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tv   New Day  CNN  January 28, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PST

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good morning, welcome to your "new day," it is wednesday, january 28th 6:00 in the east you have me chris cuomo, live in boston. michaela pereira in connecticut and alisyn camerota guiding us from new york. now, here it is freezing. barely 16 degrees, that's cementing as much as three feet of snow. the most ever in some counties the biggest january storm ever to be sure in boston. this city saw two feet of snow. today the threat of a blizzard is gone almost everywhere. but the hardest part digging out from what is now a white wall of this stuff, thanks to the frigid temperatures is just beginning. take a look the situation is bad or worse in other states. 33 1/2 inches in some of connecticut and new hampshire. as well. and where you are in new york alisyn that's where i live as much as two and a half feet added in areas out on the
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island. that's where i live. those places still bruised by super storm sandy. >> chris, i'm happy to see you're safe. i know had you a heck of a time getting to boston so. i hope you'll share your odyssey, the pictures of the journey you took. many in new york and new jersey are calling the blizzard a bust. how did the forecasters get it so wrong here? we'll examine the two different forecasting systems, the european and the u.s. and figure out which one was right. we'll have that for everyone. chris. >> alisyn we've got new york and new jersey covered between the two of us. still, we saw, heard and felt things in the northeast that will stay with us for a lifetime. here is a taste of everything from the most severe to the sublime.
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>> the sound of a blizzard. hurricane-force winds, 78 miles per hour in nantucket. the site of storm surge breaching a seawall. along the southern coast of massachusetts. roads like sled paths. drivers crawling through a white-out near boston. this is new england, buried by the year's first and historic blizzard. snow not by the inch but by the foot from connecticut to maine, towns like worcester and framingham surpassing 30 inches. cars turned into igloos in a sea of white. the snow different, depending on where you are. inland small, dry crystals from the bitter cold. along the coast, flakes were wet and clumpy like white mud on
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the ground. high tide coupled with near-hurricane strength winds flooding homes. >> the water coming up right over the sea wall. >> cnn's alexandra fields in scituate when the surging waters came to shore. mission accomplished as soldiers share a warm embrace with the community members they pluck from danger. >> i've been through a lot and that was more than i thought would have happened. >> for more national guardsman, a bittersweet return home. sergeant jennifer bruno's community was safe but her home destroyed. >> my friends and i grabbed a few things some uniforms that were right there and a sword i got when i was in iraq. >> by all accounts most residents did what they were supposed to heeding the calls of state officials. >> get ready to hunker down. >> get home and hunker down. >> the warnings possibly saving lives.
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but from the severe to the sublime, surfers riding dangerous high tides along the coast in upstate new york. this mother forced to break the travel ban during the height of the storm in connecticut, making it to the hospital just in time to deliver a beautiful baby girl. >> the roads weren't that bad because nobody was on them. i was happy once we got here. i was a little relieved. >> good news on a day that saw little. another situation, along the coast of massachusetts here the wind whipped waves close to 20 feet high. causing severe flooding forcing many people to evacuate. let's go there right now. we've got nick valencia in hard-hit scituate with the latest. what are they waking up to this morning? >> here in this coastal community in massachusetts, one of the hardest-hit, the seawall was breached leaving the road i'm standing on right now, completely under water. we're at the peak of high tide
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here. right after 6:00 in scituate that's the concern that the same could happen today as it did yesterday, i'll show you the damage that it left behind. this is part of the sea wall that's supposed to protect the water from coming over here and breaching this community. perhaps one of the most impressive images here if you can believe it just off to my side here. this house, completely frozen that's a thick sheet of ice all over that house. and that's just a snapshot of what many of the homes here in this community look like this morning. the bad news? this area under an advisory or flood advisory until 7:00 a.m. and that wind also is very brutal right now. it's about 15 degrees, but it feels more like 1. chris? >> it does especially for you off the coast with the ocean air? that's a saltwater spackling that that house got. the best to the family involved there the blizzard is just paralyzing parts of the entire
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northeast. connecticut saw close to three feet of snow in places. upwards of two feet in many communities. so many people still frozen shut this morning in areas like new london. that's where we find michaela pereira this morning. mick how are you? >> i'm doing good. we're doing really great here in new london chris, good morning, good morning to everybody at home. it's been interesting, you've been talking and alisyn has been talking about this idea of the storm having kind of two faces. there in new york the travel ban lifted yesterday, not the estimates of snow reaching manhattan and new york city. whereas here new london got smacked. i have to tell you, a lot of snow came down here. this was the brunt of the blizzard and it did meet the criteria of a blizzard. here in new london they believe they got 20 inches of snow. for the state, the highest level, chris, as you mentioned, northeast in connecticut, the town or the community of thompson 33 1/2 inches. that's an incredible amount of
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snow. so again, other parts of western connecticut only getting five to ten inches it's a very one local official said it's the tale of two storms if you will. authorities have lifted the travel ban, you see a lot of vehicles going by behind us. that's great news to a lot of people. however authorities are still saying keep the roads clear for us we need to get to the business of removing snow. it's going to be quite a task when you think about all of the accumulation that piled up on the roads. the plows have been a constant presence here, we've been watching them go by constantly here in new london. and nearby waterford. they took a bit of a rest last night so drivers could get a little shut-eye but they're going to be right back to it some of the good news to report here no power outages. state statewide, there have been very few power outages, very few downed trees. they had anticipated that. but that did not happen. and that's a really good piece of news. so they're expecting everything
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to get back to normal here. even though the temperatures are chilly. it is cold. it's about 12 degrees where i am chris, they think with wind chill, it's about minus 2. so after all of that blizzard just cold temperatures setting in the business of snow removal is key. we're going to talk to the mayor of new london coming up this hour we'll get the latest information from him. chris? >> all right. see what they need there, mick they're not going to see normal for quite some time. that's for sure. back here in massachusetts, worcester, a place you could be calling worster, they made the wrong kind of history. they broke a snow total that stood for 20 years. 34 1/2 inches of white along with heavy winds that affected everything. joining us on the phone is the city's mayor, joseph petty. mayor petty, how are you this morning? how are the people in your community? >> pretty good chris, thank you for the call. we're still digging out. we dug out all day yesterday. pretty much clear.
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and we're back in operation. the employees will be back to work today. in fact we're going to be picking up the garbage and recyclables today. the crews worked all day yesterday, took a break during the evening and are back full force this morning around 5:00 a.m. we've got some clean-up to do. >> impressive. let me ask you, mr. mayor, what did you see in terms of power loss? did everybody make it through okay? what are you dealing with on the human level? >> on the power loss we didn't have any major power loss i think nine homes had a power loss from a fallen tree. we did have a fire where seven people were displaced. including a pregnant woman. and we had a water main break, which we fixed pretty quickly so that was the issues that really we tried to solve yesterday. the crew did a great job this morning, widening the streets and doing passes through the
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city. we're asking people to use some common sense getting to work today and private industry tell their workers, be a little flexible come in late. our workers, city workers are on a two-hour delay. we're operational in worcester, the largest storm we've had in years. 34 inches. and we got another storm coming in on friday i guess. >> yeah. 34 1/2. don't forget the half mr. mayor. that's what puts you into the books. >> well we've had a lot of practice in the past. a couple of years ago. the u.s. named us the snow capital in the united states. we've got a lot of practice unfortunately. >> you sound really beat. i can imagine the workload you have in front of you, how long until you see the normal-normal there? >> i would say street widening a lot of clean-up probably a few days before we're bark to normal.
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>> mr. mayor, please -- finish what you were going to say? >> we've had a lot of practice good crews, people are committed to keeping the streets safe and clean and the city manager did a great job. >> the kind of practice you never want to put into action but you feeded to yesterday. and by all accounts you guys are doing great. please we'll stay in touch. let us know what you need there on the ground and we'll get the word out for you. mr. mayor, mayor petty the best to you and the people in your community. >> thank you. >> alisyn you got to remember the challenge is that this snow has become so solid because of the cold that that's going to be a problem all across the board if communities to all types of transportation. >> chris, i remember living in boston. sometimes that those blocks of snow ice, that you're talking about, don't melt until may. so they are in if this record-breaking snowfall is
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going to stick around for a long time. so we'll check back in with you in a second. >> i'm rubbing my nose how long will it take for the ice in my nose to go away? >> i don't know but it's looking a delightful shade of red. the blizzard grounded thousands of planes and it messed up travel for hundreds of planes and messed up travel for thousands of people. jason carroll is live at new york's laguardia airport. are the airlines getting back to normal jason? >> well alisyn it's getting there, but it's still going to take a little bit of time. if you look at the board behind me this is not what you want to see. canceled canceled a number of flights here at american. still seeing some cancellations, not like what we saw at the peak. 5,000 cancellations at the peak. but now what we're seeing is cancellations here and there. here at laguardia it's a tie with boston logan. at 157 cancellations here.
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157 cancellations at boston logan as well so more numbers for you. at jfk, 102 cancellations. philadelphia international, 81. and then at newark we're seeing 70. we're expecting those numbers to change as things go along. you know basically the crews have been working overnight, working overtime doing what they can to clear the runways so the planes can get back out there and operations can get back to normal. despite all the efforts, we did see a number of people who were stranded at the airport, they were stuck, pulling up a bit of concrete sleeping on the floor, sleeping on the tile. but in terms of the way things look i want to you look out here live at the security line here at laguardia things looking not too bad and we're told things are going to get better and better. it's going to take a little time for operations to get back to where we want them to be. alisyn? >> man that floor does not look comfortable, though. jason. we hope people can get out soon.
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thanks so much for that. we have breaking news to tell you about now, the israeli defense force says an anti-tank missile struck one of their vehicle nears the golan heights near the lebanese border. >> alisyn as you said they're reporting casualties. we're here at the intersection of the lebanese and syrian board wer israel. the mount dor behind me where the incident took place, anti-tank fire against israeli soldiers and their vehicles. the israelis have blocked off the area. other incidentsings a house in a nearby city was also hit. and also the idf has been trading fire across the lebanese and syrian border. yesterday this followed some rocket fire from syria. overnight, israeli idf targeted
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syrian positions, sending a message to syria and hezbollah, that it will not tolerate another front on the golan heights. so clearly this situation is escalating. this of course is in retaliation for something that israel is not talking about, is that attack over a week ago, against high-level iranian and hezbollah targets across the border. israelis say that they were planning an attack against israel and they will not stand for that alisyn. so the situation heating up. hopefully it will calm down soon. >> elise, i'm not certain it will. we have a news bulletin i'm reading from prime minister benjamin netenyahu who says that israel is prepared to act with force. and any response will be harsh. have you heard anything else from the prime minister? >> well he has said in the last few days that fire will be met with even more fire. and i think last night that attack those air strikes into syria was a message to syrian
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and hezbollah, not to use the syrian positions to attack israel. they're clear that they're not going to open another front. the question is what -- is this just retaliation kind of tit for tat, in response to the attack by israel against the iranian and hezbollah operatives? is it just a tit for tat and that it will calm down? >> i might mention you can forget that prime minister netenyahu has an election coming up in a few months. and he will be under a lot of pressure to show that he is going to protect the israeli people. so you can't ignore the politics in this. but clearly the idf saying they're ready to protect the people of the north. up in the mountains, residents have been instructed to stay in their homes, everybody tense and on high alert. >> elise labott thanks for the breaking news. back at home former secretary of state hillary clinton has agreed to testify before the house select
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committee investigating the 2012 terror attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. the panel's top democrat congressman elijah cummings told cnn that clinton did not hesitate when she was approached in september. but a date and time are still being worked out. clinton spokesman declined to say why or when she will testify. the first lady catching flack for straying from saudi arabia's traditional dress code. she did not wear a head scarf when she visited the country to meet the new leader. but it turns out foreigners are not required to cover their heads. and the first lady's meeting with the new king. the two shook hands, and in islamic law that forbids men from touching women they are not related to. however an exception is made for diplomatic meetings. a chilling new isis video to tell but. it warns two hostages have less than 24 hours to live unless a
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convicted terrorist on death row is freed. and president obama standing firm refusing to meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netenyahu when he visits in march. he explains in an exclusive interview with cnn's fareed zakaria. yeah, i can fix that. (dad) i wanted a car that could handle anything. i fixed it! (dad) that's why i got a subaru legacy. (vo) symmetrical all-wheel drive plus 36 mpg. i gotta break more toys. (vo) introducing the all-new subaru legacy. it's not just a sedan. it's a subaru.
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we do have breaking news for you right now. because we're learning that a deal may in the works to free two hostages being held by isis. let's bring in cnn's will ripley. live in tokyo. will what do we know? >> alisyn just moments ago, jordan state tv put out a notice quoting a government official saying that jordan is ready to hand over terrorist sanja al kashawi in exchange for a hostage. it does not mention kenji goto. threatening he and the pilot would be executed in less than three hours from now, if jordan did not hand over the terrorist who was found guilty and sentenced to death for an attack
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in 2005 that left almost 60 people dead. what this means is that jordan is willing to conduct this exchange. but only if their pilot makes it out alive. which leaves the fate of kenji goto very much uncertain. because again, he was not mentioned in this offer that was made by the jordanian government. we've been tracking these reports for hours, this is the first official government confirmation that jord sn willing to hand over this terrorist. the big question now, what will happen to kenji goto? what will happen to this pilot? is isis willing to release them both? willing to release one or perhaps none. this could fall apart or these men could come home safely. >> will this is complicated. i mean negotiating with terrorists what makes jordanian officials think that isis would abide by the deal? >> they don't know if isis will abide by the deal. this has been so unpredictable and volatile.
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isis has been making all the rules here. setting deadlines, setting ultimatums and not following through. so it's really anyone's guess right now what's going to happen. we know there have been discussions around the clock. japan has a special envoy in jordan. the japanese government in tokyo, their sole priority is getting kenji goto back safely. but for the jordan government they want their pilot back safely. isis never said they would be willing to hand over the pilot alive. only that they would not kill him if jordan handed over this terrorist. it's a very unpredictable situation. we don't know what's going to happen. >> this is obviously a minute-by-minute development. so keep us posted. the libyan branch of isis is claiming responsibility for the terror attack on the luxury hoe tep in tripoli that killed ten people including an american contractor. cnn's senior international correspondent neema al bagger is
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following the developments for us. >> this is one of the few remaining safe refuges in tripoli. it's now become the site of one of the most coordinated attacks the capital has seen in recent times, we're used to the violence flaring up in other parts of the country. but in the heart of tripoli in a hotel where the tripoli prime minister was staying, alongside with an american delegation this is causing a lot of concern. that it sends a message that nowhere in libya, especially not in tripoli, is safe. the libyan officials say they're now in control of the hotel. they'll begin their investigation into this. the fbi is also expected u.s. officials tell us to be involved in the investigation, specifically because the isis affiliate has said this is in retaliation for the extraction by u.s. special forces of a suspected al qaeda operative who died in a u.s. hospital under u.s. custody.
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alisyn? >> nima, thank you so much for that report. meanwhile, back at home new england is battered and trying to dig out. the city of boston is buried under two feet of snow and flooding of course is a big concern. we'll take you into the danger zone next. plus the media day circus at the super bowl. we'll debate over deflategate. will it die down before sunday's big game? we'll live in phoenix. if you have moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis like me and you're talking to your rheumatologist
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welcome back to "new day." we're live in boston suffering some of the worst of the monster blizzard here. more snow overnight, all over new england. take a look. had you two feet plus here in boston making this the snowiest january ever in this city. a record they did not want to need or break in worcester about 40 miles west of here they had the worst. a record with more than 34 inches. remember a blizzard is about more than snow. by definition and by practical impact. you have punishing wind that was yanking power lines loose and whipping the sea into a frenzy. the sea wall failed showing you
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pictures of it sending gushing water into towns in southern massachusetts. waves as high as 20 feet. so how do we get back to normal? time and hard work. that is the answer. school is still out here. we don't know about tomorrow. but probably thursday friday hopefully they get back. airports still canceling hundreds of flights for today, alisyn mostly in and out of new york boston and philadelphia. >> yeah it's going to take a while to get back to normal chris, we'll talk to you about your odyssey of getting there later in the hour. back to you in a minute. meanwhile we do have breaking news to tell you about. the israeli defense forces say an anti-tank missile struck one of their vehicles in the golan heights near the lebanese border. cnn has learned there were casualties but at this point it is not clear how many people are dead. the incident reportedly comes several hours after israel launched an air strike in syria. and the white house expected to field questions about security after this drone that you're about to see crashed on the white house lawn.
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the first briefing since the incident takes place today. the defense department intelligence staffer who was behind the controls was off-duty and was reportedly drinking when the drone went down on monday. and a decision is expected soon on whether the army will pursue desertion charges against sergeant bo bergdahl. he was freed by the taliban last in exchange for five detainees, but sources say bergdahl actually abandoned his post before capture. and who you gonna call? how about these four women? the new all-female cast of the "ghostbusters" reboot is set and has a heavy "snl" flavor. melissa mccarthy, kristen wiig and kate mckinnon and leslie jones, make up the phantom foursome. the new "ghostbusters" could
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start shooting this summer. it's slated for a summer 2016 release. the patriots and seahawks taking part in super bowl media day tuesday. the big topic of discussion as you might guess was deflategate. andy scholes is in phoenix with more. how did it go? >> hey, good morning, alisyn. you know media day, always a crazy day, we're here in downtown phoenix. in the heart of super bowl central. this place will be crawling with nfl fans later today. we're right next to the u.s. airways center. as always crazy atmosphere you had puppets, a guy wearing like 15 go pro cameras, you had clowns even in attendance and the big topic was deflategate. patriots owner robert kraft came out in defense of his team on sunday going as far as to say he expects an apology from the nfl if they find no wrongdoing. and the patriots players say they appreciate their owner having their back. >> it means a lot.
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he's a great owner and it's great to see him on our side. and just shows how much support he has for us players. and obviously when you have doubters you always want to prove your doubters wrong. we want to show everyone what's up. >> we've always done a great job overcoming obstacles and being mentally tough. you know we've got to do it for one more game. >> seahawks running back marshawn lynch not a big fan of media day. he was fined earlier this season for not speaking with reporters and if lynch did not make himself available, he was looking at a $500,000 fine. he kept repeating this. >> i'm here so i won't get fined. >> i'm here so i won't get fined. >> i'm just here so i won't get fined. >> so he said that 29 times. then got up and left after the mandatory four and a half minutes. just classic marshawn lynch
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there. so not too far from here up in scottsdale tiger woods set to play in his first pga event at waste management phoenix open. yesterday after a practice round tiger came out and finally explained the mystery surrounding the photos from italy of him missing one of his front teeth, take a listen. >> i still had my mask on so no one knew who i was. trying to blend in because there's not a lot of brown dudes at ski races, okay? and the dude was one of the video cameras on his shoulder was kneeling right in front of me stood up turned and caught me square in the mouth. >> alisyn tiger said very painful ordeal. he chipped one out completely cracked the other one, he got them both fixed when he got back to florida and as you can see, they look perfectly fine now. >> we were wondering what had happened to his teeth. so that's great. >> toothgate is over. >> we'll see if deflategate follows. andy scholes, thanks so much.
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all right. next we have a cnn exclusive for you. president obama, one-on-one with our fareed zakaria, insisting he will not meet with benjamin netenyahu when the israeli prime minister comes to washington in march. so what's behind this snub? he'll answer it. they take us to worlds full of heroes and titans. for respawn, building the best interactive entertainment begins with the cloud. this is "titanfall," the first multi-player game built and run on microsoft azure. empowering gamers around the world to interact in ways they never thought possible. this cloud turns data into excitement. this is the microsoft cloud.
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president obama says he won't meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netenyahu in march. house speaker john boehner roughered feathers when he did not notify the white house before inviting netenyahu. the president shares his feelings on this dust-up during an exclusive interview with cnn's fareed zakaria. >> last week it was announced that the israeli prime minister benjamin netenyahu is going to come to washington and do a joint session of congress at the invitation of the republican speaker of the house. many people are saying this is rebuttal of your arguments of negotiations with iran or a possible deal with irp. do you think it's appropriate for him to come in this manner at this time to washington?
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>> well i'll let mr. boehner answer that and mr. netenyahu. i speak with prime minister netenyahu all the time. you know we're declining to meet with him. i'm declining to meet with him, simply because our general policy is we don't meet with any world leader two weeks before their election. i think that's appropriate. and that's true with the closest of our allies david cameron who has an election coming up recently came for a visit. we insisted if he wants to come and it's a very important meeting, he needs to be far away enough from the election so it doesn't look in some ways we're meddling or putting our thumbs on the scale. to the broader issue, fareed i don't think there's been any rebuttal of my argument. i haven't heard a persuasive rebuttal of my argument that we crafted very effective sanctions against iran selfly to bring them to the negotiations table to see if we could resolve the
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iranian nuclear issue through diplomatic means. by all accounts including the accounts of israeli intelligence iran has abided by the terms of this interim agreement. they have not advanced their nuclear program. they have actually rolled back their stockpiles of highly enriched uranium and so we have lost nothing during this period of negotiations. iran's program has not advanced. and we have the chance of providing a mechanism where we can verify that iran doesn't have a nuclear weapon and iran has the ability over time to re-enter the community of nations. as a responsible player. now i don't know that we're going to be able to get that done. but my argument is for the united states congress to insist on imposing new sanctions that
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all our partners as well as the iranians can interpret as a violation of the interim agreement. for us to undermine diplomacy at this critical time for no good reason is a mistake. and that what we need to do is to finish up this round of negotiations, put the pressure on iran to say yes to what the international community is calling for and what's been remarkable is the unity we've been able to maintain. even with russia given all the strains we have with them china, which obviously has a great hunger for iranian oil. we've still been able to maintain that unity. which shows how effective our diplomats have been. and if in fact we don't get a deal -- make sure that it's the iranian iranians' fault, because they couldn't say yes to a reasonable deal. so i haven't heard a good counter argument yet. i will veto legislation if it
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comes up that imposes additional sanctions. and by the way, what i've said to members of congress and what i've said to the israelis is the day after iran walks away from a reasonable deal the easiest thing for me to do in congress is pass additional sanctions against iran. it would take about two days for me to be able to assign a bill like that. so we have ability to exert additional pressure. but it's important for us to show that we've exhausted every possible avenue of diplomatic resolution. >> if you listen to what people are saying in congress about the prospective deal and i think everyone knows where it is somewhere in the range of 5,000 to 6,000 centrifuges, it seems almost any deal you're going 0 bring do this republican senate they're not going to go for. doesn't it doom the negotiations? >> i think it's important for us to actually have a deal in place. and then make an argument for what the deal is. i've said before that we will take no deal over a bad deal. but if i can prove that the deal
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we've put in place assures us through indisputable verification mechanisms. that iran cannot achieve break-out capacity if i've got a bunch of scientists and nuclear experts saying this assures us that iran is not on the brink of being a nuclear weapons power. that's a public debate we should have. and i will then ask every member of congress to ask why would we reject that deal and prefer a potential military option that would be less effective in constraining iran's nuclear program and would have extraordinary ramifications at a time when we've already got too many conflicts in the middle east. and i'm pretty confident i can win that argument. >> can you see fareed's full
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interview with the president this sunday at 10:00 a.m. on fareed zakaria gps only on cnn. well parts of the northeast are buried under heavy snow from the monster storm. and flood something still a major concern this morning. so we will talk to the mayor of one town trying to dig out. i am never getting married. never. psssssh. guaranteed. you picked a beautiful ring. thank you. we're never having kids. mmm-mmm. breathe. i love it here. we are never moving to the suburbs. we are never getting one of those. we are never having another kid. i'm pregnant. i am never letting go. for all the nevers in life state farm is there. i have moderate to severe crohn's disease. it's tough, but i've managed. but managing my symptoms was all i was doing. so when i finally told my doctor he said humira is for adults like me who have tried other medications
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i'm michaela pereira live in new london connecticut. here on "new day," we're watching the weather and the storm and the aftermath of the blizzard that's really hammered the northeast.
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new london connecticut, a beautiful town before 30,000 people. i'm joined now by the mayor of new london mayor darrell justin finezio. good morning, sir. >> good morning. >> talk to us about the snow levels we're hearing reports in connecticut that the accumulation of snow in this area was up to 26 inches. >> yes. we haven't gotten a final number here in new london, but we know we're over two feet we had a little bit of snowfall last night. we'll get the last numbers this afternoon. but we're looking at a top five storm for the city of new london. >> talk to us about how the city fared. we had to hunker in place, we got stuck here along with other people hoping to get further in their travels. for the most part very few power outages in the area. very few downed trees. the city fared well. >> the city fared very well. it was a light snow although we got a lot of snow. that was challenging, but it didn't break lines and we have a
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great dpw crew here in new london and they've been doing a lot of proactive tree trimming and line repair as we've been getting these more intense storms and that helped us be prepared from a precautionary standpoint well in advance. >> i want to talk to you about the travel ban. it's been lifted in this area and the state travel ban had been lifted earlier than the state ban you had, or the city ban had you here locally. why did you choose to keep the travel ban in place for your city? >> well in the eastern parts of the state, they got six or eight inch here we got over two feet. so to get our crews through last night, to punch through every street which we hadn't broken through until this morning and there are still a few dead ends that we still need to punch through to get to to make sure people can get out of their houses. so long as we had people on the roads, that was hindering our efforts. so keeping people off the roads until at least midnight last night was the right move. the main arteries are open and for the major employers that are ordering people into work. people are able to get into
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work. we're still advising people if you don't need to drive into the city or you don't need to leave your house -- don't. it's smarter. >> do you think it's business as usual in new london? >> no it's not business as usual. but we're functional. we have full power, our roads are passable. our main arteries are open. we're getting there. but it will be another day or two digging out from this. this isn't going anywhere. >> we were in this spot yesterday. it's a very different vision and you saw it as well. the fact that the main artery is clear, they've been putting salt down. your crews have been working overnight. we're hoping they're getting a little rest. what is the focus today here in new london in terms of city crews? >> the first thing is to break through on the last few spots we haven't fully gotten people access out of their homes and the second priority will be on downtown. you're on the edge of downtown. note banks that we're standing in. >> the drifts are huge. >> they're huge. we have five-foot to eight-foot drifts blocking businesses downtown in an urban setting, there's nowhere for the snow to
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go. it's going to be on the street or the sidewalk. you're preventing drivers from moving around or you're preventing businesses from opening. we're bringing in private contract torres haul the snow out of downtown that will be about a 12-hour operation today. >> we know snow removal can be very expensive. we know governor malloy was looking to get federal assistance. what are you hoping to see in terms of aid coming to your city. >> any federal state or state assistance is very welcome. we are fortunate this is our first major storm of the year. our budget is holding up and our salt supplies are holding up. we go through two or three more big storms and we'll be in trouble. so any federal assistance would be welcome here in new london. >> mayor, a real pleasure and thank you for extending the wonderful new london hospitality to our crew. we enjoyed our 48 hours here. >> you have to come back in summer. it is good news there hasn't been the power outages that were anticipated. you know obviously snow removal
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is going to be key, key, in keeping people off the streets if they don't absolutely have to be is also going to be very important as the city struggles to get back to normal and business as usual as the mayor says they hope to achieve in the next few days. >> michaela way expecting you to be back here in the studio next to me this morning. did you get stuck there? >> no alisyn we did. it was interesting you saw what we were in the thick of right in this exact spot. we were standing on the street. we can't do it now because the street is obviously a major thoroughfare and it's clear and cars are going by. we will to make a decision my producer and i, we were looking at the situation, we knew the travel ban that the mayor had in place. we knew the travel ban that was statewide. we knew that some of the roads and the freeways on the way to new york were getting better. but we couldn't get to our car. we couldn't get there. we hitched a ride with a plow driver to get us to this hotel where we stayed the night. he was kind enough to get us
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here. but it wasn't safe for to us get around in our vehicle. we had to make a call to talk to our producers, because you know i grew up in canada. i'm a winter driver. i didn't feel confident about hitting the roads at all. >> that is some incredible video. are you an intrepid reporter. so two or three hot toddys when you get back. >> at your service, my dear. >> we've upped the amount from yesterday. >> you've earned it. i will look forward to seeing you and check back in the rest of the show. we're following a lot of news this morning, let's get right to it. >> bost sn bearing the brunt of the storm. >> blizzard-like conditions most of the day with record tides. >> this is the storm surge that's created tremendous problems for people out here. >> this is brutal. >> it's the wind the winds are killing us. >> this is a long-term event. >> it's great, i love it. >> american contractor david barry was killed when gunmen stormed a hotel in tripoli.
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>> a group said to be supportive of isis claiming responsibility for the attack. >> jordan state tv put out a notice quoting a government official saying that jordan is ready to hand over terrorist sajida al-rishawi in exchange for a jordanian pilot, what will happen to kenji goto? >> announcer: this is "new day," with chris cuomo, alisyn camerota and michaela pereira. >> good morning, and welcome to your "new day," i'm chris cuomo live in boston this morning. michaela pereira is in connecticut and alisyn camerota leading us from new york. the blizzard is still making all kinds of history in new england. boston here suffering the sixth biggest snowstorm since 1935. and certainly the most snow ever for a january. most of massachusetts is encased in snow. let's go wide for a second my brothers. we're not on the ground. we're about a foot off the ground. as you can see, if we pan down there's still another foot plus
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of snow. they saw 24-plus inches here in boston. but boston just part of the story. the whole northeast coast -- white. some places like the towns of auburn hudson and linenberg, ma mass, got three of snow. connecticut, thompson 33.5 nashua 33.2. long island is complaining. people got hit on the island hit hard and it ain't over. >> you contract the record-breaking results. >> this morning we'll tell you why the forecasts were off and how a new weather model may be the wave of the future. so back to you for the moest moment chris. >> as you know i'm confused by why people are upset about that. i look forward to hearing your
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discussion on it. here's what i do know the monster storm wasn't just about snow and snowfall. it's about everything that a blizzard remember that's a defined term. it means wind, damage and flooding along the coast. you have that combined with a failing sea wall which happened here in massachusetts, you had residents forced to run for their lives. so people all in the northeast saw, heard and felt things that they will never forget. here's what it was like to be in the blizzard. the sound of a blizzard. hurricane-force winds, 78 miles per hour in nantucket. the sight of storm surge breaching a sea wall. along the southern coast of massachusetts. roads like sled paths.
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drivers crawling through a whiteout near boston. this is new england, buried by the year's first and historic blizzard. snow not by the inch but by the foot from connecticut to maine, towns like worcester and framingham surpassing 30 inches cars turned into igloos in a sea of white. the snow different depending on where you were. inland small, dry crystals from the bitter cold. along the coast, flakes were wet and clumpy like white mud on the ground. high tide coupled with near hurricane-strength winds flooding homes. >> the water coming up over the sea wall. >> cnn's alexandra neelds scituate when surging water comes on to shore. the national guard racing to save the lives of residents 0 who didn't evacuate. mission accomplished as soldiers share a warm embrace with the community members they plucked
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from danger. >> i've been through a lot. and that was just more than i thought would have happened. >> for one national guardsman, a bittersweet return home. sergeant jennifer bruno's community was safe but her coastline home destroyed. >> my friends and i, we actually just grabbed a few things some uniforms that were right there and a sword i got when i was in iraq. >> by all accounts most residents did what they were supposed to. heeding the calls of state officials. >> get ready to hunker down. >> get home and hunker down. >> tles warnings possibly saving lives. >> but from the severe to the sublime, surfers riding dangerous high tides along the coast in upstate new york. monday also saw the first of many winter storm miracles this mother forced to break the travel ban during the height of the blizzard in connecticut, making it to the hospital just in time to deliver a beautiful baby girl. >> the roads weren't that bad because nobody was on them. i was happy once we got here i
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was a little relieved. >> mom power making one of the good memories that came out of this blizzard. so you had the snow dump here in boston and all the history of accumulation. but it's about the coastal areas here in massachusetts, they are really feeling the brunt of the blizzard. you have the swelling seas there's some estimates that waves are as high as 20 feet. they wound up driving floods destroying houses and forcing people to evacuate. those who did not, many had to be cressrescued. for the latest on the dire situation, that's going on right now. getting out is harder than getting into a situation like this. we have nick valencia live in scituate. what are they waking up to? >> very cold conditions. this is a community that got battered not just by snow but also wind and the water behind me. that's the atlantic ocean. that's a sea wall right there that's supposed to protect that water from coming over. i want to show you one of the most remarkable images we saw in
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this community. this house, right next door. right next to me i should say, take a look at this chris, look at this this thick ice layered all throughout that house and it's a snapshot of what we're seeing in all the homes throughout this area scituate, a coastal community that's used to this type of catastrophic damage. but even residents, look how thick that is. is that an inch? residents you talk to here say it's all the more remarkable what they witnessed yesterday. some people did not heed the evacuation warning by the massachusetts governor. so they had to be rescued by the national guard. this morning we've been keeping an eye on that. that coastal flood advisory just expired. at about 7:00 a.m. it was still a concern. the rooed that i'm standing on right now was completely submerged in water that was where yesterday where alexandra field was, that was in your piece, just an incredible scene here. frozen all around. the wind here still causing major problems in scituate. chris? >> i feel for you, coming off
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the water there. you got to be careful playing with people's house, when you get the saltwater mixing in with ice, you may have cnn get a big for ripping off part of the eaves. most people did do what they were supposed to do. we're going to talk about that this morning and how it was so important in saving lives yesterday. again we're both in massachusetts, nick and i, the story is the entire northeast. connecticut, 33 inches of snow. in the town of thompson. almost three feet, upwards of two feet in towns of lisbon and waterford. the neighbors to new london. new london got really hit hard. where michaela pereira is this morning. mick you know you're from out there in the far reaches of canada. even you couldn't get out of there last night. >> no we couldn't. and you know this was the story here what i really appreciated yesterday, was that people here in new london waterford and the
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surrounding communities heeded the call from the governor and state and local officials to shelter in place. that's all you could do. you could not get anywhere as evidenced by the fact that my producer and i couldn't get back to the city. we decided to stay here and tell the story. it's a very different picture we're seeing here on the ground in new london as opposed to yesterday. blue sky beautiful, very very cold, it's about 12 degrees. if you add the wind chill, it feels a lot colder. we had the mayor on a short time ago and we talked about the focus today being snow removal. the travel ban is lifted. but they're encouraging local residents to keep off the roads as much as possible. all the businesses right now are remaining closed. schools are still closed in this area. but you can see, this main artery behind us has been plowed and there's been a fair amount of salt on it. the roads, people are traveling. we didn't see that yesterday. there was definitely good news in this area. very very little power outage. very little very few downed power lines or downed tree
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limbs. so the fact that people had heat and light was a big boon. and it helped them stay indoors and shelter in place as we said. so one of the questions we had for the mayor was about this snow removal. it can be very verks costly we know they're reaching out to federal officials to see if there's federal aid money, fema money that can come to this area. the snow removal can be very expensive. you're talking three feet of snow in some areas here in new london. 20-24 inches. it's the gigantic drifts it's become my office this drift right here. it is so deep. there's nowhere to put it and that's what the next big challenge is going to be processing all of the snow so people of new london can get back to work and back to school. chris? >> and you're not going to go just like stomping through it today. because the temperatures are so low, that it's turned it into a cement case. you know that's going to be part of the snow removal issue as
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well. mick when we get back to new york you're going to have to teach me how to move my mouth in these temperatures. let's bring you back to boston. mick was talking about what people did to cut the toll of the storm. that's going to be a big, big theme here. because sure we got big records, we've got buried cars. the mayor, however, is talking about today. and he's asking people to stay home because the job is not just far from over this is the hardest part. let's bring in juliette kayyem cnn security analyst she served as the adviser here in massachusetts to then governor duvall patrick as the homeland adviser. she's punking me with the open jacket. boston strong. you know about the preparedness for this. 1978 you were only one year old then. i was eight years old. 100 people died 99 people died. what was the difference between
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then and now? >> it's the travel ban. in '78 most people died not because of car accidents or sledding accidents, it was carbon monoxide. people get into their cars they get isolated and they skid out, they get cold and they turn on their cars and die of carbon monoxide. today, is a prep day to start the real world tomorrow. it is sort of clear out your exhaust. clean out your cars. stay home there's just there's just no unless there's a pressing reason to go out, this is just a regroup day. and then we'll be ready to rock tomorrow so to speak. >> so the governor now put out some governor baker put out information about what to do that may not apply to the common sense of people. or appeal to it one, if your heat went off at all. you got to make sure you take a look at what got stored in the burner there a way to exhaust your burner. somebody has to know how to do it. your car, tailpipe there's a lot of practical considerations in doing this. the biggest one for citizenry is
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still heeding the warning, stay off the roads, people won't want to. make the case. >> there's two reasons, one is it's selfish and the other is it's stupid. it's stupid because you could get stuck, there's no there's no compelling reason for to you get into a car. could you get into an accident. but why i say it's selfish. is we need today to reserve the limited public safety resources, these guys and gals have been working around the clock to make the city and state prepared for a real day tomorrow. the more that they're sort of getting people who have been stuck in cars or people who go out voluntarily, the more that they have to focus their resources on those people the less they can do to sort of get the city and state prepared. so quote governor christie's famous line don't be selfish, don't be stupid. we can stay still for one more day. >> can you make sense of the new york and new jersey people? not governor christie saying we're upset at you guys, you got it wrong, we didn't get hit that hard. >> i literally do not get it. every piece of science and data
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about what was going to hit, the entire new england seaboard suggested that this was going to be a big storm. and it was a big storm for certain areas. because other areas didn't get hit, that's great news. i don't understand why people are complaining about it. if you are a mayor or governor and you saw the data coming through. not just them. thatter supported by people who have been in this field for a long time by experts, you would have done exactly what they did you stay home hunker down wait it out. let first responders do what they need to do. let the streets clear out and we'll get started again tomorrow. there will be some activity today, obviously, no city can survive too long being closed down. but two days you know it's new england, we're used to it. >> imagine if governors baker or malloy in massachusetts or connecticut said i don't buy it i think we'll be fine and hadn't prepared hadn't put in the ban and people had gone out, imagine what we'd be talking about. >> and what was happening, i'm
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getting my days mixed up but on monday when it was clear what was about to happen a lot of resources are get ready, but not deployed. that's what's happening. they're ready to surge if necessary. it's good news when they don't have to surge. >> do you think we will see a declaration, disaster in massachusetts asking for federal money because of all the damage. >> it's unclear, because there's a minimum money -- >> we'll have to see what happens in scituate. for the most part right now it's normal emergency management funds that can go into cleaning up the streets, it was an expensive storm, people stayed home so business and commerce don't thrive. we've had them before we'll have them again, it's new england. it's not a shot it's not like an earthquake right? this is what we anticipate. >> and another point that juliette understands very well from her time working in government. government is the last group that wants to shut down because it's so expensive and it's money they can never explain to voters. juliette thank you very much.
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will you please zip up your coat? make me feel better about myself. >> this is the hard part this is why you still have to listen. removal is very difficult. the effect of the blizzard is going to go on for days and days major strain on airports certainly in the northeast we're going to see flights still being delayed. hundreds are delayed for today. and going forward. and the impact is going it keep coming alisyn. and as you heard from michaela. they couldn't get out last night. you should have seen what we had to do to get up here yesterday. >> i look forward to hearing all about that and seeing your pictures. juliette looks almost hot next to you, chris, like she's actually it's balmy to her, compared to you. >> you know these boston people boston strong is not just a hash tag, it's not a meme. they're tough people. i think i lost a pinky. >> he's such a wimp. can you put him in california? that will be his next
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assignment. well the blizzard put a major strain on airports mostly in the northeast are things getting bet they are morning? cnn's jason carroll is live at laguardia airport. how are the boards at this hour? >> well you heard chris just talking about some of the problems at the airports we're still seeing some residual effects of all those groundings of the planes and the airport closures you can see there's still some cancellations on the board here at american airlines. but things are definitely getting better hour by hour i've got updated numbers for you, better numbers than what we saw just about an hour ago in terms of cancellations at various airports across the east coast. boston logan, what we're seeing right now, 108 cancellations. laguardia 105. jfk, 74. philadelphia international, 51. newark 35. so again, numbers looking a little bit better at this hour 7:00 as opposed to what we saw at 6:00 just the last hour. basically what we've been seeing
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overnight, crews working overtime on the runways, doing everything they can to get the snow out and get the planes back on the runways, things back up and running again. in the terms of the way the airport looks here at laguardia. look at the security line there? looking pretty good. this is what we're hearing, we're expecting to see throughout the day, things are still going to get better hour by hour. you're still going to see crowds out here. that's going to happen. but with each passing hour we're told things are going do get better and better. you have to be a little bit patient. >> thanks for the optimistic status report jason. we do have breaking news to tell but out of israel. hezbollah claiming responsibility for an attack on an israeli military convoy this morning. the israeli defense forces say an anti-tank missile struck one of their vehicles in the golan heights. let's get to cnn's elise labott live in israel near the lebanese border. what do we know? >> we are just a stone's throw, a couple yards really from the
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lebanese border. you can see some of the israeli tanks behind me. that was just a little bit of the activity we saw here this morning. not only was the attack on the idf military vehicle, but there was also mortar that hit a house in the surrounding area. the israelis have responded with air strikes and ground artillery to hezbollah. israeli prime minister benjamin netenyahu warning hezbollah, if it wants to start a fight in this area it should take a look at the recent operations in gaza this summer where the israelis pummeled hamas. and basically, alisyn, you can see this is response for what israel has not in fact claimed credit for. which is an attack last week across into syria, on high-level iranian and hezbollah targets. since then there's been a lot of tit for tat, a lot of fire on both sides yesterday. the situation heating up here.
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now everybody on high alert. idf in the area deploying the iron dome and warning hezbollah, if it wants to pick a fight, israel is ready. >> it sounds as though this is a situation that could ratchet up quickly. thanks so much for the update. back at home former secretary of state hillary clinton will reportedly testify again before congress on the 2012 terror attack in benghazi. senior political correspondent brianna keilar is following every development on this. and joins me in with the latest. >> ever since the committee formed several months ago, this has been the outstanding question will hillary clinton testify before it? and it appears that the answer is yes. that she has agreed to testify. of course this happening as a hillary clinton 2016 campaign seems all but certain. she's staffing up at this point we're hearing. so it seems like it's going to get going in the next couple of months. the political stakes are huge here. a lot of americans, when polled look at her time as secretary of
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state as really beneficial to her. you have republicans who say the obama administration didn't handle benghazi right. that they covered up some important details about the terrorist attack in 2012 that killed four americans, including ambassador chris stevens. and they think it should disqualify her from running for president, from being president. so the political stakes, huge here a lot hanging in the balance. and what's interesting is we're learning from the top democrat on the house republican-led committee on benghazi that hillary clinton actually agreed to testify on benghazi months ago. and we're just learning this now as the relations on the committee devolve into some partisan bickering, alisyn. but she'll have to answer these questions and certainly this could be very public. and so we're expecting this to be huge headlines, her people i'll tell you, i've spoken with them. they say they're deferring to the committee. which is code for, if the committee says she's testifying she's testifying. >> fascinating and politically
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dicey. so -- we will watch all of those developments brianna, thanks. an isis-relate terror group in libya is claiming responsibility for this deadly hotel attack in tripoli. the gunmen also died. officials say it appeared they were both libyan. and the clock is ticking on a deadline and the lives of two isis hostages hang in the balance. word of a possible deal in the works. we'll have a live report.
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breaking news we're learning a deal may in the works to free at least one of the two hostages being held by isis. let's bring in cnn's will ripley. live in tokyo with the latest. what do we know? >> well we know that the jordanian government is saying they are ready to release the terrorist sajida al-rishawi in exchange for the life of their captive pilot, the pilot that was captured by isis muath al-kaseasbeh. in this statement, they do not mention kenji goto. japan has an envoy in jordan there for days trying to work out a deal to secure the safe
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return of goto which is of course is of top priority to the central government here in tokyo. what this means is that the fate of both hostages frankly now is very unclear. because isis never up offered up this jordanian pilot's freedom. they only offered up his life. through a new propaganda message that goto read he was holding a picture of the pilot, saying the pilot would be killed and so would he in 24 hours, if this demand of the terrorist release was not met. that apparent deadline alisyn is now just 90 minutes away. jordan saying they will only hand over the terrorist if their pilot walks free. the question will isis release one or both or neither of them. this could all fall apart or these two men could come home. but we're probably won't know the outcome until this deal is done. and we know all of this happening right as we speak. and it's anyone's guess ges what the outcome could be. people in japan praying that kenji goto will also make it out of this alive as well as the
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jordanian pilot. >> thanks so much for giving us all of the background. let's get context, we want to bring in paul cruickshank, a cnn terror analyst and paul beinart, a contributing editor tore "the atlantic" media and a senior fellow and the new america foundation. peter, it makes americans nervous to think that any government would be agreeing to isis' demands, but it sounds as though jordan media that they are considering negotiating with isis? >> there's been a lot of criticism of the jordan government. protests against the king in jordan which is not something you see a lot. with a lot of people saying why is jordan in the war against isis at all. the united states is in a very difficult position. on the one hand it's trying to prevent allies from being involved in the negotiations because it creates an incentive for isis to take more hostages. on the other hand there is the possibility that political, the political support for jordan's very important role in this
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military campaign remember the u.s. worked very hard to get arab allies in this fight against isis and you can see that there's not a lot of political support in jordan for it. you face the possibility that political support could completely unravel. if either the jordanian pilot is killed or if they release the japanese hostage. but not the jordanian hostage. >> paul isis wants back its prisoner who is this would-be suicide bomber. a woman whose bomb never detonated. >> that's right, sajida al-rishawi. she's an isis living legend. she's the sister of a high-ranking deceased isis commander. it would be a huge propaganda coup from the isis point of view to secure her release. i think the deal could be done here today with the jordanians this will be isis negotiating one state to another state. from their point of view. so a big fill-up and help in their recruiting efforts. >> paul let me stick with you,
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that's dangerous on many levels. it does serve as an incentive to take more hostages for isis doesn't it? is there any other way to interpret this? >> it would create a precedent and incentive them to capture more hostages. there's some precedent for this. united states back last may swapped five guantanamo taliban commandos for bowe bergdahl. so some precedent for the united states doing these kind of prisoner swaps. not quite the same as giving isis millions of dollars to use for terror attacks. >> the bowe bergdahl thing is interesting, because the united states say they don't negotiate with terrorists, but they did negotiate, through an intermediary with the taliban. >> the pressure here is enormous politically in both jordan and japan. and it's also creating a very interesting conflict between jordan and japan. one of the reasons the jordanians have been so furious
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is the prospect that isis was willing to release the japanese prison anywhere response for this female terrorist bomber. but not the jordanian. saying what the lives of our people are worth not as much? and japan happens to be a very major doan tore jordan. jordan getting money with a huge refugee crisis a three-way diplomacy, isis jordan and japan. >> one of the problems is that isis is playing the media like a fiddle. i feel that right now as we talk about it. they have this ticking clock, a deadline they're ginning up all the interests, they're keeping us all on tenterhooks, regardless of isis does this is exactly what they wanted. >> it makes them look ten feet tall. negotiating with japan, one of the major world powers and a big regional power. jordan and of course this comes at a time when there have been some setbacks from the isis point of view in kobani they've
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lost much of that town in northern syria and they've been displaced from places like diyal diyala province in northeast baghdad. >> so what is the answer pete centre nobody wants to inflate isis to the level of statehood that they're now acting as. do you just sacrifice the hostages? what is the answer here? >> i mean the largest answer is what paul was talking about, the military campaign against isis can we continue to build up the iraqi government? this is not as sexy, it doesn't get as much attention. can we build a more legitimate government in iraq that doesn't so alienate its sunni population that we can move them away from isis? can we move into syria as well to have some viable alternative that is not a jihadist group to isis. only when that military campaign starts to bear fruit will we begin to see an end to these
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terrible incidents. back at home. the clean-up from the blizzard is only just beginning and coastal flooding from all of the snow is a major concern at this hour. so we will go back to chris in boston right after the break. push your enterprise and you can move the world. ♪ ♪ but to get from the old way to the new you'll need the right it infrastructure. from a partner who knows how to make your enterprise more agile, borderless and secure. hp helps business move on all the possibilities of today. and stay ready for everything that is still to come. in a race, it's about getting to the finish line. in life, it's how you get there that matters most. like when i found out i had a blood clot in my leg. my doctor said that it could travel to my lungs and become an even bigger problem. so he talked to me about xarelto®. >>xarelto® is the first oral prescription blood thinner proven to treat and help prevent dvt and pe that doesn't require regular blood
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welcome back to "new day." i'm chris cuomo. live in boston for you. right here there's over two feet of snow. and epic blizzard has passed but the hardest work only just beginning. history, records of the wrong kind was made. the snowiest january ever in boston. just 40 miles east in worcester, the worst -- more than 34 inches in worcester, the most ever. now remember a blizzard not just snow its main weapon is wind 30 50 75-plus miles per hour in gusts attacking power lines, whipping up the sea. waves as high as 20 feet floods after a sea wall failed sending water from a storm surge gushing into towns into southern massachusetts. airports are getting operations going again in the northeast. but still hundreds of flights
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canceled for today. maybe into tomorrow. that will cascade across the country. the rails, amtrak resuming limited service, between boston and new york today. remember the temperatures make snow like cement. very tough. and a lot of areas especially on the massachusetts coast, in cape cod are still just totally sealed in. snowed in. on skype right now is clinton terry, the owner and bar manager of the nautilus a cape cod bar. i see you there, you look okay what are you dealing with there? >> just trying to stay busy. hoping to go home today. >> you ever see anything like it? what was it like to look out the window and see what was going on? >> it's pretty epic. i'm from vermont. so we deal with a lot of snow. for here in nantucket especially where they don't deal so well.
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it's awful. it's going to be weeks of trying to make up for it and just you know digging out. the aftermath is almost as bad. >> you know in new york and new jersey i don't know how much media you've been watching they're complaining the blizzard wasn't as bad as expected for parts of those two states. here they were ready, this he did a lot of preparing. did that make a difference on cape cod? i know you're snowed in. but could it have been worse? >> it definitely could have been worse, there's emergency crews that have been running for the last couple of days. there's even a crew that drove up from kentucky to help with the power outages and stuff. so they've thankfully been prepared. >> we hear a lot of stories about how people come together in moments like this. certainly you see all the first responders doing their job like an extended family. but did you wind up getting closer to some folks you didn't know as well before? >> sure. it's a good kind of community bonding experience. i was waiting for the ferry to take me back to nantucket.
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and saw a bunch of other friends that were stranded. so we all kind of got together and commiserated. and then you meet new people as well. even in the little hotel restaurant. lots of family. lots of people. everybody pretty nervous, but still pretty good spirits. >> we heard about these waves, were you able to see the shoreline at all? were there waves as high as ten feet and more there? >> no. i haven't seen the shoreline here. but my friends in nantucket sent me the video which you've been running, which has been incredible. 18 20-foot as well as. >> nantucket, they really got slammed. and obviously that's an island and they're very hardy people there. they're used to this kind of stuff. but not like this. you think you have it bad where are you. it's much worse. so the headline is what when are you going to get out of there? >> hoping to take the 9:15 boat. they haven't said if it's running yet. but that's the hope.
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>> we wish you the best. we hope you get out of there. what were you saying? >> i said my car is another story. when they don't, when the boats don't run, so as long as i can make it. >> hey, listen that's exactly the right way to look at it you know, it could always be worse. these things you know getting the snow out, the inconvenience, that you can handle. it's what a blizzard like this can do that you can never repair that we have to worry about. so at least you got a smile on your face and you'll get out of there at some point with just some memories. i hope you get home soon. send me a tweet, let me know what happens. >> thank you, sir, i appreciate it. all right now, probably the only good way to have experienced this blizzard would be from space. and it was such a monster storm, you could see that. check out the picture. this shot by nasa astronaut terry vertz. all right? that's the storm from space, alisyn. that's the way i wish i could
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have seen it. >> and that's the way you wish you could have traveled to boston in a rocket. because i know your odyssey to boston was much more nerve-wracking. tell me a little bit about it. >> it took us hours and hours. now really i don't like to give props to this guy, but i have to. john griffin, my senior producer, drove, i could not see the road. all i kept telling him to do i don't know we should be doing this i think this may have been a bad decision. but he muscled up. it took us hours, we couldn't see anything. around the turns and there was nobody on the road. i'll tell you what, alisyn, it was a very interesting example of why you need to stay off the road. if something would have happened to us god forbid. there was nobody around. you're not going to get help for a very long time. we weren't being foolish. but we have to do it it's part of our job to try to get to the location. it's a drive i will not forget.
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>> there's an exception for the media. that you can be on the roads. i would get the tweet from you, it sounds like quite the experience, thanks for showing us the picture. that tells the story. >> it's called the intentionally dumb exemption they call it. >> yup, i hear. and you fit it well. thank you very much, chris. we'll check back in with you. we have breaking news owl of israel. the israeli defense forces are launching attacks on key hezbollah operations after the militants fired on an anti-tank missile, striking at an idf vehicle in the golan heights there are casualties at this time we don't know how many. hezbollah leaders previously vowed to retaliate against israel nor an attack earlier this month. this morning we're learning more about how a drone crashed on the white house lawn and the defense department intelligence agency staffer was apparently behind the controls. senior washington correspondent
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joe johns is live for us at the white house with the latest. what do we know today, joe? >> well alisyn the man who reported that the drone that landed here on the white house lawn was his, does work for the defense department. he works for the geospatial intelligence agency out of springfield, virginia. cnn has been told that that man told the u.s. secret service that the drone belongs to him. for his personal use. and that he had been drinking at the time of the incident. the question now of course -- what's going to happen to him that's actually an open question. prosecutors have not yet decided whether they are going to file any charges against him. cnn has been told he is likely to face disciplinary action at work. u.s. geospatial intelligence again in springfield, virginia works on imagery and mapping for the pentagon. this incident has underscored the fact that there is no regulatory structure for these types of devices right now.
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the president referring to that in an interview with cnn. it only puts more urgency on the federal aviation administration to try to come up with some rules. it's been working on that and so far, nothing. back to you, alisyn. >> at least we can still use the initials dwi, for droning while intoxicated? so there is that. joe johns, thanks for the update. two former vanderbilt university football players have been found guilty of the 2013 rape of an unconscious woman in a dormitory. cory beatty and brian vanderberg were convicted of several counts of rape. vanderberg was convicted on additional counts of tampering and unlawful photography. their sentencing scheduled for march 6th. two other ex-players are still awaiting trial. and we're learning now that the mountainside asteroid that whizzed past thert week was not alone. the first images released by nasa showed the ast r.i.d.e. had
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its own small moon. now that it's passed earth. scientists say the asteroid will not come this close again for another 200 years. well it was the big blizzard that did not meet expectations in new york city. forecasters are now backing up why they thought it would bite the big apple in such a big way. plus what's the cost of the blizzard business? we have the staggers numbers, ahead. thoughtfully crafted and intelligently designed. with avail orward collision warning and new blind spot monitor and a 2014 top safety pick plus rating. cost of entry? a fortune. until now. hey sarah, new jetta? yup. can i check it out? maybe at halftime? introducing lots of new. the new volkswagen jetta. isn't it time for german engineering? when laquinta.com sends him a ready for you alert the second his room is ready, ya know what salesman alan ames becomes? i think the numbers speak for themselves.
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welcome back to "new day." the blizzard of 2015 broke records in new england. but for folks in new york and new jersey well the forecast fael little short. let's bring in meteorologist ivan cabrera to skrus this. so ivan you guys really screwed this up huh? >> let's being honest about this. it was a bust that's what we call it in our business when you talk about two to three feet and you only get a foot that's a lot of snow but it's not two to three feet so it's a bust yes. >> that is really nice of you. ivan are you taking responsibility for the entire meteorological world. but i mean let's face it this is an imprecise science, right?
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like explain how the forecast was so different for new york city and parts of new jersey. >> well so first of all, look at the graphic behind me. this is any meteorologist's worst nightmare if you're in snow country. what we're looking at is a map that shows what actually fell. we're looking at anywhere from six inches you move about 60 miles and you have three feet of snowfall. this is almost impossible to forecast. now we do have computer models that obviously guide us here. and i think what happened was, the national weather service in new york basically got very happy with one model, weptnt all in with that and that was the forecast here. this is the european model. we have been using this for quite some time. it's an excellent model. this is the new improved gfs, american model which is the one that got it mostly right. look at the european model showing 12-24 inches of snowfall in new york.
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then i'm going to move this forward. i'm going to keep this the same. it's still the new gfs, which did great and the nam model, which is also an american model. this one now has over two feet of snow in new york. so basically national weather service saw these two, went with these two. and they did not go with the new gfs model. >> so the new gfs model got it right. and did that mean it will always get it right? does it have a better technology than the other two models you just showed us? >> two things on that -- excellent question. but here's what happened. the new gfs has new math. think of it like an iphone from when we went from ios 6 to ios 7. we didn't know if it was going to work we had never used it before. they had never used the new gfs, new math in the model. they had never used it. with a big blizzard. and so they were nervous about depending on something new versus the reliable the actual
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forecast here which panned out, which the older models the nam and the european here. that's basically what happened here. they were hesitant to use the new gfs. to the second point -- no. the new gfs, we could have a blizzard in another month and it could bust and we would go right back to the nam and the other model, the european being the one that gets it right. so essentially our job has not changed. we are going to continue to make good forecasts, we're going to continue to have some busts and you're going to have to bear with us. i must say that regardless of what happened here a lot of areas did pan out and we did get essentially what we were talking about here. now let me go to this. i'm going to leave you with what i think we can learn from this and what i think needs to happen. the new gps alisyn is going to be given more weight. it got it right. we test-rode it. it did well. we're going to give that more weight. i think we need to do a better job, this is the issue, to convey the uncertainty and the
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modeling to the public. and so that you know that there is a basically cone of uncertainty something like would you get with a hurricane. we got a big cone. well that's essentially what can happen as well with the blizzard. and better to be safe than sorry. whatever happened i think it was great thing to get people off the roads. i know it was an inconvenience and it was expensive. but it saved lives, i think. >> ivan great job. you have have vindicated your entire industry as far as i'm concerned with that explanation. >> wow, we'll see about that. >> thanks so much great to talk to you. the blizzard may not have lived up to all the hype here in new york. but it did still pack a wallop. certainly in terms of costs. the steep price of preparing for the worst. the steep price of preparing for the worst. so i finally made a decision to talk to my dermatologist about humira. humira works inside my body to target and help block a specific source of inflammation
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take a look at this beautiful live shot coming to us from wfxt fox 25 in boston. wow, it's so artistic and tranquil. but the blizzard had a chilling effect on business. chief business correspondent christine romans is here for "cnn money now." christine, what's the bill for this blizzard. >> some of the biggest businesses were shut down. the snow removal is about $1 million an inch. saved a bill a little bit. it could have been worse here for new york. canceled flights alone will be $230 million economic loss. that's from the u.s. travel association. that number right there, that's only how much idled passengers didn't contribute to the economy. that's not counting the cost to the air lines. there will be a big bill. >> oh, my gosh. we got 10 inches. that will be $10 million. >> just to get rid of the snow. >> tell me about the big story from apple. >> apple, best quarter in
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corporate history. this company made $18 billion in the quarter. they sold so many iphones it's almost hard to comprehend. ceo tim cook said it's hard to comprehend how many they sold. they made a lot of money. 30,000 iphones an hour the company sold. the stock is up 7% in the pre-market. i'm expecting it will have a big pop today. >> people love their iphones. >> a lot of investors have this in their 401 k. it will be a good day for that stock. >> christine romans. thank you. we're going back to boston for the latest as it starts to attempt to dig out from the megastorm. plus airports in the northeast, who's up and running. will your flight get out today? we'll tell you. and time is running out for the isis hostages. we're learning a deal may be in the works. we'll tell you more. e financial noise
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boston is bearing the brunt of this storm. >> this is brutal. >> it's one of the largest we've ever seen. >> it's the winds. the winds are killing us. >> the flooding was more intense and a lot higher than we
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predicted. >> this is the storm surge that has created tremendous problems for people. >> part of the roof collapsed, the wall my door was missing. >> if in fact we don't get a deal make sure that it's the iranian's fault because they couldn't say yes to a reasonable deal. jordan is ready to hand over terrorist sajida al-rishawi for their pilot. >> announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo, alisyn camerota and michaela pereira. good morning and welcome to "new day." wednesday, january 28th about 8:00 in the east. chris cuomo live in boston for you. michaela pereira in connecticut and alisyn camerota steering the ship in new york. so here's the snow situation in a snapshot here in boston. i don't know what that sound was. we'll figure it out later on. i'm about 8 inches off the ground and there's still a foot plus of snow behind me.
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more than 24 inches that's for sure. that's why this is a record-setting blizzard with at least two feet of snow on the ground and that's just here in boston. that makes it the sixth biggest snowstorm in the city since 1935. let's take a look at a map. north and west of here several towns in massachusetts got a whooping. three feet of snow in places literally, three feet of snow. all of new england feeling the pain. 33.5 inches in thompson, connecticut. 33 inches in nashua new hampshire. in long island suffolk county there, the town of orient suffolk county, 30 inches. the ferries are working. i know you were living and working up here. that's how fast they are getting up and running here. that's a testament to boston strong. >> chris, you're so right, boston is used to snow but it can still paralyze the city when it is this much and this cold as you've been describing.
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now this morning new york city and new jersey are essentially back to normal. so why didn't the forecast add up for millions who were expecting an epic amount of snow? we've been exploring that and we'll talk more about it during this hour. chris. >> reporter: yeah i still don't get why people are complaining about not getting hit. it's like some kind of mass mass so he so he kimp. that boom was old iron side firing her cannon. it's 8:00 in the morning. for all the talk about snow it was the wind that the blizzard whipped up was the worst. coastal flooding forcing many along the south shore of massachusetts to literally run for their lives. there were sights sounds sensations felt all over the northeast that will never be forgotten. here is a taste of what it was like to be in the blizzard. >> reporter: the sound of a blizzard.
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hurricane force winds. 78 miles an hour in nantucket. the sight of storm surge breaching the seawall along the southern coast of massachusetts. roads like sled paths drivers crawling through a whiteout near boston. this is new england, buried by the year's first and historic blizzard. snow not by the inch but by the foot from connecticut to maine, towns like worcester framingham surpassing 30 inches. cars turned into igloos in a sea of white. the snow different depending on where you were. inland small, dry crystals from the bitter cold. along the coast, flakes were wet and clumpy like white mud on the ground. high tide coupled with near
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hurricane strength winds flooding homes. >> there's water coming up right over the seawall right now. >> reporter: cnn's alexandra field in scituate. the national guard racing to save the lives of residents who didn't evacuate steering in near zero visibility. mission accomplished as soldiers share a warm embrace with the community members they pluck from danger. >> i've been through a lot, and that was just more than i thought would have happened. >> reporter: for one national guards man, a bitter sweet return home. sergeant jennifer bruno's community was safe but her coast line home destroyed. >> my friends and i, we actually just grabbed a few things some uniforms that were right there and a sword i got when i was in iraq. >> reporter: by all accounts, most residents did what they were supposed to heeding the calls of state officials. >> get ready to hunker down. >> get home and hunker down. >> reporter: these warnings possibly saving lives. but from the severe to the sublime, surfers riding
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dangerous high tides. monday also saw the first of many winter storm miracles. this mother forced to break the travel ban during the height of the blizzard in connecticut making it to the hospital just in time to deliver a beautiful baby girl. >> the roads weren't that bad because nobody was on them. i was happy once we got here. i was a little relieved. >> reporter: a little bit of a nod to the fact that life must go on even through the worst. and we talk about that that's going to take us to the coast of massachusetts. it is a disaster there this morning. homes are just battered by waves as rising flood waters submerged communities literally. the coastal town of scituate very hard hit. we have nick valencia there. nick we saw what you went through down there. what is it like this morning? >> reporter: good morning, chris. now that the sun is out we are getting a fresh perspective of the damage left behind by that severe weather system that whipped through here. this coastal community.
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we are seeing things slowly get back to normal in this town of scituate. people emerging from homes people getting into cars people having to shovel that more than two feet of snow that ended up in this area. really windy day as well. i was talking to this gentleman here who says he's lived here for more than 50 years and that he was here for the last really big storm, he says which was in 1978. this community, of course a coastal community that is accustomed to sort of catastrophic things catastrophic damages, but they say that what they saw here in the last 24 48 hours was truly remarkable. they say they are going to make it though. they are just glad that they think the worst part is over. the coastal flood advisory the seawall that was breached where alexander field was, that coastal advisory ended at 7:00 a.m. right now though it still is pretty cold out here. that wind seems to be the biggest issue now that that snow has stopped falling here in this coastal town. chris. >> reporter: hey, nick. i've been apologizing to you all morning. we need you there but it's so
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tough being right off the seawall there and getting hit with that wind. that's what they're living with. i don't know if you noticed when that man was shoveling snow, you see the shovel go in then there's a hitch, then he throws. that's because this snow is so heavy because of the temperature change and the freezing and moisture. the digging out will be very difficult. we've been talking about the danger okay? it's no question it's not about the snow accumulation simply it's about the wind that causes the waves that causes the flooding. that's the formula for disaster that this blizzard brought to bear especially in the coastal parts of eastern massachusetts like scituate. joining us is john dunahgy. thank you for joining us. we saw the pictures. looks frightening. what is the status of your seawall and the community's well-being? >> good morning. actually with the seawall right now, we're actually going out to assess it. unfortunately during all of the
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storm it's really hard to get out there with all the water coming in. right now we're looking at it. it looks as though about 15 feet of it from the top of the wall has been taken in and so we'll go out there, we'll put sorm large armor stone out there and other sands to try to impact it until we can get there in the spring to repair it. >> why do you have to wait until spring? is it just about the temperature, exposure to the elements and what work can be done? >> yeah. it's usually because of the -- in order to do the concrete be able to pour it given the weather conditions you usually wait until the springtime to do it. plus you've got to get access to it. the problem is trying to get the access to it because a lot of the homes are built right to the wall. so you have to approach it from the seaside. >> reporter: sure. tricky work. the community particularly vulnerable because of what you just said. they are really right on top of the sea wall there. we heard about 200 plus homes, 212, something like that lost
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power. what are the conditions now? does everybody have what they need to move on? >> sorry, i lost your -- >> reporter: you got me? you got me now, mr. danehey? mr. danehey, can you hear snee mr. danehey lost us. one of the many problems obviously, that you deal with are communications. the good news you heard it there, they're in the assessment mode. they're able to deal with what happened there. about 200 plus people lost power. they're going o hopefully get that back. our estimates that we're hearing about are from today. that's a taste of what that was. that's only massachusetts. this is all of new england. in connecticut, punished. that's the only word you can use. northern end of the state, especially the town of thompson got 33 inches of snow. in the south they're upwards of two feet in waterford. that place neighbors new london. that is where we find michaela pereira. she was born up in the hinterlands of canada.
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she laughs in the face of snow and even the great mich was stranded with what she faced in connecticut. >> reporter: stranded. stranded. look it took a lot to put my producer and i down for the count, but we got stuck in new london connecticut. we've been very grateful to the folks here for their amazing hospitality. chris, you've been talking about this sort of two-sierdded or two-faced storm. new york didn't get what was expected. >> new york city manhattan. but connecticut really really got smacked. depending where you are in the state you see different levels. thompson 33.5 inches of snow here. in new london we've seen anywhere the estimates are between 20 and 26 inches of accumulation. it is a very different story. in fact we've seen some blue sky behind me. indull me here forge me here, chris. i'm going out on the street. the road crews have done a
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yeoman's job in clearing the roads. they put a fair amount of salt and other substances. this is bare. it's not icy at all. they've been telling me that the -- not all of the roads are as clear as that one. they're working on getting roads clear. businesses are back to usual in new london. spoke with the mayor earlier this morning. while the travel ban has been lifted here they say they're trying to ask people to stay off the roads so they can get the rest of that removal going. once they get it removed and cleared from the roads, look at all these snowbanks along here. i mean this is an incredible amount of snow that was drifted and then piled up from the snow plows. so it's going to be a long melt here when it ever gets warm enough to do that. right now it's 12 degrees with a wind chill of minus 2, chris. it's chilly. >> reporter: yeah i'm waiting for the inside of my nose to defrost let alone the snow. they're not going to have any warmer temperatures for days. it's going to be tough. you braved it well and your
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reporting there has been helpful, my friend. i look forward to seeing you back in the city. alisyn you've got the short stick today there in the studio in new york. you know being all by yourself. i'm sure it's very hard. >> it's extremely hard. so hard to be this warm and cozy while watching you guys out there. you know what is hard chris? the carma that is know is going bite me for whatever the next assignment that's going to be in siberia. >> reporter: no. no. you deserve good things. i just don't like smiling this much. my face is frozen like this. i'm not smiling right now. >> i understand. your a doing a good job of speaking with frozen mouth. i know how hard that is. chris, thanks so much. we'll get back to you momentarily. breaking news following out of israel. the israeli defense forces launching attacks out of key hezbollah operations following a missile attack on one of its vehicles. cnn has learned that there are casualties but at this hour we do not know how many. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu said the idf is
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prepared to act forcefully in retaliation. former secretary of state hillary clinton agreeing to testify before the house select committee's investigating the 2012 terror attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. the panel's top democrat congressman elijah cummings says clinton did not hesitate when she was approached in september but a date and time are still being worked out. clinton's spokesman declined to say when exactly she will testify. and they're famous for outrageous super bowl ads, but go daddy may have gone too far this time. the condition pulling its ad which previewed online tuesday. an plal lovers and rescue workers blasted this ad which follows a lost puppy who made it back to his owners who are so happy to see him, not because they're home but because they sold him on the website they built with go daddy. breaking news this morning. there may be a deal in the works to free two isis hostages in exchange for a female terrorist. we are talking to a washington
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insider about this next. and you're talking to your rheumatologist about a biologic... this is humira. this is humira helping to relieve my pain and protect my joints from further damage. this is humira giving me new perspective. doctors have been prescribing humira for ten years. humira works for many adults. it targets and helps to block a specific source of inflammation that contributes to ra symptoms. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers including lymphoma have happened, as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. talk to your doctor and visit humira.com this is humira at work
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breaking news this morning. we're learning a deal may be in the works to free at least one of the two hostages being held by isis. let's bring in cnn's will ripley live in tokyo. this is a minute-by-minute developing story. what's the latest will? >> in less than 45 minutes now until the isis execution deadline where isis promised to
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execute not only the japanese hostage kenji goto but also a japanese pilot, mu'adh safi yusuf al-kasasibah. a that's if a prisoner swap was not met. the terrorist, sajida al-rishawi convicted of the 2005 bombing attack that killed dozens of people. jordan issuing a statement through the state television channel saying that they are ready to hand over al-rishawi but they insist isis hands over their pilot. that statement did not mention anything about the japanese journalist kenji goto. keep in mind isis never offered to hand over the pilot they only offered to spare his life, to not kill him 45 minutes from now. what we know about these deals, alisyn is that all of these discussions, any of these negotiations are happening far from the public and any handover that would happen would be in a secret location conducted totally secretly. so the world, japan, jordan the families of kenji goto the
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families of nooukmu'adh safi yusuf al-kasasibah they're not going to know. until one or both of these men come home to their families ken kenji goto comes home to his wife and daughter or his mother or a much more tragic outcome, alisyn if isis decides they are not willing to hand over the pilot. we'll have to wait and see. >> so nerve racking for the family. will thanks so much for the update. let's bring in congressman alex schiff. good morning, congressman. >> good morning. >> what do we know about this reported deal between jordan and isis to get the jordanian pilot out? >> there are still a lot of moving pieces. it's not clear that isil is ready to trade the jordanian pilot for al-rishawi. i'm not sure they can go ahead. the war effort is controversial in jordan.
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this puts the king of jordan in a very controversial position. there have been a number of foreign fighters who have left to yoin the fight. jordan is in a precarious fight. this is left to join a wedge between the king and his people and jordan and the nation of japan. very difficult box for jordan to be in. at this point i don't think we know how this is going to turn out. >> congressman, doesn't this put everyone, all world leaders in a precarious position? because if you ak we he is to isis's demanlts it serves as an incentive for them to continue taking hostages and doing the rest of their barbaric acts? >> that's certainly true and i think if this goes forward and there is a swap, it is going to encourage them to try to take other prisoners. that is probably more of an issue when it comes to the people like mr. goto the journalist. the jordanian pilot, all pilots anyone that's actively fighting isil is at risk of not only becoming a prisoner but
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becoming you know killed in the conflict. so that's unavoidable. obviously i think we have to all take precautions to try to avoid putting any civilians -- western civilians within the reach of isil because it is of great value to them as a propaganda coup as well as leverage against these governments and the war effort. >> you've heard the obama administration say that we do not negotiate with terrorists yet it has been pointed out that in order to get sergeant bo bergdahl out of taliban hands we had to negotiate. we went through an intermediary. it's hard to say when it's one of your own that you wouldn't use every means necessary. so how is the bo bergdahl situation different from what jordan is trying to do now? >> well look, you can't distinguish the two, but it's very difficult. whatever the jordanian government decides, we won't be critical. they're in a difficult spot. we did trade bo bergdahl for the
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taliban in something that i'm not sure was a very good exercise and a very good precedent for the united states to set, but in any eyevent jordan is a key ally. we'll support them with whatever they decide they have to do. this is the scurge of dealing with a terrorist organization that is willing to behead people if it doesn't get what it wants. there are no laws of war. there's no rules of war. there's nothing but brutality, murder and death when it comes to isil. it ought to reinforce why this terrorist group has to be stopped. >> there's also been a terror attack on a tourist hotel in libya in tripoli in the capital. one american was killed. what should the u.s. response be? >> well this is a very difficult situation because you've got two rival governments competing with each other, one in tabrook and one in tripoli. we have been trying to negotiate a resolution to help libya remain one country and reinstate
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some level of security because in the absence of that security we have isis taking advantage of the situation, carrying out attacks like we saw in this hotel. obviously we're going to go to whatever length we can to bring to justice any of those that were responsible for killing this american and seven others. but that's very difficult to do in an environment like libya where you don't have a stable government and, in fact you have two governments that are in competition with each other. >> congressmen, quickly we have been reporting this morning that hillary clinton, former secretary of state, is prepared to go back to congress to testify about the terror attack in benghazi libya. what more do you want to hear from her? >> well i'm not sure what more there is to hear from the secretary, and i fear that this is really just politically motivated. obviously they think this will be advantageous in terms of the presidential election and i'm concerned with how this is being drawn out. the committee waited six months to ask for any documents from the state department and now says well we have to delay bringing the secretary in
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because we don't have the documents we want. so i fear that they're trying to run the clock so that they can push this further into the presidential cycle, but honestly so much of the facts are known and have been described in great detail by the accountability review board and about eight other investigations i'm not sure there's much new that the secretary can tell us. >> congressman, last can you tell us where congress is on the authorization for use of military force in syria and iraq fighting isis? >> well we're not much closer than we were when this conflict started now almost half a year ago. i think that's an incredible abdication of our responsibility. i'm authorizing a bill to authorize use of force against isil, but i would love to see the congress and administration working together to actually have a debate on this war, have a vote on this. i'd also like to see it be a narrow authorization, not the kind of open ended resolution we passed in 2001 and 2002 which are still being relied upon by the administration today in very different circumstances.
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>> congressman schiff thanks for taking the time to come on "new day." >> thanks alisyn. the blizzard slamming new england is causing all sorts of problems for us. we'll go back to chris who is live in boston and we'll talk with the massachusetts governor about the big cleanup. his room at laquinta.com, he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can check in and power up before his big meeting. and when alan gets all powered up, ya know what happens? i think the numbers speak for themselves. i'm sold! he's a selling machine! put it there. and there, and there, and there. la quinta inns and suites is ready for you, so you'll be ready for business. the ready for you alert, only at laquinta.com! la quinta! how much money do you have in your pocket right now? i have $40 $21. could something that small make an impact on something as big as your retirement? i don't think so. well if you start putting that towards your retirement every week and let it grow over time, for twenty to thirty years that retirement challenge
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>> reporter: welcome back to "new day." i'm live in boston which has feet of snow and days to go before life gets back to anything near normal. let me show you the deal. right now we're eight cinches off the surface. you have another two plus feet right here and this is in boston. this is how much snow? you're not going to go tromping through it. you know what else the cold does make it hard to get up. there we go. that's the snow situation. no need to hype it because the numbers tell the story. two feet in boston making this storm deposit the most snow in
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january, any january ever in boston okay? then you go 40 miles west of here and you have a record set for the most snow ever 34 inches in worcester. so on top of digging out from all of the snow the blizzard was about wind. wind whips up the water, creates the waves, breaches a seawall, creates flooding. the southern part of the state after a sea wall failed sent water just gushing into towns, waves reported at 20 feet high. some of the storm surge, 6, 7 feet flying in. in those temperatures imagine. so the impact is being felt. the blizzard is over. the story here will last days for that reason. in the northeast, trying to get back up and running means airports hundreds of flights still being canceled for today and that's going to of course cascade across the country. and you have the rails. subways are getting back going. amtrak resuming limited service between boston and new york today. so all of that is good news but
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it's going to take time. here's what you have to remember. there is a lot of bad things that happen but it could have been so much worse. it is good that they're already in recovery mode. the governor is charlie baker. you're on the phone. can you hear us? >> hey, chris, how are you? >> reporter: i'm doing very well. i'm doing very well, and more importantly so is your state. you had planning here and a little bit of good luck. how do you think you made it through? >> i think your characterization is about right. the good news here was we knew this storm was coming for a couple of days which gave us an opportunity to pre-stage a lot of things. with respect to getting through. you were talking about the coastal flooding which the lieutenant governor and i are going to go down there and visit with people today on that. the fact that it was a little
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colder than we thought it was going to be meant the snow was a little lighter and fluffier along the coast than we thought it would be. that meant we had nowhere near as many trees down or as many lines down so the power outages we feared could be in the hundreds of thousands of customers ended up being in the tens of thousands of customers instead. so to some extent that was a big break. >> and, you know it's not just about the inconvenience, it's life and death when you lose power in these conditions and temperatures. of course you know you think back to 1978. i lived through it you lived through it. that was a deadly storm, 99 people lost their lives. here we're hearing much less. it's not even the same story on that level. what do you think accounts for that? was it preparation? was it people heeding the call better because of experience? >> i think it was a little bit of both. i will say this.
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i was around in '78 when we had that blizzard. part of what made that blizzard so deadly was the fact that it came upon people as a big surprise. people were not really anticipating or expecting that we were going to have a big storm and a huge piece of the consequence of that storm were people getting trapped and stranded in cars and along highways literally for days. i think in this particular case because of the modeling and the national weather service saying a big storm is coming and having that 24-hour period to prepare for it and the fact that we did implement a 24-hour travel ban which gave our plow people and our emergency service personnel the ability to get out there and clear the roads and not have to worry about stranded drivers, i think that combination and again with a little bit of luck is really where we came out better than we expected.
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>> reporter: right. i don't mean in any way to minimize what was actually experienced and will continue to be experienced. you make a strong point that what killed people in '78 was carbon monoxide poisoning from being stranded. this time you didn't have the cars out there. i know you're asking people to continue that forbearance to not be on the roads because that will slow down the time and response time will be long because of the stretch assets. allow me to ask you this governor before you get back to would. can you make the case to declare the impact of the blizzard a disaster? i know this is all about how much money it will be to fix. >> we have some homework to do but you can anticipate that we will be. the fema people federal emergency management folks were side by side with us throughout the past few days and were terrific. yeah you can expect that we'll be having conversations with the federal government to see if there's some opportunity for them to assist us with paying
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for some of the damage that was done here, but i think overall i'm really proud of all the folks who were involved in getting us through this and the way we got through it. and your comment about the fact that we still have a lot of digging out to do over the course of the next two days is exactly right, and that's what we're going to focus on. >> reporter: and i know that you're asking people to cooperate and they've done so thus far. this is one of those situations that is a test of leadership and the state seems to be pulling through. so good luck to you going forward and good job so far. >> hey, thanks very much chris. this isn't our first snowstorm. >> reporter: no no. no it wasn't. this was a tough one and every one is a challenge. governor baker, good luck to you. thanks for joining us on "new day." all right, alisyn, over to you in new york. chris, thanks so much. the president speaking exclusively to cnn on the controversy around prime
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minister benjamin netanyahu's planned visit. plus it's been 70 years since the liberation of auschwitz. our wolf blitzer has a very personal connection to the concentration camp and he'll be with us to share his emotional journey.
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president obama back in washington after a trip to india where he spoke with cnn's fareed zakaria about nuclear negotiations with iran and why he thinks those will work better than new sanctions. >> if i've got a bunch of scientists and nuclear experts saying this assures us that iran is not on the brink of being a nuclear weapons power, then that's a public debate we should have. >> let's talk about this and so much more. joining us now is cnn political analyst and editor in chief of the daily beast, john avlon and republican strategies and sirius xm host margaret hoover. great to see you guys. i can use some company in here. >> i know. we don't want you to be alone. >> and warm. >> thank you. so margaret basically what the president is saying i hear to
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congress back off. we have negotiations in place. we're trying for a diplomatic is a lugs with iran. back off on sanctions. >> the question is how credible is it? it seems to the members of the senate and the house, both republicans and democrats, is they're buying time. what has happened since the president laid off the sanctions is that it seems that iran has just bought more time bought more time bought more time and continued spinning their centrifuges. it is democrats and republicans in the house andersen nate who feel that not that sanctions are going to derail the process. they're into the trying to derail it they feel that it gives the president leverage at the table in order to actually get a deal done with iran. >> yeah. i mean the thing is if the intention is to give the president leverage you should probably check with the president to see if it does give him leverage. these are fundamentally different responsibilities. there's the responsibility to negotiate in executive capacity
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and then there's the sincere ideaological approach. they have no credibility as being an honest actor. >> so in other words, president obama is being played? >> no, i don't know that he's being played. i think what president obama is trying to do is nudge iran into a more responsible role. trust verified players here. they are trying to get negotiations done before march 24th. >> it strains credibility to call chuck shum mer and bob menendez saber rattlers. i think what we're seeing here is not pure ideology but senators who are also responsible who know a lot about the dynamics of iran and the negotiations. >> not as much as the state department. >> not necessarily true actually. the senate foreign relations committee has been intimately involved even before this president came to the white house.
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by the way, they didn't even like the sanction at first. now that they have been successful they're happy to associate themselves with them. >> so one thing congress is doing is inviting benjamin netanyahu who has strong feelings about this to come and speak before congress. should the president -- how should the president react to this josh? should he meet with netanyahu when he's here? >> look israel is our closest ally on the world stage in addition to great britain. on an interpersonal level there's a lot of bad blood between the presidents. i think the issue here and the one the white house is using is you have an israeli election in mid-march. this would be putting a finger on the scale is the phrase the president has used. that's a credible common standard and that's probably one that should be enforced. the decision to invite netanyahu unilaterally on the part of the speaker without consulting the white house is a brush back move. >> should the president break that rule that they have of not meeting with other world leaders when they have an election coming up within two weeks because they don't want to somehow sway the election?
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>> this whole thing is such a debacle. frankly, it's become a distraction from the negotiations over the nuclear deal with iran. you can certainly -- the relationship between bebe netanyahu and president obama is so bad and the relationship between john boehner and the president is so bad it's almost like nothing -- there's just not -- it's beyond salvageable. so unfortunately it's played out the way it's going to play out. bebe netanyahu, the prime minister of israel has made the calculation that his best relationship and the place to really focus his attention is on the congress of the united states and not the presidency. there's two more years of this president. as long as he can get through the presidency makes him look stronger. >> i want to get to some pictures of the first lady and the president when they went to saudi arabia. the first lady some people are saying that there was an etiquette breach. she did not wear a head covering when she met with the new king and she shook his hand which apparently breaks protocol. was michelle obama sending some
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sort of message, do you think, margaret? >> i do not think the first lady went to saudi arabia in order to make a statement about a country that is frankly in the medieval ages against women. if she was, i'd applaud her. that's not what she was doing. she was following strict protocols of the president -- of the u.s. department of state and as i understand in some of the reporting, the king signaled to her and stuck out his hand and she responded. >> let's play out the reaction if she did wear a head scarf. if you can write that twitter storm yourself in your sleep. >> european women don't have to wear head scarves. >> you can have mutual respect without mutual adaptation. this is a complex relationship with a lot of history to it. the fact you saw the show of support to the new king shows how complex the relationship is. >> john and marg relt. thanks so much. you can watch fareed's full exclusive interview this sunday
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at 10:00 a.m. a somber milestone in poland as the world marks 70 years since the liberation of auschwitz concentration camp. cnn's wolf blitzer has a very close connection to the camp and he will join us to talk about his trip there. (son) oh no... can you fix it, dad? yeah, i can fix that. (dad) i wanted a car that could handle anything. i fixed it! (dad) that's why i got a subaru legacy. (vo) symmetrical all-wheel drive plus 36 mpg. i gotta break more toys. (vo) introducing the all-new subaru legacy. it's not just a sedan. it's a subaru. ♪ nice! gr-reat!
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about a biologic... this is humira. this is humira helping to relieve my pain and protect my joints from further damage. this is humira giving me new perspective. doctors have been prescribing humira for ten years. humira works for many adults. it targets and helps to block a specific source of inflammation that contributes to ra symptoms. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers including lymphoma have happened, as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. talk to your doctor and visit humira.com this is humira at work
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world leaders and hundreds of holocaust survivors marked 70 years since the liberation of the auschwitz thoughts si death camp. more than 200 people were
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killed mostly jews. the day holds personal significance for cnn's wolf blitzer who traveled to the concentration camp for a new cnn documentary "voices of auschwitz." let's watch. >> it haunts us to this very day. you just hear that word auschwitz, and you think of death. you smell the death when you're walking around. i'd read a lot about the holocaust, i had seen the movies i've soon a lot of the pictures. certainly i knew what happened but until you actually see the location, you see where it occurred and you get a sense of the enormity of this crime, it's hard to believe that people can be as cruel as they clearly have been. on my dad's side he grew up in the town of auschwitz. he was born in auschwitz. he grew up in a village, that town. i walked around that town. i couldn't believe how close it was. he himself was never taken to auschwitz. they took him to a dozen other slave labor camps. i grew up hearing these stories.
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my parents were very open about their experiences. they never hid anything from me but i finally went but it was a powerful moment for me when you walked around those areas at auschwitz and berken knowing the blood that's in the ground there. it wasn't until that moment that it hit me that my father's parents were killed at auschwitz. powerful experience. something i'll never forget. >> and wolf blitzer joins us now to talk more about it. good morning, wolf. >> good morning. >> so it is haunting. it's haunting to see those pictures and for you knowing that your grandparents were killed there. what was the experience going back like? >> it was really moving. it was powerful. just to walk around. auschwitz itself is not all that big. there are baraks there, buildings, that's where dr. yosef mengodolin did his experiments on the twinls.
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a mile from there is the gas chamber and where the mass murder occurred. when you see the enormity of that you see what's left of the crematoria the gas chambers, you walk into the bearingaraks. 1.1 million jews were murdered in auschwitz, 100,000 non-jews were murdered, gypsies, homosexuals, political partisans, catholic priests. this was a killing machine that the nazis had established there in occupied poland. to see it and walking around and knowing that on my dad's side his parents, my grandparents were murdered there was a chilling experience for me just to experience it. and you had never been there before. so what had your family told you about auschwitz? >> well, my dad grew up in the town. auschwitz is the german name. all of the towns in poland have three names, german poland and
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yiddish before world war ii. a huge part of the population was jewish in poland. i heard all of the stories about the town auschwitz as it was called in german but -- and my dad, of course and my mom always told me that their parents died during the holocaust, but i really didn't -- i may have known it but i really didn't remember it. i certainly didn't appreciate it that my paternal grandparents were actually murdered at auschwitz. i never knew exactly where they died the circumstances. i knew my dad, even though he grew up in that town of auschwitz, he had never been an inmate in the death camp at auschwitz. he was a young guy so he was taken to the slave labor camps. i heard all these stories my whole life in buffalo but i didn't really appreciate the fact that my paternal grandparents died at auschwitz. my maternal grandparents my mom's parents, they died in the slave labor camp called
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schneraziko. all four of my grandparents were murdered during world war ii. i knew that as a little boy growing up but i didn't know all the details until i started to get into that roots package that i was working on last summer and then in the course of that research whether at the holocaust memorial museum in jerusalem when i was covering the war between israel hamas and gaza. i got to learn a whole lot more. a lot of this, by the way, the "voices of auschwitz" documentary is so powerful. not my voice, but the voices of the auschwitz survivors. they tell their story. it's amazing. >> we can't wait to watch it. we're so happy you came on "new day" to preview it. it looks really emotional and really moving. thanks so much for sharing your family's personal history with us. >> thank you. >> wolf blitzer's emotional documentary "voices of auschwitz" airs tonight at 9:00 p.m. on cnn. don't miss that. the blizzard of 2015 won't
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be forgotten by those who lived through it. what about one little boy who was born during it? it can only be the good stuff. that's next. financial noise financial noise financial noise
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>> reporter: all right. it's a good stuff. we have a little of the good stuff going on behind us. dave show this. we have fenway and bower and that's the brindle. harry and his mom are going at it with the snow balls. she was hitting them from behind. that's dirty pool. people are having fun. the digout obviously a big deal. mich i saw you in repose in the snow. i respect it. the good stuff is normally people doing the extraordinary. the blizzard created so much negativity that we just wanted to find you know something positive that came out of it. nothing says positive like a new baby. that takes us to danielle smith from nantucket. nantucket, you know was really hard hit. just an island. she wasn't supposed to give birth until next week but before the first snowflake even fell she told cnn she started having contractions and went to the hospital with power out all over the island and guess who came? caden keith moore delivered at 3:53 tuesday morning.
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doctors at a nantucket cottage hospital using generators to bring the blizzard baby into the world. we're told that mother and child are doing well. thank god this morning. and also thank god she gave him a normal name didn't name him bliz or something like that. that doesn't have any staying power. >> michaela you are really acclimating. >> we have one in connecticut, too. >> tell us. >> reporter: oh, you had a baby? >> reporter: sarah and andrew browning yes. graham michael browning was born during the storm at 8:30 in the morning. not due until february 14th. he came really early. 5 pounds 11 ounces. mom and baby are doing just fine. congratulations to them. >> that's great. get back here. >> reporter: the urgency has passed. alisyn if i were there in connecticut, i would pancake you in that snow right now. michy, you wouldn't have a chance. >> reporter: hey, hey. >> better watch yourself. >> reporter: we'll all be together tomorrow. alisyn thank you for guiding the ship from new york.
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michy, i'll see you soon. time for "newsroom" with carol costello. >> thanks, chris. "newsroom" starts now. happening now in the "newsroom," after the storm, folks not digging this. >> just the wind. the winds are killing us. >> mother nature's winning. >> so like 23 inches. >> 28.8 inches. >> i'm not even sure how i'm going to get out of

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