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tv   CNN Newsroom With Fredricka Whitfield  CNN  September 20, 2014 7:00am-11:01am PDT

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everybody into the park. right now. everybody get back. get back. >> you can hear it got frantic there for a bit. at the white house here, do we know exactly happened? >> well no one knows exactly why he wasn't seen at that moment jumping the fence. but -- now you can't see this behind me where the fence is but it is only about 7 or 8 feet tall. omar gonzalez jumped the fence and ran right behind me here, about 105 yards to the front door. of course there were secret service officials yelling at him to stop. but they didn't shoot. he got inside the front doors before they apprehended him. then took him in an balance to gw medical center where he was later evaluated. officials are saying they believe he was mentally
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disturbed. and secret service say that he was known to them. but they said he hadn't been arrested before. obviously today there is a lot of talk about how this possibly could have happened. when i entered the white house this morning there were groups of secret service agents talking, trying to figure this out. it was clear. and we actually heard from a former secret service official earlier this morning and he discussed that very thing. listen. >> i'm stunned. i think what they have to look at is, remember, we're always -- we can't stick the president in a big iron box. he has to be out there amongst the people. but i've always seen especially on the north portion of the white house, the distance to the front door is short in contrast to the south portion. it is quite a run. you won't make it to the south doors. they are going to have to do something with the fence, even if it's something as simple as curving the bars to the street side to make it harder to scale. time buys you options, remember.
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and right now they don't have time. you scale the fence, you are almost right at the door. >> and right now, why this happened? and if the proper protocols were followed is under investigation, christy and victor. >> erin mcpike at the white house. thank you o much. some people are asking if these are shades of the cold war. you answer the question. u.s. fighter jets intercepted a half dozen russian military planes flying too close to alaskan air space on thursday. they came within 55 miles which is pretty close. our correspondent barbara star looks as if it was planned to coincide with the ukrainian president's visit with u.s. and canada. >> now a hunt for a suspected cop killer. police appear to be closing in on the man they believe killed a state trooper and wounded another in the ambush a week ago
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outside the police barracks. here in barrett township law enforcement swarmd a rural area in the poconos as they hunt for eric matthew freem. and what do you have for us this morning? what is the latest. >> reporter: again hopefully we'll be able to get more details in terms of exactly what happens and what police were dealing with last night. it was last night about 7:00. and pennsylvania not far where where we are now. that is the town where eric freen grew up. it was about 7:00. that is when we started getting reports in that shots were fired. shortly thereafter that alert went out telling residents to stay off the roads and stay in their homes and stay away from windows. that alert still in effect out
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here this morning. once again, we are dealing with a fugitive whose well versed with the woods in the surrounding area. he knows the back woods and trails and has been able to elude police the past week. this is someone armed and considered extremely dangerous. has already proven himself to be deadly. he knows how to handle a gun. he's been handling guns ever since he was in high school. his father taught him how to shoot. his father said when he does shoot, he rarely misses. and in terms of the search area and what is going on with that, let me point out that investigators have been saying since thursday what they are trying to do is actually shrink the area of his movement. meaning eliminate places where they think he has been, try to restrict places where we he can go. so hopefully during the press conference we will get more updated information in terms of how the search is going and maybe more information about whether or not they have been able to corner eric frein.
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>> his fathering talking about how adroit he is as a marksman. are there any plans to perhaps use the father in some way to try to get through to the son in some fashion? and get him to turn himself in? >> well certainly investigators have not shared that type of information with us at this point. perhaps they are not at that stage. it would just be pure speculation at this point. also i should point out that when it comes to information that is being released by investigators, obviously they are being very smart about that. because they believe that, once again, eric frien is in the area. they don't want to tip their hat here and give out too much information about the search. so perhaps that could be one
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reason that question can't be answered at that point. but i think it is a safe assumption they are looking at all options on the table, doing whatever they can to find him before he tries to hurt somebody else. >> thank you so much jason. jason carroll there in pennsylvania. and again we're waiting for a news conference from authorities there. as soon as that happens we'll take it live. >> we'll have that as soon as it happens. meanwhile, nfl commissioner roger goodell says despite the league's controversies he's not going anywhere. >> and his first public remarks in more than a week. he apologized yesterday for mishandling the situation but made it clear that he's never even considered leaving his post despite calls for him to step down. >> and ray rice scandal doesn't seem to be going away either. cnn now learned the baltimore ravens did in fact know about the controversial elevator official showing the star running back knocking out his
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then fiancé. >> here's more. >> reporter: roger goodell speaking in manhattan at a news conference amid calls for his resignation. >> i got it wrong on a number of levels, from the process that i led, to the decision that i reached. but now i will get it right and do whatever is necessary to accomplish that. >> reporter: the embattled nfl commissioner apologizing for what he said was his mishandling of the ray rice domestic violence scandal. here is a question from cnn's rachelal nickels. >> you have had pretty extreme unilateral power in deciding discipline and as you said you have gotten wrong in a few occasions. and that tends to happen when there is no checks and balances. how willing are you to give up that power and would it be the right thing for you to do.
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>> as i said in my statement, everything is on the table. we are going to make sure to look at every aspect of the process how we gather information to make a decision, how we make that decision and then the appeals process. >> even as goodell pledged to move ahead, questions still lum in the rice case about who knew what when after tmz released the now infamous inside the elevator video. >> we asked for it on several occasions. we went through it and asked for it on several occasions over the spring from february through june. i'm confident that i our people did that. >> two security videos put the rice case squarely in the public out showing the star knocking out his fiancé with a punch last february. a source from the ravens organization tells cnn that within hours after the incident at an atlantic city hotel and casino the head of security
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darren sanders spoke with police who described in detail to sanders the elevator video. espn is reporting that sanders then shared the information with team executives and they started extensive public and private campaigns for leniency for rice. a source reason the ravens organization tells cnn the ravens never saw the video until tms first released it. the ravens issue a statement late friday says espn article contains numerous error, inaccuracy, false assumption and perhaps misunderstandings. the ravens will discuss it sunday. alexander field, cnn new york. >> of course we'll continue to follow the latest on that. this morning we are getting a new look from isis. another video. this time there is a new voice. a man with a north american accent. and it delivers a frightening
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message to the west. >> also how can the united states win the war against isis? that is a big question. congress back arming and training the syrian rebels but not everyone supports that plan. that is next. how much money do you have in your pocket right now? i have $40, $21. could something that small make an impact on something as big as your retirement? i don't think so. well if you start putting that towards your retirement every week and let it grow over time, for twenty to thirty years, that retirement challenge might not seem so big after all.
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>> -- the intelligence community is analyzing this video, trying to determine this man's origin. >> and we are here with the soldiers of bashaud. you can see them digging their own graves in the very place where they were stationed. >> his cloaked as he presides over the execution of syrians apparently captured from the military base. >> they said the event in the fronts had stopped fighting and turn our guns towards the muslims. they lied. we are the [inaudible] . and the flames of war are only beginning to intensify. >> this and he speaks perfect english. he would be arab and educated in the west. he would be american or canadian. >> clearly isis had a calculated step to be able to put this guy on camera. why?
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because he seems american. the message is aimed at a western audience. and his intent is to a, project fear to the united states and b, to instill and give the sense of projection of power. >> the entire video is pure isis propaganda. stylishly edited battle scenes featuring the enemy's heavy ar ma mor getting blown apart. >> this is isn't a north american. it's quite extraordinary. it would be the first time a north american isis fighter has committed a crime on camera. >> it's too difficult to tell where his dialect is from. how will they find clues? >> voice analysis. they are going to be looking at any particular accents they may have. anything that could tip off law
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enforcement where they can then pull the thread even further in terms of state and local to meet with some of the communities. >> brian todd, cnn washington. >> well in a war we're weary country congress passed had bill that provides the money the president will need to organize the fight against isis. and that money will help to train and arm these men, the syrian rebels. it was a rare bipartisan show of support and a pretty bipartisan show of rejection. we have one of the representatives who voted no. florida republican toom rooney is joining us now. representative rooney. it is good to have you with us from washington. >> thanks victor. >> so right after the president's comment tos on the of september 11th you released one statement. you say if we are charged with the responsibility to keep our
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nation safe and if we agree that isis is a threat to our national security, then we must destroy them, period. we must will resolute by all means necessary to do so. so my question, if you are not in favor of funding the syrian rebels, are you advocating for u.s. troops to do that job? >> we might have to victor. nobody wants to go back to war. there are a lot of veterans in congress that voted against this measure. there are a lot of my friends that served in iraq and afghanistan that the last thing they want to do is have to go back and redo what they have already done. but the fact of the matter is that if you are looking -- as my statement said, if you are looking at isis as a national security threat that can hurt us here in america as the president in insin ates.
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i don't know that will work. so when posed with the question will you support that strategy? i had to oppose. >> and i want to take that next step again. you say we may have to. do you think that is where the u.s. should sart start? >> i think it is a conversation, as we saw over 10 years ago when we gave george w. bush the authorization to go into the initial stages of iraq and afghanistan, it took months of deliberation in congress. not a few days. and this is very serious stuff. so i think that when we get back from this election -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com it is it is incoupumbent upon uo have this debate and figure what we are willing to do and not willing to do. but by and large that request, as speaker boehner has said has
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to come from the president himself. and then we agree or not agree whether or not to give him a new authorization. which is what i think we really need right now. this is different than ten years ago. >> how do you gauge the threat against the u.s. homeland? the president, many have said there is in imminent threat to the homeland. but if this is a threat to national security, do you believe that, from what you know, that this is becoming a greater threat? >> it is absolutely becoming a greater threat. i sit on the intelligence committee. and we get briefed on these matters on a weekly basis. and this is been going on for some time. these syrian rebel that we are talking about arming we have been trying to get to know for some time. it isn't just a new idea. it's had mixed results, which is another reason why i oppose. but in the end i think that when
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you say and the president says that they are not imminent, yes they are probably not coming here today or tomorrow. but their goals and their intentions are to wreak havoc in the middle east and do whatever they can to recruit people to be able to get back here and get back into europe and to be able to continue the kind of things that we just saw in your last segment there. so i think that was proof in the pudding having somebody from north america in their propaganda. so that is their goal. and certainly it is something that we should take seriously and i'm glad the president says they need to be destroyed. funding the syrian rebels is not going to do that. >> all right, republican congressman too many rooney of florida. good to talk with you this morning. >> thanks victor. senator bill nelson of florida voted yes on this motion to arm and train syrian rebels. isis is a snake and you have to go where the head of the snake
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is and chop it off. he joins us later this hour. >> there's been torrential rain and flooding in texas this week. we're going to tell you what the weather is going to be like today in that area and around the country. also keeping our eyes on monroe county pennsylvania. officials are set to update us on the certainly for one america's most wanted fugitives. when healthcare gets simpler. when frustration and paperwork decrease. when grandparents get to live at home instead of in a home. so let's do it. let's simplify healthcare. let's close the gap between people and care.
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i'm meteorologist jennifer gray. we are going to see more flooding in west texas. and you can see already seeing showers popping up to the northeast of midland. expected as we get heat in the atmosphere through the day they become more wide spread. and into the afternoon and sunday and monday we could see an initiadditional 2-4 inches. because of that we have flood watch, warnings, even flash flood warnings in place for today for these areas. and now as we go from an area of too much rain to an area of not enough. the king fire burning and you can see the smoke just billowing to the north. this has consumed about 76,000 acres. about 4500 firefighters battling this place and about 21,000 structures are threatened and the smoke flume is stretching about 250 miles to the northeast. so this is something we're going
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to be watching and keep you updated with the very latest. >> thanks jen. and best of like for the firefighters there. that is a tough one. well vatican radio says the pope has selected had next archbishop of chicago. this move marks pope francis's first major appointment in the united states. >> right now the community of charlottesville, virginia and people from outside the community have rushed in. they are racing against the clock to try and find missing uva student hanna graham a little more than a week after she vanished. police may be one step closer to solving her experience. on the ground in chartsville with more. >> more and more people are coming today to want to volunteer. the entire community is come, one purpose to find hanna
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graham. i'll have the latest after this. ♪ i thought it'd be bigger. ♪ ♪ (dad) there's nothing i can't reach in my subaru. (vo) introducing the all-new subaru outback. love. it's what makes a subaru,a subaru. dave, i'm sorry to interrupt... i gotta take a sick day tomorrow. dads don't take sick days, dads take nyquil. the nighttime, sniffling, sneezing, coughing, aching, fever, best sleep with a cold, medicine.
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live look here. we are waiting a news conference here in monroe county pennsylvania. there was an exchange of gunfire overnight. police believe that it might have been frein, the man who they believe shot a cop a week ago, injured another. we are waiting to hear the very latest on that search for him. we'll bring it to you live when it happens. meanwhile today more than 1500 volunteers are helping search for missing virginia student hannah graham. he disappeared last we're after dinner with friends. there was surveillance video that's helped piece together her movements. >> and that's led to a major break in the case. what's the latest this morning, j
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jenn. we know large crowds are out to help. >> reporter: people just keep coming from this community to help. there is the line for people to board the bus. when you come here you get your flowers vest on and you stand in line. and we learned they not only are searching the city area of charlottesville, they are going into the wooded area. but the passion with this community to in fact find hannah brown is amazing. watch this. >> that if this has been one of my daughter, i would most certainly want people out here doing everything they can. >> find hannah. that is the mission in hand right now to find hannah. of course we are looking for the clothing possibly that she had on the night she went missing, her cell phone that's not been recovered. so anything that has any aspect of hannah is what we're looking for. >> reporter: now yesterday think they executed a search warrant on a vehicle and apartment here
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in sharmltsville. they are very interested in that african american 32-year-old man. they don't have probable cause to arrest him but at this point they want anyone that saw them together a week ago friday night into the early mornings of saturday to come forward to law enforcement. >> one question. if they know who this guy is and they know the car and where he is. they know his name. why isn't he in custody? why hasn't he been questioned? why not an arrest? >> the answer is they don't have probable cause to arrest him or detain him. but in the same breath they are saying anyone who saw them together in a restaurant, or saw them leave the restaurant in the downtown mall area last friday night or get into his car. they want to hear from those people. so what i'm thinking is they want to see the demeanor of hanna and also this man. they want to see if she was
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resistant to go with him. they want to look at his demeanor. they want to see any interaction or communication people can give to them which will aid more information for the investigation. >> jane, thank you so much. >> want to talk about this investigation with private investigator and former fbi herald cope. thank you for being with us. when you look at the videos is there anything that stands out to you? >> i thought she was being stalked. and when i look at that i'm thinking okay what do we do? of course we now know the police have talked to one person. and why don't they arrest him? in my business it's called s.o.d. somebody else did it. and search warrants were executed. and i suspect there will be more to come. >> the police chief yesterday talked about how important just a member of the public coming forward with some information will be to solving this case.
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listen and we'll talk about it. >> this press conference, and every press conference here after is about one thing and one thing only. and that is finding hannah. everyone within the sound of my voice has that responsibility. if you live in the city of charlottesville, if you attend the university of virginia, if that young lady has touched your life in anyway you have the responsibility to help us find her. >> and you really can't put too fine a point on that. because you have been doing this work for decades. and john walsh told us once that a tattoo or a hair style or i heard this voice and it didn't seem as if it was okay. >> sometimes you never know what what will turn this case over. and if they start getting phone calls and they are. they will investigate every one of them. the key inside that car.
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something made them a execute a search warrant for that car. i suspect the guy whose a person of interest has more explain dog. >> is she not in arn an area, is she not the fifth person disappeared in this area in the last couple of years? and some of them have never been found. are they looking at the other cases do you think? >> well they have to. but let me tell you what happens. is if you are running that case you are breaking this down. so you have guys working the cold case and now they are being fed this data. they are still working over here. so you have four or five people doing many different things. and this area they are going to be searching, densely wooded. and you only go two two or three miles a little north and you are in farm country. hera herald. >> herald we so appreciate you being here. thank you very much. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] this is the cat that drank the milk... [ meows ] ...and let in the dog that woke the man who drove to the control room [ woman ] driverless mode engaged. find parking space. [ woman ] parking space found.
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president obama got the green light from congress, a spending bill to arm and train syrian rebels in the fight against isis. now has a signature. it is law. on the daily show president obama weighed in on the strategy. >> the reason i think that the president's strategy to combat isis has a chance to succeed is that the iraqi government finally includes sunnis who were representing those tribal leaders who are moderate and
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without whom isis cannot be defeated. we can't win a land war in iraq. we proved that. but they can and we can help them win it. and that has got to be what we're trying to do. >> democratic senator bill nelson of florida joins us from orlando. you help with the measure. first good morning to you. >> good morning. here is the question to y. >> here is question. we heard from the senator in georgia, he voted for it. he knows it's not necessarily going to work but it is the only option. what are you thoughts? >> well i think president clintonen said it best. we can't win a land war whoever the enemy is unless you have some help on the land. and the american people are not going back into iraq and they
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are certainly not their attitude of going into syria on the ground. but we have the capability of doing the pinpoint strikes along with sunnis on the ground. that is the combination that can work. there are people who have some question about will it? but what is the alternative? i happen to agree with what your clip of president clintonen. i think it will work. >> so let me ask you this. if your vote is, you know, we really don't have any other option, we had congressman tom rooney on a few moments ago who said that very likely u.s. troops will have to go in. the president has said that no combat troops, u.s. combat troops will be there. what is your view? do you believe that u.s. combat troops will have to go in and clean up the job in iraq and
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syria? >> in some cases but it is how you define combat troops. what you want to prevent is the large standing armies. but if we are going in to assist a sunni muslims on the ground, it may well be that we have american boots on the ground in the form of forward air observers or maybe special operations like the seals or the delta force. it certainly if you are going to try to win this war, there is the possibility of some american boots on the ground. but it is not what the american people fear, which is what we experienced in iraq. >> but essentially, senator, if any one of the enemy, they shoot at a u.s. soldier, a u.s. troop, he is going -- or she is going to shoot back. and then essentially you are in combat. so whether my job title here is
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to secure mosul, if they shoot, we are shooting back and then you are in a ground war of sorts. is that not right? >> well it is not the large standing armies. i mean, do you want to win this against this vicious, brutal inhumane group or not? and so i'd say you do the air, just like president clinton says with the sunni ground. because you have got to change the sunni mind set that is so fearful now by this isis crowd. and then you support that air operation so that you are going to have success at the end of the day. >> turkey up to this point has been reticent to off of this full-throated endorsement of the plan and join this global coalition. with the breaking news overnight of the release of those 49 hostage, how do you think that will change their view of going
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after isis? >> i think you are right on. your insight is good. when i saw that i think now turkey will help us. they will do it clandestinely because they have got a muslim population that is somewhat cozy with isis that they have to watch out. it is a significant minority. but nevertheless will be in a position to have turkey necessa inessence as a coalition partner. >> bill nelson, democrat of florida. always a pleasure. >> have a good day. roger goodell says the nfl is addressing the crisis and will also provide financial support to the national domestic abuse hotline. we are going to tell you how this hotline helps men and women every day. and what this money is going to co-.
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well nfl commissioner roger goodell says he's not stepping down. instead the league will address the domestic violence crisis by starting mandatory training for all players on how to prevent abuse and it is also going to support the national domestic violence hotline. listen. >> the hotline received an 84%
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increase in call volume just last week. they did not have the resources to reach even half of those calls. they need our help. and we are providing it. >> so let's bring in brian panero. thank you for being here and all the work you do. i've been to the hotline facility myself. i know that you are in such need of this money, just to man the phones there. when you saw the video of ray rice punching his then fiancé and now wife, how much do you think that video and then getting the information out there prompted people to call and ask for your help? >> well it was tremendous. i think when you see that video, i mean that is the first time that we've ever had something that really shows just what we as advocates has known existed
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all along. the savageness of the punch and carrying her out as almost i think a lot of people realizing that in that moment people realizing that this is not a person. i think that video resulted immediately in that 84% increase. and a lot of people called and were recognizing that they saw themselves in this and wanted out. and or they saw and realized i know someone and i need to learn more about what i can do. so it's a huge powerful touch stone meemt for people to see what we've known as always existed as advocates. >> and it is such a delegate situation for a you will of you on the other end of that line. you don't only get calls from victims. you get calls from people who abuse, is that right? and how do you deal with that. >> that's right. and that is another message we want to make sure is out there. we are not going to focus only on victims. if you think maybe you are the
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perpetrator or you are noticing some of those behavior, we are taking the calls and advocates are trained to talk to them as well. because in situations like this, a lot of the times when you do recognize you need someone that is also believing that you can change. and part of our job as advocates at the national domestic abuse hotline is to make sure we are passing the message out and connecting the person to help. >> i know victims feel so much humiliation and shame, you are one of the only outlets they have to talk in an anonymous fashion. what should we, if we know somebody whose in that situation -- because this is a question i get asked all the time. how do you help that person get help and get over that hurdle of blaming themselves for the abuse? you know, i think of this entire thing, the one thing we are trying to get out is just believe the victim. i mean, believing that what is happening to them is real. not questioning it as what did
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you do or what happened? or sh surely can't be the situation you are in. first believing them, as a loved one or a friend or even a coworker. and secondarily, we are there to help. and what you can do is continue to be a resource to that person and saying what can i do to support you? do you need me to help you be on the call with you and i can sit there and hold your hand? or something as simple as when you are ready to go let me know and i'll be there to support and encourage you. because leaving is the most dangerous but we also want to make sure she is able to stay gone so she doesn't weend up going back and know she's protected by friends and loved ones. >> they need a safe place to fall. a safe place they know they are going to be okay. >> exactly. >> and thank you for bringing that up. a lot of people don't understand why victims stay. and as you pointed out it is because statistics show us the most dangerous time for people is when they try to leave. so how do you think that this
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financial support from the nfl, how is that going to be utilized for you? how much will that help? because as i understand it when people call now you are so short funded that people -- you can't get to their calls right away. >> that sadly is true. i mean, you know, last year alone 77,000 contacts we just couldn't get to. and i mean just yesterday the impact was felt. we had already hired five new positions with the hope of hiring 25 here in the next three weeks, that is going to cut in at least 700 contacts more that we'll be answer more a day. we're able to go into overtime to allow our advocates to work overtime to be there to answer more contacts and what it's also going to do is help us turn our chat services we have not just for the hotline but to continue to offer digital ways for people to connect with us through the website.
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so it is not just going to improve the infrastructure and help us answer more contacts. it is also going to help more people get safe. >> thank you again brian to you and all the team there for everything you do. it is so appreciated. we're grateful and you are doing really important work. so thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> of course. and we'll be right back.
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it's national childhood cancer awareness month. and estimated about 10,400 under the age of 15 are going to be diagnosed this year alone. >> one team is helping the kids kick cancer with power, peace and purpose. >> reporter: when children get a diagnosis like cancer or major disease, they lose any sense of feeling that they are controlling their lives. they are prodded and poked and they are often so afraid. our daughter was diagnosed with
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leukemia. she was such an incredible little soul who taught me about the power inside of our ourselves. >> are you ready? >> yes. >> okay. begin. >> after our daughter passed away i started a program that provides classes to children who are sick. to make them feel powerful. >> every single type of martial arts uses the breath to take control. >> i'm a black belt in tae kwon do. platform to allow children to gain these tools to really face down so much of the fear, the anger that accompanies pain. >> breathe in. >> and you can see the light on their face. i feel like their souls are shining. >> yay, you did it.
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>> oh god bless that man. doing such special work. >> i love to see the kids just center themselves. >> we all need some of that. >> yes. >> yes we do. go out in make some great memories today. >> thank you for watching. much more ahead in the cnn news much more ahead in the cnn news room. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com happening right now a hunter is being hunted. it is day 8 of a multistate man hunt for suspected cop killer. residents are on lock down and on edge. also we have new tails details about the white house fence j jumper who was able to make it through the front doors. >> a huge failure and i can almost guarantee you there are
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going to be operational changes pursuant to this. >> plus nfl commissioner roger goodell says he's not going anywhere and never planned to but he announced new change s a new details emerged about the ray rice incident and who knew what and when. we begin in the pocono mountains of pennsylvania where tensions are still running high and alleged cop killer is still on the loose. overnight reports that eric matthew frein was spotted. shots were fired and he was c n cornered at some point. his is man who they say killed a pennsylvania state trooper last week and wounded another. he is on if fbi's most wanted list. and jason is in monroe county pennsylvania. he's a survivalist who knows the woods well. it appears as though he has
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disappeared again though. >> well look, you are absolutely right. and this is something that investigators know. they know he knows these backwoods well. he knows the area very well. especially the area in the town where he grew up. and that is where we've seen a great deal of the police activity, thursday night and then again last night. last night was far more intense than what we saw out here on thursday night. that is when again you have the report of shots fired. and then the alert that went out telling residents to stay inside their homes, off the roads and away from windows. so that was at the point where things really went to another level out here. but i also want to point out that investigators believe and have believed since thursday that frein is in the area. they still believe he is in the area. what they are trying to do is narrow their search.
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fr fr >> and how do you go about doing that, especially with residents on edge? >> and a wide wooded area that is very dense. it is difficult, make no mistake about that. but they are working on this gridlike system, basically trying to eliminate places where's possibly been and try to cutoff and prevent places he might be able to go. and yes he is a survivalist, self described, self taught survivalist. but even a survivalist after seven, eight day, might need food, water or shelter. and these are the things they are going to try to cutoff in some way to try to find him. >> jason carroll, thanks so much. from monroe county pennsylvania. it is considered one of the best protected buildings on the planet. but this morning the u.s. secret service is trying to figure how out how a man jumped the fence outside the white house and made
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his way inside the white house last night. where was the president when this man got past secret service? >> that is the biggest point of all in this. president obama and his two daughters took off four minutes before. they were leave fing for camp dd for the weekend. so there was a lot of activity. but four minutes later this man from texas, omar gonzalez jumped over the fence on the north lawn here in front of the white house. the fence about 7 or 8 feet tall. when you say this is one of the most protected buildings maybe on the planet. there are snipers on the roof of the white house. some of the buildings around the white house. but still, omar gonzalez jumped the fence, then ran about 105 yards behind me. now at that time secret service officials were yelling at him to stop. they didn't shoot. they say he didn't appear to be armed. he wasn't carrying anything like a bag or a backpack.
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and they say he may have been mentally disturbed. then he ran up to the front doors, ran inside. that is then when secret service officials apprehended him. he was then taken via balance to the george washington university medical center to be evaluated. they also evacuated the white house, the entire process corps, many white house staff and then we see secret service after that combing through the bushes and grass to make sure he didn't drop anything, a foreign substance a chemical. and again they say hi didn't appear to be armed but he could have dropped something. and then this morning i was out here about 7:15. a secret serviceman came up to me as they were going to do another k 9 search to conform he didn't drop anything. >> wasn't it just a few weeks ago there was a toddler who
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slipped through the fence and now someone intentionally jumping over the fence. is it an issue with too much shrubbery or trees close to the fence perhaps obstructing the view of the snipers? >> it is a great question and they are investigating to make sure that proper protocols were followed. we did speak with a former secret service official whose brother is currently a secret service agent. his name is daniel and take a listen to what he said. >> they will acknowledge that. you know, during my time in the secret service, one thing i always found rewarding about working there is they never tried to gloss over mistakes. whether it was the reagan shooting or the george w. bush incident in georgia, the country of georgia. they always acknowledge right away this is a huge failure and here's what we're going to do to remedy it. and i can almost guarantee there are going to be operational changes pursuant to this.
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>> and on that point when i a arrived here this morning there was a bigger security presence than we usually see out front. a number of clusters of secret service agents, obviously talking in hushed voices about what happened and what may have gone wrong. >> thanks so much. now to the nfl and the league's commissioner trying to repair its image. roger goodell apologized friday for what he said was his mishandling of the ray rice domestic violence scandal. many feel he should be fired for not taking a tougher stance. and other cases involving different players. but yesterday goodell said he has not considered stepping down. he said he's focused on doing his job. and part of that is making all players and staff get education and training on how to prevent abuse. that announcement however did not spare him from getting grilled by cnn's rachelal nichols. here is one of her questions.
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>> you have had pretty extreme unilateral power in deciding discipline. as you have said a few times you have gotten it wrong in o few cases and that tends to happen with no checks and balances. how willing are you to give up some of that power? and do you think that would be the right thing for you to do? >> as i said in my statement, everything is on the table. we are going to make sure we look at every aspect of the process of how we gather information to make a decision, how we make that decision, and then the appeals process. >> even as goodell vows to move forward, questions linger in the rice case, who knew what and when after tmz released the elevator video. organizations tell cnn that atlantic city police described the video to the ravens radio head. and they explained that in
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details to them. the ravens responded saying quote tmz.com outside the lines articles contains numerous errors, inaccuracies false assumptions and perhaps misunderstandings. a analyst shows where this controversy is going. i'll get his reaction to how good el is handling this controversy. and the heisman trophy winning quarterback of last year's college championship team has been suspended for today's entire game. florida state's jameis winston originally was supposed to sit sit out just the first half of today's game against clemson for shouting an obscene phrase on campus. the university announced the change in a statement last night by interim president garnett stokes, and athletic director stan wilcox saying this, quote, based upon the results of our continuing investigation of
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tuesday's incident, we have decided to not play him for the entire game against clemson on saturday night. cnn internist rachel nichols has more on the reasoning behind the change. she tweeted, quote, am being told increased penalty for fsu's jameis winston came after school discovered he'd not entirely opinion truthful with them. base upon results of our continuing investigation of tuesday's incident involving jameis winston we have decided to not play him for the entire game against clemson. that quote coming from the school. we mentioned that earlier. there are new developments in the meantime. we'll get more on that situation. also up next, the missing virginia college student, ahead we'll get you the latest on the police investigation and next, experts in the intelligence community say the biggest terror threat to the u.s. homeland is not from isis. there is now growing concern
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over another group, an affiliate of al qaeda. ♪ there it is... this is where i met your grandpa. right under this tree. ♪ (man) some things are worth holding onto. they're hugging the tree. (man) that's why we got a subaru. or was it that tree? (man) introducing the all-new subaru outback. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. sea captain: there's a narratorstorm cominhe storm narrator: that whipped through the turbine which poured... surplus energy into the plant which generously lowered its price and tipped off the house which used all that energy to stay warm through the storm. chipmunk: there's a bad storm comin!
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there is reason to celebrate today for some families in turkey. dozens of turkish hostages abducted by islamic militants are now free after three months in captivity. isis militants had raided had turkish consulate in june and seized 49 people, including children. it is not clear how they were released but the turkey's president put a statement thanking turkish intelligence officials on their website. and now warnings of the threat of isis on american soil. isis is not the only threat to the united states. cnn pamela brown takes another look at another group that may be much more dangerous to the
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homeland. >> reporter: it is newer, even smaller bombs than the ones in these tooth paste tubes that u.s. officials so concerned. an american intelligence official said publicly the government is worried about a terrorist cell known as corazon saying it is working with u.s. lawmakers to target. behind a failed 2009 underwear bomb in a detroit bound plane and the bomb hidden in a printer cartridge on a plane in 2010. >> this group is potentially yet another threat to the homeland. >> corazon is made of al qaeda fighters who were fighting in afghanistan pack stan border region. the worry is they are now in syria working to recruit american born fighters who can use their passports to smuggle
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bombs on to planes. >> one is a saudi operative. he is an experienced fighter. he was part of al qaeda's command structure in the afghanistan, pack stan border region. and a year or so ago he moved to syria and according to intelligence he's involved in plotting attacks against western targets. >> wednesday u.s. officials hintded at the same concerns telling officials al qaeda are intent on attacking. >> they tried three times to take down an airplane bound for u.s. >> and there is fierce competition between al qaeda and isis, to be known as the biggest, baddest, jihaddy organization. >> that would be a very very worrying scenario if the two groups try to start to out do each other. for al qaeda it would be a way to restore its relevance when isis is grabbing all the head lines. >> thanks to pamela brown for
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that report. so just how much of this threat is the al qaeda affiliate to the united states? cnn security analyst and author of "man hunt, the ten year search for bin laden" is now joining us. one of three to interview osama bin laden just to bring you up to date. all that you have done in the realm of the antiterrorism and research. so should we really be concerned about this corazon group? >> well it is the job of u.s. government officials to be concerned about this kind of thing and certainly they are concerned about this group. i first heard about the group back in july. and it has been hinted at several months earlier but u.s. intelligence officials. basically they were saying what they were concerned about was a stream of people coming out of regions in pakistan with long
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rolodexes and long history in fermenting terrorism who are moving to syria and joining the al qaeda affiliate there. the other dimension is pamela brown mentioned in her piece is if tact they are hooking up with people associated with the al qaeda in the arabian peninsula making these highly effective small bombs. that said we had matt olson in that piece talking about three plots to put bombs on american planes. the one commonality they all is they failed. the cargo plot was discovered because of extremely precise intelligence given to the united states by a saudi intelligence mole inside the group. and the other plot was never really serious because it was controlled by another saudi mole. so yes, it is a concern. but the fact is that so far these groups have failed. >> and how potentially dangerous is this real obstacle and challenge for u.s. intelligence that it is difficult to
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distinguish these groups, to differentiate them even. there have been some analysts who say that isis is just a rebranded al qaeda. >> well i think it basically is. freud once talked about the narcissism of minor differences and the differences between al qaeda and isis are one merely of degree. they share the same ideology basically. both groups are fighting each other. al qaeda publicly rejected isis and isis publicly rejected al qaeda. but sort of the distinction between fascist italy and nazi germany in a sense. it is just a matter of degree. >> thanks so much. tonight a cnn exclusive. meet the al qaeda terrorist who switched sides and became a spy o help the west in the war against terror. double agent, inside al qaeda
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for the cia. that's tonight. new clues in the missing university of virginia student. police believe she got into a car with a man after a dinner with friends. we'll tell you what else next.
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new clues today in the case of a missing university of virginia student, hannah graham left din we are friends in charlottesville area last friday. a few hours later she sent a text to her friends saying she was lost. hanna hasn't been seen or heard from since. investigators believe she got into a car with a man. i want to bring in gene. what are they saying about this person? they make it sound like they know who he is but then they are having vague as well. >> reporter: they exactly know who he is. and they believe she was in a restaurant with him. and they left together. she got in his car. his apartment was searched and the car. but there is no probable cause to be able to arrest him at this point. a new day. and it is a massive ser ivive s the area.
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community volunteers. 1,500 we're hearing at last count. they are out combing every single nook and cranny of charlottesville. professional search and rescue groups are going to wooded areas. but volunteers are being asked to look indumpsters, manholes. and anything to help to try to find hannah. and that is what everybody is saying. find hannah. >> so gene, what about the sequence of events or at least what officials are willing to reveal? because i found that press conference yesterday by the police chief a little perplexing. because while this some circumstances it seemed like things were very definitive. then there were big question marks. so has the timeline or the sequence of events improved or crystallized anymore this morning? >> reporter: i think serve a little confused.
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because it was a bomb shell yesterday. we didn't know what to expect but when we hear they believe that an african american man, 32 years old, 6'2", 270 pounds with dread locks actually was walking on the opposite side of the mall from hannah. made a u turn and videotape shows her walking and then behind her is him. and out of the camera's view they say he put his arm around her. and that is when they then walked to a restaurant. but they don't believe that they knew each other. that led them to his car which was searched and his apartment. but no probable cause to arrest him. so the parents of hannah came out with a statement thanking the community for the support. the vigil they had thursday night. but saying if any of you are out this weekend, exercise the buddy system. be careful. be aware. >> very unsettling.
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gene, this i so much. keep us posted on updates. >> thanks. and next the fight against isis. why the pentagon may not be on the same page as the white house. a woman who loves to share her passions. grandma! mary has atrial fibrillation, an irregular heartbeat not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts her at a greater risk of stroke. rome? sure! before xarelto®, mary took warfarin, which required monthly trips to get her blood tested. but that's history.
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starr reports the challenge now is finding the best way to help syrian rebels as they battle isis on the ground. >> reporter: in northern syria, kurdish forces clash with isis fighters who have taken over some 60 villages in recent days according to a monitoring group. u.s. officials know the war against isis must be won on the ground but president obama insists it won't be with u.s. ground troops. >> it has to be the syrians fighting for their own country. that is the best way to do it the most effective way, the most sustainable way to it. >> reporter: but is the u.s. running outs of time before it even gets started? the pentagon estimates it will take up to five months to first find 5,000 reliable syrian fighters to train and then. >> probably a period of 8 to 12 months of training and fielding. so it's going to be a little while before you start to see
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opposition fighters returning to syria. >> reporter: so is it worth starting air strikes in syria now? >> there is still a significant weakness and a significant gap if you don't have ground forces that are ready, willing and able to conduct missions in conjunction with air power. >> reporter: in iraq general lloyd austin, head of central command did ask to place a small number of troops on the ground to direct u.s. air strikes when the u.s. began helping local forces retake mosul dam last month. the white house said no. president obama was sticking to his pledge. >> the president has ruled out the option of deploying american boots on the ground in iraq and in syria in a combat role. >> reporter: the pentagon insists commanders are not at odds with the president even as the chairman of the joint chiefs holds open the option of requesting the u.s. military join as advisers on the front
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lines. >> there is kpleecomplete a alit between the white house the president and the pentagon, from secretary hagel right on down to the all the options. >> reporter: but a former head of central command warns the u.s. may be telling isis too much about no u.s. ground troops. >> i don't think we should reassure the enemy in advance that they will never face them. >> reporter: on the ground in iraq already there are nearly some 1,700 u.s. troops mainly acting as advisers. military officials say that number could still grow. barbara starr, cnn the pentagon. is the supporting role for the u.s. enough to defeat isis? the u.s. and the pentagon may have different viewpoints particularly when it comes to u.s. ground troops. aaron david miller from washington now. at the woodrow wilson international center also adviser to six secretaries of
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the state. and in orlando, florida, lieutenant kernel mark hurdling. general, to you first, is this a true disconnect between the president and pentagon or is this the real culture gap that sometimes happens with any white house and the pentagon? >> no. and good morning, this is not a disconnect at all. i think this is a tempest that's been blown out of proportion by the reporting of it. there is no disconnect. i think you have heard that from general dempsey and the pentagon spokesman. it is the chairman doing the things he is supposed to do. he's thinking ahead. he cea he's saying if we see a potential option we will go to the president and have him make a decision. we would be appalled if he were
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not thinking of the future opportunities. >> what is the public message then? and does this in any way kind of empower if not give more credibility to isis? >> think mark is right. you have to distinguish between the possibility of the redeployment of thousands of american combat forces in iraq and perhaps in even afghanistan from the reality that we are going to have to use, as we're doing now, special forces or special operators. and in iraq that number could double or triple. and once you again to stand up syrian ally, and local allies and that is going to be a tough sell, tough do. you will probably have to deploy special operators and special forces into syria as well. but the model is in afghanistan in fall of '08. good allies, special operators and air strikes. whether it will defeat isis is another matter. but i agree it's been blown out of proportion. >> special ops, if they were
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engaged isn't that boots on the ground. >> it certainly is, but as you know i can't stand that expression boots on the ground. these are people in harms's potentially but when you are advisers and doing things the right way you have to be there with him. and i think that is what general austin asked. and can we send them forward and the president said not now because of the risks involved of a special operator or special forces at the front line and getting killed would be quite devastating to the extension of the strategy today. there is a nuanced approach and i think a disconnect between the military understanding of the terms and what the politicians, the media and our public understand in this terms of this boots on the ground. >> and to both of you, is this late that the u.s. would take this kind of action? does it come too late? meaning did it allow these forces to take too much control
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of syria or to regroup enough to make this kind of impact in iraq? or, you know, aaron, you first. is this the time that needed to have been taken for the u.s. to get a better handle of who represents the rebels? the syrian rebels before giving them arms. >> the conventional opposition critique of the president is we headed for the exits too fast in iraq and we were late to stand up a so called modern syrian opposition. and there may be some truth to that but the reality is isis feeds on the reality of two failing states, syria and iraq. it feeds on maliki's willful efforts to persecute and prosecute sunnis and ashad's use of the barrel bombs and chemical weapons to defeat opponents. i doubt frankly whether or not we could have fundamentally changed the trajectory. has an agreement to lead 5,000,
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10,000 forces in iraq been achievable i think it would have helped? >> in less than a few seconds general, too late? >> not at all. but we have to reinforce this is a generational problem. i think a lot of people want quick solutions. this is going to take years, if not decades to solve. so i think the president's slow approach or paced approach with the right operational tempo is the right way to go. >> thanks to both of you gentlemen. appreciate it. >> and we'll be right back with much more in the news room. ♪
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all right. some harrowing moments aboard a jet blue flight. smoke filled the cabin and so did panic, just minutes after takeoff. one passenger described the ordeal. >> the engine blew out we were out over the ocean. >> what do you mean? >> our engine blew out. >> you actually heard it. >> it blew it. and smoke filled the cabin and. >> it was that bad. >> it was that bad. >> that plane actually landed and several passengers were hurt in the frantic scramble to safety. much of the ordeal was caught on cell phone cameras. so here now is stephanie.
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>> reporter: terrifying video from inside the cabin. the air thick with smoke. >> keep your seat belts faste. d >> reporter: it was just shortly after takeoff. >> i heard a weird noise, the landing gear came up and then a pop. >> reporter: the airline says there was an issue with the number two engine. the oxygen masks failed to deploy according to one passenger forcing attendants to minnelli release them. >> we were way over the ocean a couple miles out. >> reporter: the pilot immediately turned the plane back to long beach. you can hear babies crying, as the 142 passengers and five crew braced for an emergency landing. >> once we turned around and got over land it was jarring all over and people started to get
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really worried. >> reporter: he thought he was going to die. >> i thought it was. my wife was next to me. we were on vacation. and she held me and she was crying and i was like well here we go. >> reporter: >> the scariest things we were going for landing and the flight attendn'ts kept yelling brace brace brace and it was at the top of their lungs. >> reporter: and then the landing. the control tower told the pilot smoke wasn't coming from the engine but the passengers weren't waiting. they quickly escaped down the slides. >> well i figured it was going to be too hot to wear black. >> reporter: tweeting photos of everyone crowding the tarmac. including his family, the plane in the background. four people were injured. thankfully none seriously. >> i'm just happy to be alive.
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i don't think i'll ever be mean to anybody ever again. >> reporter: cnn los angeles. >> scary stuff there. >> announcer: nfl commissioner roger goodell has pledged to get his house in order. will it be enough to redeem the league in the eyes of fans and sponsors? we asked people a question, how much money do you have in your pocket right now? i have $40, $53, $21, do you think the money in your pocket could make an impact on something as big as your retirement? not a chance. i don't think so. it's hard to imagine how something so small can help with something so big. but if you start putting that towards your retirement every week and let it grow over time, for twenty to thirty years, that retirement challenge sfx: crowd cheering
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the nfl commissioner stood
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his ground friday in a major news conference saying he had not seen the elevator video of ray rice knocking out his then fiancé until it was released to the public. but a source with the ravens' organization and an espn reporter alleged the ravens did know about it. the source tells cnn that atlantic city police described the elevator video to the ravens' security head. espn reported had security head shared the details with team executives in baltimore. the ravens responded in a statement saying the espn.com "outside the lines" article contains numerous errors, inaccuracy, false assumptions and perhaps misunderstandings. end quote. nfl commissioner roger goodell commits he admits he fumbled the handling of the scandal. he pledged to, quote, get his
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house in order, end quote. he's now promising sweeping changes to counter domestic abuse in the lead. >> i got it wrong in the handling of the ray rice matter. and i'm sorry for that. i got it wrong on a number of levels, from the process that i led to the decision that i reached. but now i will get it right and do whatever is necessary to accomplish that. >> all right. after those latest comments from commissioner goodell, is he saying enough? joining us right now from new york, keith reid. he is a sports business analyst and former senior editor for "espn," the magazine. so is roger goodell making the right moves to turn things around? is this the beginning, in your view? >> it's a very, very tertiary beginning, right? he is absolutely right, he did get it wrong.
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exactly, what are you going to do about it? he talked yesterday about revamping the nfl's personal conduct policy, which to me is what actually led to this entire thing to begin with. the ray rice incident was a picture of a much, much bigger issue that the league has always had, which starts with roger goodell himself being judge, jury, and executioner for all of these players. not allowing due process to happen, and being really haphazard and capricious with how he's always handed out discipline, not just for domestic violence, but in terms of almost everything that a player can do. from drugs to violence to anything else. that has to change, it should not be left up to roger goodell himself and himself alone. and if they're willing to come to some sort of a meeting of the minds with the player's union, to fix that, then it's a step in the right direction. but we just don't know that from what roger goodell said yesterday. >> so he's planning on coupling efforts, you know, of awareness, helping to re, i guess, teach people in their thinking about
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domestic abuse and domestic problems, but he said nothing about changing, i guess, his discretionary powers. and that's where some of the criticism has come into play. that it is at his discretion, whether an athlete is suspended, whether they are fined, whether they are removed from the team. and you mentioned, it's capricious. it's been arbitrary. and so, what kind of commitment does the nfl have to make to revamp that effort? >> well, he talked about the formulation of a conduct committee, right? and so that's a step in the right direction. now, we don't know who's going to be on that committee, we don't know who it's going to include. if it's going to have owners, players, if it's going to have people who come from outside the league. it would seem to me that the right thing to do would be to have a player representative, someone from the league office, someone who represents the owners, and potentially someone from the outside. but we don't know that yet. one thing is clear.
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discipline in the nfl, whether it's on domestic violence or anything else, can no longer be up to roger goodell and roger goodell alone. that can never happen again if they want to get this right. >> what kind of rule would the player's union be playing in all of this? >> the player's union has already had a role, right? if you look back at one thing that was missed in all of this talk about domestic violence, the league just revamped its substance abuse policy. and it did that with significant input from the player union, right? that was an example of the union taking back a little bit of the power that it ceded in the last collective bargaining negotiation, which helped out some of the players, quite frankly, in terms of the length of suspensions they had been handed by roger goodell himself. >> last week you talked about the potential fallout from the nfl sponsors. we are seeing many of the sponsors go public with their concerns. how influential is this going to be in compelling the commissioner to change his ways or change the policies or even
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change the message? >> well, the sponsors have a huge role, right? i mean, listen, the nfl, anheuser-busch was one of the first ones to come out. they spend upwards of $1 billion a year with the nfl. when you're spending that kind of money, it's really difficult for them to pull away. they're not going to pull entirely out of the nfl, but they've got a lot of influence in terms of what the nfl does. i think roger goodell's press conference yesterday was very, very carefully orchestrated. i don't believe for a second that goodell himself and some of the other higher ranking officials at the nfl spoke directly to sponsors that are very high level and talked to them before they had that press conference yesterday. so it's going to make a big, big difference. >> all right. keith reid, thanks so much from new york. good to see you. >> thank you. great to see you. >> all right. nasa reaches a new milestone in someplapace exploration. we'll explain its new plan to get american astronauts back up to the international space station. that's keeping you from the healthcare you deserve..
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all right. in the u.s., the days of government-run space travel are becoming a thing of the past. this week, nasa announced a new arrangement between boeing and space-x that send americans to space again. karen kafa has more on this report. >> reporter: one up in the air for almost 100 years, the other around for just over a decade. boeing and elon musk's space-x following a four-year competition have been tapped by nasa for a private sector partnership to put american astronauts back on american spacecraft. >> from day one, the obama administration has made it very clear that the greatest nation on earth should not be dependent on any other nation to get into
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space. >> reporter: the first flight to the international space station is planned for 2017, the year in which an agreement with russia ends. the contract's worth $6.8 billion. boeing bid with its cst-1 space capsule. space-x already goes to the space station with its dragon capsule. nasa's space shuttle flew for over three decades before being cut amid funding concerns. so when "atlantis" touched down in the pre-dawn hours of july 21st, 2011. >> the space shuttle pulls into port for the last time. >> reporter: it marked the end of an era. now a new chapter for cape canaveral and new goals for nasa. >> turning over low earth transportation to private industry will allow nasa to focus on an even more ambitious mission, that of sending humans to mars. >> reporter: nasa says hopping on russia's spacecraft cost about $70 million per seat.
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recent tensions over ukraine have also led to increased tensions between the two space programs. in washington, i'm karen kafa. >> much more straight ahead in the newsroom and it all starts right now. hello, again, everyone. i'm fredricka whitfield. we're following two massive searches currently underway. first the manhunt continues for an accused cop killer who has been on the run for a week. we're live in pennsylvania. and the search continues for a missing university of virginia student, hanna graham. police releasing new details about who she may have met before she disappeared. then -- >> right now! go back! everybody into the park! right now! into the park! >> a man jumps the fence and makes it all the way into the white house. what the u.s. secret service is doing to prevent it from happening again.
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all right. we begin with new clues in the case of a missing university of virginia student. it has been one week since hanna graham went missing. she left dinner with friends in the charlottesville area last friday around 11:00 p.m. a few hours later, she sent a text to her friends saying she was lost. no word from her since. but now investigators have a theory on what happened that night. police believe she got into a car with a man after that dinner with friends. let's go to cnn's jean casarez in charlottesville, virginia. so, jean, why are police saying that they're confident she left with a man? >> reporter: well, some of it was caught on videotape, they say. others, it's witnesses' tips, people in the area. ion, a lot of people were there a week ago friday night in the downtown mall area. but i want to tell you what's happening today, because there are well over a thousand members of this community that are
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searching right now for hanna and any clue for hanna. but we really do have a development, i think, today. because last night, the police chief was saying that the searches were going to be on the areas where hanna had already walked. where videotapes showed that she had gone that night. to have a second set of eyes. to try to see if they could find any of her personal belongings. here's the reality of what is being searched today, by these searchers. manholes, gutters, vacant buildings, construction sites. and professional search and rescue operators are going to wooded areas. so the reality is far different. but this is a missing person's case. but as we know from the past, many times, it becomes a criminal, even a homicide investigation at the very same time, even though they don't say that publicly. >> and then, jean, how about her family? how are her parents holding up with this kind of information? >> reporter: well, they're here in charlottesville. they don't live here, but they
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are here. we have not seen them publicly, was the police chief said last night that they are so distraught, obviously, they are angry, they want answers. and i think that's one thing that's fueling this community. you know, this isn't the first young woman to go missing from charlottesville, virginia. right here at the joan paul jones river, morghgan harringto went missing back in 2009 and the community is telling me they've had enough. they don't want young women to keep going missing. >> young hanna, her parents from fairfax county, outside the washington, d.c. area. jean casarez, keep us posted there from charlottesville, virginia. all right, in the backwoods of northeast pennsylvania, the manhunt for an alleged cop killer continues. this after reports overnight that shots were fired and police at one point had 31-year-old eric matthew frein cornered. he's the man authorities say killed one state trooper and injured another last week outside of police barracks. jason carroll has the latest. >> reporter: well, people out
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here, still very much on edge, especially after what happened in this area last night. heavy police presence, shots fired. this all happening just at about 7:00 last night. that's when the first reports started coming in of shots being fired. shortly thereafter, an alert went out, warning residents to stay in their homes, stay off the roads, and to stay away from windows. that alert state in effect until this morning. at this point, investigators are trying to do everything they can to narrow their search, to shrink their search for eric frein. what they've basically been doing is working in a grid-like sort of system, eliminating places that he's been, trying to cut off places where he could potentially go. once again, trying to shrink that area where he could be moving around. they believe, actually, every since thursday, that he was in the area. he's been described as a survivalist. but, you know, there is a theory that even if he is a survivalist, even if he does know this backwooded area very, very well, he still, at some point, might need food, might
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need water, might need shelter. that is what investigators are going to be banking on. they know that this man has already proven himself to be deadly and they are doing everything in their power to catch him before he hurts someone else. back to you. >> jason carroll, thank you so much. there is reason to celebrate today for some families in turkey. dozens of turkish hostages abducted by islamist militants in northern iraq are now free after three months in captivity. isis militants had raided the turkish consulate in june and seized 49 people, including children. it's not clear exactly how they were released, but turkey's president put a statement on his website, thanking turkish intelligence officials. back in this country, president obama and his national security team are preparing to arm syrian rebels to fight isis militants in iraq and syria. the house and senate gave the president approval to move ahead and approve money to pay for it.
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it was a bipartisan vote. florida house member tom rooney, however, voted no. >> these syrian rebels that we're talking about arming, we've been trying to get to know for some time, it isn't just a new idea. it's had pretty mixed results, which is another reason why i oppose. but in the end, i think that when you say and the president says that they're not imminent, yes, they're probably not coming here today or tomorrow. but their goals and their intentions are to wreak havoc in the middle east and do whatever they can to recruit people to be able to get back here and get back into europe. so that is their goal. and certainly, it is something that we should take seriously. and i'm glad that the president says that they need to be destroyed. funding the syrian rebels is not going to do that. new york house member gregory meeks voted yes. she he's joining me now live. so congressman, why did you vote yes? >> -- best plan that's out
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there. one, we know that isis is -- or iso is a group that we have to destroy. so then, how do you do that? well, and they're also a threat to the region. the immediate threat, the imminent threat are those countries in iraq, in saudi arabia, in turkey, in jordan. so, we know that they're bringing a coalition together in iraq with the kurds, with the sunnis, that government there. and when they push them back to syria, we know that then, there needs to be a ground force there that will stop them. we will be of assistance through the air, through the ground forces in training of these individuals in syria is important so they can be the ground force on the ground in syria. and it is individuals who have been fighting isil already. and so we know that they have some -- that the will to do it, now we want to give them the training and the weapons that they need to continue that fight on the ground.
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>> so congressman, does it concern you, of those countries that you mentioned, saudi arabia, jordan, as well as turkey, they are not lending the same kind of support to the u.s. right now is committing the to this fight. does that concern you at all? >> well, i think that there's the dialogue that's going on, because what the president has also said, it's military as well as diplomatic, saudi arabia has agreed already, that they will fly along with the united states doing some air strikes. there's current conversation that's still taking place in regards to others. i know that secretary of state john kerry testified before the florida affairs committee, just this past thursday, where there's some 50 nations that are involved in these conversations, as we currently speak. the president has indicated this is not something that's going to happen overnight. and so, while we're working those coalitions together and talking together, to figure out collectively what we need to do on a collective basis, we're also training at the same time, because training's not going to
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take just a few hours or a few days. those individuals that are in the fight now. and i believe that as a result, we'll have a multi-lateral force that's coming together to make sure that we get rid of isil. >> and do i have this right, you did not vote yes for the war in iraq. what's different here? why did you vote yes on this kind of military engagement? >> because when we talked about iraq, what i was looking for is what the president said was taking place at that time. he said there was an imminent threat to the united states and he indicated that there was weapons of mass destruction and there was a direct implication that iraq had something to do with 9/11. upon my going to meetings and examining, i found there was not an imminent threat to the united states, there were no weapons of mass destruction that was proved by the administration that i was talking about, and so therefore -- and there was no connection to 9/11. >> and today you're convinced of the imminent threat? >> and today, there's no question. the president said it's not an
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imminent threat to our homeland, but there is, if we don't do something about isil, in the future it will be, but there is a threat in the region, because the goal of what this organization, isil, is looking to do now is to create an islamic state in that area, in the middle east. and we cannot allow that to happen either. and that's why we've got to work collectively with others who have that, who are of interest and in direct threat by this group of isil. >> and you feel confident about the identification of who these syrian rebels are when it comes down to arming them, training them, with u.s. resources? >> you know, there's no 100% guarantees on anything. and i keep hearing people coming with a hypothetical example, saying, what if it doesn't work. i don't hear people saying, well, what if it does work? what we do know is we need troops on the ground. we do know that these individuals are have been fighting isil already. because they are living in these
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villages and isil as well as the assad regime are threats to them. and so therefore -- and they're doing it with little to nothing. no training and no proper equipment. so i believe that with the proper vetting, and utilitizinging our friends, you know, the kurds, who also, we have syrian kurds who are there, and others, to help us get the intelligence on the ground, vet them, watch them, train them. i think that that's our best bet. >> congressman gregory meeks, thanks so much for your time today. appreciate it. >> good to be with you. all right. coming up, roger goodell says he messed up. but he's not going anywhere. new damaging details are emerging, however, about the ray rice tape and who really may have known about it all along. then, a shocking security breach. a man jumping this fence. live pictures right now outside the white house, 1600 pennsylvania avenue. and that man even getting inside the white house. details on how someone got into this most secure address, when
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for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. the u.s. secret service is trying to figure out how a man jumped the fence and barged right into the white house before guards were able to apprehend him. cnn's erin mcpike picks up the story at the white house. >> reporter: a security breach at the white house this flagrant seems unthinkable. >> get back! get back! >> everybody back in the park! >> reporter: but friday night, the man captured on this cell phone video not only scaled the fence in front of 1600 pennsylvania avenue, he ran up to the building and barged through the front door. secret service officers yelled at 42-year-old omar gonzalez to stop, but they didn't shoot. according to a law enforcement official, he didn't appear to be carrying anything, and may have been mentally disturbed. >> they're going to have to do something with the fence.
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even if it's something as simple as curving the bars over towards the street side, the pennsylvania avenue side, which would make it harder to scale. remember, time buys you options. and right now, they don't have time. you scale the fence, you're already right at the door. >> once he got inside, officials apprehended gonzalez. an ambulance took him to george washington university medical center for evaluation. >> everybody turn around and head out the gate here. you'll have to go out to 17th street, please. >> reporter: parts of the white house and the press corps were evacuated while secret service combed through the bushes and grass to make sure gonzalez didn't drop anything on the grounds. the incident happened just four minutes after the first family had left the white house grounds for the weekend. this isn't the first time a white house breach has occurred, but almost all fence jumpers are captured within seconds. >> i've never heard of such a thing. you know, i've been there for hundreds of fence jumpers, and they never make it even close. you know, we have dogs, there's multiple layers of security. there was a failure here.
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>> reporter: to ensure no risks to the family upon their return, the secret service agents pictured here began a k-9 sweep of the north grounds to reconfirm gonzalez left nothing behind as soon as it was light enough this morning. >> all right, cnn's erin mcpike joining us right now, live. so are things somewhat back to normal now? are you seeing any kind of new security changes that are obvious? >> reporter: well, fred, we did have that k-9 sweep this morning, right after about 7:15, and a secret service agent came up to me and said, everyone needs to go inside so that they could complete that search. we have seen more secret service agents out today, walking dogs back and forth. and i will tell you, when i arrived this morning, there were more secret service agents outside than there are normally are around 6:00 a.m. on a saturday. and they were in clusters talking about why this happened, in very hushed voices. they didn't want any of us to hear. but it certainly is the talk here today about why this possibly could have happened. because it is a huge breach,
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fred. >> pretty significant, indeed. all right. and as you mentioned earlier, just narrowly, i guess, escaping the presence of the president in the white house by just about four minutes. all right. thanks so much. keep us posted. all right, coming up, it's not exactly good news for roger goodell. brand-new claims about who really knew what and when about the ravens' ray rice tape. but first, more than 10,000 children in the united states will be diagnosed with some form of cancer this year. according to the american cancer society. well, this week's cnn hero gives sick kids a weapon to fight the pain and the fear. >> i really hate when it hurts. it's a really sharp pain. i get all teary. the shots really scared me a lot. and they still scare me now. >> when children get a diagnosis like cancer or any major
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nfl commissioner roger goodell admits, he mishandled the domestic violence scandal involving ravens' ray rice. in a major news conference friday, he vowed to do more to stop domestic violence. but to all those people who want him to step down, he says, he hasn't even considered that. here's cnn's nick valencia. >> reporter: roger goodell speaking at a manhattan news conference amid calls for his resignation. >> i got it wrong on a number of levels, from the process that i led to the decision that i
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reached. but now i will get it right and do whatever is necessary to accomplish that. >> reporter: the embattled nfl commissioner apologizing for what he said was a mishandling of the ray rice domestic violence scandal. here's a question from cnn's rachel nichols. >> roger, you've had pretty extreme unilateral power in deciding discipline, but as you've said a few times, you've gotten it wrong in a few cases. and that tends to happen when there's no checks and balances. how willing are you to give up some of that power and do you think that that would be the right thing for you to do? >> well, rachel, as i said in my statement, everything is on the table. we're going to make sure that we look at every aspect of the process of how we gather information to make a decision, how we make that decision, and then, the appeals process. >> reporter: even as goodell pledged to move ahead, questions still loom in the rice case want who knew what, when, after tmz
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released the now infamous inside the elevator video. >> oh, we asked for it on several occasions, according to our security department. we went through it -- we asked for it on several occasions throughout the spring, all the way through june. from february through june. so i'm confident that our people did that. >> reporter: two security camera videos put the rice case squarely in the public eye, showing the former baltimore ravens star running back knocking out his then-fiancee with a punch last february. a source within the ravens organization tells cnn that hours after the incident at the atlantic city hotel and casino, the head of the baltimore ravens security, darren sanders, spoke with atlantic city police, who described in detail the elevator video to sanders. espn is reporting that sanders then shared the information with team executives and that those executives started extensive public and private campaigns for leniency for rice, according to espn. the ravens issued a statement late friday saying the espn.com
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"outside the lines" article consumes numerous errors and inaccura inaccuracies, false assumptions, and perhaps, misunderstandings. the ravens will address all of these next week in baltimore after our trip to cleveland for sunday's game against the browns. a source within the ravens organization tells cnn, the ravens never saw the video until tmz first released it. >> all right. nick valencia joining me live thousand. so there has been, you know, mixed reaction from the football community. >> well, both current and past nfl players, very critical of roger goodell saying, what are you going to do? you've been very strict in the past against teams like the new orleans saints during games like bountygate, when players were paid basically from a slush fund to go after opponents, illegal hits. so why weren't you more accountable yourself. so troy inkman weighing in, i can only imagine how upset sean payton and the new orleans
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saints must be watching the commissioner's prempbss confere. all around the league, current and past players saying this won't end until roger goodell is removed or stepped down. >> nick valencia, appreciate that. thank you. all right. about 5 minutes from now, our legal guys take a look at roger goodell's promises to change the league's code of conduct. and later this hour -- >> oh, my god! >> wow, that's an suv flipped over, trapping three teens in a river. and you can see everyone there trying to carry out an amazing rescue. when we come right back. ugh. heartburn. did someone say burn? try alka seltzer reliefchews. they work just as fast and are proven to taste better than tums smoothies assorted fruit. mmm. amazing. yeah, i get that a lot. alka seltzer heartburn reliefchews. enjoy the relief. suddenly you're a mouthbreather. well, put on a breathe right strip
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all right. bottom of the hour now. welcome back. i'm fredricka whitfield. here are the five things crossing the cnn news desk that you need to know now. a massive police present, shots fired, and residents on lockdown. alleged cop killer eric matthew frein are still on the loose after reports that police had frein surrounded in a house near the suspect's family home. police couldn't confirm that report, but a government official says police did exchange gunfire in that area with an individual believed to be frein. police say he is responsible for killing one trooper and wounding another outside his state police
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barracks last week. and one week after a university of virginia student disappeared, more than 1,500 people have volunteered to help in the search for 18-year-old hanna graham. yesterday, police searched the apartment and car of a man they believe was with graham the night she vanished. the individual has not been arrested, but police say he matches the description of a man seen inside a bar with graham after she left dinner with friends. all right, now to the controversy surrounding former baltimore ravens running back, ray rice. a source tells cnn, atlantic city police described the video showing video punching his then-fiancee to ravens' head of security. and espn is now reporting the head of security shared that detailed description with team executives. the ravens responded to that in a statement saying, quote, the espn.com "outside the lines"
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article contains numerous errors, inaccuracies, false assumptions, and perhaps misunderstandings, end quote. this comes after nfl commissioner roger goodell spoke about his handling of the growing controversy yesterday. >> unfortunately, over the past several weeks, we have seen all too much of the nfl doing wrong. that starts with me. i said this before, back on august 28th, and i say it again now. i got it wrong in the handling of the ray rice matter. and i'm sorry for that. i got it wrong on a number of levels. >> all right. let's check in with our legal guys. avery friedman, law professor in cleveland. richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor joining us from las vegas. good to see you both, gentleman. >> hi, fredricka!
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>> welcome back, fred. you made it, you made it! >> i made it, indeed. we'll talk more about that later, the survival skills that had to come into play. let's talk more about this. so if, indeed, the espn report turns out to be true, did the baltimore ravens have a legal obligation to describe this video to roger goodell? and if, indeed, that were to have taken place, wouldn't that compel him to want to see it, richard? >> well, fred, i don't know if it's a technical legal obligation, but the ravens are contracted as a team and in the nfl, they have all sorts of responsibilities to turn over and be forthright and open with the commissioner's office. and getting this information, they should have turned it over immediately, but the nfl should have been able to get the same report that the ravens claim they got. and when goodell stands up there and says he got it wrong on numerous occasions, and we look as your reporters, nick valencia brought up before, how they
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treated the new orleans saints in the past, goodell, how he has this supreme power in him. if you are looking for credibility in the nfl, goodell must leave now. if a player -- if allegations are filed against a player, players get suspended! they get suspended! why doesn't goodell get suspended, because there's allegations against him? and the owners should investigate him. no good, fred. big problems in the nfl. >> and i think it's interesting, too, avery, because the policy, the code of conduct really leaves it to the discretion of the commissioner. so i don't know what, you know, what kind of policy he has to adhere to, but for the players, it's very clear that, you know, he gets to be, you know, the judge and the jury, essentially. will that likely change? >> that's right. well, you know what? rachel nichols showed great journalism heroics yesterday during the press conference. and asked the commissioner, look it, if you're the judge and jury, as you put it, fredricka,
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how is there any way of checks -- is there a system of checks and balances? and he said, well, everything's on the table. meaning, of course, he didn't answer the question. but i want to take it back to the question that you're asking about the legality. if the ravens knew about it and i think they had a legal and a moral obligation to share it with the league. and frankly, the associated press claims that atlantic city law enforcement shared it with the league back in april! so there are a multitude of errors, mistakes, that continue on. and i think the turning point, fredricka, on legal issues, was when rachel nichols said, look it, the same law firm that you have negotiating television deals, you're assigning to do the investigation in the ray rice case. that's the end. where richard and i are actually in agreement in, is that roger goodell both morally and legally, i think it's time for him to go. >> hmm? you do? >> absolutely. >> before that is or would
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happen, because he's already said he hasn't even given that any consideration, he does promise that there will be some sort of policy changes. code of conduct being one of them. and then right now, the nfl personal conduct policy, it does say that it will be considered conduct detrimental for covered persons to engage in violent and/or criminal activity. but certainly, richard, it does seem to be, you know, fairly arbitrary, what is detrimental. does it mean suspension, does it mean removal? and when goodell says that he is going to revamp or, you know, i guess, rewrite this personal conduct policy, what does that policy need to say? does it have to spell out specifically, whether you're a suspect, whether there is evidence of, whether you are convicted. because right now, it doesn't spell out with that kind of specifici specificity. >> and that's the problem, fred. and that's why you have a criminal justice system. and that's why an organization like the nfl, which has numerous flaws in it, and which is
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getting bombarded with media coverage today, and on these issues, and people seem to think this is going to cure the worlds and domestic battery, et cetera. because the nfl has a few players involved in it, that's not going to happen. but the nfl, fred, is in trouble right now. and that's why you have the criminal justice system, with the powers and the investigative tools they have. it's very dangerous, when you give those powers to a man like the commissioner of the nfl, to unilaterally make determinations on athletes' lives, the nfl life span is maybe five, six years for a player and it's over for them. and to suspend and terminate, it's extremely important, and they don't have the ability, i think, to do it. that's the problem. >> so avery, you're disagreeing on a lot of that. but is this any different from any mainstream employer? you know, that there is code of conduct policies. they can make a decision on when to remove you from your job if you have violated your conduct or their policy on conduct?
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is this the same or is it different here? >> well, the difference is, i don't think the criminal justice system has anything to do with the employment policies. that's -- >> it has everything to do with it. everything. >> -- you quoted for seven years, for seven years, without any consequence. it's amorphis, it doesn't tell players what is permissible, what is not. they could have changed the policy a long time ago. and let me tell you something, if somebody at turner or cnn screws up doing something like what we said with ray rice. we don't have to worry about the criminal justice system. that employee is gone and the rules should be the same for the nfl. >> all right, guys. i know we're not done with this topic. it will come back, we know it will. but there's yet another case we want you to weigh in on when we come back. plus, police may not like apple's new operating system. it keeps more of your information private than the old one. we'll tell you how it works and why law enforcement may not be pleased, next.
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and later, plane passengers behaving badly. how a former flight attendant is fighting back against rude passengers. at t-mobile, get 4 lines for just $100 bucks. unlimited talk & text and now up to 10gb of 4g lte data. plus get the best trade-in value on you current phone guaranteed. a yummy reward is important so i give butch delicious milo's kitchen chicken grillers recipe dog treats. that's called inward facing dog. he could do it all day. milo's kitchen. made in the usa with chicken or beef as the number one ingredient. the best treats come from the kitchen. but i've managed.e crohn's disease is tough, except that managing my symptoms was all i was doing. and when i finally told my doctor, he said humira is for adults like me who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. and that in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief. and many achieved remission.
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an unprecedented program arting busithat partners businesses with universities across the state. for better access to talent, cutting edge research, and state of the art facilities. and you pay no taxes for ten years. from biotech in brooklyn, to next gen energy in binghamton, to manufacturing in buffalo... startup-ny has new businesses popping up across the state. see how startup-ny can help your business grow at startup.ny.gov all right. with the unveiling of the iphone 6, apple is also revealing a new operating system that will impact everyone's privacy. the ios8 system encrypts iphone and ipad data, preventing the u.s. government from seeing it. our legal guys are back. richard herman in las vegas.
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so what does this new operating system mean, perhaps for prosecutors and police in general, richard? >> well, fred, from what i've been reading, the ios8 system makes it impossible for apple to reveal information on your phone. so pursuant to a subpoena from the federal government or state government to turn over information on your cell phone, apple can't do it anymore. so everybody's real happy about that and jumping up and down. except that in this age of terrorism, when people can get these phones and communicate freely and not have the information turned over or recorded or somehow reviewed by law enforcement, investigating crimes, it's a problem, fred. >> and so then i wonder, avery, this new security system, is this an admission, then, that apple might be culpable in past breaches, if they're saying, we want to put this in place, you know, because it can never happen again. but clearly it has already, you know, there's some precedence. it's already happened, many times. >> yeah, that's a great legal question. the answer, however, is no.
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apple could never promise that because it was out there on icloud, that law enforcement wouldn't pick it up. they can't now with the new system. if they're going to get a warrant, they'll have to go to the encrypted telephone, rather than to the provider. so the bottom line is, this is a brand-new era in personal privacy. it's a big deal. law enforcement will have to figure out how to get their hands on the phone rather than go to apple instead. >> and bottom line, i wonder, richard, what should -- still, what should be the expectation for any consumer? any user of, you know, getting online, using their phone, computers, et cetera, how much privacy should they really expect? >> hey, fred, my father told me a long time ago, don't put anything in writing you don't want published to the world. >> is that what he told you? >> in today's day and age, if you take naked pictures of yourself and sex videos and store it on your phone, don't you really a little bit want it released to the public? why would you even do something like that? it's insane. it's absolutely insane.
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>> that's what these people do. these people do this and then they release it and then they make believe, oh, how did it get out there, i didn't want -- they pay people to put it out there. it's ridiculous, these non-celebrities, making millions of dollars, name begins with a "k," i can't even say it, it's disgusting. >> avery, how you going to top that? >> i agree with richard's father, i guess. i don't know. it doesn't make any sense. but i've got to raise this issue, fredricka. i know you competed in a triathlon, you trained for seven months to benefit children's hospital. and you walked away with something, didn't you? >> i know, that was the biggest surprise of all. first of all, it was so -- oh, yeah, there i am, you know, the woman with the mouth open, because i can't help myself, always just a loud mouth. but i had a great time with sanjay gupta's fit nation team. there we are there. and there is an even bigger time warner team. but this is -- that really helped profile the six viewers
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who committed to competing in that marathon of a triathlon. it was a triathlon, there in malibu. but fantastic people along the way. and yeah, i walked away with a bronze medal! and if you cross the finish line, you get this medal representative of the malibu classic and i got very lucky and i don't though how things came together, but i got the bronze medal in my division. >> it's your olympic dna. seven months of hard training. fabulous! >> thank you! that would be really great, however, my mom when she saw the videotape of me running, my mom was there, but she didn't see me coming across the finish line, so when she saw the videotape of me running, she said, oh, your form is terrible, i hope your father's not watching. so, there goes the whole olympic blood thing. my running form, not so pretty. >> a wonderful deal. congratulations. >> thanks so much. it was fun. you guys were in my thoughts. >> very proud of you. >> it was a great challenge to
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take part in. you can catch our legal guys every weekend at about this time, taking on the most intriguing legal cases of the day, week, month, you name it. they're always, they're always gold medal finishers! >> whoa! >> yeah! and we'll be right back. they're custom made trains. you can't get any better than that. siemens trains are not your grandparent's technology. they're something that's gonna change the cities we live in today. i find it so fascinating how many people ride this and go to work every single day. i'm one of the lucky guys. i get to play with trains. people say, "wow, we still build that in the united states?" and we say, "yeah, we do!"
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all right. it is fall break for capitol hill. members of the house and senate have recessed for the entire month of october. most of them are going home to campaign to keep their seats in the upcoming election. senator claire mccaskill explained the origins of this six-week break. >> the tradition, i think, began because the house of representatives runs every two years. and for many, many years, the house has adjourned for the month of october. >> all right. we're only 45 days from midterm election day and there's a lot at stake, including whether democrats will keep control of the u.s. senate. fareed zakaria sat down with former president bill clinton and asked him who he thinks will prevail. >> got to ask you about some politics. are the democrats going to hold the senate? >> i think so, but it's going to be close. and it depends, frankly, on whether we can continue to match
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the money provided by all these outside groups. i think the koch brothers are going to spend about $300 million in the last couple of months. and it depends on who turns out. we have got to somehow, sooner or later, to convince the people that vote in presidential elections for our side, they have to vote in the congressional elections. and if they don't, they can complain when they lose governorships, state legislatures, and members of congress for the senators who happen to be up in that year. we've got a lot more senators up this year than the republicans do. we have them up in states that president obama did not carry in 2012. but they're running great campaigns and we seem to be doing reasonably well. but if you look at all these polls, which are all over the place, they're all accurate. that is, the real question in polling today is the sample you pick based on who you think will vote. and the answer to that is, no one knows. so, if we can get our turnout
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up, we'll be fine and they'll hold the senate. >> and don't forget, you can catch fareed zakaria every sunday on "fareed gps," 10:00 eastern and also 1:00 p.m. eastern time. and we will be right back.
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thanks to a few good samaritans, a tragedy was avoided in salt lake city, utah. and the dramatic rescue was all caught on camera. >> go, go! come on! get down there! go! jump! jump! i don't know, man! [ screaming ]
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>> whoo! yes! oh, my god, yes! >> oh, my god! >> oh, my god. oh, my god! >> wow! extraordinary. you can see right there, it was upside down and then folks came together and tried to right side. inside, three teenage boys. somehow, that vehicle slid off a bridge while allegedly going too fast on thursday. the driver and passengers are all alive now because of these bystanders that jumped in and turned that vehicle over and were able to rescue them. extraordinary. all right. what a way to begin a new hour. hello again, everyone. i'm fredricka whitfield. here are the top stories we're following inside the "cnn newsroom." a terrifying event at the white house may lead to new security details. we have new information about the fence jumper and how he made it through the front doors. plus, pennsylvania police think they are closing in on a suspect in the killing of a state trooper. for eight days, residents have been scared and on edge.
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and later, there is a fine line between discipline and abuse. people are talking about where that line is, especially when it comes to children. we begin with new clues in the case of a missing university of virginia student. it has been one week since hanna graham went missing. she left dinner with friends in the charlottesville area last friday around 11:00 p.m. a few hours later, she sent a text to her friends saying, she was lost. no word from her since. but now, investigators have a theory on what happened that night. police believe she got into a car with a man after that dinner with friends. let's go now to cnn's jean casarez in charlottesville, virginia. so, jean, you're in the area where more than a thousand people are looking for hanna. what more are you learning? >> reporter: well, let me give you the latest. a lot of the searchers are coming back now to refresh, the
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red cross is here with water and snacks and they're going back out. and i just spoke with one of the searchers and she said that they were in a densely wooded area. she said it was so difficult to even walk. and they were being told to look for clothing of hanna. and they were right next to a creek. and i said, are investigators asking you to look in the creek? and she said, they're asking us to look everywhere. but this is what we learned this morning. and this gives a new slant to this missing persons investigation. last night, the police chief was told that people were going to retrace hanna's step in the downtown mall area. today what they're looking at are vacant buildings, construction sites. they're taking flashlights and being asked to look in manholes and drains. anywhere to find anything of hanna. and also dumpsters. people have been in dumpsters, looking to see if they can find something. but the passion from this community to find hanna, a sophomore at the university of virginia, a very emotional today. >> so, jean, what is it about
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this man that they are describing, not naming, and why do they believe that she was with him for a period of time and may even have left the area with him? >> reporter: they don't believe that she knew him at all bulb wh, but what we learned last night, and it was a bombshell, they said that surveillance video and witness testimony shows that this man began to follow her in the mall. african-american, 32 years old, 270 pounds with dreadlocks. they say that he put his arm around her, they went into a local restaurant, the tempo restaurant. he ordered alcohol, they left 15 minutes later, she got into his car. they want anyone that saw any bit of that to come forward. they say they know who he is, but had no probable cause to arrest him, but enough probable cause to search his car and his apartment. >> and are police revealing anything about the sequence of events, that eyewitness account, or the video showing that she's
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with him, where does that come in between this whole texting to friends that "i'm lost." i mean, what's the timeline here? >> reporter: most of it comes outside of the view of videotape surveillance. although they are reviewing some of that, i think, that has not been released to the public. but, this man that they are sew interested in was caught on videotape. and so, they're putting it together. but they want people, i think, to see the demeanor between the two of them. they don't believe they knew each other, but was she scared, did she willingly go, did he seem to force her in the vehicle? and i think that they need more of that to actually go further in this investigation. >> yes, very curious situation. all right, thanks so much, jean casarez. appreciate that. keep us posted. all right. now to northeast pennsylvania, where suspected cop killer eric matthew frein is still on the loose. this after a night of drama in the woods that included a massive police presence, shots being fired and residents on
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lockdown. and at one point, a report that police had surrounded an area where they thought frein was hiding. alexander is in monroe, pennsylvania. can you keep us up to date on this? >> reporter: for a while, it looked like they were closing in on the suspect, but today they are continuing to search for eric frein and frankly, the search efforts have only grown this morning. we're now hearing there are 300 to 400 law enforcement officers, all in the area, continuing to look for the man who has evaded them for a week now, joining in this search. state police, the fbi, the u.s. marsha marshall's office, atf officers, a large group of people who are out there looking to find this man. but they are telling the public to stay inside. they believe that frein is armed and dangerous. they're trying to bring this search to a resolution without any other innocent bystanders or law enforcement officers being hurt in the process. so while it did look encouraging for a little while overnight, right now we know, fred, that this search is still very much
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continuing. >> so are residents still on lockdown? >> reporter: they are. they're being told to stay away from their windows, lock their doors, stay off the road. that speaks to the severity of the situation. we do not know where frein is. earlier in the week, law enforcement officials say he believed they were in the area. then there was activity thursday night. then that activity last night. reports that shots were fired, reports that police believed that they had closed in on him, that they had him sort of surrounded in an area. but we're talking about really densely, thickly wooded areas here. they're doing a grid search right now, which means they are trying to check off areas and then restrict access. all in an effort to locate this suspect. >> all right. alexander field, thank you so much. all right, the white house secret service detail is now trying to figure it all out. how a man jumped the fence, escaping uniformed guards, running right across the northern lawn, and then right into the white house last night. they searched the grounds today to ensure that there were no
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explosives or other devices that may have been dropped, perhaps, on the ground. a former secret service agent, whose brother is still in the service, says it doesn't take long to get from the fence to the front door. >> i'm stunned. i think what they have to look at is, remember, we're always -- we can't stick the president in a big iron box. he's the president of the united states, he has to be out there amongst the people. but i've always seen, especially on the north portion of the white house, the distance to the front door is really short in contrast to the south portion. it's quite a run. you're not going to make it to the south doors. they're going to have to do something with the fence. even if it's sympathetic as simple as curving the bars over towards the street side, the pennsylvania avenue side, which would make it harder to scale. remember, time buys you options. and right now, they don't have time. you scale the fence, you're almost right at the door. >> so no one was injured in the incident and the president and the first family had just left the grounds on a marine helicopter. just by a matter of four minutes, we understand. startling new details on a
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don't start humira if you have an infection. if you're still just managing your symptoms, ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, remission is possible. all right, major developments on the condition of a u.s. marine held in a mexican prison for more than six months. the u.s. marine reservist says he entered mexico after taking a wrong turn on the california side of the border into tijuana. well, he has been held on weapons charges ever since. and now his mother says he is, quote, highly despondent. nick valencia has covered this story from the very beginning. so where are we in the case of this young marine and what is his mom saying about his condition? >> there's no timetable for if or when he will be released. and his mother, i spoke to her last week, and she said he's doing worse than ever, and
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that's saying a lot after he tried to take his own life after threats against his life in the first prison he was in tijuana. communication is very limited, but he was using a phone in the prison to communicate with his family and friends. that phone is broken, so that's essentially limited his contact with the outside world. so for six months, he's been in the prison system in mexico. and he's maintained from the very beginning that he made a wrong turn, he got turned around, that's when mexican customs agented found these three military grade weapons. >> why'd he have all of that in the vehicle? >> he had moved from california to florida to live with friends, suffering from ptsd, and is living out of his truck. he had asked a friend at one point to keep those weapons at his friend's home, that friend had kids so he said, absolutely not, so he had all of his worldly possessions in this car. he made an accidental wrong turn into mexico, and now he's being held. but there are people that doubt his story. >> including the state
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department? >> including some in the u.s. state department. a source at the u.s. state department told me recently that there's doubt around his story. he had booked a hotel, a motel, in tijuana, and had spent the previous night before he was arrested. some believe that he was intend to go back into mexico that night that he was arrested. i asked the state department about that. they didn't respond to that, but they did say that they've done everything in their power to try to get him out, visited him 20 times, secretary of state kerry has talked about that, but much to the disappointment of tahmooressi supporters, president obama hasn't mentioned this at all. >> what does that include when the state department says, they've tried everything. what does that mean in those negotiations, i guess, with you know, mexican counterparts. what kind of power does the u.s. state department have to compel another country to say, release our guy? >> that's just it. they don't have much power. they can put the pressure on mexico, but really, all of this power is in the hands of a district judge that's hearing
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the evidence. he's had three evidentiary hearings, the latest on september 9th, when they submitted this surveillance video. and according to his defense attorney, this video shows that his client had been telling the truth all along, that there was a pause there. still, there's this doubt that he, perhaps, intentionally crossed. there is conversations, though, in the mexican government's office and high-level administration officials i've been told by a source in the office in mexico, they're considering letting him go based on this mental health. mexico doesn't officially treat ptsd for their prisoners. they say they don't have the resources to say treat someone who's suffering for this. he has served his country, two tours in afghanistan and he's doing really bad mentally right now. i've spoken to him several times over the phone from his prison cell. and initially he was very despondent, he had that optimism, and now he's back at square one with no timetable. there is a congressional hearing on october 1st from the house foreign affairs committee, subcommittee, to talk about tahmooressi, to try to get him out. he has his next court date on the 29th of september.
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but really, there is no suggestion that he will be released. though some maintaining their optimism. >> what a complicated situation. all right, nick valencia, thanks so much. appreciate it. >> you bet. it is the biggest ipo wall street has ever seen. we'll tell you about the chinese company making a big splash here in the u.s. they're custom made trains. you can't get any better than that. siemens trains are not your grandparent's technology. they're something that's gonna change the cities we live in today. i find it so fascinating how many people ride this and go to work every single day. i'm one of the lucky guys. i get to play with trains. people say, "wow, we still build that in the united states?" and we say, "yeah, we do!"
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okay. it is the biggest ipo ever to hit wall street. shares of the chinese ecommerce company, ali baba began trading on the new york stock exchange. it jumped 38% in its first day of trading. and when the dust settled, the company raised almost $22 billion. even though it's sometimes called the chinese amazon, maggie lake explains why it is so much more than that. >> reporter: forget twitter and facebook. a alibaba's ipo is unlike anything investors have seen before. >> it's really like 12 companies. like ebay and amazon and paypal is pretty easy. it's a netflix, a group-on, they have a money market fund business, where buyers and sellers to just park their cash. they have $100 billion u.s. in
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their money market fund business. so it's almost like an ecosystem of its own. >> reporter: the numbers swirling around this ecosystem are huge. even by silicon valley standards. alibaba's profit for the second quarter jumped some 179% to $2 billion. revenue increased by 46%, double that of u.s. online retailers amazon. mobile user growth has jumped tenfold. and last year, the company delivered 6 billion packages, more than global delivery giant u.p.s. those stats are enough to put even the most confident ceos on edge. who should be afraid of them, if anyone? who do they compare to? >> i think to a lot of other countries trying of their own ecommerce. i don't see alibaba jumping ebay or amazon out of their place in the united states. but as ebay and amazon try to become global in more and more heart attacks, they're going to fight heavily entrenched alibaba that's working really hard to get into those markets. so it will more cut them that way. >> reporter: the financials are
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backed up by some serious sizzle. charismatic found jack mah has the stage presence to rival many tech i cons. and he's followed the tech world's preference for structuring the stock sales to make sure control stays in management's hand. but alibaba is still young, and analysts say it won't be easy to knock the likes of amazon and ebay from their perch. >> they are sort of a walled garden and they're not the cheapest thing in the world. they force you to use alipay, they're not that cheap, and don't have such a global mix of premium brands, because they have a counterfeiting problem with t-mall, which is kind of extreme. so maybe half or more of some of the branded contents are knockoffs. >> reporter: maintaining momentum after the listing will be a challenge. but the windfall from the ipo means alibaba has the cash to spend on winning over skeptics. >> wow, that's something else, isn't it? alibaba closed yesterday just short of $94 a share. that's up 38%, a little reminder
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there, over the initial offering of $68. so should we jump in and buy alibaba stock? or is this all a lot of hype? and what about the company's chinese roots? here to talk about all of that is rob wilson. he is a financial adviser and host of rob wilson tv. so insiders, you know, have a permanent lock of control of the company, but hold small minority of the equity capital. so, what does this mean for an investor. what do you get when you lay down your money and say, i'm going to invest in this company? >> well, this ownership structure is very sketchy. because, see, the chinese government puts restrictions on foreign investments and certain industries in their country. so what they did is they set up a shell corporation in the cayman islands, and that's actually the entity that you get shares in. so that company has contractual agreements to receive the profits from the chinese entity. but you should be very leery of putting your money and investing in something when you don't have actual ownership of the company. if you go out and buy shares of
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apple or google or facebook, you own a piece of that company. that's not exactly how this is working here. >> you're talking to the ordinary consumer, because clearly a lot of investors did buy into it. and they made a significant investment in these chairs. >> oh, absolutely. the smart money jumped all over this. as you mentioned, the ipo was up 38% yesterday. so they're pretty happy with their investment. but listen, all of these things are good until they're not. so there's other chinese companies just like this that have gone public with this structure. badu is up 1,700%. but there's another company that went public at 16 and is now trading at $1.18, so there are some bad stories. and the reason that last company didn't do so well, is that people lost confidence that they would be able to manage this structure. >> so the bad stories got the attention of u.s. senator bob casey, who asserts that alibaba and several other chinese companies listing on u.s.
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exchanges may have fraudulent accounting, his words, fraudulent accounting practices. and is that a legitimate concern? >> it's a very legitimate concern. when you invest in companies in the united states, you can have some reasonable amount of faith that the big auditing firms here are going through those financials with a fine tooth comb, so you know what you're getting. but the s.e.c. here has not been able to really review those auditing firms in china. so you're not exactly sure if those financials are what they say they are. so there's got to be other better places to put your money, where you can be a little bit more certain about what you're investing. >> i guess there was a feeling that many people, investors, big investors would be a little reluctant to kind of jump on the bandwagon, because so many were burned with the facebook ipo. but clearly, that didn't happen. >> because, i think they anticipated that people were going to learn from that mistake. and listen, they structured this so that people would make money. they didn't want this to go down on the first day. it was going to be a lot of bad press. so they structured so that would go up. your big investors will be happy and you'll hold it for a while and not just sell it on the first day. >> you're afraid the other shoe will drop. something may come of ali baba
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and all of this money that's been invested km >> i'm a little nervous. i would not jump and rush into it. a lot of times when companies go public, over the next six months, the stock price just jumps all over the place. there's always a better time to get in. even if you didn't get google or facebook on the first day, there was always a better time to buy and you could still make money in those investments. >> rob wilson, thanks so much. appreciate it. >> thanks for having me. >> good to see you. up next, the president says no ground troops in the fight against isis, but is the pentagon on the same page as the white house? ...and tkind of like you huffing sometimes, grandpa. well, when you have copd, it can be hard to breathe. it can be hard to get air out, which can make it hard to get air in.
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all right. bottom of the hour now. welcome back. i'm fredricka whitfield. here are the top stories crossing the cnn news desk right now. an anonymous source tells cnn the nigerian government and the international committee of the red cross are negotiating the release of more than 200 missing nigerian schoolgirls. the source says officials have met with senior boko haram members four times and discussed exchanging commanders for the schoolgirls. boko haram members say the girls were never raped or sexually assaulted. two u.s. jets intercepted a half dozen russian military planes flying too close to u.s. airspace off alaska yesterday. they didn't enter sovereign
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territory, but came within 55 miles of the alaskan coast. and early thursday morning, canadian planes intercepted two russian bombers approaching canadian air space. a u.s. official tells cnn it's likely the incidents were related to the president of ukraine's visit this week to the u.s. is and canada. and the "e!" television network has announced its hit show "fashion police," will continue next year, despite the death of its host, joan rivers. "e!" released a statement saying in part, quote, we decided with melissa rivers' blessing that joan would have wanted the franchise to continue, end quote. rivers died about two weeks ago at the age of 81. and thanks to a few good samaritans in salt lake city, utah. a tragedy was avoided and the dramatic rescue was all caught on camera. take a look. >> jump! jump! you'll buy shoes later! jump! i don't know!
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>> yes, yes, yes! >> whoo! yes! >> amazing, that suv was uprighted. inside, three teenage boys, inside that vehicle, which had slid off a bridge thursday. the driver and the passengers are all alive because of the bystanders that jumped in to save them. president barack obama now has the go-ahead from congress to arm and train moderate syrian rebels in the fight against isis. the white house has been adamant any war on isis won't include u.s. ground troops. some pentagon generals have suggested it might have to be an option, but only if syrian and iraqi forces don't succeed with american help. earlier, i spoke with former state department adviser, aaron david miller, and cnn military analyst, lieutenant general mark hurtling. and i asked hurtling if this was a real divide, or just the debate that sometimes happens between the white house and the pentagon. >> there's no disconnect. i think you've heard that from both general dempsey and the
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pentagon spokesman. it's the chairman doing the things he's supposed to do. he's thinking ahead. he's thinking about potential options. he clearly said, hey, if we see this as a possibility, we will go to the president and have him make a decision. we would be appalled if general dempsey was not thinking of future opportunities. >> okay. so, aaron, if that is the case, this really is customary and perhaps people are misinterpreting this. what is the public message, then, and does this, in any way, kind of empower, if not give more credibility to isis? >> well, i think mark's right. you have to distinguish between the possibility of the redeployment of thousands of american combat forces in iraq and perhaps even in afghanistan, from the reality that we are going to have to use, as we're doing in iraq now, special forces or special operators. and in iraq, that number could double or triple. and once you begin to stand up syrian allies, local allies, that's going to be a tough sell, tough to do, you will have to
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probably deploy special operators or special forces into syria as well. but, again, the model is afghanistan in the fall of '08. good intelligence, local allies, special operators, and air strikes. whether it will work or not, to defeat isis, is another matter. but i think mark's right. this has really been blown way out of proportion. >> and so general, special ops, special forces, if they were engaged, isn't that boots on the ground? >> it certainly is, but first of all, fredricka, as you know, i can't stand that expression of "boots on the ground," these are forces in harm's way, potentially. but when you're an adviser and contributing to another force doing the things the right way, you have to be right there. and i think that's maybe what general austin asked the president. hey, can we send them forward, and the president said, not now. because the potential risk involved with having a special operator or a special forces troop being at the front line and potentially getting killed, would really be quite devastating to the extension of
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the strategy today. it -- there's a nuanced approach, and i think there is a disconnect between the military understanding of the terms and what the politicians, the media, and our public understand in terms of this boots on the ground. >> all right. thanks so much. general mark heardling and aaron david miller. so, something else we're going to discuss, straight ahead. when does spanking become child abuse? coming up, a heart-to-heart conversation with the family from the south that says you shouldn't spare the rod and spoil the child. ♪ t-mobile's network has more data capacity than verizon or at&t. it's a network designed data strong. suddenly you're a mouth breather. a mouth breather! how do you sleep like that?
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minnesota vikings player, adrian peterson, won't be on the field when the team takes on the saints tomorrow. he has been deactivated by his team after being indicted on a child abuse charge. peterson took a switch to his 4-year-old son. was that discipline or abuse? cnn's gary tuchman talked with an atlanta area family who says, in the south, spanking or discipline of that nature is part of the culture. >> it's a school night at katrina hall's house in norcross, georgia. but her children are staying up late because we're paying a visit to talk about spankings, or what many call them, whoopings. also in the house this evening,
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katrina's mother, laura. three generations. >> my children are spanked. and i will go to the closet and i will use a belt. >> a belt? >> they will get spankings with a belt. >> reporter: and for lesser infractions, with her hand. kanay is 10 years old, joshua is 4. they are both great kids. but -- >> in a four-month time span, honestly, she's gotten a spanking once. >> reporter: and your son, joshua, who's 4, how often does he get it? >> joshua gets a spanking every single day. i mean, to be more serious. i would say as often as needed. >> reporter: not long ago, joshua spat on his sister. >> and i said, son, you will never, ever spit on anyone again. you get a spanking. this is consist of maybe four or five pops on your leg, and that's the end of it. >> reporter: with what? >> with the belt.
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>> reporter: don't you think it's possible, the very least possible, that they be the same type of kids today if you would just yelled at them, took things away, made them go to sleep early, took the toys away and didn't lay a hand on them? >> not at all. not at all. >> first of all, my belief system, i don't -- that's not my belief system. you know, i believe in the believe, i believe in the word of god. >> reporter: grandmother and mother believe you cannot spare the rod. single mother, katrina, also believes former nba great charles barkley when on cbs' nfl program today said. >> i'm from the south, whipping is -- we do that all the time. every black parent in the south is going to be in jail urn those circumstances. >> reporter: a study by a leading researcher at the university of texas does indicate it's more common for african-americans to spank children than it is for other groups. other studies have similar results. >> i don't know one african-american person that has not gotten a spanking and that does not spank their children.
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i know not one. >> reporter: does it concern you that by teaching them that discipline involves hitting, that ultimately, they would hit people too. >> absolutely not. because my children are very intelligent. and they understand the chain of command. >> when katrina was a child, she was punished plenty too, with a small tree branch. also known as a switch. >> reporter: so you would go outside, and tell me what you would do? >> take a pair of scissors, cut a little switch. >> reporter: and then you would bring the switch in the house, and then what would happen? >> tear them legs up. >> reporter: and what? >> tear them legs up. >> she said, tear them legs up. >> i think that's pretty clear. that >> that's a southern -- >> so when you got your legs teared up, did it hurt? >> of course! >> i got more whoopings when i was younger, but it wasn't that bad. but it was just now, it's like, i don't even -- i barely do anything to get whoopings, so --
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>> so you feel good about that? >> yeah. >> in this house, the children are being taught it is part of their culture that if you're bad, you might get spanked, so you become good. >> i love them more than i love myself. when i think about how much i love them, i automatically start to cry. >> reporter: gary tuchman, cnn, norcross, georgia. >> all right. we're going to dig a little bit deeper on this. and our next panel of experts will be joining us in the studio, when does spanking cross the line? right after this. they're custom made trains. you can't get any better than that. siemens trains are not your grandparent's technology. they're something that's gonna change the cities we live in today. i find it so fascinating how many people ride this and go to work every single day. i'm one of the lucky guys. i get to play with trains. people say, "wow, we still build that in the united states?"
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comcast business. built for business. the abuse case against minnesota vikings player adrian peterson has raised a lot of questions, particularly about child discipline. when does spanking cross the line and become child abuse? joining me right now in studio to talk about this very important issue is psychologist eric fisher and former prosecutor, tanya miller. so, eric, to you first. you know, how is it that we've come to this point, where it seems that the definition of discipline varies from family to family. and now, versus quite a few years ago, maybe 10, 20, 30 years ago, the law steps in and says, i don't know if we necessarily agree with how you discipline your kid.
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>> well, i think we have to look at a whole range of issues. and you know, which would really take time to go through the history of that. however, what i always back up to is, the word discipline is often equated with punishment. and the word discipline comes from the word "disciple," which means to teach. and i think if we look at what we're trying to do with our children, we're trying to teach them and prepare them for the rest of their life. and while we look at often parenting and discipline, which had to do with spanking, and which would become abuse, had such a wide range. and we looked at children's rights. children were often looked at more of as a piece of property. and now i think we have to look at them as gift. and this is an opportunity to raise a child to move into their generation of adulthood to understand values and morals and respect. and i just don't think we do that through physical discipline myself. >> so, you know, a parent feels like one of their biggest jobs is to teach, as you put it. you know, or to, you know, draw the line. but at what point is one family's choice of how they do
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that too much? i mean, you know, and who, and when should anyone be stepping in? >> well, you know, that's the $1 million question, fred. ultimately, parents do legally have the right to use corporal punishment on their children. the question becomes when that corporal punishment is deemed unreasonable under the law. >> and who makes that decision? >> it's sometimes police officers that show up on the scene, if they've been called by a teacher, because the child presents at school with marks, or someone calls 911, a neighbor. the officer has to sort of make the initial call, based on the facts. but ultimately, it's the prosecutor. it's the person who makes that decision about who to charge and who not to charge. and there are all kinds of factors that the prosecutor is going to look at. >> in the case of say, peterson, he says, listen, i'm just doing what my family did with me. and while he admits there were markings on his child, you know, as a result of, you know, this discipline, in his view, his
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defense is, i don't see this as being any different than what i endured as a kid and there are others who come to his defense who say, you know, i wouldn't be who i am today if not for, you know, that kind of discipline imposed. so, is it an issue of evolution? it may have been acceptable years ago, it is not today? or is it an issue of, you know, we're in the day and age of photographs and video that's a lot more compelling than the spoken word? >> i think there's sort of two ways to look at it. there's sort of cultural evolution. sort of whether or not that sort of defense that peterson is putting forward, culturally makes sense. as a matter of law, it doesn't. you cannot simply say, well, this is the way my mom raised me, therefore, that's the way i'm raising my son, as a matter of law, it can't be child abuse. that's not the standard. the standard is whether or not what you did to that child can be considered excessive, excessively cruel, and to have caused that child excessive pain. and i do think that peterson's case really crosses that line.
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and we can't conflate this issue of peterson and abuse with whether or not spanking is reasonable and appropriate and if there is some room on the parenting spectrum for spanking. that's a larger debate. the law really can't join in on that debate. we're a little bit more constrained in terms of what we can say is abuse and is not abuse. >> and erica, as we talk about evolution, there's been an evolution in everything. i mean, we were kids who sat in the backseat of our cars without seat belts, et cetera. studies say, now, if you have some kind of restraint, car restraints, your life is better protected. and so, you know, the same can be applied to this psychology or this method of discipline. there are studies that say there is mental and physical suffering that comes from corporal punishment. so, you know, how does anyone make reason or, you know, digest this, especially if they want to, you know, recall family history as opposed to referring to new studies? >> well, i think not only to look at the scars of physical
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discipline, but also the scars of emotional abuse. and it can be more severe, that we have to pay attention to, 2,000 years ago, our world evolved because when we look at the phrase spare the rod, spoil the child is from proverbs put together by king salomon. king solomon was an extremely punitive father. his son rehobom was extremely abusive to his subjects and actually had to escape assassination a few times because he basically took what his dad did to him and passed it on down. when the new testament was written, jesus never talked about spanking your children. he loved thy neighbor as thyshelve. do unto others as you do unto you. we want to teach our i had kids a love-base respect. and time and time again when i have kids and parents and families -- >> we heard from the one child in that piece from gary tuchman.
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the little girl said i try really hard not to do anything so as to not get a whooping or a spanking. and the mom even said you know what? these children are very intelligent, and so they know right from wrong. >> you can do that with a time-out, a response cost or writing essays, other ways that teach them not to use power over people to get control. i believe in teaching people to have power with people. to understand that i want to learn to respect others for who they are, not respect them because they can hurt me. and that's what i feel concern that kids learn through this. and if parents spent more time parenting and really being present with their kids and forming solid attachments, we wouldn't have these issues. i see the difference between parents don't spend as much quality time with their kids, and that could be the founding variable. not that they don't spank their kids. >> so still a persistent conflict is going to be balancing, you know, philosophical differences with what the law expects or what the law is able to enforce? >> right. i mean, listen. my own experience, my mother
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raised me. she did not spank me. she didn't believe in spanking. she grew up in the south, in the '50s and '60s with a mother who did believe in it and who enforced her rule by using that kind of punishment. my mother came out okay. but i came out okay, too. and ultimately, i think that the time that my grandmother was parenting in versus the time that my mother was parenting in versus the time that i'm now parenting in has changed. and i do think that, you know, there is this notion of evolution and this notion that we can change and we can do things differently. the law might not be able to enforce that, but i think that culturally and as a society, discussions like this, people being open to the possibility that there is another way to do it could very well lead to that evolution. >> all right. tonya miller, eric fisher, good to see both of you. it is a conversation that is taking place in kitchens and living rooms everywhere right now, particularly as a result of all that's happened in the nfl. appreciate it. a man arrested for allegedly
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starting a huge california wildfire. and while he sits in jail, the fire he is accused of setting threatens thousands of homes now. an unprecedented program arting busithat partners businesses with universities across the state. for better access to talent, cutting edge research, and state of the art facilities. and you pay no taxes for ten years. from biotech in brooklyn, to next gen energy in binghamton, to manufacturing in buffalo... startup-ny has new businesses popping up across the state. see how startup-ny can help your business grow at startup.ny.gov
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one huge wildfire raging
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across california is not only threatening homes and lives. it's also costing up to $5 million a day to fight it. cnn's dan simon has the latest on the man who's accused of starting the fire. dan. >> reporter: fredericka, we are at the courthouse in placerville, california, where the man accused of setting this wildfire had his first court appearance. 37-year-old wayne allen huntsman pleading not guilty to the charge of felony arson. authorities not revealing the evidence against him, but the devastation has been enormous. more than 75,000 acres have been charred, and thousands of residents have been forced to evacuate their homes. >> there's no stopping this fire. they dropped retardant on it. they dropped water. the air crews were -- >> it's sickening. it's horrifying. and it's sickening. it's just awful. i don't know what else to say. >> reporter: the terrain is really steep, so getting air
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support has been critical. and it's always an impressive sight to see dc-10 air tankers. dropping 12,000 gallons of red fire retardant. we should also point out the three-year drought situation, and that's what's causing this fire really to burn. there's so much dry vegetation out there. and we're seeing 12 fires burning at once in the state of california, and officials say it's because of the drought. they say this is an unprecedent situation. as for mr. huntsman, he'll have his next court appearance in october. fredericka? >> thanks so much, dan simon. so incredible drought in california. how long is this going to go on? jennifer gray with us now. i mean, it really is noticeably dry. i was just a visitor in california last week. i can't believe how much i felt so dehydrated all the time, let alone looking at the landscape. >> you're exactly right. it is really, really dry. and it's going to take much, much more than just a couple of days of rain to reverse this. this is a look at the king fire from space.
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nasa provided these images. and you can see the smoke just billowing up to the north and east. like dan said, 76,000 acres have burned. 4500 firefighters fighting this. 21,000 homes threatened. and smoke plume stretches over 250 miles. just incredible images. fredericka, you're right, that drought is not going anywhere any time soon. not improving. 95% of the state in severe drought. 82% in exceptional drought. and here is the forecast over the next couple of days. nothing more than about a 10% chance of rain. temperatures in the mid-80s, low 90s. so firefighters in extreme heat battling these blazes. i want to switch gears because in west texas, we're seeing the very opposite thing. we are seeing a lot of rain in west texas. flooding has been a concern. new mexico, arizona as well will still see that flooding today, so it is worth a mention, we are going to see those flood watches, warnings and even flash flood warnings in effect, fredericka, as we go through the day today. should be wrapping up today,
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though, and getting better by tomorrow. >> good warnings. thanks so much, jennifer. appreciate that. hello again, everyone. i'm fredericka whitfield. we start this hour in northeast pennsylvania where as many as 400 law enforcement personnel are helping in the search for suspected cop killer eric frein. against a backdrops of shots fired and residents on lockdown, there was a report police had surrounded an area where they thought frein was hiding. but the man authorities say shot and killed one state trooper and wounded another last week is still free. jason carroll has more on the suspect police describe as a survivalist who wants to kill again. >> reporter: pennsylvania state police are piecing together a profile of a man they're calling a killer. 31-year-old eric frein. >> this fellow is extreme

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