraq. now has four oil facilities in mosul. go down to cukirkuk, a total of 80,000 barrels of capacity per day. what isis lacks is refining capacity. unable to wrestle control of the strategic refinery south of mosul. energy strategists say they're silling crude ats 25ds tore $65 a barrel, a deep discount on the global benchmark of $100 a bearing. >> in northern iraq, people have been stealing and smuggling oil and tapping oil from pipelines for years in small volumes. an infrastructure and the middle men who know how to trade the stuff. >> reporter: islamic militants applied the trade in eastern syria seizing oil and gas assets for the past few years. in early juneneder the banner of isis, they took control of syria's biggest field in this
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province. opposition turkish parliamentarian based in the country's south boreding syria claims $800 million worth of oil isis obtained a being sold in turkey. with u.s. military intervention, strategists say the kurds kept isis out of kirkuk's super oil field, capping for now the group's new-found wealth. >> john defterios, thanks. how crucial is it to cut off sources of revenue for isis in order to defeat them? this week two senators, democrat bob casey and republican marco rubio wrote an open letter to secretary of state john kerry saying exactly that, saying, "any strategy to roll back the group's gains must includes efforts to cut off resources." although under u.s. sanctions, we should employ all sanctions to detail this and disrupt its financial networks."
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senator bob casey joining me. a democrat from pennsylvania and member of the senator foreign relations committee. so senator casey, what is unique about your plan that the white house and the president's security team have not already proposed or are entertaining? >> well, fredricka, i think what you're seeing now with the president's good work and that of secretary kerry to build a coalition is very important to this effort to cut off the financing. the purpose of cutting off the financing is really twofold. swun to undermine the operations that isis is able to undertake and secondly, to damping or diminish their recruiting potential as well. i've spoken to the white house about this directly. haven't had a specific response from the state department yet, but that will be forthcoming. this will be a central element in a broader strategy, because if you can degrade their ability
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to finance their operations, obviously that will have an adverse impact over time, but it will take some time to implement. >> the president said degrade, dismantle, destroy. wouldn't you all be speaking the same language? degrade meaning trying to cut it off at the knees by interrupting the financial flow? >> that's right. and i think that's going to be part of that, that degrading process, but this is going to take a while. it won't happen easily. you have to use this coalition to say to countries, look, if you do business with these guys, with regard to oil or anything else, you're going pay a price. you're going to be sanctioned. you're going to be somehow punished economically, and i think the other thing which is interesting. even though the country -- i'm sorry? >> well, i'm wondering how the u.s. realistically does intervene in the way isis is making money reportedly earning $1 billion from the black market oil in iraq?
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who exactly is purchasing this black market oil? and in what way does the u.s. intervene without also potentially damaging structurally the oil fields in iraq? so clearly that kind of military strike would not be advisable, but how does the u.s. realistically go about interrupting, intervening? >> yeah. a lot of it is by way of building a coalition. just like we're able to create enormous international pressure on the iranians with regard to the use of sanctions, you have to develop a similar set of pressures. one of the problems here, fredricka is a lot of -- >> what would be an example of this? >> oil trade is within syria. >> i'm sorry to interrupt you senator, i'm wondering specifically in what way? right now we know nine allied nation part of nato all agreed and say, yes, we are speaking in a united way. a united front. we all want to do something about dismantling, destroying isis, but then, you know, papt a
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picture for me how would any of these countries go about punishing, perhaps, those who are benefitting from the black market oil so as to make an impact financially on isis? how do you do that? >> well, by use of sanctions, use of international pressure, use of diplomacy. all the tools we use on a regular basis. i would say this, though. that what's not clearly evident yet in addition to having the turks involved. they're very important in this, is we have to make sure that the jordanians and the -- and the united arab emirates and the saudis as well are helping on all aspects of this strategy, including the strategy to cut off the financing. >> okay. because allegedly turkey is actually purchased some of this black market oil and to the tune of $800 million? is that your understanding? >> i don't know the amount, but if that is true, and i can't
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confirm that, but if that's true, that's, you're identifying part of the problem. look, diplomacy is difficult. it doesn't happen with one meeting or one agreement. this is going to take many, many months to have the full force of this coalition have an impact. not only in the financing, but as well as the military and other aspects of the strategy. >> sure. okay. senator bob casey. thanks for joining us this saturday. appreciate it. >> thanks, fredricka. and after the break, we'll ask the former u.s. general in iraq if he thinks the u.s. has the right approach in the fight against isis. also ahead -- stormy weather. well, it's hitting the med west right now. the latest on effort to restore power across that region. i got this. [thinking] is it that time? the son picks up the check? [thinking] i'm still working. he's retired. i hope he's saving.
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you can't contain an organization that is running roughshod through that much territory, causing that much havoc, displacing that many people, killing that many innocents, enslaving that many women. the goal has to be to dismantle them. >> all right. that was president barack obama
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speaking at the nato summit yesterday. before the break we talked to senator bob case high argues one of the most effective ways to dismantle isis, cut the group off from the oil fields that had has been captures across northern iraq and that would drain a huge amount of their funding. retired colonel peter mansoar a cnn military analyst and commander in armored division in baghdad during the time while in the u.s. army. good to see you. >> good to see you, fredricka. >> colonel, were you able to hear senator casey, which she suggesting to the president there has to be a building of a coalition and through this coalition there has to be a concerted effort to try to dismantle isis by way of funding, interrupt how they're able to sell oil in the black market? does that sound reasonable to you? >> i did hear his discussion with you, and it's part of the strategy. certainly you have to cut off the financing and the economic
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wear withall of the islamic state. the way to do this is to force turk toy patrol its border and stop accepting oil shipments from isis. >> because, purportedly it is. allegedly turkey benefited something like $800 million in black oil market, but turkey is, you know, a very important nato ally. it's the only muslim, you know, country as part of that nato coalition, and certainly a good friend of the u.s. so how will the u.s. try to convince turkey or if turkey would even admit to this, that it is complicit in this black market of oil involving isis? >> well, it may or may not be complicit. the oil could be going through oil brokers and private hands. in any case, turkey needs to realize that isis is eventually a threat to it as well and it needs to come out with a public statement saying we will not
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accept oil from the islamic state and we will close our border, and if they need help, this would about great place for nato to step up and say, okay, we'll deploy forces on turkey's southern border as a part of a nato force to close off this, these oil lanes. but this is just part of a strategy against isis. it has to be a combined military, diplomatic, informational, financial, legal strategy to hit isis with more forms of contact than it can handle. >> as it pertains to military strategy is there a concern potentially those very valuable oil fields, while in the hands of isis or not, could potentially get damage if part of the military commitment is to target isis wherever they are, but what if they are in the oil fields and in the bull's-eye of whether it be u.s. air strikes or nato military forces? would that be a -- a zone, an area where there would not be a good military plan? it would not be recommended?
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>> well, fortunately, more than 90% of iraq's oil fields are in kurdish hands or in the southern portion of the country. so it's very -- it's a very minute portion of the oil capacity of iraq that's in isis control. significant for that group, because it could sell up to $1 billion worth of oil a year, and finance its operations, but not significant for the global economy as a whole. >> colonel peter monsoar, thank you for your time this saturday. appreciate t. thanks, fredricka. all right, how did a routine surgery and joan rivers' life, was age a factor? the clinic where the ledge already comedienne suffered complications is now under investigation. but um of the.
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welcome back. i'm fredricka whitfield. five things crossing the cnn newsdesk now. steven sotloff remembered as a loving son, brother and loyal friend. a memorial for the journalist who was beheaded by isis militants was held yesterday in his home state of florida. his parents and sister spoke and sotloff words were also heard. his father read passages from two letters written by sotloff during his captivity and smuggled out of syria. one read in part, everyone has
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two lives. a second one begins when you realize you only have one. huge crowds at a church festival near detroit. had to run for kov whir a massive storm blew in. several people were hurt when strong winds picked up and toss add tent. one energy company is reporting more than 300,000 customers in southeast michigan are now without pow perp those outages are expected to last several days. and people in 700 homes near yosemite national park have been told to evacuate, because of an out of control wildfire. the bridge fire started yesterday afternoon. it's already scorched at least 300 acres, and hurt one person. and a small beach community on the big island of hawaii could be cust off by lava within days. lava started flowing from the vent in the kilauea volcano in june and now is within a mile of the subdivision in the district of puna.
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no far no evacuations but the mayor declared a state of emergency. non-residents are told to stay away. a private funeral for comedienne joan rivers is set for tomorrow in new york. just a short time ago, cnn caught her leaving her mother's apartment with her son. so many of her mother's fans offered condolences to her during this very difficult time. meanwhile, an investigation into joan rivers' death is underway. our alexandra field is out rivers' home in new york. you were able to ask melissa about the tributes to her mother and we're seeing a lot of it right behind you there with the bouquets of flowers and how did she respond? >> reporter: she's clearly touched by it. people have been stopping here the last couple of days. you see behind me, leaving flowers and notes for joan, melissa, the entire family. melissa stopping to look at tributes into and out of the building and stopped for a moment to sap she's amazeed by
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the outpouring of love and support that's left here in joan's honor. while people are reflecting on joan's memory, getting ready to say their final good-bye as tomorrow's funeral, three different investigations are going on about what happened. joan rivers lived for laughs and joked about death. >> i have got 81 years -- i could die at any second, no, no, no. don't applaud. i could go like that. do you understand how lucky you would be? do you understand you will have something to talk about for the rest of i don't are life? >> reporter: she lit up the stage for the last time last week in new york city. >> she gave a tremendous performance her last performance. she's particularly on that night. she came in, was in great mood. she left in a great mood. she was very healthy. she was very vital. she looked great. she always looked great. >> reporter: the next day rivers was rushed to mount sinai hospital in critical condition.
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the comedy legend put on life support and never recovered. rivers went into cardiac and respiratory arrest during a procedure at the yorkville endoscopy center, now the focus of an investigation by the new york state department of health. the board that gave the clinic its accreditation is also investigatin investigating. together will look at clinic's staffing, life-saving protocol and which drugs might have been given. >> what sedative might have been used in a case like this? >> a combination of verse ed, like valium, intravenous valium and maybe another type of sedation. more commonly today propofol is used. and propofol is newer medication with respect to some of the others, but it provides a really adequate level of sedation to do this type of a procedure. >> reporter: doctors say medical professionals would have had to determine that rivers was healthy enough to undergo the out-patient procedure. one night earlier, rivers sold
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out her final show. taking the stage at the laurie beechman theatre. >> down the stage, rediapered, back to the car, pulled in -- >> reporter: at 81 years old, the legendary comedienne was still testing out new material. >> a history of violations according to the state helicopter department. back at the clinic to talk to physicians and staff and goin review-month-old records and documents, fred. >> alexandra field, thank you so much in new york. keep us posted. everyone agrees, there is no one like her. she was loved by so many, not because she was a trailblazing comedienne, but versatile as a talk show host, fashion designer, jewelry designer and author. at a remarkable 81, still juggling a demanding schedule filled with performance dates and appearances. i had the privilege of interviewing joan rivers twice. first on the passing of her one-time mentor johnny carson in
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2005, and then most recently this summer while promoting her 12th book "diary of a mad diva." how it abruptly ended went viral and upstaged moments in the seven-minute interview which underscored her very much adm e admired stam ma and staying power in the entertainment industry. >> you have been, you know, a trailblazer in so many different ways, and you know, it seems like you've cover it all, but i wonder, are there projects and, involving you, perhaps alongside your daughter melissa, is there anything else on your list that you feel like you've got to tackle? >> oh -- oh, everything. i mean -- we're in the fourth year of "fashion police." the second year of the internet show, "in bed with joan." i'm going back to broadway starting in washington at the national theater in november. i want to do another book. i want to do another book. you just want to keep doing things. it's so much fun to make people
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laugh, and get a check. life is very tough, and if you can make a joke to make something easier, and funny, do it. done. do it! that's all. but, darling, i don't know what you're life has been like, but i have a lot of people who have gone through hell, and if you can make winston churchill said if you make someone laugh you give them a little vacation, and maybe you take the worst thing in the world and make it funny, it's a vacation from a, for a minute from horror. >> and joan rivers made millions of us take that vacation, because she made us laugh. whether it was by being direct, self-deprecating or downright blunt. her style was unmatched. for that we fondly salute her. again, her private funeral will be held tomorrow in new york city. a drought is leaving many lakes and rivers in california very dry. is it also increasing the risk of earthquakes?
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all right. in today's "american journey" we take you to a very dry california. the state is facing the worst drought on record. the before and after photos of lakes and rivers really tell the story. here's cnn's dan simon. >> reporter: a healthy and full lake in northern california. there's only one problem. this picture is three years old. and now i'm walking on top of
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that very same bridge, take a look. it is a virtual desert. this is what drought looks like in the state of california. here's another before and after side-by-side, and just when this drought couldn't seem any worse, new research indicates the depletion of groundwater in the state may actually trigger earthquakes. more on that in a moment. first -- this is lake orville. a boater's paradise, at least when it's full. more importantly, it's a reservoir storing water, ultimately piped into homes, and for agriculture. helping to grow much of the nation's fruits and vegetables. >> we have 167 miles of shoreline. >> reporter: john precedo took us on a boat to see the shoreline. it's more astounding up close. the lake seems more like a narrow river. the drought has created a canyon, a hillside of rock that's normally covered by water. the water level is down by more than 200 feet.
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it's a common sight throughout the state. most of california's major reservoirs are less than half full. >> what would we be seeing? >> we would be seeing the water up probably half way up that hillside. at this time of the year. >> reporter: more than 80% of the state is either in the extreme or exceptional category. the highest levels. it's meant things like, no showers or running water for several communities. an increase in wildfires. neglected public parks and farmers losing their crops. >> it's like mourning. it's -- dead. our product is dead. >> reporter: jesse rodriguez grows table grapes and estimates he'll lose 40% of his crop due to drought. >> water is the main thing. without water we can't survive. >> reporter: with low reservoirs farmer have to pump water out of the ground. as if that wasn't bad enough, new information from researchers who believe the depletion of
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groundwater in california's central valley could unstable lice the infamous san adrain is fault and trigger earthquakes. it could remove so much weight it causes the earth to spring upward and the change in pressure can cause quakes. >> earthquakes are these mysterious things that happen under our feet. so having a way for people to cause these earthquakes to happen is unsettling. >> reporter: experts say the quakes would be small and unlikely to cause any damage. still, it's yet another example of why this drought is causing so much stress. to both the land and the mental well-being of nearly an entire state. dan simon, cnn, orville, california. and one of my colleagues from cnn.com experienced california's drought in a very personal way. john sutter tried sutter tried kayak is length of the river and it's been labeled one of
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america's most endangered rivers. at one point, he actually had to carry his kayak because there was so little water. john will actually join me in the 1:00 eastern hour to talk about his experiences, including a firsthand scare with quick sand. i make a lot of purchases for my business. and i get a lot in return with ink plus from chase. like 50,000 bonus points when i spent $5,000 in the first 3 months after i opened my account. and i earn 5 times the rewards on internet, phone services and at office supply stores. with ink plus i can choose how to redeem my points. travel, gift cards, even cash back. and my rewards points won't expire. so you can make owning a business even more rewarding. ink from chase. so you can. that's keeping you from the healthcare you deserve..
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hello, hi. that was kind of fun, wasn't it? hello, over here, too. all right. we're just having a zany little old time here. an nfl player is scheduled to take the field tomorrow facing possible domestic violence charges. no joke about that. >> yeah, well, san francisco 49ers defensive tackle ray
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mcdonald will play on sunday when the team takes on the cowboys. this after being arrested on suspicion of domestic violence last week. no charges have been filed, but the investigation is ongoing. team officials say they will lit it play out before discipline. his arrest comes less than three days after roger goodell announced harsher penalties for domestic violence cases. for the first time, players place a six-game suspension and lifetime ban for second. a pro football team takes an incredible step to show there's a lot more to life than winning and losing. the bengals cut def p steel from their roster, but resigned him. they kept him to make sure he keeps his health insurance and continues to get paid so his 4-year-old daughter, who's battling cancer. >> the opportunity to go to
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different teams, but those on the west coast, i said the bengals was to me, so i'm not going to up and leave them. loyalty is something i really need right now. because i never know which direction this is going to go for my daughter. >> we wish her a speedy recovery, but these nfl teams have compassion. >> i love that. they are root iing fer her, his daughter. she is precious. >> and i'm root frg you in another sense. triathlete, you are. so, you have a triathlon coming up soon. >> next weekend, sanjay gupta is the man, but he has rounded up a beautiful team here at cnn and it encompasses all kinds of stories. people have different reasons why they're inspired to do a triathlon, so next weekend is the malibu classic and there i am training. i've been training since late this spring. and -- >> nice stroke there. >> oh, gosh. swimming, biking, running. you know, half mile swim.
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18 mile bike. and then four mile run. my biking is horrible. look how embarrassing. i'm a terrible biker. >> but it's okay because so many people would never even attempt to do a triathlon. i've done two sprint triathlons, so i would consider myself a triathlete as well, so you should be giving me some tips. next weekend is the big race. it's a two-day event. there's the international, the olympic, distance and sprint distance is on sunday. that's the one i'm doing because you know -- graduated to the big two. i'm looking forward to it. >> pray. >> i've been saying that all along. people, pray for me. but the great thing is we're also doing this to raise money for our children's hospital los angeles, so i've been saying all along, support the children, pray for me. >> i love it. good luck. >> thank you. of course, we'll have much more about the journey of the
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training next weekend just prior to the race and more straight ahead in the news room. it starts right after this. hey pal? you ready? ♪ can you pick me up at 6:30? ah... life can be hard, buddy. ok... oh i'm so glad i got the car washed. (boy) i'm here! i'm here! (cop) too late. i was gone for five minutes. gotta feed the meter. what's a meter? where am i supposed to go? ugh, people! ugh! i'm five! move it. you're killing me. you know what, dad? i'm good. (dad) it may be quite a while before he's ready, but our subaru legacy will be waiting for him. (vo) the longest-lasting midsize sedan in its class. introducing the all-new subaru legacy.
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com hello again, everyone. here are the top stories we're following. a powerful storm rips through
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the midwest putting neighborhoods under water and leveling powerlines. hear where this dangerous storm system is headed next and the white house reveals when president obama plans to take action on immigration and the timing is infuriating immigration rights activists. plus, a texas mom is mistakenly pulled over by police at gunpoint then handcuffed in front of her frightened children. >> hold on, hold on. >> they're 6 and 8 and 10, 9. what are we doing? >> now, that terrified mom is outraged and demanding retribution. we start with nasty weather across the country. in fact, the world today. in dearborn, michigan, tents full of people went flying when a massive storm went in.
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one energy company is reporting $365,000 customers if southeast michigan are without power and those outages are expected to last several days. in chicago, nearly 175,000 people got their power knocked out last night. strong winds even knocked out a revolving door for one building in the suburbs and in india, nearly 100 people have died in devastating floods. monsoon rains have soaked villages in two regions. then in china, 18 people are still missinging after a week of floods there. 44 people have died. a small beach community on the big island of hawaii could be cut off by lava within days. lava flowing from a vent in the kill way area volcano is within a mile of the subdivision, but the mayor declared a state of emergency. jennifer gray is with us in the severe weather center.
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what an incredible mixed bag, then stuff in the northeast, too. >> a lot going on around the world and the focus is going to be the storms pushing into the northeast. those nasty storms pushed through the midwest. same storm system that's going to push into the northeast later today. right now, not much going on. boston down to d.c. you are completely dry. we have some very warm, moist air that's going to fuel a lot of these showers and storms in the afternoon and then the frobt moving through this evening, so we have a slight risk of severe weather from new york city including boston, portland. main threats will be hail and especially those gusty winds, so be aware of that. we have the u.s. open going on today, so we could see some of those matches rained out. but as we go through the late afternoon and evening hours, those storms should be pushing into the new york, d.c., boston area, pushing offshore. good news is cooler air is filtering in behind it, so we will see the humidity come down. high pressure will move in. it's going to feel a lot better
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by the early part of the week. >> this has been a brutal summer. thanks so much. moving on now to the intense search for a couple on board a plane that crashed in the ocean near jamaica. the plane flew for hours unresponsive yesterday before crashing. relatives say larry and jane glazer were on board. no word on what happened to them. but their children said last night they were devastated by the sudden loss of their parents who live in new york. jamaican and u.s. crews were out at 5:00 a.m. local time today trying to find the wreckage. last night, they found an oil slick in the area. how it started, well, the flight left rochester, new york yesterday morning and was headed for naples, florida, where the couple has a home, but somewhere over north carolina, air traffic controllers lost control after he mentioned there was a problem.
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the plane flew for hours going over cuba before it crashed over jamaica. fighter jets flew alongside it at one point, then saw the pilot slumped over. listen. >> they say the windows were frosted, which could have indicated a loss of cabin pressure and now to an unnevering journey for 100 americans on a charter flight from afghanistan to the united arab emirates. it was carrying -- when it was forced to stop in iran. iranian officials ordered the pilot to land or be intercepted, claiming its flight plan was not current. u.s. officials say the problem began when the jet left afghanistan three hours late. and that put it in iranian air space at a time that was not expected. so, the plane landed in southern
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iran, being forced to land there and then after an inspection, it was cleared for take off back to dubai. back here at home, a major decision on immigration. cnn has confirmed president obama will delay executive action on immigration until after the midterm elections. erin mcpike is at the white house. what's behind the president's decision? some hoped he would act, use executive order, privileges by the end of the summer. >> well, that's right and president obama did say on june 30th that he would begin some sort of executive action without delay. of course now, they're announcing he's delaying. the political calculus from dakt sources is that they believe doing this before the midterm elections would ignite it as a political issue. keep it in the headlines and then motivate the right wing, but already, the democratic party is in danger of losing the
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senate, so they just decided not to do any harm to democratic candidates going into the midterm elections. of course though, president obama has still said and officials confirmed, he will still do something wii the end of the year, just after the midterms. >> all right, and the president fresh from that nato summit, he came away with you know, significant support from nine nations on isis. what was the take away from the meetings? does there feel like there's a concerted, insync mission? >> they're beginning to outline the goals and right now as we understand it from white house and national security officials, what they want to begin to do is train and support and equip iraqi forces on the ground to take the fight directly to isis there. there has been no decision yet on air strikes that the u.s. could undertake in later days after congress comes back. they also want to cut off in any way they can, the formidable
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considerable funding isis has, but of course, president obama has said this will take a long time. returning from talks in europe over how to deal with the isis threat, president obama now faces a returning congress and lawmakers demanding a strategy. >> there was unanimity over the last two days that isil poses a significant threat to nato members. >> the strategy alluding the president for weeks becoming clearer. >> what we can accomplish is to dismantli dismantle this network, this force that has claimed to control this much territory. so that they can't do us harm. and that's going to be our objective. >> but achieving that goal in syria with a government the u.s. doesn't support remains a challenge.
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lawmakers on both sides of the aisle including republican frank wolf in the house and democratic bill nelson in the senate, already are preparing legislation ahead of any presidential requests to authorize u.s. air strikes inside syria. so far, mr. obama pledged no u.s. ground troops will enter syria, stressing that the u.s. and an international coalition will pop up partners on the ground there like the relatively moderate free syrian army to take the fight directly to isis. >> they have been to some degree outdone and outmanned and that's why it's important for us to work with our friends and alleys to support them more effectively. >> now, president obama also compared the fight against isis to the fight against al qaeda in recent years. of course, al-qaeda has come back stronger in recent years, so not really sure if this policy will work. >> all right. thanks so much. coming up next, we'll check the
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political thermometer on the president's immigration decision. plus, is america on a war footing now that nato has agreed to destroy and dismantle isis? when your favorite food starts a fight fight back fast with tums. relief that neutralizes acid on contact... ...and goes to work in seconds. ♪ tum, tum tum tum tums! try great tasting tums chewy delights. yummy. for over 19 million people. [ susan ] my promotion allowed me to start investing for my retirement. transamerica made it easy. [ female announcer ] everyone has a moment when tomorrow becomes real. transamerica. transform tomorrow.
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buy their services directly at angieslist.com no more calling around. no more hassles. start shopping from a list of top-rated providers today. angie's list is revolutionizing local service again. visit angieslist.com today. barack obama has decided the delay any executive action on immigration until after november midterm elections. already criticizing the president's decision, senate democrats who are battling to keep their seats in close races. cnn political commentators maria and ben are both here. good to see you guys. maria, to you first. how does this decision hit you? >> as al latina activist who's
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been working for years, i would have hoped the president would have acted two months ago, but let's not forget why the president was in this decision with the necessity to act in the first place. that's because republicans have completely turned their back not just on the latino community, but on the american economy for advocating their responsibility to do something to solve this american bipartisan problem, so the fact the president has now delayed it, i think we need to think about the fact he wants to do it right. he wants to do it big and he wants to have this space to explain to the american people what he's doing and how that is going to affect our economy positively. so having it done after the elections helps him do that. >> so, is this an issue of the delay, this is no long er in yor view, this is the issue of whether it's needed or not, but the issue of disearning why the delay. >> it's an issue of hypocrisy. this president has had the ability to pass immigration reform multiple times. when he first ran for president,
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he said he was going act on immigration reform. he had the house, the senate and white house. they could have passed anything they wanted to pass and they chose not to. so, for maria to believe somehow this president is really going to act, i would say what has he done for you over the last seven years? this is politics. it is hypocrisy. he's not going to act on this. >> so, you're seeing this delay, you see delay translation is he's never going to do it. as opposed to delay translation is wait until after midterm elections as the white house is saying because this might benefit certain seats. >> well, look at his actions. he said we could not wait any longer. he said that in 2007, when he was then senator barack obama. it's 2014. he's not even going to look at this probably until 2015. maybe. and he's had this ability and the votes to do this before and
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they choose not to do it. again, this is a hypocrisy issue where they want to run on it. if they wanted to fix it, they should have, but they chose not to because it's a political game to them. >> i can't wait to be on with ben the day after the president announces executive action before the end of the year. >> why doesn't he do it now then? >> because the white house said. he wants to do it right and he wants to do it with the time and the space to be able to explain to the merp people why it's necessary. i understand -- >> he's had seven years to explain it. >> i understand that ben needs to attack the president because republicans have zero excuse on why they haven't acted on immigration. >> you have zero excuse. >> does not have the power to do this. >> but it did in the past. he did in the past. >> republicans have said no. they're not going to do it, so now the president is going to
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act before the end of the year and by the way, americans understand that. >> you're hard to understand. if doing it right means waiting until after midterm elections and it still means electing to use executive action, i'm wondering if you could help us understand why does that amount of time make a difference when the president has made it clear that the president has an idea about what he wants the executive order to look like. why would it have to wait until after the midterm elections if not just a move? >> well, i do think that politics does play into it. but for this reason, democrats are fighting to keep the senate. we're not in a position we were five months ago where republicans swore up and down they were going to take the senate. right now, it's about 50-50. democrats are holding their own. they want to continue to hold their own, keep the senate because fred, by keeping the senate, there is a much better
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chance that immigration reform is actually done legislatively, which by the way, the president has said since day one, that is his preference. if he does an executive action, that's not a long-term solution. >> if he wants to have a long-term solution, he would have passed it at the beginning of his administration. this is a political issue they've used during re-election campaigns and they've used it very well politically. but this idea that the system's broken and he's going to be the guy to fix it and democrats are going to fix it, if they believed in it, then don't play politics with immigrants. actually do what you say you're going to do and they've lied to their voters for seven years now. >> hold it right there. we're not done with the conversation. >> republicans -- >> i want to hear more about your comments and response on that. we're going to take a short break and continue this right after this.
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executive action to be used after midterm elections. that says no involvement with congress, doesn't it? >> no, this is something that the president has talked to many law mackers about and he is talked to them about it for a long time. again, let's look at the possibility of there being a legislative solution. ben loves to talk about how the president didn't do it when he had the majority in congress. first of all, he never had a super majority. the second thing is you know, he was a little distracted by a spiralling economy thanks to republican policies, but we'll put that aside. and so -- >> immigration reform -- >> the other thing i would say is ben, why should this just be the responsibility of democrats? why should democrats have to pass this by themselves? >> i'll answer that question. >> for republicans -- this should be a bipartisan solution. >> answer the question, ben. couple of members in here, house speaker john boehner saying
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this, quote, there's never a right time for the president to declare amnesty by executive action. here it is. there is never a right time for the president to declare amnesty for a decision to simply delay this controversial new lateral action until after the election instead of abandoning. it's raw politics. while republicans are scared of the tea party members. republicans at the end of the day, barack obama said i'm going to take executive action because he knows it is so unpopular that his own party is saying do not
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do this while i'm running for re-election -- are going to find unpopular. if it was popular, he would have signed it and democrats would be running on it, but most americans understand if you don't put out amnesty for executive order. you also don't do that and not fix the problem with the security at the border. so that's why he's abandoning it. it's a lack of leadership. if he believed in it, he would have done it. >> first, yes. he's not abandoning it. let me finish. >> seven years. >> let me now speak. so, first of all, he's not abandoning it. it's a six-week delay. >> or seven years and six weeks. >> and then the second thing i would say is again, this needs to be a real solution here needs to be a bipartisan solution and
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we know that republicans have no interest in a bipartisan solution. >> it's amazing that districts have control of the white house and senate and you act like you're not in leadership. you are. you have the strongest parts of the -- >> yes, but the -- >> we're going to end it right there. >> he's going to do what he can. >> end it there as it pertains to this because we know the dialogue is just getting started. thank you so much to both of you. appreciate it. a new investigation meantime in ferguson, missouri. the u.s. justice department has opened another case. our legal guys tackle that next.
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big day? ah, the usual. moved some new cars. hauled a bunch of steel. kept the supermarket shelves stocked. made sure everyone got their latest gadgets. what's up for the next shift? ah, nothing much. just keeping the lights on. (laugh) nice. doing the big things that move an economy. see you tomorrow, mac. see you tomorrow, sam. just another day at norfolk southern.
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the federal government has two investigations underway in ferguson, missouri. it follows last month's shooting of michael brown by a police officer. this week, eric holder launched an investigation into the ferguson police department. it will look into everything from the use of deadly force to every day police stops. >> now, i want to be clear. this is not a stopgap or short-term solution. it's a long-term strategy founded on community policing that will provide a really detaed road map to build trust, bolster public safety, to ensure accountability and to change the way law enforcement leaders make decisions, implement policies and forge community partnerships. >> tom jackson responded by saying there's nothing wrong
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with his department. >> do you think there's a problem with the department when it comes to civil right sns. >> i don't. i think that we've worked really hard to make sure we treat everybody fairly. i think there's a, there's a segment of the community that is a little distrustful. in light of some of the events in recent weeks. >> let's bring in our legal guy, avery, good to see you. and richard herman. a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor joining us from las vegas. >> hi, fred. >> avery, how different are these doj investigations? >> these are unusual. they are undertaken by the special investigations section of the civil rights division of the u.s. department of justice based in washington. this attorney general, eric holder, has undertaken about 20 of them, double the previous administration, and it involves
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not only excessive force, but race. it is a comprehensive investigation and even though chief jackson said we think we're fine, he's actually cooperating. now, americans know about these kind of investigation. because you recall, the justice department did something similar to joe arpayo in maricopa county. there were problems and ultimately, a federal court order monitoring the entire sheriff's department. that may or may not happen in ferguson, but we are, this is a civil matter, not a criminal matter and it's going to take a number months to complete the investigation. >> so, civil, not criminal. then richard, if the doj finds michael brown was a victim of police force with a history, you know, brutality or excessive force, would ferguson pd be prosecuted or is that you know, or fined? what ultimately happened potentially? >> okay, fred, you have to break
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this thing down. his new investigation is as they're claiming systemic police targeting of blacks. avery said it's civil. when law enforcement welcomes this investigation, you know, don't expect anything really to come out of this. you have a population of about 20,000. of that population, it's predominantly all black. you have a police force of 53 with 49 white police officers who are you know, trying to enforce crimes in the community. who's goat geting arrested, poverty. it's a tough situation there to be in, but in addition to this new investigation, fred, you have the federal criminal civil rights investigation against police officer darren wilson in addition to that, you have a state grand jury investigating and probably going to bring charges against the police officer at a minimum and then you have a flurry of civil lawsuits against police officers for excessive force. all these investigations they
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put the civil cases on hold because people have fifth amendment rights and they're not going to testify. >> it's not going hold up justice department. >> again, this is a civil, this is looking at, but this is looking at procedures and they're going to try to implement new procedures against excessive force. this could apply throughout the united states. every police department. implement procedures to avoid excessive force. >> it sounds like you're saying richard, these competing ve investigations means there are no, there are not likely any quick rulings around the corner. this is something that could be drawn out for a long time. so, then i wonder -- >> months and months. >> and i wonder then, avery, since eric holder has visited with michael brown's family, you know, as the nation's top cop, top prosecutor -- >> which is unheard of. >> does that impact, influence these investigations because he is the highest public figure in law enforcement and while the family has been hurting and you
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know, he gave him sort of a public hug, does that also mean it shows some bias from the department of justice? >> good point. >> you know, i don't think so. i considered general holder an honorab honorable, careful attorney general when it comes to civil rights. i don't think he's creating false expectations. nor is is it going to affect the grand jury or criminal case. justice department will bring a criminal case. remember james byrd, the guy that was dragged in texas? that's a criminal case. this is strictly civil, pattern and practice. it takes six months to a year. no one's talked about that. so, i think the way it's being handled is absolutely proper and correct. >> and richard, last word on that. you see bias? >> yeah, i think it was wrong of him to make that personal visit while there was a federal, criminal civil rights investigation pending. i think he should have let the district attorney's office handle it by the state and town.
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he came out there before this civil doj investigation. i think it was wrong. i think it sends the wrong message here. let the system work and take place. you've got a grand jury. see if there's an indictment here first of all and i don't believe they're going to be able to prove a criminal civil rights claim. >> okay. all right, richard and avery, stick around. there's more. i want to ask you about the case of this young mother who is now planning to sue police after she was pulled over and put in handcuffs and her 6-year-old son walked towards officers with his hands up as you see right there. oh, my goodness. these pictures are extraordinary, but i want to ask you more about where this case goes. we'll be right back. i've always loved exploring and looking for something better. that's the way i look at life. especially now that i live with a higher risk of stroke due to afib, a type of irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. i was taking warfarin, but wondered if i kept digging,
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the georgia dad who left his son in a hot car faces three counts for murder in the young boy's death. this is justin ross harris. he was indicted by grand jury this week. harris left his son, cooper, in a car in june in suburban atlanta for more than seven hours. the temperature hit 92 degrees that day. >> we are pleased with the pace and the thoroughness of this investigation, which continues on today. the evidence in this case has led us to this point today. whether or not it leads us to
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anyone else remains to be answered. >> harris faces a mandatory life sentence if convicted on any of the murder charges and the district attorney could still seek the death penalty. harris' attorney believes the charges go too far. >> he's lost his son. his livelihood. his freedom. he's basically lost everything. his wife has been vilified. humiliated. embarrassing things about his private life have been aired in public. in attempt to make him look like a bad guy. >> our legal guys are back. avery and richard, richard to you first. what evidence is needed to support these murder charges, especially with malice? >> well, fred, i have a copy of
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the indictment here that i've pulled down and it's very interesting. that first charge of malice, we see several counts here for murder and felony murder is for instance, if you're robbing a bank and someone dies, then that's felony murder. you can be charged with felony murder for that. murder, first degree murder in most cases is is where you form that intent to actually kill someone. that brings the death penalty in a case like this. and that's their top charge here. they believe that he carefully planned and schemed to kill his child and that's what they're going to have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. they muddied it up with other issues concerning cruelty to children. and issues of sexual exploitation of children. that is separate from the murder case. if you want to -- >> is it separate or is that being one of the building blocks to use? >> absolutely.
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>> they will never go to trial with the vote. murder and those counts will not go in the same trial here. >> so, you're saying this package deal, richard, i think i'm hearing what you're saying. this package deal, these building blocks, will help prosecutors get what they want, which is guilty on at least malice by way of using these other things that say speak to his character, right? at the time of the child's death? >> look at. this guy, this guy was sexting at work while -- >> so what. >> while the kid was literally dying in the vehicle. this is an awful story. this was planned. he went to the website about child free life. i mean, as i understand, a lot of people go out there, hold on. that actually, the fact is that does go to the question of intent. whether or not people do things like that, he did in a context of what's going on.
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i actually like the prosecutor's case. i actually think the wife who, the defense lawyer claimed was vilified. she called the day care center, fredricka. where's cooper? did she call her husband? what the heck was going on here, fred? i think further digging will show that there may have been some involvement. remains to be scene, but i -- have a good case. >> there's a lot of information we don't have yet on this case and avery mentioned some intent. muddying this indictment up with him sending pictures to underage children has nothing to do with murder and the intent. >> this is the activity of what was taking place while this man's child was dying and this person was doing this. and this is his state of mind. that's not what that says? >> that's right. it's not going to be admissible in this case, fred, but the fact
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investigating childless life and what it takes to kill someone or to kill an animal in a car, that's going to commit an act and that goes to intent here. it's a horrible, horrible case. and when they get a description, when they put an expert on to say how the child suffered in the heat, the jury's going to fall. he's going to have a big problem defending himself in this case. >> let's move on to another case, this one in texas. this is shocking for a whole lot of people and now, o young mother says she is going to sue a local texas police department after they handcuffed her right in front of her children. >> what is wrong? >> hold on. >> they're 6 and 8 and 10, 9, what are we doing? what is going on? >> oh, my gosh.
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so, police pulled her over and ordered her out of the car, as you could hear there, then her 6-year-old, face is blurred getting out of the car with the hands up walk iing towards poli. officers had just received a call about four men in a beige car, so they pulled over this burgundy car. >> said lord, please don't let them -- in front of my children. that's what i asked right there. >> to get up and say you know, that they felt that procedure had been followed, well, your procedure needs to change because it says okay, we don't have four black men here. any black body will do. >> police called the stop a mistake, but say the officers did the right thing. the city manager tells our affiliate that it is, it has received no complaints rather of racial injustice or creating an environment of mistrust. so avery and richard back with
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us now. okay, so, in texas or really almost any jury diction, how difficult is it for you to turn around and sue the police department even if they admit to a mistake. mistaken identity here. they shouldn't have pulled her over, her vehicle didn't fit the description nor did she or kids in the car. there weren't guys in the car. it was a mother and her children. avery, you first. does chef a chance at trying to sue police? >> yeah, good for them. i'd have jumped, taken a one way ticket to federal court in dallas to represent these people. number one, the standard is that the police know or should they have known about the fact that it was the wrong color of car, the wrong make of car. there weren't men. this was a woman, the only similarity is her race. and the fact is that under that, there's a civil rights act passed in 1871 and i'm happy she's thinking about moving forward. i represent police.
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this is not good police work. it is so out of line that i think that police department is going to have a lot of trouble including the individual officers. >> richard, what's next here? >> absolutely not. avery is completely wrong here. there are no damages as a case, fred. >> what? >> it was a case of mistaken identity. they have a report someone is shoot ago gun out of a car with four people in it at this particular exit. so, they went and stopped her briefly detained. briefly. >> what? minutes. briefly detained her. >> that videotape doesn't sound -- >> i don't know how you minimize this. >> wow. i know, but when you look at the videotape, that doesn't look like a briefly stopped -- i think when people envision briefly stopped, you ask for the i.d. look around and move on. but this was handcuffing at least you hear her talking through it, then you see a little kid getting out of the car, hands up.
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richard? >> we must be looking at two different cases. >> shooting a gun of a window at this exit. it's a brief detention and they let her go. >> oh, my gosh. >> that's it. no damages. watch what happens here. >> no, i'm sorry, that's breaking my heart right there. >> this is damages. >> zero trouble for the department. no way. >> okay. we don't ever expect that you all will be in agreement, but wow, you are diametrically opposed. >> we're excited about your triathlon. what's the charity? >> children's hospital los angeles. yes. >> right. >> you make us proud. >> thank you so much, hey, i just need to finish. that's all. >> fred, you've got to change that red swim cap. got to get rid of that one. >> i don't know about that. >> my favorite colors. well, they're going to give me a different color because we have to be you know, in unison.
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they want all the little bobbing heads in the water to look like the same color, so you're not going to see hot pick out there. >> pasta. i know you'll do well. >> lots of pasta the night before. thank you. wish me well. i appreciate it. love you guys. richard, avery. the legal guys are here every saturday at this time. those hackers know they can cause chaos because thousands of people will click on those pictures. coming up, we dig into who is really to blame in the age when a click creates demand. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, carpenters shopping online is as easy as it gets. and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. we've made hiring anyone from a handyman to a dog walker as simple as a few clicks. buy their services directly at angieslist.com no more calling around. no more hassles. start shopping from a list of top-rated providers today. angie's list is revolutionizing local service again.
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dozens of celebrities were exposed this week when they explicit photos were stolen around posted online. hackers got into i cloud accounts and stole nude photos. apple says it was a targeted attack and it's boosting security to stop future hacks. can they really? i'm joined by cnn technology analyst, brett larson in new york. by now, everybody knows there is no privacy on images that are e-mailed, texted or tweeted. can we agree on that? no privacy. so, what is that say -- >> very valid. >> what does this say about you know, i guess not just those who
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are taking those images, but those sending it and there's clearly a market for it because there are people who intercept it, view it and there you go. boom, it goes viral. big problem. >> and they're trading it. exactly. this is what we've been learning over the past week or so. there's this entire underground community. there's literally a black market for naked photos of celebrities and you know, they post them on sights and other places where they all hang out and collaborate on what they get and then there are of course these hackers who are you know, pretty scummy if you're trying to go after somebody b to steal their naked pictures and then you're exchanging them, trading them like baseball cards. telling people i've got a trove of naked photos if you want to buy them. it's really quite disgusting. >> it seems like it is well-known there is that market. one argument is don't put yourself in a position so that your terrible gets out there. and then i guess there's another argument of i have the right to
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do that. so where is the protection for me? what are the answers to any of that is this. >> where do we draw the line in the sand on this. i equate this breaking into someone's phone by any means necessary. i don't care if you stole it out of their purse or hacked into it because of a vulnerability in some sort of clubhouse based online storage system. the fact you got in there, took something and gave it to other people, that's the same thing as if i broke into your house, stole personal property and then stood in front of your house and said look what i just stole out of this person's house. who wants to give me bit coins for it. it's really quite terrible. but a warning to us is you know, if you've got pictures of yourself like this, maybe you should delete them because you're absolutely as you said in the beginning, if you're sending photos to someone, they're not the only ones who are going to get it because now, they have it and if they get mad at you or want to bribe you, maybe the
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relationship went sour and i know how i'm going to get this guy back. >> remember that breck commercial and so on and so on and so on, the hair and the boxes, i think that's what this is like. you send the picture and so on and so on and it's got a life after a life and so on and so on it goes. >> it's the modern version of the telephone game only the story you're telling is a naked photograph of yourself and that story never changes. >> okay, thank you so much. we're going to see you again later. thanks so much. much more right after this. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go,
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banks and getting away with it for years. >> he's already shown a potential to fire on police and i have a feeling it's just going to be a bloody shoot out when that happens. >> and police believe the gunman is one of their own. the hunt for the ak 47 bandit this hour. deadly storms ripped through the midwest leaving a path of destruction. now, the storm is marching east. find out who's in the danger zone and a different threat in hawaii. red hot lava is now within a mile of a beach town. the ominous warning from authorities coming up. we begin with major news out of washington. president obama deciding to delay executive action until after the midterm elections in november. let's go straight to the white house with erin mcpike. why the delay? >> well, what we're hearinging
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is that the white house decided this was not a good idea to go forward until after the midterm elections. president obama evidently made this decision on the plane ride home last night. i want to play for you though something he said on june 30th in the rose garden. take a listen. >> if congress will not do their job, at least we can do ours. i expect the recommendations before the end of the summer. and i tend to adopt those recommendations without further delay. >> of course now, he has decided to delay that until after the midterm elections, however, the white house is stressing he will make some sort of executive action by the end of the year. as you can imagine, there has been some strong reaction across the political spectrum today. i'm going to read to you a comment from senate minority leader, mitch mcconnell. he says what's so cynical about today's immigration announcement is that the president isn't saying he'll follow the law, he's just saying he'll go around
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the law once it's too late for americans to hold his party account bable in the november election. this is clearly not decision making to run around the best policy. it's washington politics as its worst. now, pro immigration reform groups are also upset saying that president obama is cementing his legacy, so a lot of reaction on both sides of the al there. >> thank you so much from the white house. in michigan, tents, school people went flying everywhere when a massive storm blew in. several people were hurt at two different church events in detroit last night and the power outages are are expected to last for days. jennifer gray joins us from the weather center. >> it was a mess and we had over 350,000 people without power in michigan alone. and it's going to take days for that power to be restored as you said. about 2,000 powerlines down in that storm. same storm system is pushing to the east now. we aren't seeing much in the form of heavy rain or any rain
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at all in boston, new york, d.c. even philly, so quiet for now, but some warm, moist air is feeding in. it's going to cause pop-up showers and storms anywhere from the southeast to up the east coast, so a slight risk of severe weather in place today. boston and new york included in that heavy rain. should be pushing offshore by the late hours. early morning hours, storms lingering in florida by tomorrow, but cooler air behind it and this is the big story because of of humidity levels coming down, temperatures will finally come down, so it will be out of the 90s and 80s. >> appreciate that. hopefully, the folks at the u.s. open can still get going good tennis. >> appreciate. powerful new video showing deadly flood waters in india. up to the windows of people's homes. nearly 100 people have died after monsoon rains caused heavy floods. more than 2,000 villages were hit and in pakistan, more than
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100 people have lost their lives to flooding. incredible images there. spokesman for a disaster relief group says it is expecting even more deaths in the coming days. back at home, a private funeral for joan rivers is planned for tomorrow in new york and just a short time ago, cnn caught rivers daughter, melissa, leaving her mother's apartment with her son there. so many of her mother's fans have offered their condolences to her during this very difficult time. meanwhile, an investigation into her death is underway. alexandria field is outside her home in new york. you were able to ask melissa a question. >> yes, we saw her come out of joan rivers' apartment, getting into a car and stopped just a moment to tell us how amazed she was by all the tributes we've seen to joan rivers, really a legendary comedian, not least of which the ones behind me.
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flowers, cards have been piling up outside the door of the apartment buildings where joan rivers lived here in new york massachusetts so many people are grieving the loss. investigators are conducting three separate investigations into what went wrong. >> joan rivers lived for r laughs and joked about death. >> 81 years old, i could die any second. like that. do you understand how lucky you would be? do you understand you would have something to talk about for the rest of your life? >> she lit up the stage for the last time last week in new york city. >> she gave a tremendous performance, her last performance. she was particularly on that night. she came in, she was in a great mood. she left in a great mood. very healthy, very vital. she looked great. she always looked great. >> the next day, rivers was rushed to mt. sinai in critical condition. the comedy legend was put on
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life support and never recovered. she went into cardiac and respiratory arrest during a procedure at the endoss copi center. the board that gave the clinic its accreditation is investigating. together, they'll look at the clinic's staffing, life saving protocalls and which drugs may have been gien. what kind of sedative? >> some use a combination of versed, like valium and then maybe another other type of sedation, but more commonly today, propofol is used and propofol is a newer medication with respect to some of the others, but it provides a really adequate level of sedation to do this type of procedure. >> tok tors say medical professionals would have had to determine she was healthy enough to undergo the procedure.
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one night earlier, she sold out her last show. >> back in the car. >> where at 81 years old, the legendary comedian was still testing out new material. and friends and family will say their final good-bye to joan rivers tomorrow. the funeral is scheduled for tomorrow. there was no topic that was off limits for joan rivers, she had joked about everything. even written in one of the books about the sort of grand showbiz affair she wanted. i think it's supposed to be taken as humor and comedy. the family is keeping the details of the funeral private, but we are certain there will be a lot of friends and fans to be there to say good-bye. >> she went where nobody else would and that's why we love her. this just in. we've just learned possible debris from that plane that crashed near jamaica has been spotted according to the
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jamaican government's information service. yesterday, that plane flew for hours unresponsive before crashing from over the skies of north carolina, then crashing there in jamaica. relatives say larry and jane glazer were on board that flight. their flight left rochester, new york yesterday morning and was heading for naples, florida, where they have a home, but somewhere over north carolina, air traffic controllers lost contact with the pilot after he mentioned he wanted to descend, come to a lower altitude. fighter jets flew alongside at one point, even a pilot seeing the pilot in that small plane slumped over. and the windows frosted. kurdish fighters are making gains against isis militants. we'll get the latest and find out how nato forces could help in this fight and later, a serial bank robber striking again and this guy isn't just stealing money. why police are afraid of what he might do next.
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forces still battling isis militants in the mosul area. they have managed to retake several villages. they launched strikes around erbi lirks. after a fierce battle, iraqi and kurdish forces retook the dam from isis in the last couple of weeks. it was seen as vital and important for iraqi forces. isis was a big topic at this week's nato summit. to form what it is calling a spearhead force of troops. these troops would be ready to deploy within days and would be prepared to deal with isis or an escalation of tense rather in
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ukraine. kurt knows about the challenges of nato and what they'll be facing. he is executive director of the mccain institute for international leadership. this turned out to be one of the most important nato meetings in quite some time. did this result in a more united front? united message on both the topics of russia and isis? >> i think there was some good steps nato took this week and there are a few shortcomings as well. on the positive side, i think nato needed to reassure the baltic states it is 100% committed to collective defense. an attack on one is an attack on all and put in place some steps to make it real, additional exercises, this 4,000 man response force. all those things are good. where i think nato came up short was on actually dealing with
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russia's invasion of ukraine. i think there's more that can be done there in terms of helping the ukrainians gain control. >> in what way? >> i think providing trainers to the ukrainian military equipment. a full cut off of sales to russia. advisers in the ministry of defense. and frankly, if necessary, if you crane required it, additional nato support such as air or ground reenforcement to ukraine. there's a war going on. they're lose iing control of a d chunk of their territory. russia's supporting that. they are fighting back. they want to regain their territory and nato didn't really put much on the table in terms of helping them. >> so, even with this alliance, eve fn it's lacking some of those things you just spelled out, is this really the only leverage there could be on russia? because russia's saying so what to sanctions.
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>> it seems this may be the only thing -- doesn't mean they aren't real and that russia's not concerned in the long-term. yes, the u.s. and europe both can put in place tougher sanction, particularly in the energy sector, that russia depends upon for its income. the nato steps we talked about, trainers, adviser, equipment and so forth, those things could still be done and could be done by individual countries if not by nato as a whole, so the u.s. could be doing more nationally if we chose to, rather than limiting to what everybody in nato agrees to. >> thank you so much for being with us. >> thank you. >> so, this cease fire between ukraine and pro russian rebel leaders appears to be holding now. the truce went into effect more than 24 hours ago. ukrainian officials say the president talked with russian president putin by phone just after the cease fire was
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reached. they say the two leaders discussed additional steps that could be taken to make the truce last. those measures included greater economic freedoms for the rebel stronghol strongholds. lava keeps flowing from a very active volcano in hawaii and now, a small community is in its direction path. nineteen years ago, we thought, "wow, how is there no way to tell the good from the bad?" so we gave people the power of the review. and now angie's list is revolutionizing local service again. you can easily buy and schedule services from top-rated providers. conveniently stay up to date on progress. and effortlessly turn your photos into finished projects with our snapfix app. visit angieslist.com today. ♪ ♪
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a small beach town in hawaii is under a state of emergency after warnings that lava is headed their way. experts say it could reach the district as soon as this week and when it does, it will completely isolate the village, but at last check, there were no evacuations ordered. jennifer gray joining me now. always fascinating when kilauea erupts. i visited it in a sleepy stage. and the people who live there are used to it, but this could really be potentially dangerous. >> they're used to it. this has been active since 1983, but this is a new vent. ever since 1983, the lava that's been coming out of it has been flowing to the south. straight into the ocean. this new vent that popped up on
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june 27th, the lava from it is is flowing in more of a northeasterly direction, opposite of the way kilauea normally flows. that's why it's impacting these homes. before, it was never a concern. you're right new york city evacuation orders have been made, but they have told people get ready, because it could be coming. this lava is flowing very, very slowly, anywhere from 1800 to 1600 feet per day, so slowly, but in the next five to seven days, it could impact these homes. here's a look at the terrain we're talking about. the little village right there. the lava could cut off some of these roads, so then, you'll have a problem getting in and out of these places. there's a closer look. you can see farmland, cattle and even homes, so as you can manage, very, very concerned. >> you can't redirect that lava. it's going where it wants to go.
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it has the upper hand. >> it certainly does. >> thanks so much. a nationwide man hunt is now underway for a serial bank robber. this is the man police want to capture and he didn't just carry that weapon. he used it to fire at police they say.
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zblnchs bottom of the hour now. welcome back. here are some of the big stories crossing the cnn news desk now. an american doctor infected with ebola is in stable condition at a nebraska hospital. he arrived in the u.s. on friday making him the third ebola patient to enter this country, but he will not receive the experimental drug. that's because there isn't any left. only a small amount of the drug was made. a wildfire in central california has forced people in 700 homes to evacuate. the bridge fire started yesterday afternoon near owe similarity national park and has burned 300 acres. so far, from structures have been damaged and only one person was injured. a newly discovered asteroid is zipping by earth this weekend coming within just 25,000 miles of the planet.
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the space rock is about 60 feet in diameter. it was only discovered last week. scientists say the asteroid does not pose any threat to the earth. and american serena williams is going for her sixth, count them, six, u.s. open women's titles tomorrow. she will face caroline wozniak in the finals. it would be her 18th grand slam title. you can watch the match tomorrow, noontime. or at least learn about it by watching us first. right now, a national man hunt is underway for the so-called ak 47 bandit. he's wanted in a string of bank robberies across the country. police say he could strike anywhere. he started on the west coast, but they've warned he's now moving east. he's incredibly dangerous, police say, earning his nickname by threatening people with his massive rifle.
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authorities believe he has a police or military background and now, they are bracing for a potential shootout. here's ken law. >> he's very serious, aggressive. >> automatic rifle raised. a trained gunman. the masked robber moves through the tellers in minutes. detective dominguez instantly recognizes him. >> same guy. no doubt. >> he's been hunting the bandit for two years. that's when he first struck in california. appear tog where the same mask, same gloves, carrying the same assault rifle with 75 to 80 rounds, similar clothes, even driving the same car. a chiu know police officer respondinging to the call never even had a chance to grab his gun, striking the officer once, wounding him. >> he's got some skills.
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there's no doubt he's law enforcement or military trained. >> how bold is this guy? >> he's very bold. it's almost like a game to him. >> a game law enforcement says he's moving across the country. february 29th, 2012, he hits a california bank and trust in chino, california. two weeks later, march 12th, wearing a vest marked as sheriff, he robs a back in bacaville and then goes north to washington and robs a bank there. november 7th, 2012, he strikes a credit union in rexburg, idaho. he disappeared for almost two years until robbing a bank in nebraska. how badly do you want to have him? >> real bad. this is leaping more towards a north hollywood type shooting. >> the 1997 north hollywood bank
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robbery. officers were outgunned, facing two robbers armed with high powered rifles who refused to surrender. two dozen others both officers and civilian, were wounded. no one other than the gunman were killed. the fbi fears a repeat of this battle with the bandit. >> he's shown a propensity that he will fire upon police and i have a feeling it will just be a bloody shoot outwhen that does happen. >> law enforcement chasing a man they believe is one of their own, so this case is also personal. >> we're going to hunt this guy down regardless of where he goes. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, carpenters shopping online is as easy as it gets. and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. we've made hiring anyone from a handyman to a dog walker as simple as a few clicks. buy their services directly at angieslist.com
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now, pope francis can add the title social media pope. in a first, he went online and held a google hang out video chat session. he spoke to children from around the world thursday on the internet. students from israel, turkey, south africa and el salvador got the chance to ask him questions. it's part of his new initiative to promote social integration, education and culture. brett larson is back with me now
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in new york and john allen is cnn's senior vatican analyst join i joining us from denver. good to see both of you guys. so, brett, wow. he is a social media savvy, too. >> i think it's fantastic. i think the more attention we can draw to that level, the pope is pretty much the highest level you can get, especially in the catholic church, is fantastic. if there's anything he can do to help get more technology into places where it needs to be because it's such a helpful thing to have, i think it's fantastic. >> wow, it is. incredible. john, i'm just learning about this google hang out thanks to the pope now, but he already knew. he has the attention of these kids from around the world. what does this say to you about
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about the vatican, that this pope is reaching out in this fashion to young people, answering questions candidly? >> he obviously sees social media as a missionary tool in the tool box. not only did he make his debut on google hang out, which i couldn't have even defined, but most can't. that's the problem with google hang out. sorry. he also became the first pope to attach a photo to one of his tweets. he actually sent out a photo of a family in iraq that's living under an overpass, it's a photo taken by catholic relief service, the overseas arm of the u.s. bishop. he's just clicking on all cylinders. look, what does it mean? it means this pope fundamentally
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sees himself as an evangelist, as a missionary. he is not really personally that much of a high-tech guy. he is the first pope to use -- >> but he has the willingness. that's sometimes, that means a lot. >> he has the willingness. >> that's right, for example, he does not send out his own tweets. he's got people who do that for him, but what he believes in his heart is that the church has to, this is his famous line, the church has to get out of this -- the room in which priests get ready for the mass of sunday. and into the streets and i think what he recognizes is that for people around the world in the early 21st century, young people in particular, the streets means the dingital highway. the information superhighway and so, he is profoundly committed to using every tool in the tool box to get his message across. >> wow, google hang out.
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>> what's the next frontier? digital frontier that we could expect this pope will leave his imprint? >> if we can go to confession via skype, i think that would be phenomenal. maybe that won't happen. >> just for the record, the vatican has actually said that digital confessions don't count. >> see, now, we got to get them to get on that. >> just when we thought -- updated, now the setback. >> i think it's great that they're putting this in their missionary tool box. i think if we could you know, if as part of their humanitarian aid as the church, if not only are they bringing food and help and relief, if they were bringing inexpensive computers and internet connection and access to the rest of the world, that would be fantastic. >> i'm hearing some great ideas. thanks so much.
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appreciate it. the pope is paying attention. >> tweet at me, pope. >> i wish i had people to help me tweet like he's got people. i got to work on that. hook me up. appreciate it. >> i'm on it. >> i can count on you. land that used to be the bottom of a flowing river is now miles of dry, parched dirt. one of our cnn colleagues tried to kayak that river and you see right there, there is feet. you see the outcome at least in part with the outcome. he's got an incredible story about that journey coming up. first, dr. gupta, six cnn viewers and me. we're gearing up for the nautica mali malibu try ath lon next week and we want to take a minute to reintroduce you to the teammates. >> in january, these six cnn
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viewers were selected to join me on a journey to become triathletes. they all had one common goal. to make a change. and over the last eight months, i've seen them transform. swimming dozens of hours. biking hurricanes of miles and running farther than they ever thought possible. >> today, we're going to do a 400 yard swim in the ocean. >> with hard work comes rewards. they're healthy. physically. and mentally. connie's breakthrough, it's not all about the scale. >> if weight loss would have been my only goal this year, i may have quit within the first few weeks. this experience has given me so much more than weight loss. it's given me strength, confidence, endurance, new friends, new sports. lots of spandex and a great tan. >> mike learned how to balance his new healthy lifestyle. >> the structure i have in my life now is amazing. i plan my meals ahead of time. eating out is a rarity.
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>> karen now makes herself a priority. >> i have learned to listen and take care of my body with proper sleep and nutrition is very important. >> for ron, he learned that age really is just a number. >> age does not define who i am or what i can do. it is simply a mile post along the journey of my life. >> jamil started this journey recovering from cancer. he beat that cancer and got his confidence back. >> i'm capable of the same things, but those things may take me longer. the sooner i made peace with my new normal, the easier i was on myself, which helped me grow into my new body and make better results. >> last, but not least, cia. >> it's so important to have your family and friends on board. their involvement is critical to your success. >> gettinging the success of those around you, it's an answer lute must. >> nice. well, they are all inspirations
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and so are you, sanjay, and that's why i took him onup on the offer to join the group. i will be in malibu next weekend hoping that my swimming, my biking, my running, training, all of that allows me to at least keep up. my only expectation is that i finish and i can't promise you what kind of shape i'm going to be in, but hey, sanjay, a team, i will see you at zula beach and we will be right back. this is kathleen. setting up the perfect wedding day begins with arthritis pain and two pills. afternoon arrives and feeling good, but her knee pain returns... that's two more pills. the evening's event brings laughter, joy, and more pain... when jamie says... what's that like six pills today? yeah... i can take 2 aleve for all day relief. really, and... and that's it. this is kathleen...
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for my arthritis pain, i now choose aleve. get all day arthritis pain relief with an easy-open cap. ♪ eenie. meenie. miney. go. more adventures await in the seven-passenger lexus gx. see your lexus dealer.
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more than 80% of california is in an extreme crippling drought. people, animal, businesses, nature, all of it suffering. one place where it is extremely evident, the rivers. and one river in california, the san joaquin river, has been named the most endangered in america by the non-profit conversation organization, american rivers, but the problems on the river started long before this drought. john sutter kayaked the whole thing or sort of kind of tried to this summer.
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huge section of the river are only a trickle or completely dry. these are some of his images. here is a fact fact of how he made it to the pacific ocean. ♪ >> so, three weeks of my 400 miles later, this is my beard, my ridiculous paddling clothes and proof i made it to the golden gate. you don't see me? i'm the orange dot. from the sierra to the sea, i thought back on all the people i met along the way. there's bill conner who drink frs the river. michelle sneed, who's measuring the sinking ground and george, whose job depends on the water. we owe it to ourselves and them to make this river -- it's a broken river, but not a dead one. smarter policies to con serve water could stop nonsense like this from happening. as i floated under the golden
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gate, i thought back on how far i'd come, then i realized none of the water from the start of the san joaquin makes it this far. >> wow. great perspective. i'm joined now by john and jennifer. what a huge undertaking. you just told me you're not really a kayaker, but you decided, i'm going to take the challenge and see what happens to this river. your expectations were met by a lot of surprises, weren't they? >> surprises all along the way. i think a lot of us are really blind to our rivers. they're sort of invisible. this was sort of my idea to get to know this river at its own speed and sort of this intimate, personal way and yeah, there were surprises all along the river. i met formers whose land is completely dry because they don't have water to use from it.
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i encountered part of the river for about 40 miles and i had the leave the kay yak in a parking lot and hiked for three days across this desert portion of the river and then it is sort of refilled by drain water from farms. surprises. for me one of the most surprising thing is that so many of our rivers including the san joaquin no longer make it to the ocean. the river is dry from overuse. the drought contributes to it but essentially california has engineered this river to be dry. it's engineered it almost to the point of extinction. i found that shocking. but this is not just a california story. the colorado river until earlier this year didn't meet the ocean. it carves out the grand canyon and the majestic american symbol, it's in trouble. the rio grande which forms our border with mexico. i think this is really a national problem and i think it can be solved in part by looking at our rivers and understanding their stories. i think it's something we don't really do anymore. >> and part of your experience you talked about the drought and the dryness of this river where you had to, you know, hike for three days, you said, right?
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three days? you also encountered quicksand and no one can prepare you for that. what happened? >> i had no idea this was happening. this was after the dry section. >> it sounds like something that's just in the movies and it's fictitious but there's really quicksand. >> "princess bride" i had the images in my head but i didn't have that experience at all. i was told the river was back now you can get your kayak and get back in and start paddling and i started that again and it was dry again and back again and intermi intermittent. i was finding a spot where it was flowing backwards because it's being pumped backwards by a former's pump and it's sort of a dry and sort of wet area. i got stuck for quite a bit of time. >> did you panic? >> i did. because i was by myself. i had to leverage myself on the kayak to swing myself out of it and i didn't expect it at all. and i later met that farmer whose pump was basically pulling -- it's many farmers, many people who were overusing the river and i met him and
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talked about it and it's interesting to hear the perspective that needs every drop of that water to keep his business going as opposed to mine who is sort of connect the river and help tell its story. >> it's a calamity of errors, isn't it? there's a need for the river. the overuse is the language that you're using of the river. there is naturally the weather pattern. >> right. >> the drought in california. so you've got a confluence of events and then just as john is telling us you've got situations where none of that water is making it to the ocean. >> right. >> and it's not just the san joaquin but it's the colorado river and others. >> it's so sad and this is progressively getting worse and worse over the past three years. they've essentially been in this drought for the past three years. right now it's the worst that we've ever seen. historically this will go down as california's worst drought wrx so 95% of the state in severe drought, you know, we've got over 50% in exceptional drought. and this is something we've never seen before so it is going
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to take a lot of rain to reverse this. and it is just getting worse by the second as he saw first hand. amazing. >> what's the forecast? is there an immediate forecast? an immediate relief, you know, people can count on, weeks, months or something like that? >> we're counting nino, we've been counting on it and it will change the weather patterns and drive storms in to, you know, california which is what we need. right now it's not looking like it's really materializing. we're hoping that it will, with but, you know, over the next couple of weeks, the next couple of months, we need rain and then when we turn into winter we need the snowpack to come back because in the mountains because, remember, last year it just wasn't there. and this is something that we're going to be dealing with for years to come. >> and then, john, what did you learn from the people who rely on the river, who live by the river, who do business by the river? what's their forecast? what are they planning for, hoping for? >> i think everyone in california's hoping for rain and
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the degree to which this is the conversation that everyone there was having was really surprising to me. i met people who didn't know where this river was coming from or where it's going but water is on everyone's mind in california. i think that's really a sign of what's to come for us nationally especially with climate change. you mentioned snowpack, you know, the forecast for snowpack in the long term are great, great reductions in what will be there and that feeds the river. i think what i learned is that all of this is connected. i think there are -- there's common ground between farmers and environmentalists in california that they often don't see. and i've seen some positive things happening. california recently passed sort of commonsense ground water legislation to regulate the use of water that's under the ground. sort of out of sight, out of mind. there's a proposal to bring back just half of the san joaquin's natural flow before the california waterboard. and there are people who are supporting that and half of the river would be, you know, an amazingly healthier version than what currently is happening. >> and all of this came about you're opening our eyes because of this change, the list
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challenge on cnn.com and, of course, if folks want to learn more about it, how it came about and more about your journey, go to cnn.com. >> yes. cnn.com/change. people voted for this story and so i reported it. >> and you went there. you had an incredible story to tell, john sutter, jennifer grey, appreciate it. >> thanks. all right, still ahead a random act of kindness provides more to winning on the field in the nfl. what one team is doing to help its player and his sick daughter. nineteen years ago, we thought, "wow, how is there no way to tell the good from the bad?" so we gave people the power of the review. and now angie's list is revolutionizing local service again. you can easily buy and schedule services from top-rated providers. conveniently stay up to date on progress. and effortlessly turn your photos into finished projects
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with our snapfix app. visit angieslist.com today. ♪
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an nfl team has taken an incredible step to show there's a lot more to life than just winning and losing. the cincinnati bengals had cut number 75 defensive tackle devon still from the 53-man roster, but then the team re-signed him to the practice squad. why? because of that little girl right there. they kept him to make sure that he keeps his health insurance and continues to get paid all to help his 4-year-old daughter who is battling cancer who he says is his main concern. >> it was tough to stay focused,
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but what i had is what i gave to football. i mean, i have a lot of stuff going on right now, but when i stepped on the football field, i try to focus on football as much as possible, but in the back of my head what was going on outside of football is a distraction i just can't stop thinking about so -- >> very compassionate move by the bengals and, of course, we wish devon, the family and his daughter the best. all right, hello, again, everyone, i'm fredricka whitfield. here are the big stories we're following this hour -- >> we begin with a major announcement out of washington. president barack obama deciding to delay executive action on immigration until after the midterm elections in november. let's go straight to the cnn white house correspondent erin mcpike. so, erin, what more is the white house saying about this? >> rte

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