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tv   New Day Sunday  CNN  December 7, 2014 3:00am-4:31am PST

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[ sirens ] we're beginning with breaking news. overnight in california, a peaceful protest turns violent in berkeley. flash bombs and tear gas, two police officers hurt, stores vandalized. the demonstrators upset over a new york grand jury's decision not to indict an officer in the death of eric garner. and good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye, in today for christi paul. >> i'm victor blackwell.
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6:00 here on the east coast. >> violent protests ignite over the controversial death of eric garner. this was the chaotic scene in berkeley, california, last night. as many as 1,000 protesters filled the streets to demand justice and law enforcement reform. >> things took a turn for the worse when a small group of masked protesters started hurling weapons, like these bricks and pipe and this stone at police officers. at least two officers were injured, including one that had to be treated at a local hospital after being hit with a sandbag. >> and like the violent protests we saw in ferguson, local stores were also a target. >> next thing you know, that window breaks, that window started breaking, these two windows break. >> a kid with a hammer comes in, throws brake fluid, like he's going to start the house on fire. >> i thought we were going to get attacked because they had weapons, like hammers and crowbars and things. >> police say they were forced to use smoke and tear gas after the crowd refused to let up.
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look at this. at one point, other protesters, they tried to keep the peace. >> why is there police? there is no need. for people protesting, they shouldn't be taking things from stores that aren't bothering them. >> it is unclear just how many people were arrested. at least seven other police departments have stepped up to help. >> we have with us jennifer coates on the phone. she's the berkeley police public information officer. it's good to have you this morning. can you set the scene for us? what's the latest there? >> good morning. thanks for having me. currently, the protests have pretty much winded down. there's just a small group, less than 50, that are still marching, but it is peaceful at this point, and we have pulled our resources back, and the mutual aid agencies that have been assisting us have been relieved from helping us and are now leaving the area. >> fewer than 50 now. at the height of the protest,
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how many were demonstrating? and give us an idea of how many of those demonstrators were the violent ones who, as we see, are fighting here, who were breaking windows and throwing stones. >> we did have estimates up to and around 1,000 people at the height of the protests. during the time, kind of the splinter group that split off and was causing some of the vandalism and damage, that group is estimated anywhere between 200 or maybe up to 300 people. and as the night progresses, the numbers did get smaller, but you know, the main group that stayed around usually was roughly around 150. >> and how many officers there? >> so, i don't know approximately. we probably had around 200 or more officers, you know, including all the officers from our agencies and then the seven other agencies that assisted us. >> now, there are some claims that the tear gas and the smoke incited some of the violence. what's your response to that? >> well, you know, in this case,
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you know, berkeley is known for protests and the first amendment, and we do everything we can to ensure that people can peacefully exercise their freedom to express themselves. in this case, a response occurred because a group of the protesters did become violent. they did start throwing rocks and bricks and bottles, also small pipes were thrown at our officers, and including later on in the evening, we also had objects that were lit on fire and thrown at our officers, which created a huge hazard between our officers and the community. so, we determined at that point that the assembly was unlawful, and they were given orders to disperse, which they refused and continued to throw objects at us. so, we responded with trying to clear the crowds by using tear gas and smoke. >> do you have hard numbers this morning on arrests and injuries? >> i don't have specific numbers. we have made several arrests from various charges, including
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assault as well as vandalism. we just now finished up, so we're looking to see at the numbers for the rest that occurred. >> jennifer coates, public information officer for berkeley police department, thanks so much for clearing the picture for us this morning. >> you're welcome. thank you for having me. >> there have been protests around the nation since the grand jury's decision last wednesday. also, last night protests from tulsa, oklahoma, to dallas to chicago and atlanta. the protests have been largely peaceful, though. so, why did the protests in berkeley, that we were just showing you, take a violent turn? joining us is cnn law enforcement analyst tom fuentes. tom, good morning to you. let's talk about this. take us into the minds, if you can, of these police officers who were dealing with the protesters in berkeley. when you're dealing with such high emotion and such a large crowd, how do you know that things are about to go south, and do you know? >> well, good morning, randi. first of all, i've been in that situation. when on was a police officer earlier in my career, i had to
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stand and protect the american nazi party when they had their demonstrations in several cities in cook county, illinois. and when you're standing in front of the crowd like that -- in those days, we didn't have all the body armor, all the equipment they have now. but when you're standing in front of a crowd like that, what you realize is that you're sitting on top of a bomb that might explode or it might not. and what may ignite it is leadership on the part of whoever's in that crowd. and if you have anarchists or hooligans or hoodlums and people that want to loot and get a free tv or case of liquor, sometimes that's all that it takes is someone like that to come out, antagonize police, throw rocks at police, force the police to use tear gas or try to disperse the crowd, and then that's what they want. in the ensuing chaos, they can do what they want, steal things from stores or threaten other people. so, often, sdwrust that spark. it's just that spark of leadership. and that's why sports teams have leadership, because people can
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inspire other people, and it might be cheering and it might not. it might be violent. >> right. we know there are at least three instances of violence before the police used tear gas to break up the group. should they and could they have put a stop to the leader and maybe the bad apples there before things escalated to what we saw last night? >> the problem is, the bad apples are in the barrel, and it's hard to pick them out. and you know, until something actually erupts, it's hard to tell where it's going to erupt from. so, it's almost like watching a volcano. you just don't know if it's going to go or not and at what time and place it exactly will erupt. so, that's a very difficult situation for the police to be in. but what you're noticing is that, you know, it's not the police trying to incite this trouble, but they're trying to protect property, they're trying to protect these store owners, they're trying to protect the protesters that are protesting peacefully, and it's a heck of a situation to be in, when suddenly, they become the enemy. and in this recent narrative of this, you know, group of
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protests around the country, the narrative is that the police are bad. you're in danger of the police, not the hoodlums and the hooligans and the bad people that are out will. >> so, what can we take away from this? what can other cities learn from berkeley to make sure the protests remain peaceful? we've seen huge protests, massive protests all over new york city, and the police there seem to be doing something right. >> well, what they're doing right is, again, though, the protesters are driving this. so, the police are giving them as much leeway as possible. if they shut down highways, so be it. if they go into a store like apple and have a dye-in or a sit-in or disrupt business, but it's only for a short period of time, allow it. but you know, all it's going to take is one or two people to really start bombarding the police with any debris that could be dangerous or shots fired or actual looting. and you'll see a whole different reaction from the police. and i think there were some people out there, as this goes on, that may be what happens
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down the line. this may get worse before it gets better. >> all right. tom fuentes, thank you, as always, for your insight. appreciate it. >> thank you, randi. navy s.e.a.l.s had just a few minutes to rescue an american being held hostage in yemen, and they had to go through rough terrain and armed militants to get luke somers. a firefight broke out as drones flew overhead. we're going to take you inside this dangerous mission. that's next. and it was an unusual saturday at the white house. president obama made an unscheduled visit to the doctor. we'll have the details and the diagnosis, coming up. (woman) the constipation and belly pain feel like a knot. how can i ease this pain? (man) when i can't go, it's like bricks piling up. i wish i could find some relief. (announcer) ask your doctor about linzess-- a once-daily capsule for adults with ibs with constipation or chronic idiopathic constipation. linzess is thought to help calm pain-sensing nerves and accelerate bowel movements.
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intelligence officials, umar farooq was killed in a suspected drone strike. farooq is believed to be the head of al qaeda's operations in pakistan and afghanistan. he was killed along with four other suspected militants. >> and today's report comes on the heels of news that pakistan killed another senior al qaeda commander yesterday morning. that target had once been indicted for his alleged role in a planned attack on the new york city subways. >> all right, so, this morning, we are learning some stunning, new details about the risky and very dangerous mission to try to rescue photojournalist luke somers and south african teacher apir corky in yemen. >> the u.s. is saying there was no time to wait, the clock was ticking. administration officials believed armed al qaeda militants would carry out their threat to kill somers on saturday if rescuers did not get to him on time. >> meantime, a south african relief group, gift of the giver, says it was negotiating for fellow hostage pierre corky to be freed today.
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a senior state department official tells cnn the obama administration did not know that. here's how the attempt to get both men to safety unfolded. a u.s. official tells cnn the operation to rescue luke somers and pierre corky started at 1:00 a.m. saturday local time in yemen, friday 7:00 p.m. two tilt rotor osprey aircraft touched down six miles from the walled compound where both men were being held captive. on board about three dozen special operations forces, mostly seal team 6 commandos. they trekked through scrub and brush to the compound, but about 100 yards from it, the official says the militants realized they were there. a firefight broke out as drones and fighter jets circled overhead, but according to the u.s. official, a militant ran back into the compound and shot somers and corky. the s.e.a.l. team 6 commandos were able to reach the badly wounded men, and they stayed on
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the ground for 30 minutes as the combat medical team tried to stabilize somers and corky, but one of the men died on the plane ride to the navy assault ship waiting off yemen's coast. the other died afterwards. at least five al qaeda militants were killed in the raid. no special forces were injured. >> let's bring in cnn military analyst and retired major general james "spider" marks in washington. we're learning so many details about how this mission unfolded. the one that stands out to me, they had to trek six miles first before they began to rescue them, but randi reminds us, that's why they're navy s.e.a.l.s. from what we're learning about this, do you see or hear anything that stands out as an operational or logistical error? >> no, i don't. you know, victor -- first of all, thanks for allowing me to discuss this with you. the operation clearly was based on good, targetable intelligence. it wouldn't have taken place, a
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decision would not have been made to go and put these s.e.a.l.s and the rest of this enterprise -- you know, this is a very large operation that takes place. with the talent of the s.e.a.l.s on the ground, that is backed up and supported by those that are flying the drones, the fighter aircraft, the folks on the ship, the medical teams available, the communications guys, the intel folks that have to bring platest intelligence, et cetera. this is a very large enterprise, but very well rehearsed. so, it's based on good intelligence. but clearly, what always happens in situations like this is there will be an unfolding set of events that you try to plan for all contingencies, but you just simply cannot. i think this is clearly a sad and unfortunate outcome, but thank goodness we've got a chain of command all the way up through the president that's willing to act on this intelligence to try to rescue this american citizen. and clearly, unfortunately, we did not know about the south
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african, but again, that happens as well. so, i think this thing unfolded as planned as well as it could have happened. sadly, there was a last-minute decision on the part of the captors. they were taken by surprise, as were the s.e.a.l.s. there's a gun fight, and then you end up with two dead hostages, which is clearly an unfortunate incident. >> so, the u.s., as we've said, did not know about the negotiations to free pierre corky. you said that happens as well. but would you have expected the white house to have known that there were negotiations under way? i mean, there was intelligence that corky and his wife had been taken hostage. the wife had been released. there's still the question then of where is corky? maybe they should have known that he was still there somewhere. >> well, clearly, the united states knew that korkie, the intelligence community -- and that's what they do, they do exceptionally well -- knew he was there, but not necessarily in this particular compound. these are separate, almost
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indistinct incidents that are taking place. the fact that korkie, who was a south africa, has been in country doing what he's doing as a teacher, and the fact that luke somers now, a photojournalist, was captured in sana'a, in yemen, and they now happen to be in the same compound. that's very difficult. now, to the fact of your point about negotiations for the release of korkie. that's an entirely independent negotiation that's going on place. nobody's asking permission from the united states to participate in that, and no one in the united states necessarily would be involved or would have knowledge of that. so, you've got these two parallel, distinct operations taking place. and again, it's unfortunate, but it's a far stretch to imagine that the united states would be able to be involved very specifically in this very precise negotiation that's taking place. plus, as we know, the united states will not negotiate, at least pay ransom, for the release of hostages. >> as we're learning from military analysts like yourself,
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that even with all the planning, sometimes these tragedies happen. general james "spider" marks, we thank you so much. >> thanks, victor. well, after two weeks with a sore throat, president obama undergoes a series of medical tests. we'll have the latest on the president's health. plus, big wins and some blowouts last night in college football, as some of the country's top teams look to keep their seasons alive and earn a spot in the inaugural college football playoff. turn the trips you have to take, into one you'll never forget. earn triple points when you book with the expedia app. expedia plus rewards. (vo)rescued.ed. protected. given new hope. during the subaru "share the love" event, subaru owners feel it, too. because when you take home a new subaru,
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welcome back to "new day," everyone. let's get you caught up with "the morning read."
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>> breaking overnight, chaos in the streets of berkeley, california, after protests turned violent over the controversial choke hold death of eric garner. things took a turn for the worse when a small group of massed protesters started hurling weapons, bricks and pipes at police officers. and despite repeated calls for peace, several shops were vandalized. police let off tear gas on the crowd when protesters refused to let up. we know at least two police officers were injured. we'll have more on this breaking news in a couple minutes. republicans added a ninth seat to the senate last night. democratic senator mary landrieu lost her bid for re-election in louisiana to republican opponent representative bill cassidy. landrieu has been in office since 1997 and touted her senate clout during her campaign, but in the end, she couldn't fight off republican attacks targeting her vote for obamacare. the "washington post" says that one of its correspondents has been detained in iran since july. we know that.
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jason rezaian has u.s. and iranian citizenship. he's been there at the paper's bureau chief in iran since 2012. it's not clear which charges specifically, if any, he's facing. secretary of state john kerry is urging iran to free him. the northern part of the philippines is bracing for typhoon hagupit's fury and it is concern it will cause mudslides, putting nearly 40 million people's lives now in danger. earlier, hagupit slammed into tacloban with 140-mile-per-hour winds, causing severe damage to homes and businesses. we're keeping an eye on that and will have more in a few minutes. another unbeaten season for florida state, surviving the win over georgia taking tech to take the acc championship last night. alabama and texas christian university also easily won their conference championship games and they hope won over the
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college football selection committee. we will see. they'll decide today which teams play in the inaugural college football playoff. they've got a big decision to make. >> they sure do. an unscheduled doctor's visit for the president. we'll have his diagnosis as well as which of his former vices may be to blame. bricks, rocks and pipe, those were some of the weapons used against police officers last night in berkeley, california, as protests over the death of eric garner turned violent. up next, why those peaceful demonstrations could be changing. my name's louis,
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♪soft holiday music ]♪ can you help me up? [ snow intensifies ] [ sleighbells ring in the distance ] aleve. all day pain relief with just 2 pills. get back to being you. coming up this half hour, peaceful protests turned violent in california. demonstrators upset over a grand
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jury's decision not to indict a police officer in the death of eric garner. a typhoon is hammering the philippines. torrential rain, damaging winds, they're creating new dangers. a huge storm surge, flooding and landslides from a volcano. >> bottom of the hour now. i'm randi kaye. >> i'm victor blackwell. >> president obama back at the white house this morning after making an unscheduled trip saturday to the walter reed medical center in maryland. >> the white house says the president had been complaining of a sore throat for the last couple of weeks, and with his schedule clear yesterday, he fit in a trip to the doctor. >> we're joined now from washington with all the details. good morning, sunlin. >> randi and victor, this was a rare occurrence saturday afternoon. the white house says president obama made an unexpected visit to the hospital for a sore throat. saturday morning, the white house said that the president had no events on his schedule and told reporters that none were anticipated, but all of
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that changed in the afternoon when an announcement hurried press to the motorcade to travel with the president to an undisclosed location. his motorcade arrived at walter reed medical center in bethesda, maryland. shortly after, press secretary josh ernest released a statement, saying the president had been complaining of a sore throat, and with free time on his schedule, was going in for some diagnostic tests, which he says were not urgent. and later, the white house put out a statement from the white house doctor, saying that the president did have a fiber-optic exam of his throat, which did reveal some swelling, but they say that the ct scan did come back normal. according to white house dr. ronnie jackson, he said, "the president's symptoms are consistent with soft tissue inflammation related to acid reflux and will be treated accordingly." in previous physicals of the president, he's been shown to be in excellent health, but this latest development sure raises a lot of questions. randi and victor?
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>> thank you very much. >> all right, so, now that president obama is back at the white house with this acid reflux diagnosis, when is he supposed to do? we put that question to chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta. >> acid reflux in and of itself is something that can be pretty easily treated. a lot of times, it may just be dietary changes. sometimes you want to give medicines to reduce the amount of acid in the stomach. you know, we know the president has a history of smoking in the past. we're told that he has quit, but that can be a risk factor as well. certainly, if he is still smoking at all, he would be told to absolutely stop. >> we've of course asked him questions about why the president could need a ct scan related to acid reflux. we're going to have a live report. dr. sanjay gupta will be joining us in the next hour. and now to a breaking news story that we're following. violent protests ignite in california over the controversial death of eric garner.
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>> just take a look at this. this was the chaotic scene in berkeley last night. as many as 1,000 protesters demanded justice and law enforcement reform. things took a turn for the worse when masked protesters started hurling weapons, including bricks and pipes at police officers. and we know at least two officers were injured, including one who was treated at a local hospital after being hit with a sandbag. >> and like the violent protests that we saw in ferguson, local stores were also a target. >> just in work, and next thing you know, that window breaks that window started breaking, these break. >> a kid with a hammer comes in, throws brake fluid like he was going to set the store on fire and just starts taking stuff. i thought we were going to get attacked because they had weapons like crowbars and hammers and everything. >> police say they were forced to use smoke and tear gas after
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crowds refused to let up. at one point, other protesters tried to restore peace. this morning, though, the berkeley police department says the crowds are thinning out. about 60 protesters are still on the streets. at least seven other police departments have stepped up to help. it's still not clear how many people were arrested. let's dig deeper now with hln legal analyst joey jackson. joey, good to have you this morning. >> good morning, victor. good to see you. >> so, this is first time we're seeing large-scale protests over the choke hold of eric garner turned violent. we've seen those in the ferguson case, but in this case specifically, we're now seeing some of this violence. earlier this morning, the berkeley police department told us that several people were charged with assault and vandalism. what else could they possibly face as a result of the violence at these protests? >> you know what happens, victor? there's a major distinction between peaceful protests and people who are engaging in acts of civil disobedience. there's a long history of that.
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and of course, people could be arrested for that also, for things like disorderly conduct, et cetera, if you're impeding pedestrian movement and otherwise causing public alarm. and that's a political decision, in terms of whether the government wants to do that and make mass arrests. then this, what we're talking about and what you're asking me about, which are direct acts of violence. and the reality is, is that you know, protests should never be used as an excuse to riot, to loot or anything else. but when you're looking at the video, when you're talking about, you know, it getting physical, you could look at assault, you can look at battery, which is, obviously, you know, either putting somebody in fear that they'll be harmed, or actually worse, striking them. you talk about acts of criminal mischief, where you're engaged in property damage. and of course, the punishment would have to do with the amount of property that was damaged. if you look, if it results in burning, you look at issues like arson. you know, it goes on and on. if it ever gets to the point of looting, then you're looking at, obviously, theft and stealing of property, you know.
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you could also be looking at trespass to the extent that they're on someone's property. so, every case, victor, would be individual, depending upon specifically what they did. but certainly, there are significant consequences that could result in records of these people, in the event that this continues. and obviously, the government has an interest in stopping it so that, you know what, people engage in peaceful protests, but when they're doing this, they're held accountable. >> and for those who are arrested as part of peaceful protests, maybe blocking interstates, blocking roads, if that's happening in other cities, are those charges going to stay on the permanent records of the people who are arrested? and if they're not involved in these violent acts. >> you know, it's an interesting question, because in new york, we have the police commissioner speaking about that. that's william bratton. and historically, when there's these large groups of protesters, it creates a problem for the police and it costs them millions of dollars to house them. they're not doing anything, you know, really of the variety of
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violence. they're engaged in civil acts of disobedience, which is unlawful. but oftentimes, those records get expunged and dismissed, because they'll go before the court, and to the extent that there is no violence and nobody suffered as a result, those cases will go away. but if you engage in other acts of violence, victor, no matter where you are, whether it's california, whether it's new york, whether it's minneapolis, whether it's portland, oregon, whether it's around the country, the government has an interest in holding you accountable, because now you're affecting other people. and of course, we should hasten to add that the vast majority of the people we see are engaged in their constitutional right under the first amendment, and they're doing it peacefully. and there are even reports of others in the crowd who are trying to stop this from happening. but if you're engaged in violent acts, you're held accountable, it goes on your record. if you're engaged in peaceful acts of disorderly conduct, oftentimes you're brought before the court and the case is otherwise disposed off and you leave without a record. >> how about the store owners? many of these stores, they found most of them have surveillance.
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and in some of these college towns, you can identify the people who are breaking in or possibly looting. do they have some civil recourse against these looters? >> oh, you know, certainly, they do. and you know, we're in a day in age where there's technology. and as a result of that, you know what? you're caught on camera engaged in these acts, and you know. you've just shown the clip where we see acts of violence and people throwing things, and certainly with technology, those people could be brought in and held accountable. and whenever someone is arrested, they, oftentimes, the owners of the business and the government assists them in getting what's called restitution. and that means that the people who are responsible have to pay back. and of course, obviously, they have insurance. there will be insurance claims that are made. but sometimes these protesters don't have the ability to pay, so restitution, which is the paying back of the money, is not really that possible. engage in protests, do so peacefully. we have a wide history of the first amendment. that should be respected, but it should be respected in a way that's in conference wiaccordan law.
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>> and that's what we're hearing from gwen carr, the mother of eric garner, asking people to continue to protest, but do so peacefully. glad to have your insight. >> pleasure, victor. have a good day. >> you, too. so, what happens when a typhoon dumps rain on a volcano? it could create a long-term catastrophe, and it's exactly what authorities in the philippines are worried could actually happen today, as typhoon hagupit tears across their country. we're going live to tacloban, next. but first, in december's "ones to watch" series, we are exploring the world of street art. legendary artist shepard fairey, the man behind the obama hope poster, and steve laserites explain how the sub culture has turned a corner and which artists are leading the way. ♪ >> one image is enough to make a statement. street art, it's the universal language of images which speaks out from the most unexpected corners of our cities.
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the lines capture our history. the colors captivate. they decorate. they provoke. >> i see street art as a metaphor for courageous expression in any venue. >> this sub culture is turning into a multimillion dollar business. last year, street art worth an estimated $80 million was traded globally. it was once associated with vandalism, but it now holds a prime position in the contemporary art market. >> when people are buying it, it's almost like they're buying a slice of philosophy, they're buying a slice of rebellion. it's like, if they're buying it, they're taking part in the act and feel part of it. >> we're consulting two experts, a view from the street and a view from the gallery, to discover which three artists they would consider the ones to watch. >> i like a lot of art that
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functions as a piece that's just pleasing to the eye, but then there are also layers to peel back, and i think this work achieves that. >> hasani is definitely one to watch. she has kind of that one iconic image that people can link back. it's part of the old political tradition of graffiti. >> he's charted a new course and he's the best at it so far. >> and you can watch the entire "ones to watch" show on street art over at cnn.com/onestowatch. we'll be right back. i've been called a control freak...
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welcome back. nearly 40 million people are in danger, as typhoon hagupit makes its way to the northern philippines. >> this cyclone is moving so slowly, and it's already slammed seibu and tacloban with winds of over 100 miles per hour. homes have been damaged, businesses, too, and it is not done yet. >> joining us, our andrew stevens. he is live in tacloban. andrew, first of all, tell us what it is like over there. what are folks dealing with? >> reporter: well, conditions certainly over the last couple of hours, randi, have improved an awful lot. light rain now and virtually no wind at all. so, the worst is definitely
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over. and there is an enormous sense of relief here in tacloban, because you'll remember, tacloban was the ground zero for typhoon mian just a little bit more than a year ago now. 6,300 people died in this city, most of them from a storm surge, an 8-meter wall of water, a 16-foot wall of water coming through the low-lying areas. this time, authorities acted very, very quickly. and i have to say, very efficiently to get people out of the most vulnerable areas. and on top of that, we had just a brush with this new typhoon, hagupit. it landed quite a long way north of here. we did get strong winds, we did get a lot of rain, and rain is going to be the bigger issue for this entire country, given the amount of water it is dumping across this country because it's so slow moving. but right here in tacloban, it is relief. i would say, though, i'm standing at a church which has
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doubled as an evacuation center. they're still doing sunday mass here, but there are literally hundreds of evacuees who are still here 12 hours after the storm reached its peak and passed. they're still here. they're not prepared to go home yet. some of them say they can't go home because they've got flood damage, they've lost the roofs of their houses, and a lot of these houses are very, very, sort of scantly built places, you know, tin and wooden structures, which wouldn't stand up to much structure at all. they're not going back until that's been fixed. but a lot of them are also saying we're not going back until we're absolutely sure that the typhoon has passed. such is the mental scars they bear from what happened here about 13 months ago. >> and andrew, you mentioned the rain. what about the mudslides? is there a great concern about that? and if so, how are they going to protect the people in the path of those mudslides? >> reporter: well, the philippines is prone to mudslides, it's prone to heavy rain. this is an area which does get a
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lot of intense weather systems, and mudslides, flash flooding are a major issue. you put that on top of a storm system which is dumping 400, 500, 600 millimeters of rain in areas which are already vulnerab vulnerable, and it is major problem. not so much where i am, but if you go further north, it's helia. there are a lot of villages in the hills. you know, there have been reports in the past of entire villages being buried under feet and feet of mud. so, that is going to be the real issue. the other issue, of course, is this typhoon is actually making its way towards the capital manila. manila is a city, greater manila is a city of 12 million people. it's low-lying. if you get a big, big rain dump there, you are going to have major flooding and also major issues at the capital. so, this storm is still not spent. there is still a lot of potential for a lot of damage. >> yeah, certainly a lot of concern still there. andrew stevens in the philippines for us. thank you, andrew.
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>> and there was a dramatic evacuation in the gulf of mexico. >> yes, a woman was medevaced from a cruise ship and taken to the hospital. we'll have all the details for you coming up next. turn the trips you have to take, into one you'll never forget. earn triple points when you book with the expedia app. expedia plus rewards. i have a cold with terrible chest congestion. better take something. theraflu severe cold doesn't treat chest congestion. really? new alka-seltzer plus day powder rushes relief to your worst cold symptoms plus chest congestion. oh, what a relief it is. here we go!
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wow! [ narrator ] on a mission to get richard to his campbell's chunky soup. it's new chunky beer-n-cheese with beef and bacon soup. i love it. and mama loves you. ♪ and mam(vo)rescued.ed. protected. given new hope. during the subaru "share the love" event, subaru owners feel it, too. because when you take home a new subaru, we donate 250 dollars to helping those in need. we'll have given 50 million dollars over seven years. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru.
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here are some other stories that we're following this morning. >> the remains of one of the 43 students who went missing in mexico have been identified. that's according to lawyers for relatives of the victims. they spoke to cnn en espanol. and the students have been missing since september 26th. authorities believe police turned the students over to a
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gang cartel that killed them. the "washington post" says its iran bureau chief has been charged by the iranian government with unspecified crimes. jason rezaian has been detained in iran since july. he has both u.s. and iranian citizenship. according to the newspaper, rezaian's lawyer has not been allowed to visit him. secretary of state john kerry urging iran now to free him. a 48-year-old woman is recovering in new orleans in a hospital there after she was medevaced from a carnival cruise ship by the coast guard on saturday. now, the woman was reportedly unconscious and suffering from kidney-related problems. the ship was about 23 miles off the coast of louisiana when the woman fell ill. we're continuing to push forward on this breaking news overnight. at the top of the hour, the violent protests in california as demonstrators clashed with cops over a grand jury's decision not to indict a new york officer in the death of eric garner. >> store owners expressing their outrage over the violence.
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>> i don't know why they have white people coming in and shoving black people. if you're protesting white on black crime, you shouldn't be in this protest if you have white skin. [ narrator ] mama sherman and the legion of super fans. wow! [ narrator ] on a mission to get richard to his campbell's chunky soup. it's new chunky beer-n-cheese with beef and bacon soup. i love it. and mama loves you. ♪
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it is the season of giving, and tonight, cnn has its own holiday tradition. "cnn heroes: an all-star
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tribute." >> it is a great place to get inspired. cnn's michaela pereira has what's in store. >> at first glance it might look like any other award show, but "cnn heroes: an all-star tribute" hosted by anderson cooper is an event like no other. here, it's everyday people doing extraordinary work to do others who take center stage and the stars turn out to honor them. >> it's great night for so many people being honored for just doing good because it just pushes humanity forward. >> it's basically recognizing people for what we should be doing every day, which is thinking beyond ourselves. >> i'm here with my daughter because that's what i want to teach her, that the individual really can make a difference. >> reach. reach. >> reporter: individuals like a man who helped people with disabilities get stronger inside and out. >> it is my honor to hug the weightlifter with the biggest heart ever, ned norton. >> reporter: a woman who works with a messi to save lions from
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extinction. and a rabbi with a black belt who helps kids fight cancer. >> given the opportunity, these children can inspire the world. >> you're killing me, cnn. you've got me sobbing all up in my chardonnay. >> reporter: it's a night full of emotion. >> those are my babies. >> reporter: laughter. >> my friend, kathy griffith. >> thank you, jake tapper. hi, everybody. >> reporter: an uplifting message -- >> even in the darkest of places, decency and love can persevere. >> reporter: and performances that inspire. ♪ standing higher ♪ prize fighter >> reporter: and it ends with a life-changing moment. >> the 2014 cnn hero of the year -- >> and that was, of course, just a taste of what's to come. watch the entire show, "cnn heroes: an all-star tribute" tonight, 8:00 eastern right here
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on cnn. tune in, and we are sure you will be inspired. thanks for starting your morning with us. >> we've got much more ahead on the next hour of your "new day." it starts right now. new details this morning of the dangerous and risky mission to rescue american hostage luke somers. special commando officers under cover of darkness and under an urgent deadline to free somers. breaking overnight, protests turned violent in berkeley, california. police resort to flash bang grenades and tear gas. and president obama whisked to the hospital by motorcades because of a persistent sore throat. >> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. >> i'm victor blackwell.
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7:00 a.m. on the east coast. we begin with the protests in berkeley, california, now. bricks, pipes and flaming objects, just some of the weapons used by protesters against california police last night. >> this was the dramatic scene in berkeley after 1,000 people filled the streets to protest the controversial choke hold death of eric garner. >> the situation escalated when a small group of masked vandals started breaking car windows and then storming into the local stores. at least two officers were injured, including one who was treated at a local hospital after being hit with a sandbag. >> police say they were forced to use smoke and tear gas after crowds refused to let up. now, at one point, other prot t protesters tried to restore peace. one woman even stood in front of a broken window to prevent other looters from vandalizing a store. >> why are people looting? there's no need.
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we're peacefully protesting. we shouldn't be taking things from stores that aren't bothering us. we shouldn't be starting more crime on top of that. why do you feel you need to guard the window here at trader jo joe's? >> because people are taking things, and that's not right! i'm sorry, but they're not fighting against us. >> this morning the berkeley police department says crowds are thinning. about 50 protesters now still on the streets. >> meanwhile, at least seven other police departments have now stepped up to help. >> earlier today, the berkeley application department told cnn police made several arrests and charged people with assault and vandalism. >> berkeley is known for protests and the first amendment, and we do everything we can to ensure that people can peacefully express their freedom to express themselves. in this case, a response occurred, because you know, the group of the protesters did become violent. they did start throwing rocks and bricks and bottles, also small pipes were thrown at our officers, and including later on in the evening, we also had
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objects that were lit on fire. >> so, let's bring in cnn law enforcement analyst tom fuentes. tom, good morning to you. what a mess there in berkeley overnight. do you think what happened there is an isolated incident, or is this, would you say, a turning point in the protests? >> you know, we hope it's an isolated incident, but you know, in these events, it only takes a couple of people to come out and spark violence and cause the mayhem that we see. and unfortunately, you know, we're getting into a situation where we're asking store owners to protect their own property, or we're asking community leaders or protest leaders to try to keep the hoodlums from causing violence and looting. and we need the police to be the police, whether it's popular or not, that's their job, to protect the property, protect the lives, protect the protesters themselves from these kids and anarchists and the people that come out to do the damage that we've seen. those people breaking the
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windows and looting, we need to get something straight, they could care less about michael brown or eric garner or any other person that's had an altercation with a police officer. they don't care about that. what they care is that there's going to be a big crowd, there's going to be a large number of police officers and it gives them a great opportunity to do the kind of things they like to do. >> right. and when you look at some of the video, i mean, the protesters, at least some of them, are really getting in the face of these officers. how do these police officers control their response, when the protesters are throwing objects at them? i mean, what are they supposed to do? >> well, for the most part, they're supposed to be disciplined and restrain themselves and try to really get to where they just have no alternative, they have to take the action to protect themselves and protect others and defuse a violent situation. it is a judgment call and it takes the expertise of the commanders that are out there to make the call of how many police, what's their deployment, when are they going to go into
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action, when are they going to deploy tear gas and other measures and actually disperse the crowd, and that's a difficult situation. and we are asking a lot of people, a lot of commanders across this country, to make that call night after night. >> and how do they decide that? i mean, how do they know when to make that call exactly? how do they know when to, you know, release the tear gas? and do you think that maybe in berkeley, they might have waited too long, or was it about the right time, would you say? >> well, i don't want to second guess how long. but you know, what they're looking at is when they see from observation and the reports of their officers on the front line, when they see that there are some individuals that are starting to sway the crowd into more violent action. as i mentioned, you know, cheerleading to take on the police, to throw things at the police. you know, that's when they start to realize that they cannot have their police like they're in a shooting gallery. and you know, i've heard some of the protest leaders over the
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other protest days say, what's the big deal if they throw a bottle of water at a police officer? what, you know, that can't kill you. well, yeah, you can. it is a big deal. i'd like that person to allow a bottle of water to bounce off their head and see what that's like. so, you know, this is not a game out here. and you know, the peaceful protest is great, and the police are allowing it, and in many ways, have to support it. but not the violence. >> yeah, seems certainly they accomplished a lot more with the peaceful protests than what we saw overnight in berkeley. >> well, it does hurt the whole argument. that's true, randi. >> tom, thank you so much. appreciate it. nice to see you. >> thinice to see you. six minutes after the hour now and we're learning stunning details about the risky and dangerous and unsuccessful mission to try to rescue american photojournalist luke somers and south african teacher pierre korkie in yemen. >> a team of navy s.e.a.l.s armed and wearing night vision goggles had to get to both men
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under cover of darkness. administration officials believed that al qaeda militants would carry out their threat and kill somers on saturday if rescuers didn't get to him in time, but a walled compound, armed militants and even a barking dog stood between the rescuers and somers. >> all this was happening as a south african relief group gift of the givers says it was negotiating for fellow hostage pierre korkie to be freed today. a senior state department official tells cnn the obama administration did not know that. cnn's sunlin serbati has more details about the failed raid. >> reporter: the mission extremely risky and made urgent when u.s. intelligence shows american luke somers would be murdered by saturday morning. by midmorning friday, the president authorizes the rescue, giving no hint of the drama about to play out. just a few hours later, according to u.s. officials, two b-22 ospreys under cover of darkness touched down in a remote area of yemen, some six
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miles from the compound where the hostages are held. about 40 special force commandos, mostly navy s.e.a.l.s, move undetected over the rough terrain. but suddenly, everything goes wrong, when just 300 feet away, they are exposed, maybe by a barking dog. a firefight breaks out. and as a u.s. drone watches overhead, one terrorist runs back inside and shoots both hostages. u.s. forces kill five aqap terrorists. the rest flee. and in one of the most dangerous parts of the mission, a combat medical team needs to spend a tense half hour on the ground, trying to stabilize the two gravely wounded men. finally, they are flown back to the "uss makin island" off yemen's coast, but one dies on the way and another dies on the ship. >> you have to really look at this from a surgical point, just like a heart surgeon or a brain surgeon. some will live, some will die. >> reporter: as word of the failed rescue mission leaks out,
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the president called luke somers' killing a barbaric murder. vice president biden promises the u.s. will be relentless in seeking justice. >> the women and men who, the special forces who are engaged in these two rescue missions did an incredible job and inflicted serious damage on the captors. but this time, this time they were unable to the save luke. >> all right, our thanks to you for that report. coming up, we are going to take a closer look at that failed rescue and what could have gone wrong. plus, we're hearing a top al qaeda figure has been killed in a suspected drone strike. more on that story as well. and president obama whisked to the hospital by motorcade because of a persistent sore throat. we are going to talk live with cnn's chief medical correspondent, dr. sanjay gupta. i was just looking at your credit report site.
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our developing news out of pakistan this morning, 13 minutes after the hour. according to pakistani intelligence officials, a suspected drone strike has killed umar farooq. it's believed he headed up al qaeda's operations in pakistan and afghanistan. and four other suspected militants were also killed. and this follows reports that pakistan killed another senior al qaeda commander yesterday morning. that target had once been indicted for his alleged role in a planned attack on the new york city subways. so, two key al qaeda commanders dead this morning. and stunning, new details we're getting about this failed mission to rescue hostage luke
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somers. let's dig deeper into this with another element of news this morning. we have retired major general james spi"spider" marks joining from washington. your response to and reaction to the reported death of umar farooq. >> well, what it tells you is that the united states and its partners are going to be persistent in going after known terrorists, and we're going to use every element of national power, primarily our intelligence capacities, and our alliances and our intelligence-sharing to go after these guys in a very aggressive way. this is really, victor, i mean, in a very broad sense, this is the new normal, if you will, in terms of our perception of c conflict moving forward. we're in a persistent state of conflict. we're going to have to address that. we have to square with the american public that as a matter of routine, we're going to see operations like this. >> are we seeing a refocus on al qaeda, or has that focus been there constantly, although the fight against isis has certainly been at the top of mind? >> yeah, we're doing multiple things at once.
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that's a very good question. al qaeda remains at the forefront. and what you see with isis is really the metastasizing of different storms of terrorism into different groups, often regionally identified. but clearly, it's global motivation and manifestation, and you know, the hijacking of islam. that's, frankly, what we're looking at. so, the united states has multiple targets within this broader effort against terrorism. >> let's talk about the failed mission in yemen also, to rescue luke somers. >> victor, can i jump in here quickly? >> go ahead. >> i'd be careful about calling it the failed mission. this is a mission that was based on some very precise intelligence. at the end of the day, you're absolutely correct, so i'm not trying to be impolite here. but i think we need to be very careful about calling it a failed mission. we did not rescue the one hostage we knew about. there was another hostage that was in the compound with somers. based on great intelligence, incredible work up front, an
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immensely risky operation with this immense enterprise of support from drones and fighters, a joint operation of s.e.a.l.s. all the services were involved, the navy, the air force, the army, et cetera. everybody gets involved in this thing. i don't know, i feel sensitive about calling it a failed mission. >> and i hear that. and as valiant as the effort was, and again, they had to trek six miles from where they landed to try to get to this spot to rescue them, success would have been safely bringing luke somers home. >> you are correct. >> although the word failed seems a little harsh, they did not accomplish what the mission set out to do. >> you got it. >> so, let's talk about a detail. and for the sake of this conversation, we won't use that word and let people at home decide if it was a failed mission or not. but considering that there was this attempt just a couple of weeks ago and this negotiation with the south africans to bring home pierre korkie, would those militants have been at unusually high alert? and should the u.s. have known that?
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>> yes and yes. the u.s. tried to conduct an operation, and in fact, conducted an operation a couple of weeks before to go after somers. korkie, again, was an unknown in this entire equation until the operation was conducted on saturday morning in yemen. clearly, the terrorists were at a heightened state of alert, you're absolutely correct. based on that, obviously, there was additional intelligence that said irrespective of their heightened state of alert, somers is at increased risk. there is the possibility that he's going to be murdered. the united states has to act based on the intelligence they had. so, there is a constant intelligence collection effort that takes place. so, you have a persistent stare, what we call an unblinking eye, hopefully, on the target and all of the environment around it. you have the forces that are in the region. so, there's cover for action, if you will, for those forces to be there so that another operation could take place. so, the short answer is, sure, they're probably at a heightened
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state of alert, but the united states and its partners in yemen that are trying to solve this problem are equally prepared to go walk into this circumstance. >> all right, general james "spider" marks, thanks very much for your insight this morning. and your point is well taken on the characterization of this mission. >> victor, thanks very, very much. >> thank you, sir. president obama was hit with a diagnosis of acid reflux yesterday. could his former vice, smoking, have played a role here? we'll ask our chief medical correspondent, dr. sanjay gupta, in a live report coming up next. i've been called a control freak...
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expedia plus rewards. welcome back. president obama is back at the white house this morning after making an unscheduled trip saturday to walter reed medical center in maryland. >> the white house says the president had been complaining of a sore throat for the last couple of weeks, and with his schedule clear yesterday, he fit in a trip to the doctor. >> so, to discuss this, let's bring in cnn medical correspondent sanjay gupta, who joins us now by phone. sanjay, good morning to you. >> good morning. >> first of all, we're talking about acid reflux. what is it and why is it making the president so uncomfortable? >> well, you know, it sounds like he had a sore throat for a couple of weeks. this is what we're hearing from the white house and finally sde decided to get it checked out. and what they did was put a little fiber-optic camera down the back of his throat and found some changes in the back of his throat that were consistent with acid reflux.
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and what it is, basically, you have acid in your stomach. there's a couple of, sort of what are called sphincters in the esophagus that typically prevent that acid from bubbling up from the stomach into your esophagus. the esophagus is your food pipe. if it's not working properly, for whatever reason, the acid comes up. sometimes people will have heartburn, but also, that acid can get into the back of the throat and cause this acid reflux and sore throat sort of problem. what they saw on that exam, where they put that little camera down his throat, you know, warranted enough concern for him to go and get a cat scan at the hospital, and that was the visit to walter reed yesterday. >> right. >> we're told that cat scan was normal, but that was sort of done out of an abundance of caution. >> and from what we understand, the president, he was at the hospital for about 28 minutes or so. so, a pretty quick visit. he did both of those exams, as you mentioned, the fiber-optic and the ct scan. is that pretty standard, to have both of those?
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>> well, you know, first of all, 28 minutes is really fast, right? i guess maybe things move quickly if you're a president of the united states. but i wouldn't say that it's typical. to do the camera exam is not that -- is pretty common. what would normally happen is you think it's acid reflux, someone would be given medications or given treatments for that acid reflux. and if it didn't go away after a few weeks, maybe then they would get a cat scan. but to get it done, as you point out, in the same day, is a little bit unusual. but you know, this is the president of the united states, so things are probably done in a more expeditious way. josh ernest mentioned that he happened to have an opening in his calendar and some free time, so he went ahead and had it done yesterday, as opposed to waiting until another time. that's our guess, but of course, we're going based on what the white house is telling us. >> right. all right. sanjay gupta, thank you so much. >> you got it. thank you. >> and of course, you can catch
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"sanjay gupta md" at the bottom of this hour. this morning he is featuring an incredible brain surgery, where the patient is actually awake. but the real story is why she's having this surgery. that's this morning, 7:30 eastern, just a few minutes away, and we'll be right back. (vo) nourished. rescued. protected. given new hope. during the subaru "share the love" event, subaru owners feel it, too. because when you take home a new subaru, we donate 250 dollars to helping those in need. we'll have given 50 million dollars over seven years. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru.
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feet...tiptoeing. better things than the pain, stiffness, and joint damage of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. before you and your rheumatologist decide on a biologic, ask if xeljanz is right for you. xeljanz (tofacitinib) is a small pill, not an injection or infusion, for adults with moderate to severe ra for whom methotrexate did not work well. xeljanz can relieve ra symptoms, and help stop further joint damage. xeljanz can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers have happened in patients taking xeljanz. don't start xeljanz if you have any infection, unless ok with your doctor. tears in the stomach or intestines, low blood cell counts and higher liver tests and cholesterol levels have happened. your doctor should perform blood tests before you start and while taking xeljanz and routinely check certain liver tests. tell your doctor if you have been to a region where fungal infections are common, and if you have had tb, hepatitis b or c,
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or are prone to infections. tell your doctor about all the medicines you take. one pill, twice daily, xeljanz can reduce ra pain and help stop further joint damage, even without methotrexate. ask about xeljanz.
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all right, let's get you caught up with "the morning
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read." >> let's do it. two police officers are recovering from injuries after protests in berkeley, california, over the choke hold death of eric garner turned violent. police responded with tear gas after looters hit local businesses and threw rocks and bricks at officers. elsewhere, from oklahoma to atlanta, protests have largely been peaceful. pakistani officials report a high-ranking terrorist was killed in a suspected u.s. drone strike. umar farooq is believed to have been the head of al qaeda's operations in pakistan and afghanistan. he died along with four other suspected militants. republicans added a ninth pickup this round to their senate sweep last night. democratic senator mary landrieu lost her bid for re-election in louisiana to republican congressman bill cassidy. landrieu could not cut off the gop attacks targeting her for a vote on obamacare, and republicans will now control 54 senate seats next session. there is a cold front approaching the southeast u.s. it's due to bring temperatures
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down by about ten degrees. and on the west coast, a rain system stretching from northern california to washington will soak the region through wednesday. >> all right, we'll see you back here at the top of the hour. "sanjay gupta md" starts right now. >> on the program today, you're going to see an incredible brain operation while the patient is awake, but why she's having this operation is even more incredible. plus, mike rowe is going to stop by later in the show. first, there is a new threat to teenagers, a new type of drug you may have never heard of but are being marketed to your kids as harmless. and the truth is, as you might guess, is that they are anything but harmless. senior investigative correspondent drew griffin is here with a really important story to tell. >> and it's a story, sanjay, that the parents of two dead teenagers really want to be told, because they themselves had no idea what happened to their children. these new drugs are called synthetics, chemically produced, designer drugs, designed to

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