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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  February 28, 2015 7:00am-11:01am PST

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thanks so much for joining me. don't forget follow me on twitter if you can smell smerconish. see you next week. so glad to have you with us. we begin with breaking news as we now have for you brand new images coming into us. take a look at this. the car that may have been used by the killers of one of russia's president's most outspoken critics.
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this is the white car that you see there in full. these pictures are from russia 24 that's the state-run broadcasting network. and police are searching for this very car as we speak. >> we'll continue to have this conversation. good morning, i'm victor blackwell. >> i'm christi paulson. glad to have you here. >> we are getting video with a manhunt out for the killer of moscow's president. his killers are still at large and the supporters are bringing flowers and candles to the spot where he was killed. cnn's senior international correspondent fred fiken is there, what do we know about this car, fred? >> reporter: well, we know that since the late evening hours when this killing happened that the police have been saying they have been searching for a white car. it was really in the early stages of the investigation that
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we heard that eyewitnesss had seen a white car stop in front of boris' office. and a friend he was with from ukraine here opened fire and then sped off. and so certainly there was a manhunt underway. also specifically they are looking for a white car. it was interesting as we drove around moscow late last night and there were white cars being stopped frequently as police were clearly looking for the suspects. now, still it is unclear who was driving that car. it's still very much unclear who is behind this. however, throughout the day the russian authorities have said they have been making they believe headway on the investigation. they have questioned several witnesses. of course first and foremost the female friend who was with boris walking on this bridge late last night. also one of the things we have to keep in mind is that the area we're in right now, the area around the kremlin, has a lot of surveillance technology. there's a lot of cameras here and a lot of police officers here.
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many of them in plain clothes as well. so certainly there would be a lot of eyewitnesss. there would be a lot of tape that the police says they are going through. and clearly there's video of that white car that police believe might be the one that was used. it isn't confirmed yet, but clearly it was caught on surveillance cameras as well. victor. >> fred explain for us his role in the opposition movement and what is planned tomorrow to memorialize him? >> reporter: he was very important here in russia but we have to keep in mind that the opposition movement here for a long time has been marginalized. you can read that. when you look at the approval ratings vladimir putin has in this country, the recent approval rating came out a couple days ago at 86% approval. think about that. if you look at the western politicians and the approval ratings they regularly get. and one of the things we have to say is that the approval is
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real. the vast majority of the people here in this country support vladimir putin. this certainly was not someone who would have been a threat to vladimir putin in any way, shape or form. but he was significant in the opposition movement. and certainly the march tomorrow is when it's going to be a lot different than it was going to be. the main theme of it was going to be before all this happened criticism of russia's actions in ukraine. now it's going to be a march of silence, a march of mourning for boris nemtsov. president obama signed a short-term bill that extends funding for seven days. the house lawmakers approved the plan just hours before the midnight deadline. and that means thousands of tsa workers, border agents and other federal employees will indeed continue to get paid for the time being. cnn's aaron mcpike is live for us outside the white house. good morning, erin.
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>> reporter: christie good morning. we need to stress this is just a one-week extension. it was done at the 11th hour. and that is after a three-week extension failed in the house. that passed in the senate as did a clean funding bill. with overwhelming support, republicans lenting saying we will give president obama what he needs in order to fund that department for the rest of the year. this is really going to come down to house republicans. i should point out, of course that the reason that the three-week extension failed is house democrats wanted to stop playing the games. they just wanted to fund the department for the rest of the year. but going forward in the next week they only have a breather for the next couple of days as house republicans have to figure out how to get enough people on board to fund this department for the rest of the year. >> all right. erin mcpike, thank you so much. now that there's that one-week extension, we have been trying to talk about the debate at the
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start of this immigration battle. republicans trying to tie money from homeland security to legislation, rolling back the president's executive orders. congressional democrats expected to block that effort. now let's bring in new mexico's governor bill richardson. thank you so much for taking the time to be with us here. >> thank you. nice to be with you. >> thank you. so, first of all, what is your reaction to the stopgap measure? >> well, i just think that what's happening is another example of the dysfunction in the congress. a week reprieve it shows combined with the netanyahu speech the fact that no action seems to happen on immigration, on anything the gridlock continues continues. and the republicans have chosen dysfunction as a tactic. and right now the executive
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branch is basically trying to see where there's a penetration on potential action on immigration, on funding the budget on homeland security and then deal with this netanyahu issue in the congress next week. >> so governor you said republicans are choosing dysfunction. do you think that all the chaos falls on them? >> well, it does. because they are the ones blocking the budget the homeland security issue. the senate i think the democratic senate found a one-week reprieve. look i'm not just blaming republicans. i think both sides, both sides need to come to the table and say, this has to end. i mean this is the funding of the federal government. these are jobs. this is the security of the american people. the homeland security. this is domestic terrorism. this is funding to protect americans at airports. so this is incredible what is happening. you know, when i served in the congress we had disagreements
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to the stage where there would be a breakdown in government. i don't see where the benefit for any political party is when there is total incapacity total dysfunction in getting even a budget for security for the american people passed. >> let me ask you this do you think the issue of immigration should be in this bill? or should it be something separate? >> well, it should be something separate. because the president clearly has federal control over immigration. what he did on the deportation issue is proven by legal scholars on the right and the left. but i think a very small fraction maybe 60 in the house republican caucus the tea party caucus is holding up funding for homeland security. the entire department the entire scope of domestic security for the american people in retaliation for that
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action. so you have to be honest and say, this is what's happening. >> okay. ambassador richardson do stay with us. we have so much more that we want to get your thoughts on regarding what is the most talked about stories in politics this weekend. the flowing protest over israeli benjamin netanyahu. we want to hear more on that from you as well as maybe what is going to happen with speaker boehner now that he's really feeling the fire under his feet. again, ambassador richardson sticking with us. we are back in just a moment.
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♪ how did i set a new personal record today? i started with a test run. then i got a solid night's rest in a great room. and before i hit the road, i hit the breakfast bar where i got my fuel for the next 26 miles. great endings begin here. and now when you choose choice twice, get a night at no price at 1,500 hotels. book now at choicehotels.com welcome back to "cnn newsroom." we'll continue our conversation with governor richardson. prime minister netanyahu's upcoming speech before a joint session of congress. this debate started heating up last month after the republican house speaker john boehner
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invited the israeli leader to speak in washington without consulting the white house. already, 33 democrats have vowed to boycott the speech arguing that his message could jeopardize talks over iran's nuclear program, which are approaching a critical deadline. others say two weeks before the election in israel is inappropriate. what is your take on the prime minister's decision to sidestep the white house and speak on capitol hill? and we now know in his own words, he will discuss with congress this proposed or potential deal with iran. >> well, i do believe it was a breach of protocol by the prime minister by the speaker. they should have consulted the white house. on the other hand the israeli/american relationship is very strong. this is a public spat. this is a breach. this is a lovers quarrel gone bad. it's not the end or the weakening of the u.s./israelly
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relationship. this is a big bad public spat which should end. but, at the same time i have to confess, i am concerned about this deal with iran. i want to see more details. i want to see iran end its nuclear capacity. so the prime minister is raising legitimate issues on behalf of israel on behalf of the security in the region. but the way he did it i think, is wrong. i'm a strong supporter of israel and the relationship and i think the obama administration needs to minimize this incident as much as they can. and not use words like destructive phase of the relationship as has been used. i think we need to cool down because this is a very important security relationship in a region that is basically exploding and where the united states doesn't have too many allies. >> let me ask you also about phyllis sorter she's an
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american who was serving as a missionary in nigeria kidnapped on monday in lagos, nigeria, we understand the kidnapping happened outside the area where boka horam is. so it is not seen as terror related by this definition of a terror group being involved. but they asked for the equivalent of $300,000 for her safe return. because this is not seen as terror-related or related to a terror group, and for some families or congregations, $300,000 might be doable should they be allowed to pay ransom to get this reverend back? >> i hope not. i think u.s. policy is correct. that there shouldn't be no ramsoms. otherwise you will have random ransoms everywhere and it will
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be chaotic. that doesn't mean you don't use special envoys the church other potential breakthroughs that might secure the release of this person. you know it's a private case. there have been cases where americans have paid through organizations some kind of kidnapping funds. that is a private decision. but my hope is that the families the organization they use the u.s. government because the nigerian government is virtually helpless in many of the kidnapping cases. that they are either inept or not cooperating with anyone. so i think you have to go on a case by case basis. but ransom should not happen. there should be better concentration of information given to the families by the u.s. government. and if we have that information, families many times suffer because they don't know the scope of the negotiations the condition that their loved ones are in. so i think we should make an effort to get better intel,
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better intelligence but at the same time more information to the families and groups that are the victims of some of these kidnappings. >> former new mexico governor bill richardson thank you so much for your time this morning. >> thank you. well, guess what? it seems that winter is just not going to let go of texas. snow ice, triggering pile-ups gridlock on slippery highways. look at these pictures. we have the latest on this brutal weather that will not seem to let us go. plus the trial for one of the boston marathon bombing suspects expected to get underway next week. here's the question can he really get a fair and impartial jury? t in . not to be focusing again, on my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis. so i finally made a decision to talk to my dermatologist about humira. humira works inside my body to target and help block a specific source of inflammation that contributes to my symptoms.
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all right. welcome back to "newsroom." we are tracking conditions here in dallas with issues of groundstops at the airport as a result of icing. that has been lifted now. but if you're traveling on i-20 i still think you're going to see slick spots because we are dealing with temperatures below freezing and we still have a little bit of rain that's going to be moving through. temperatures are into the upper 20s. then eventually this afternoon we'll climb up a good ten degrees more. that will be enough to melt whatever is left as far as ice on the roads. so good news there. then we track the storm heading off to the north and east. st. louis, indianapolis you'll be getting into the snow tomorrow. may see some issues there. then eventually this all heads to the north and east where we
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could see additional accumulations from philly heading up to boston. in fact in boston four to six inches could put you into the snowiest winter ever. incredible stuff here with four to six inches. a pretty good swath there. winter storm watches are posted. some will become warnings the next few hours as conditions get closer. frigid air begins to retreat a little bit with milder conditions taking over across the southeast. so that's certainly good news. but then the cold air mass pushes right back in here with temperatures over the next few days my goodness look at atlanta, pushing 60 degrees by the afternoon. staying cold to the north but not as frigid although we'll watch that snow closely for you throughout the weekend and heading into the early part of monday. victor? >> sounds good. getting closer to 60. ivan cabrera, thank you so much. we'll get you a look at the other stories developing right now. >> it was the attack that terrorized boston. now a court has ruled the marathon bombing trial can stay in boston. a federal appeals court denied a petition to change the venue for
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the trial of dzhokhar tsarnaev. that means the jury procedure can proceed next week. and it was an emotional day for president obama saying good-bye to outgoing attorney general eric holder. the president was among those who attended a portrait unveiling ceremony for holder at the department of justice yesterday. and legendary soul singer aretha franklin delivered a surprise performance of "america the beautiful." she called holder a champion and warrior. and actors say good-bye to leonard nimoy who died yesterday at the age of 83. he may be best remembered for playing spock. and jihadi john. what we are learning about his childhood growing up in london.
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and an american blogger who spoke out about extremists is hacked to death on the streets of bangladesh. our next one to watch is in the locker room and ready to roll. jennifer lopez has hired him as a choreography but found his dancing so captivated she pulled him from behind the scenes to perform with her center stage. so what is it that makes him so irresistible to the stars? >> he's the best dancer in the world, okay? i think the thing that makes chris and beyonce and j-lo and michael jackson is the fire. >> dance like it's your last dance all the time. you know always you know and he does that.
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the spins, the hits the thrusts. chris spent his childhood studying michael jackson's every move and performed his routines at talent competitions across the state. the king of pop had a magic he was desperate to understand. >> the way he performed, the way he transformed when he got on the stage, the way he owned the stage was amazing to me. and he really made me feel how he was feeling. it's one thing to learn something and to move and do all the stuff, but for you to really embody it and fill it and have the emotion, you know, it's really it's tough. i was taught to always rehearse rehearse rehearse until it just becomes you. where you don't have to think. >> you can check out the full show at cnn.com/onestowatch.
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>> > just hours before a midnight deadline lawmakers approved a one-week funding extension for the department of homeland security. late last night president obama signed the bill which expires next friday. and democrats are vowing to reject any republican measure that would tie dhs funding to rolling back the president's immigration orders. and police are searching a car that may have been used in the drive-by shooting of opposition leader boris nemtsov. he was gunned down as he walked across the moscow bridge last night. in a message to his mother president putin asked her to accept his deepest condolences and promised to do everything possible to find and punish his killers. we have new details about
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the isis killer known as jihadi john. it's now known that mohommad emwazi has a normal childhood in london. you see him here in this class photo in a school uniform. now a terrorism expert is trying to figure out how he went from that person to the infamous killer seen in the isis beheading videos. this morning officials in bangladesh are trying to figure out who carried out a brutal attack on a bangladeshi-american blogger. >> the man who lived in the area at one time was hacked to death on the streets of bangladesh and his wife was walking with him. he was the target of threats from islamists for his view on islamic extremism. listen to what an eyewitness had to say here. >> translator: i saw an unknown person bring out a big knife and first hit him from behind on his head. and then on his shoulders.
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i shouted for help from the people but nobody came to save him. no one came. a lady was with him. she was his wife. she was also hit on the shoulder. >> let's be i think in cnn's international correspondent ivan watson for more now. ivan? >> reporter: the grieving father of a well-known bangladeshi-american writer and critic of religious extremism murdered in the streets of the bangladeshi capital sunday night. the father says his son faced many death threats and suspected islamist groups of carrying out the grisly murder. now, we have spoken to the doctor who carried out the autopsy and says he had deep wounds to the back of his skull, to his neck and to his back from some kind of a weapon like a machete. witnesses say that two men attacked roy and his wife as they were walking down the street in the bangladeshi
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capital thursday night on their way back from a book fair. now roy said he got a surge in death threats after he published a book last year that was titled "the virus of faith." in which he denounced religious extreme itch. and in a column he wrote for a mag sheen published in april, he condemned the attacks in paris against the cartoon magazine "charlie hebdo" carried out by islamist fundamentalists. i'm going to read an excerpt that goes quote, religious extremism is like a highly contagious virus. death threats started flowing to my e-mail inbox on a regular basis. i suddenly found myself a target of militant islamists and terrorists. even more ominous, roy said that he quoted one threat that he says he received from a man who wrote that they couldn't reach roy while he was in the u.s.
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where he lived outside of the u.s. city of atlanta, but they would wait to attack him when he returned to bangladesh. the bangladeshi police have yet to arrest anybody in connection with this murder. the u.s. state department has condemned the attack and offered to help with the investigation. ivan watson cnn, hong kong. >> ivan thank you so much. jordan's king abdullah ii told cnn he didn't watch the video of his nation's pilot being burned to death by isis calling it propaganda that backfired on the terrorist group. but in an exclusive television interview, his first we should point out since the pilot was killed the king spoke to cnn's fareed zakaria about president obama's refusal to label this war on radical islam. listen. >> president obama has gotten into a little trouble or at least has received some criticism because he says he doesn't want to call groups like
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isis islamic extremists because he doesn't want to give them the mental legitimacy by acknowledging they are islamic. do you think he's right? >> i think he is right. and i think this is -- this is something that has to be understood on a much larger platform. because they are looking for legitimacy they don't have inside of islam. are you a wanted extremist? what these people want is to be called an extremist. they take that as a label of honor. to label islam under moderates is completely wrong. so i think by making this comparison they are extremist muslims is exactly what these people want. no we are muslims. i don't know what these people are, but they definitely do not have any relationship to our faith. >> watch the entire interview with jordan's king abdullah ii on fareez zakaria gps tomorrow
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at 10:00 a.m. eastern. it was the attack that terrorized boston. a court now has ruled the marathon bombing trial can indeed stay in that city. a federal appeals court denied a petition to change the venue for the trial of accused bomber dzhokhar tsarnaev. that means jury selection proceeds as scheduled as this week. we'll bring in cnn legal analyst mel robins to talk about this. mel, god tood to see you. where does the defense team go from here do they have the option to file another appeal or is this it? >> christie great to be on with you. the defense, he has the best defense on the planet. these are the number one death penalty lawyers, literally, in america. so you're going to see them basically take appeals wherever they possibly can. this wasn't the first time they tried to get the trial moved. this was the third time.
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and you could see them possibly do it yet again. however, when they get into court, chris ty they are going to be facing 70 jurors. they have whittled them down from a pool of thousands. then they whittled the thousands down to a pool of 256. they interviewed those 256 for over a week. they filled out huge questionnaires and now we finally have a pool of 70 potential jurors. now, what's going to happen is each side has 20 challenges where they can strike people from the jury without saying exactly why. they will then impanel a jury of 12 people. there will be six alternates and then they will start opening statements on wednesday. >> i want to read you something one of the decenting judges wrote. because he said from the coverage of the day of the bombing has been unparalleled in american legal history. and thats the absurd to suggest tsarnaev will receive a fair and
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impartial trial. do you agree? >> i completely disagree. and frankly i find it insulting. he's before one of the most respected federal court judges in this jurisdiction. they are meticulously scrutinizing every single thing that they do. as i mentioned earlier, he's got the number one death penalty attorneys in the country representing him. they have made multiple appeals already. and to suggest that he can't get a fair trial in a city of at least 5 million people and to say that they can't find 12 open-minded jurors that can take a look at this case and view him as presumed innocent and look at the facts, i find it to be insulting, frankly. >> mel, really quickly here, you say he has the best defense on the planet. how do you think they are going to depend him? >> i think what you're going to see them do is create a narrative around his life story. many of us have already said
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this is really a trial of two parts, one is about the guilt or innocence. and i don't think there's anybody that believes he will be found innocent of these charges. i think he will be found guilty on all of the counts. then we move to a sentencing phase. and the sentencing phase is all about whether or not he's going to spend his life in prison and die there or whether or not he's going to get the death penalty. and ironically one of the best places for him to be is in massachusetts. because the majority of people in this state disagree with the death penalty. while you have to say you impose the death penalty in order to be impanelled on a death penalty case the truth of the matter is he probably has a better chance of getting a sympathetic jury here to actually spare his life than if they moved it to a different venue. so what you do as a defense attorney on this kind of case is you build a story around his life and around how he was
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overwhelmed by his brother. and you use it to try to get the jury to spare his life and only sentence him to life without the possibility of parole. >> interesting. all right. mel robbins, always appreciate your voice on this. thank you. a small missouri town population 50. now rocked to its core after a shooter guns down seven of the 50 in a house-to-house rampage. long-acting levemir® an injectable insulin that can give you blood sugar control for up to 24 hours. and levemir® helps lower your a1c. levemir® comes in flextouch® the only prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension. levemir® lasts 42 days without refrigeration. that's 50% longer than lantus® which lasts 28 days. today i'm asking about levemir® flextouch®. levemir® is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes
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investigators in missouri are trying to find the motive behind a house-to-house killing spree that left seven people shot to death. the rampage happened in the small town of tyrone in southeast, missouri. where most of the residents, 50 at most know each other and don't even lock their doors at night. cnn's will ripley as the latest for us this morning. will what do we expect to learn from police? >> reporter: well, we know victor that today, perhaps it was scheduled to begin a short time ago. they are examining the body of alice aldridge she's the mother of the suspected gunman joseph aldridge. we are learning she may have been dead for 24 hours before her body was discovered. and police are trying to find out if there was a link between alice's death of natural causes and what they believe is joseph's shooting spree that he went on in the town of tyrone.
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a town of about 50 people beginning on thursday night. according to the investigators here he essentially, because people here don't lock their doors, he was able to go from house to house to house killing four members of the aldridge family essentially wiping out most of that family who live in the town of tyrone. and also going on to kill at least two members of another family which police have not yet named. we spoke yesterday with the cousin of some of the other people who were killed from the other family. he went over there and found their bodies. and he also found their 13-year-old son who was in his back bedroom essentially in a state of shock. we also know there was a 15-year-old girl who heard gunfire in one of the aldridge homes. she raced out, went to a neighbor's house and called police. also she is traumatized this morning. there was one survivor of the shooting. another member of the aldridge family in the hospital talking to police to give them as much information as she can. but understandably shock that
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this town now the scene of the deadliest mass shooting in vent history here in missouri. >> your heart certainly goes out to that town and to that family. will ripley for us there in missouri. thank you. a high school principal that you do not want to mess with. the iraq war veteran pinned a scathing letter to his students vowing to go after pathetic cowards who use social media for cyber bullying. he is joining us next. en i finally told my doctor, he said humira is for adults like me who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. and that in clinical studies the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief. and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure.
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before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common and if you've had tb hepatitis b, are prone to infections or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, remission is possible.
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cowards. that's what a high school principal in massachusetts is calling cyber bullies using anonymous twitter accounts to pick on students. and he's so frustrated he's vowing to go after them. take a look at this letter the iraq war veteran sent out, this was sent to 350 students. i'm going to read part of it for you here. to the pathetic cowards who chose to start and participate in this you are warned. i am coming for you and i am furious. i hate sniveling, cowardly behavior like this. i have more respect for insurgents. i fought in iraq than i do for people behind this twitter account. at least iraqis had the courage to face their targets and not hide behind a twitter account. principal romano is with us now. thank you for taking time to be with us now. this video went viral. thousands of people have read
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it but i understand you wish you would have chosen your words differently. why so? >> well, i think that i didn't want to come across quite so strong but i was writing very much in the heat of the moment. i had just been speaking with the parents of one of the children who was a target on the account, a 15-year-old girl who just absolute lily had vulgar and crass things said about her. obviously the student is upset and the parents are notified about it. once i was notified about it and looked at the tweet, just the level of vulgarity displayed in them really pushed me to make a strong message. and i care about these children very much. and i don't want to see bad things happen to them. so i was reacting to that. the thing that set me off is not only was it the actual post on there by the few people who created the account, but there were already 50 students
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following them. people re-tweeting them which just spreads it further. so where normally in a bullying case i would go and deal with the aggressor and it would be something dealt with school-wide between the anonymity of twitter where i didn't have a suspect or any suspects. and the fact that so many students were participating in it and spreading it. i felt i had to act strong to make sure students knew exactly how i felt about it and see if i could stop that for the sake of the two dozen or so students victimized by these two accounts. >> so two dozen victims of this. i want to listen to some found here because you have students and parents really backing you up on this. let's listen. >> i think he's doing a good job. >> yeah i think he's the best principal we have had. >> that just shows he's a good person and actually cares about us. >> i thought it was great. maybe if more people stuck up less kids would get bullied and less bad things would happen. >> all right. so you mentioned a couple dozen
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who have been affected by this. has this been an ongoing problem for a long time and have you seen any changes since you wrote that letter? >> i have never seen twitter accounts like this where just anonymous places where people are posting hateful comments. and so my fear when the first two accounts started and all the other students were participating, is that this was going to become the next problem. that i had two students doing it now. what if i had ten other students who decide hey, this is really cool and start their own. now i have a dozen forums in which people are just dishing out hatred towards classmates and horrible things. so you're always dealing with bullying as a high school principal. you're always dealing with it to some extent. typically, it is not at this scale where it's literally schoolwide. typically it's one aggressor targeting one student. and it can be through electronic media, but typically it could be something through facebook where you know who is doing it. this is the first time i have
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seen something to this scale. >> real quickly, i want to ask you, you mentioned the word crime. they are alleging sexual vulgar things. and they are under age. is there a possibility of legal action anywhere here? >> the only way there would be legal action would be if i was able to identify who the aggressors were and it was part of a pattern towards the target. if there was a student targeted by one of the aggressors and it was part of a tyrant of bullying then you can make charges of criminal harassment. but until i have suspects until i know who created the accounts i can't do that. and the nature of twitter allows for anonymity where people don't have to put their name anywhere on their profile. so it is very hard without someone coming forward to find out who the aggressor is. until i have a name there's no possibility at all for criminal charges. >> joshua romano thank you for taking the time to talk to us. thank you, too, for your service. >> thank you very much. >> sure take care. a manhunt continues in russia for the killer of this man.
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boris nemtsov. he's a critic of vladimir putin. a live report ahead from the crime scene where great numbers of mourners have gathered. veggies you're cool. mayo, corn dogs you are so out of here! ahh... 'cause i'm reworking the menu. keeping her healthy and you on your toes. the complete balanced nutrition of great tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals antioxidants and 9 grams of protein. i see you cupcake. uh oh the #1 doctor recommended brand. ensure. nutrition in charge!
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today's cnn hero recognizes a 12-year-old girl who invented a special drinking cup for people with mobility issues like her grandfather with parkinson's disease. now she sold 11,000 of them and they are being used by everyone. take a look. >> my grandfather has parkinson's disease that causes him to shake. he spilled all the time. so i decided to make the kangaroo cup. i came up with the idea when i was around 8 or 9 years old. i wanted to put legs on the cup because i figured that it wouldn't be as likely to spill. the original cup was made out of porcelain. we decided to make a plastic version, so it can be used by anybody. like little kids. people with mobility issues. i have a design team.
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and they really do help me so much. color-wise blue? >> uh-huh. >> lily has sold about 11,000 cups total. the classmates and teachers don't even know what she's doing. >> let it be like the next big thing. >> i do think i'm keeping kangaroo cup to a minimum. >> now the word is getting around school like wait lily? she invented this cup? oh my gosh. >> that is so cool. >> hi lily how are you doing? >> good. my cup has changed my grandfather's life. because that's the only cup he uses now. once the kangaroo cup came the other cups he used were just out of the picture. one day i gave him a kangaroo cup to parkinson's research and hopefully one day they will find a cure. >> here's to you. >> good for her. hey, we hope you make some great
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memories today. thank you for being with us. >> there's much ahead in the next hour of "the cnn newsroom." let's go to our colleague, katerina whitfield. thank you so much you guys. have a great day. i'm fredericka whitfield. "the newsroom" starts right now. >> critics of the government critics of putin, bad things seem to happen to them. >> yes, unfortunately existent to our representative of russia in the 19th century. >> erie words from boris nemtsov who was gunned down. his murder could be to
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destabilize the country. plus an 11th hour reprieve to keep money funding to the homeland security. but the fight is not over. and investigators now know what triggered a door-to-door killing in missouri. we're live in the "cnn newsroom." we start with a developing story in the shdadow of the kremlin. the hunt is underway for the suspects who killed boris nemtsov. he was shot last night walking across the bridge with a friend barely 100 yards from the russian government. just minutes ago the russian state media released this car they say could be the vehicle used in the shooting. investigators believe nemtsov's shooting was carefully planned and opposition leaders call it a
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direct message from the kremlin. earlier this month in a chilling premonition of his death, nemtsov said quote, i'm afraid putin will kill me. i believe that he was the one who unleashed the war in you crain. i couldn't dislike him more end quote. last year nemtsov told anthony bourdain he understood the criticism. >> when he learned you were joining, he was uninvited. should i be concerned with having dinner with you? >> you are in a very unsafe situation. everyone can press you on the story of business. that's it. this is a system. >> meet boris nemtsov, deputy prime minister under yeltsin. bad things seemed to happen to them. >> yes. i represent russia of the 19th
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century, not of 21st. >> this is a case of a known enemy of putin that has radioactive plutonium, are you concerned? >> me? myself? >> yeah. >> i was born here 54 years ago. this is my country. russian people are in a bit of trouble. the russian court doesn't work. russian education declining every year. and i believe russia has a chance to be free. it is difficult what you must do. >> well, today mourners held a vigil at the site of nemtsov's death. this as president obama called for an impartial investigation into the leader's murder. and his mother says her son's killer will be properly punished. joining me from moscow fred anything new on the search? i see a huge group of people
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mourners who have turned out, but what more on the investigation? and is it trusted an investigation will be pursued? >> reporter: well, it certainly is entrusted by many people for the investigation that will be impartial. but right now it seems as though that's all people have to grasp onto. if you listen to politicians here in this country, even opposition politicians, they also call on the kremlin to conduct this investigation in a thorough way to make sure it is run professionally. one of the things that the russian state said vladimir putin himself will be overseeing the investigation and he of course has come forward and as you said written that letter to the mother of boris nemtsov and said the people who are behind this will be found and punished adequately. so certainly this investigation is going forward. the interesting thing about all of this fredericka is the murder happened in a place where there is an abundance of surveillance. we are right next to the
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kremlin, less than 100 yards away. there are surveillance cameras here and there are claims the officers here are walking around all the time. and it is interesting to note that there are a lot of eyewitnesses being questioned by police. that's one of the reasons they were able to zero in on this white vehicle so quickly. it still is unclear whether or not that is actually the vehicle that was used in the killing. certainly the authorities appear to believe that's the case but there is an abundance, as i said of surveillance here out here. and that's one of the things people find so chilling. something like that could have happened in such a public place. and really in the heart of moscow in a place so important to terms of security fred. >> all right. fred piken, thank you so much. appreciate that from moscow. we'll talk more about this with cnn global affairs analyst and delta force commander, retired lieutenant colonel james reese. you heard from fred who said lots of surveillance cameras
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everywhere and eyewitnesses, you have to wonder if they feel intimidated and really say everything they think and feel there. do you trust that the general public says when putin says an investigation will happen that it will indeed happen? >> good morning. it's difficult, especially in russia. with all the issues happening throughout the years and the destabilization ongoing. president putin runs a pretty tight ship over there. bottom line this was a contract hit. you know like everyone has talked about, a lot of cameras there, a lot of police a lot of people so someone was tracking this. someone knew how to do this. especially driving up behind a car, getting out six shots, four in the body it's a contract hit. >> do you feel like in any way this further complicates, even the u.s. commitment to try to get to the bottom of what is happening in ukraine and russia's role. and now there's this investigation. and president obama even saying that a thorough investigation
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needs to happen there in russia. do you see any real connections here to a real conflicted in what the u.s. sees in russia? >> yes, i do have concerns. my biggest concern right now is the total destabilization going around the world, with the middle east russia ukraine, even here in the united states. these aspects that are happening just really stop us from any type of watchdog or any type of opposition to the leadership of russia where we are trying to say, hey, we disagree with what you're doing in the ukraine. and if you are going to kill off all the opposition it's tough to have a democratic decision and discussion about what should be done and what shouldn't be done by the super powers. >> and then -- i guess would you or should anyone believe that there could ever be a real thorough investigation? because, you know european allies of russia certainly don't
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trust the government. the u.s. in many instances has conveyed it doesn't trust vladimir putin and his leadership. and then you underscore the destabilization in ukraine. and then some accuse this murder as an effort to further destabilize. so what do you do with all that kind of information in terms of whether there will be a credible investigation in whether anyone can trust it will actually happen? >> well, i think that you know the bottom line is this. you know everyone's going to have there's a lot of conspiracy theories going on out there right now. we'll watch this the next couple of days but the russians have some great investigating people. not even outside the police in the special police there, but they have people who really want to bring russia to the next level. so it will be interesting to watch it come down to the federal and the governmental side. then the watch room the reporters and the other investigators are out there. and the watchdog groups it really put a tough pressure on
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putin and the presidency in the russian oligarchs. >> colonel james reese, thank you so much. appreciate it. we'll check back with you. any time there's an international hunt on to find at least four teens who may have gone to join isis. authorities are concerned the canadian students are either on their way to the middle east or are already there. it's believed they flew from montreal to turkey in mid-january. authorities say they don't know where the teens are now. paula newton has more on the story from montreal. >> reporter: smart, kind and normal. that's how many are describing 18-year-old shima sinusi possibly on her way to join isis in syria. at the montreal high school she once attended she was liked. and this was her tutor a couple years ago? what was your impression of her
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while she was tutoring you? >> i just knew she was a normal girl. >> reporter: did you get the impression she was very religious religious? >> no not really. it was just normal talk. >> reporter: normal talk is how it seemed to those who knew her until she went missing earlier this year. one of at least four possibly more young people from montreal whose families fear they have been lured into joining isis. three of the missing teens attended this community college across town. and at least one attended classes taught by a muslim preacher who has been accused by the college of spreading hate speech in the classrooms he used for teaching arabic and the koran. he is known to security officials. in 2003 police said he was an al qaeda sleeper agent who received training in afghanistan. he spent six years being watched by canadian authorities. but in 2009 the courts determined he was not a security threat. he says he only met one of the missing students on a couple of
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occasions and says he is just trying to integrate young muslims, not radicalize them. still he and his classes have been suspended from campus while police try to determine what could have led the teens to possibly join isis. it's been a baffling case here in terms of when you look at the profiles of the young people. nothing to really indicate that they would actually leave their families in this way. again, fred canadian authorities trying to work with turkish authorities to determine if these young people are in syria right now. fred? >> all right. this is going to be one heck of a search. all right, thank you so much paula newton in montreal. still ahead, u.s. homeland security will continue to get money, but only for another week. and now another big fight is brewing. in wondering if house speaker john bone earehner's job is now on the line.
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>> fred if he does not fight president obama on immigration right now, conservative congressmen say they could try to oust him from the speakership. more on that after the break. would you be willing to give up sharing your moments? sacrifice streaming all night long? is it okay to drop a connection, when you need it most? if you're not on the largest, most reliable network, what are you giving up? verizon. alright, so this tylenol arthritis lasts 8 hours but aleve can last 12 hours. and aleve is proven to work better on pain than tylenol arthritis. so why am i still thinking about this? how are ya? good. aleve. proven better on pain.
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all right. call it a hail mary for the department of homeland security. minutes before the midnight deadline president obama signed a bill to extend funding to dhs for another just seven days. erin mcpike is at the white house for us. we're hearing the funding showdown is also having serious consequences for house speaker john boehner. and people talk about whether he needs to keep his job or not. >> reporter: well, fred, that's right. and by and large, pressure is building on the house to pass a clean funding bill that would fund the department of homeland security for the rest of the year. we're hearing from moderate republicans and people really all over the country who are saying just get this done and
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tackle president obama's executive action on immigration another way. i want to play for you what bernard karerik said earlier to cnn. >> do whatever you have to do but do not hold up funding for the department of homeland security. it's just not -- it's outrageous it's dangerous. and it puts us in jeopardy. >> reporter: and, fred earlier i spoke with the first dhs secretary, tom ridge, who was a republican. he's the former governor of pennsylvania. and he believes cooler heads will prevail. he says that republicans have made their point, they really aught to just pass this. but there is a small group of conservative republicans in the house who were trying to hold speaker boehner's feet to the fire. and it's putting him in a really tough position. and i want to read to you a comment made by steve womack a
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republican congressman from arkansas. here's what he said to cnn yesterday. it's a hell of a position to be in. i just can't imagine the frustration the speaker must have now. and fred as you know speaker boehner has been threatened multiple times by some of these really conservative congressmen. there are conservative republican senators who have tried to do the same thing to senate majority leader mitch mcconnell. but ultimately the senate passed the clean funding bill yesterday. and the house hasn't been able to do that. and speaker boehner is under a lot of pressure from these conservative congressmen. >> i guess what is different now, erin is as of that decision or that vote last night in the president signing it just before midnight that now you do have republican leadership which you're using this latest example as another way in which to push the discussion on the ousting of boehner. is that being taken very seriously in the rank and file? >> reporter: it certainly is. if it weren't being taken seriously, they -- speaker boehner probably would have
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brought this bigger bill to the floor. he has to cater to these conservative congressmen. he's been doing that. now, the question remains, can the conservatives chorale together enough votes to oust speaker boehner? that remains to be seen but he does take the threats seriously. >> erin mcpike at the white house, appreciate it. still ahead, investigators have one possible motive for what triggered a deadly shooting spree. will winripley is in tyrone, missouri. >> reporter: a mother is wanting to know if her death is what triggered the shootings in a fifth of the town's population.
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checking your top stories now in iraq. the prime minister talked about the destruction at the hands of isis. he called them barbarians and vowed to hunt them down. iraq's museum was ransacked during the fall of baghdad back in 2003. and tomorrow the space walk is a go despite a small amount of water found in a helmet of
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the american. water was pushed into the helmet after it was depressurized. they have a high degree of confidence now in the suit. and in a new development, a u.s. appeals court has ruled the boston marathon bombing trial will stay in boston. jury selection in the death penalty trial of dzhokhar tsarnaev is now set to begin next week. three people were killed and another 250 injured in april 2013 bombings near the marathon's finish line. investigators now think they know what may have triggered a door-to-door killing spree in the tiny southern missouri town of tyrone. seven people were shot dead. one injured. the victims were found in four homes. the gunman the alleged gunman was found dead in a pickup truck 15 miles away after apparently shooting himself. cnn's will win leeripley is joining us from nearby kabul, missouri. what is the latest?
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>> reporter: we know the shooter's mother alice aldridge did die before the shooting. it is speculation at this point, but since they cannot talk to the gunman and most of the members of the aldridge family that live here were killed in the rampage, they can only look at every possibility. and that's why they keep looking at the death of this mother. we know that joseph aldridge lived with his mother. and there was no suicide note. and so they are going to be talking to the one sole survivor member of the aldridge family to see if she can reveal more. if he said something at the time when going on this rampage thursday night. killing, again, four members of his family. gerald julie, harold and janelle aldridge all in their late 40s to 50s. he spared a 15-year-old girl in the house who heard gunfire, ran to a nearby house and called for
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help. fred, we also talked to a member of another family that has not been named by police yet. he found two of his dead cousins after getting a call to go to their house. listen to him describe what he saw. >> i didn't see her at first. she was kind of doubled over like a bunch of clothes or something. just kind of like she had bent over forward. and her head was down on the floor. >> reporter: even more terrifying fred that couple had a 13-year-old son who was in the house when this happened in another bedroom alive unhurt. but as you can imagine, terrified. >> gosh terribly sad. will ripley thank you. still ahead, the cpac made its choice today for its choice for president. who is down with this republican
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hello again, everyone. thank you for joining me. i'm fredericka whitfield. if you're going to run for president as a republican one of the groups you need to impress is the cpac. many get together in the republican party to discover who is up and down among the potential contenders in the race for presidency. scott walker is one of those who has been surging in the polls. he got a strong reception when he addressed the cpac audience. >> what makes us exceptional, what makes us arguably the greatest country in the history of the world, is that in moments of crisis be it economic orifice
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call or fiscal, men and women have stood up to make decisions about their children and grandchildren more so than they did about their own political futures. ladies and gentlemen, this tonight is one of those moments in american history. >> a new poll from quinnipiac shows walker up by a wide margin in iowa getting almost double the support of his closest competitor rand paul. in texas, walker has surged to second just one percent behind texas senator ted cruz and also one ahead of rick perry. chris moody, good to see you here. >> good to be here. >> despite the comments on rudy giuliani, the president doesn't love america's comment, and criticism that came with walker's silence, what is behind walker's surge in popularity? >> well, i spent the last couple of days at this conference with a couple thousand conservatives.
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and a couple things i have learned, one of them is that this thing is wide open. and that number two, people are really excited about scott walker because they see him as a fighter. somebody who will defend their values. and someone who has not only paid lip service to that but has done it in the arena. and not only competed but he's also won several times. won several battles for conservatives. and i watched scott walker's speech this week. he looked like he was in full campaign mode. he had his sleeves rolled up and was talking to the crowd without any notes or anything like that. and he did get a wide reception. remember we have a year before the first caucus or primaries really kickoff. and the stuff that you mentioned, the words he said about president obama and about evolution, you know a lot of the republican voters don't necessarily care about that. they want to know if he's going to fight for their values if he reaches the white house. and they see him do that in the capital in wisconsin. >> right. you referred to president obama, it was walker remaining silent
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on whether the president was christian or not. so who is likely to do well? what is the prediction in today's straw poll? and what kind of impact does it really have on the whole potential race? >> well, not much impact. i think we should unplay that. but i always enjoy watching it as a bit of a gut check on the movement. although there's a lot of factors here. it's a matter of who wants to play in the straw poll. you have to organize your people get them to vote and that doesn't always tell you where the conservative movement is feeling. rand paul wins quite often, mitt romney won when he was going to go be the nominee. then ron paul won quite often before that. so it's a matter of organization but i think what you see from cpac when you talk from the activists is to find out where they stand on a lot of issues and on the presidential race and right now, again, i really think that they are giving a lot of these candidates or potential candidates an opportunity to be heard out.
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and they are listening. that's what i saw a lot over the past couple days people sitting and listening. and these people all have a chance to make their case. the people are going to be up folks are going to be down but it's a long road ahead. and i think everyone is going to get a real shot to see if they can pull this off. >> yeah it's always quite the roller-coaster ride isn't it? >> it always is. and it's a long ride. >> a very long ride. it's a marathon ride. all right. chris moody, thank you so much. appreciate it. >> thank you. still to come the police chief who led the investigation into the jonbenet ramsey 1996 murder posted shocking insights into the still unsolved case. and hi did it online. you'll hear new revelations, next. so i asked my doctor about victoza. he said victoza works differently than pills and comes in a pen. victoza is proven to lower blood sugar and a1c. it's taken once a day, any time. and the needle is thin.
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ask your doctor about xarelto® today. it's hard to believe, jonbenet ramsey would be 25 years old if she were alive today. but the little girl never saw another birthday after her murder in december of 1996. the mystery is still unsolved after nearly two decades now. but now we're learning new details about the crime that may shed new light on this case. cnn's annika cabrera reports. >> reporter: who killed jonbenet ramsey? >> there is a killer on the loose. >> reporter: the 6-year-old beauty queen was found dead in the basement of her family's boulder home the day after christmas in 1996. >> i will tell my friends to
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keep -- keep your babies close to you. there's someone out there. >> reporter: while a killer has never been caught new details about the case just revealed by a lead investigator. former boulder police chief mark beckner. in a recent ask me anything section which has now been deleted, he shared new information on how jonbenet died. she was hit in the head knocked unconscious. 45 minutes prior to be strangled. and he says jonbenet was most likely not sexually molested at the time with a case that said otherwise. >> at last count, we had investigated over 140 people as possible suspects in this case. >> reporter: in 2009 beckner spoke regretfully not one
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suspect was identified. the mystery unsolved. now he admits mistakes were made by police in the initial days after the crime. in retrospect he says jonbenet's parents should have been separated and statements made immediately. he called it a perfect storm type scenario. it was the christmas holiday and we were short-staffed, he write, and there was confusion at the scene as people were arriving before we had enough personnel at the scene. as a result some evidence was compromised. the redeeming value of his candid confession of sorts. >> all the details converge to create renewed interest it will create renewed scrutiny and may trigger somebody to remember something. >> incredible questions now, right? about that unsolved murder. these new revelations about this case raising so many questions. joining me now, criminal defense attorney richard herman. usually we are so used to seeing
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you along with avery. we have a pleasure to see you solo. avery will join us via satellite from cleveland but we're glad to have you here to talk about this. because this is one of those cases, it is mysterious. of course it is the one that is provokeing so many theories about what happened too. how could this police chief reveal this kind of information now in this kind of forum? did he realize that it was something that the public would be able to read embrace, learn from? or did he think this was a private conversation? >> i don't think he knew this was going to go viral the way it did. but i think it gives us insight, it gives us insight in what is burning him up. and it's been 14 years that we have been doing legal on weekends. >> i know it's hard to believe. >> and we have covered cases where district attorneys have kind of corrupted the investigation and the prosecution. in the duke lacrosse case as
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well. this district attorney took over the investigative stage and took the power away from the police. and incredibly he shielded the ramseys. and in this type of case they were not interviewed individually until some five months after the murder of jonbenet. that's outrageous. >> so these discoveries beckner talks about in terms of the blow to the head these are things i don't think many people have heard before. the blow to the head jonbenet may have suffered and the strangulation came nearly between 45 and two hours later. is this information that boulder police were able to discover substantiate and you talk about the district attorney then prosecutors took over that information. that was suppressed or is it a matter of this is information that now beckner is allowed to talk about so many years after the fact? >> they knew about this and had all the information. >> everyone knew but the public did not. >> blunt force trauma to the head which ultimately would have caused her death, but apparently
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about an hour and a half after that blunt force trauma someone strangled her. and then there was this ransom note that was apparently written on the mother's stationary in perhaps similar or her own handwriting. some two-and-a-half pages. and it was written at the time of the murder. which is preposterous. no viable evidence at the scene there. >> there was a lot of finger-pointing at the parents. and there was a brother. and -- the public was led to believe that all of them were cleared. with this kind of information, that it appears now she was not sexually assaulted, she was assaulted but not -- with some artificial means that came after her death. according to what beckner is saying. does that invite furthering the investigation, returning to people who had been questioned whether they were -- the case is not closed. can it be reopened in a very
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fervent kind of way? >> if any murder does not have a statute of limit takesations. of course mrs. ramsey is dead and she may have been a prime target. she died of cancer. and i think, fred what happened in the sexual molestation portion of this is that there was evidence that she had been molested but prior to the murder. >> that was a new discovery. she may have been sexually assaulted repeatedly days weeks, prior to this. not prior as in just moments before she was killed. >> the incredible scenarios, the parents who were in the house at the time were not interviewed by law enforcement. were not allowed to be interviewedinterview interviewed because a district attorney said to lay off them. they were high society people and very wealthy. he runs for election and says stay away from them. don't interview them. five months were wasted when they couldn't get them separately in rooms to pin down their versions.
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it is really upsetting and is not the perfect storm. it's a corrupted investigation, that's what it is. >> thank you for your input on this. see you next hour with avery. of course we'll talk about a few other cases. this one, which has received a whole lot of attention, don't you remember the two young girls who said they were inspired by slenderman to try to attempt murder on their good friend. we'll talk about that coming up. also ahead, good news for travis quapaly. his car was stolen in a trailer. guess what? now it's been found and i am going to talk to that driver although he's upset he's not racing this weekend. but i can't wait to hear his side of the story in all this, right after this. over the years we have all increased the amount of technology in our homes. and that's meant increased demands on the electric grid.
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functions you would with your own family. so we have the vices, for example, that emulate a toaster, blender, a mixer. all these operate a precise time according to a schedule so that the home is occupied as a home normally would be. >> in the first year the house went way beyond net zero. it actually produced a surplus. enough energy was leftover to drive an electric vehicle 1400 miles.
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found. police have located the nascar sprint cup car that was stolen from a hotel parking lot near atlanta. number 44 was found along the side of the road. this is a tweet from team extreme after it was found. the race car was stolen yesterday, along with the pickup truck and the trailer that was hauling it. just hours before travis was to run his qualifying race for this weekend's sprint cup race at the atlanta motor speedway. the driver of that car, travis kupel is on the phone with us right now. so first, travis congratulations, that the trailer, the car, all the
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equipment, everything was there and intact. but so sorry that you missed your qualifying. so you know how happy or relieved or also disappointed are you? >> well mixed feelings for sure. it's a big plus that we found the race car, and i think some of the equipment and actually the truck and trailer is still missing, i believe. but the biggest thing is we found the race car. it's a small team, and this is a big set back for us if that was missing. so it was enough of a setback as it was, not being able to qualify and run the race atlanta motor speedway this weekend. but, you know we can -- with this race car, we can move forward, and we can go to las vegas next week and just really thankful. and happy for all the guys that worked so hard on this car. we've put a lot of hours into it and it would have been a real shame if it was just gone. >> so do you think this -- you know alleged thief knew what he or she was taking?
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because the white trailer isn't necessarily marked. it doesn't say your name number 44 that it's a race car. but do you think they knew what they were doing, what they grabbed? >> i'm sure they had no idea. you know we have a 18-wheeler big semi transporter. but we sent that down a couple days -- or a day earlier, because there was a big snowstorm in the charlotte area. we wanted to get the semi down the road but we didn't quite have the race car done and wasn't ready to go to the racetrack yet. guys had to do more work on it at the shop. so they stayed back with the car and sent it down a day later with a truck and smaller trailer and parked it in the hotel parking lot. and woke up the next morning and it was gone. so like you said there's no markings no you know sponsors or anything on it. >> yeah. >> so i'm sure they had no idea what was inside that trailer. >> so in the end, it was just abandoned, left as opposed to anyone spotted it and was able to call police. >> yep, i guess it was out in rural atlanta and just on some
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back road somewhere, and they just -- just sitting in the side of the road. so happy to have it recovered. that's the car we plan to take to las vegas. >> wow. >> nice to have it back in our hands. >> well travis safe travels to las vegas. something tells me you are going to have some kind of special wheel locks or something on that truck and trailer so that it never happens again. good luck to you. we'll be watching and looking out for you in las vegas. >> absolutely. thank you. we appreciate being with you. >> all right. fantastic. travis kuaple number 44. we'll be right back in the "newsroom."
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all right. tomorrow night, cnn will take you on an amazing journey around the world.
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the wonder list with bill weir. explore wonderful and unique locations that may soon disappear from our planet. the south pacific island nation of venue watt u off the australian coast. >> instead of packing for this camping trip, they brought bows and arrows. and spears made of bicycle spokes for the reef. but the most stunning example of the bountiyyiy of these waters comes when they grab a net. and once it is in place, the
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catch is over in about 90 seconds. >> my goodness. look at this. >> yeah! >> that's not fishing. that's not fair. when i fish i have to sit and drink beer for eight hours before i get one bite. >> look at this. i guess we have dinner. ♪ >> wow. it's vennuatu. let's hear from cnn's bill weir. you were there, got to know the people and place. extraordinary pictures and just to see the way of life there, how many so many americans would think that is so much work. and for them they're like this is what we do, and we do it with ease. so what struck you the most on this journey? >> well fred it was -- i started with a question here. that's kind of what the whole series is about, questions about what kind of world -- my little girl is going to turn my age in
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2050 and i wonder will there still be hawaiis without hotels balis without burger joints. and we found this place right on the edge of discovery. some tribes can't wait until the big hotels come because they think that's a ticket to a better life. we've got other tribes who think they are living in heaven they have been to our big cities and they don't want any part of it. and so i just wanted to see what happens when i see an example which actually happened here an investor from california shows up and says i want to buy this island and i want all of you to work in my hotel. give up fishing, tend bar, wait tables for me. >> no i'm not buying people like that. they don't like that idea. >> well no the guy said -- he said name your price. give me a price. this local man said -- tlufhrew out the biggest number he could think. $5,000. >> man tried to write him a check, and that's when he freaked out because he had never seen a checkbook before. there were so many surprising
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things. and we went to another island that seemed to primitive. the cell phone service was better than my apartment. the guy -- the guy in the loin cloth i had seen in this amazing picture wants to be an actor. so it's a great sort of journey, not only to help you forget the winter blues for an hour tomorrow night, but also make you think about what we have what they have and whose grass is really greener. >> yeah and you paint a great picture. you're an adventurist and a water boy so i saw the promo. what did you learn there that you think will stick with you that maybe will even apply again, how eye-opening was it for you personally? from a lesson taught by them to you? >> well you know each one of these destinations and we went everywhere from the middle east to the top of the alps to the south pacific there. and what strikes me every time is we are much more similar than we are different around the world. you know we brought a photographer on this trip who had taken these amazing
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portraits of indigenous folks around the world, he went back to show them his book of work they were in that book. and it was the funniest thing, you see these guys giggling at the naked foreigners. just like kids looking at "national geographic." so we are so similar, and i don't think we realize that all of our lives are connected in ways that you wouldn't really imagine. the choices we make what kind of hotels we pick on our vacations determines the future lives and folks you may never even meet. >> yeah it's about survival and adapting isn't it? >> exactly. >> all right. bill weir thank you so much. look forward to it. "the wonder list" premiers sunday evening. you need to be right in front of your tv set. you're going to watch this 10:00 right here on cnn. the next hour of "newsroom" starts right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com happening right now in the "newsroom" --
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>> critics of the government putin, bad things seem to happen to them. >> yes. unfortunately, represent what i say in russia over 19th century. >> eerie words from boriseis nemtsov, gunned down. plus an 11th hour reprieve to keep money flowing to the u.s. department of homeland security. but the funding fight definitely not over. and investigators say they may now know what triggered a door-to-door killing spree in missouri. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." hello again, everyone. thank you so much for joining me i'm fredricka whitfield. we start this hour with a developing story. a murder in the shadow of the kremlin. boris nemtsov, russian opposition leader and critic of president vladimir putin, was shot to death last night as he walked across a bridge barely
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100 yards from the seat of russian government. a manhunt is now on for the killer or killers, and today russia's state media released this video of a car they say could be -- could have been used in this shooting. investigators say nemtsov's shooting was carefully planned. opposition leaders call it a direct message from the kremlin. earlier this month, in a chilling premonition of his death, nemtsov said this quote, i'm afraid putin will kill me. i believe that he was the one who unleashed the war in ukraine. i couldn't dislike him more. end quote. last year nemtsov told cnn's anthony bourdain he knew of the risk involved in criticizing russia's leadership. >> you were supposed to be dining at another restaurant this evening. and when they heard that you would be joining me we were uninvited. should i be concerned about having dinner with you? >> this is a country of corruption. and if you have business you
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are in a very unsafe situation. everybody can press you and destroy your business. that's it. this is a system. >> meet boris nemtsov. he was deputy prime minister under yeltsin. >> critics of the government critics of putin, bad things seem to happen to them. >> yes. unfortunately, represent what i say in russia over 19th century. not of 21st. >> here's -- this is a case -- a known enemy of putin with a bout of radioactive. aren't you concerned? >> me? about myself? tony i was born here 54 years ago. this is my country. russian people are in trouble. russian court doesn't work. russian education declines every year. and i believe that russia has a chance to be free. has a chance. it is difficult, but we must do it. >> today, mourners held a vigil
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at the site of nemtsov's death. this as president barack obama called for an impartial investigation into the opposition leader's murder. and vladimir putin promising nemtsov's mother her sons killers will be quote, properly punished. joining me now is cnn international correspondent, fred pleitgen. fred you said earlier, there were some eye-witnesses, but does anyone dare speak up and really reveal what they saw? >> what they know? >> well i do think that the eye-witnesses are speaking to the police fredricka. that doesn't mean necessarily that the people we speak to have very much faith or very much trust in the investigation that has begun here. there are many people whom we've been speaking to who say they believe that no one will ever really know who really killed boris nemtsov, and that --
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certainly investigations in the past have also sort of turned up shady results, as well. nevertheless the authorities are telling us that they have talked to several eye-witnesses here and one of the things we have to keep in mind is that when this happened yesterday night or last night, at around 11:40 p.m. this bridge that we're on right now, where all this happened is a place -- actually there are a lot of people where there is a lot of traffic and so there will have been a lot of eye-witnesses who most probably came forward. one of the people who apparently is talking to the police is the person who was with boris nemtsov at the time. it was a female companion who had apparently come here from ukraine. we spoke to another person who had -- was -- managed to speak to her a little bit and said she told him that she was walking here with boris nemtsov, and at some point, a car stopped next to the two, shots were fired from that car, directly at boris nemtsov, and then the car sped off. that is sort of also in line with what the police are saying as well. they of course as you said have also released that video of
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that car that they believe was involved in all of this. and so certainly it seems as though they're sort of piecing together what happened but it doesn't appear as though at this point in time they have a suspect yet, fredricka. >> and then anna let me ask you to weigh in. because i understand you knew nemtsov. is there a presumption that because he was an opposition leader the government had something to do with his death? >> well you know there were many things. opposition voices were silenced in russia gunned down in the center of moscow or in petersburg. these investigations never really show any results, unfortunately. we never heard about who really ordered the murder of others. this time i spoke with people of those who come from my
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hometown. we have the same name but we are not related. but since my early age, i was watching his career and was very curious about this politician. he was a really powerful interesting democrat with -- always with free speech and always successful. viewed him so many times. and no matter who he was, a deputy of duma or vice prime minister or minister of energy he would always allow us on the scene and always give comments. so this time he criticized yesterday about, you know an hour before his murder he criticized vladimir putin again, calling vladimir putin a criminal. he had done that many times. people say that maybe not putin ordered him, but there were people during the march about a week ago call for finishing up
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and considered by many nationalists a part of this so-called fifth cone. >> other opposition leaders, while it probably is common anna, they would always be fearing for their lives to speak out against government. but now that this murder has taken place, is there a feeling that their fears, other opposition leaders, their fears have been heightened they're changing their way to be less of a target? are you hearing anything about that? >> reporter: that's true. i've spoken to a number of opposition leaders last night and today. and they all say that before they never paid attention to live threats on social network. since last night, they are going -- they are going to pay more attention, become more serious about such threats. as people cannot be really safe in downtown moscow anymore. his death -- the place where he was killed was really symbolic.
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it was right by the kremlin wall. i was in a cafe when it happened. and i spoke with young people at a cafe in downtown moscow. one of them said, you know nobody can be safe anymore, even putin could be killed in the middle of moscow. that was a young voice. an 1-year-old boy who said that -- 18-year-old boy who said that. so somebody who wanted to demonstrate that nobody can be secure anymore in moscow committed that crime, obviously. >> wow. that's a very resonating message. all right, anna nemtsov. oh fred pleitgen -- fred can i ask if there is a feeling from the people who have come out for the vigil, have they felt similar to what anna says if the opposition leader would be killed in this very symbolic location shouldn't everyone feel they're lives are in jeopardy even she said the president, vladimir putin. >> reporter: well i'm not sure people feel their lives are in
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jeopardy but certainly is something that really krosd crossed the new boundary in moscow where people are saying that it is to them absolutely outrageous that something like this could happen in a place like this. and certainly, they don't feel safe and they -- feel this is something -- a new quality, if you will in all of this. and that's i think also one of the reasons why so many people came out here. is because they are truly shocked at what happened here. i mean a lot of people said they knew there could be shady dealings going on there was criminal elements in the city. but something like that could happen in a place like this with the security like this. right in the middle of moscow is certainly i think bears a new quality. i just want to say one other thing. i think we're going to have a very good benchmark for how the opposition here feels. how intimidated they feel tomorrow when there is going to be that march to mourn mr. nemtsov. because that's when we'll see how many people come out and how outspoken. >> fred pleitgen thank you so
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much. and anna nemtsov -- we apologize to our viewer it's not your television set but the signal with fred pleitgen is deteriorating so we're glad we got those last words. thank you so much. minutes before the midnight deadline, president barack obama signed a bill to extend funding to dhs for another seven days. that means hundreds of thousands of tsa workers, border agents and others will still get paid for now. but some republicans want to tie permanent funding to stopping the president's executive order curtailing deportation of undocumented immigrants. erin mcpike is joining us from the white house. erin the fight doesn't appear to be over yet. maybe it's just getting revved up again. >> reporter: fred think back to december when congress was voting on the overall budget for the next year. for this year. and republicans singled out the department of homeland security and said they would fund it for
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just two months so they could have this fight again on immigration with a new republican majority in the senate. now republicans have one more week to try to make that point. >> this vote the ayes are 357. the nays are 60. >> with the sound of the gavel, congress compromised and passed a one-week extension to fund the department of homeland security. just hours before a friday night deadline. now tsa screeners, border agents and federal workers can get paid and keep working. but chaos came before the compromise. for most of friday lawmakers seemed poised to avoid a nail-biting showdown. but when it came to a vote to fund the department for three weeks, a shocking twist in the house to an already dramatic day on the hill. >> the joint resolution is not passed. >> nearly every democrat and a few dozen republicans voted against it.
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it all came down to playing politics. republicans wanted a provision blocking the president's executive order on immigration, which the bill didn't have. and democrats didn't vote for it because they want wanted to force republicans to fund the department for the full year rather than just three weeks. as hopes started to fade by the hour house minority leader nancy pelosi told democrats to vote on a patch that would fund the government for a week. >> we want to protect the people every minute of every day, 24/7. >> the house apparently took note and passed the temporary fix. congress is expected to continue the debate next week. and in that next week house speaker john boehner will have to decide whether to pull that full bill that funds dhs in a clean way without stripping back president obama's executive actions on the immigration to the house floor. but there's a small crew of conservative republicans who are
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threatening to oust him or try to at least oust him for the speakership if he brings that full bill to the floor, fred. >> erin mcpike at the white house, thank you so much. still ahead, police now think they know what triggered a deadly shooting spree in a tiny missouri town. will ripley is in missouri. will. >> reporter: and there are still a lot of unanswered questions here fred. but they do wonder if the death of the gunman's mother may have caused him to do something horrible in a very small town. and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night, and stay awake during the day. this is called non-24. learn more by calling 844-824-2424. or visit your24info.com.
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investigators may have one possible motive about why a gunman went on a deadly shooting spree in the tiny southern missouri town of tyrone. seven people in four separate homes were shot dead. one injured. the gunman was found dead in a pickup truck 15 miles away after apparently shooting himself. cnn's will ripley joins us from
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nearby kabul, missouri. what more do we know about the investigation? the gunman's mother apparently dead of natural causes, police investigating if her death somehow triggered the rampage. there's no stoplight in tyrone missouri no post office or a gas station. but this tiny town is the scene of the deadliest mass shooting in recent missouri history. john shriver got a phone call to go to his cousin's house down the street. >> whenever i got him by the arm, you know it just -- you could tell that he was dead already. >> he thinks he and his wife were killed quickly. their car and washing machine still running. their 13-year-old son alive and terrified in a back bedroom. >> he's in shock.
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>> i would say. >> nine deaths seven people shot and killed four from the same family less than three miles apart. the gunman's mother apparently dead of natural causes. police investigating if her death somehow triggered the rampage. >> you know what that's -- in our job, we see a lot of bad stuff, and this is bad. this is also hard on the police officers who are working there. it's not natural to see that sort of thing. >> reporter: the missouri state highway patrol says the gunman joseph aldrich, killed himself. authorities say he had only a minor criminal history, nothing to foreshadow something like this. many in this quiet corner of southeast missouri say they don't even lock their doors. >> my concern is children. and so our kids are having a really tough time. a wide variety of emotions shock, some tears. a lot of questions.
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>> reporter: investigators working to figure out why someone would want to kill nearly an entire family. hoping the soul survivor now in the hospital can provide answers. how is your community going to move forward from this? >> one day at a time. as a family. this community is based in faith and based in family. and i have seen them come through some very difficult situations. nothing like this of course. >> reporter: a massacre in a missouri town. the few left behind left to wonder why. fred that sole survivor remains in the hospital police trying to get as much information as they can to figure out the motive because there was no suicide note found in the gunman's truck. just a horrible situation for this town. the other victims still have not been publicly named. but we believe they're members of another prominent and well-known family here that has now lost many of its own. >> devastating situation. thank you so much will ripley.
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still ahead, the one man who possibly knew spock best. william shatner talks about the loss of his friend and "star trek" legend leonard nimoy. dad. military families are thankful for many things. the legacy of usaa auto insurance could be one of them. our world-class service earned usaa the top spot in a study of the most recommended large companies in america. if you're current or former military or their family, see if you're eligible to get an auto insurance quote. so i got this listing. 3 bedroom, 3 bath. i have a client that lives out of state. just knew it was for her. so i tried to get her on video chat. i'm on verizon. i... i'm not. so it's not a problem. my video chat isn't working so i try to send photos but even that doesn't work. she saw the granite counters and the fire pit she went nuts. so i'm trying really hard to describe it but words are not my thing. that was all it took. i mean what do you want, i'm a realtor, not a poet.
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will stay in boston. jury selection in the death penalty trial of dzhokhar tsarnaev is now set to begin next week. three people were killed and another 250 injured in the april, 2013, bombings near the marathon's finish line. and tomorrow's space walk is a go. despite a small amount of water found in the helmet of astronaut terry verts, the suit has a history of creating water when repressurized, causing water to be pushed into the helmet. nasa says it has a high degree of confidence in the suit. and sci-fi fans loss a legend this week with the passing of leonard nimoy. mr. spock died friday from lung disease. he was 83. his co star william shatner, remembered him as someone to admire love and respect. >> it's a wonderful phrase for the vulcan to have live long. and i would like to think that
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the prosper is not just make some good money, but prosper in evolving yourself as a human being. which is what i think leonard was trying to do all his life. >> cnn's jason carol has more on nimoy's legacy. >> that is quite logical, captain. >> reporter: leonard nimoy was and will always be remembered as spock, the half human, half vulcan he portrayed for more than four decades on the big screen and the small screen. where his character debuted in the original "star trek" series septemberth 1966. >> that may be correct. >> spock's life on board the "starship ber enterprise" took him to many worlds and in his hometown. >> i started acting when i was a
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little boy, 8 years old, settlement houses in boston and grew up into it. >> live long and prosper. >> reporter: as beloved as spock is with his audiences in his early career nimoy played a lot of characters audiences love to hate. >> i have done a lot, pushed people around and got my comeuppance. >> they can smell a winner. >> reporter: nimoy's big break came in an episode of the '60s marine corps drama "the lieutenant." that producer gene roddenbury who like the cast saw something special in nimoy's spock. >> they invented the character and made an earlier pilot in which nobody had grasped the edges of the character. >> with his imagination and his innovation his creativity. made that character one interestingly, humanized and so rivetingly intriguing. >> reporter: despite all the
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"star trek" spinoffs countless conventions, the first "star trek" series lasted only three seasons, 79 episodes. >> my favorite episode, we heard the words live long and prosper for the first time and we saw spock do this for the first time. >> one of our classic arts -- >> reporter: nimoy went on to star in a number of tv shows following the series. he also pursued other passions photography and poetry publishing a book in 1977. >> the answer has been here. >> reporter: in the '90s, spock appeared in "star trek: the next generation." and when jj abrams rebooted the movies in 2009 again in 2013 the original spock was there too. >> 35 years ago, i was on the "enterprise" for the first time. >> reporter: nasa's shuttle "enterprise," nimoy was there to talk about it. tell us what you're feeling
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today. >> like a reunion. >> reporter: and later, he spoke about the dangers of smoking after being diagnosed with a lung disease. >> i quit a long time ago. why is this happening to me? but it's a lesson i had to learn. >> reporter: his character, spock, may have prided himself on being emotionless, but in the end, that could not be further from who the man was to his family and friends. >> always shall be your friend. >> first and foremost is a long and deep friendship. love that i have for leonard. he is in essence the brother i never had. >> and you turned around and went -- >> live long and prosper. [meow mix jingle slowly and quietly plucks] right on cue. [cat meows] ♪meow, meow, meow, meow...♪ it's more than just a meal it's meow mix mealtime. with great taste and 100% complete nutrition, it's the only one cats ask for by name. ready for another reason to switch to t-mobile.
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all right. hello again, everyone.
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thank you so much for joining me. i'm fredricka whitfield. growing concern that at least four canadian teens may have gone off to join isis. authorities believe they flew from montreal to turkey in mid january, and they don't know where the teens might be now. paula newton is in montreal with us for more on this story. family friends, anyone saying these kids showed some signs of if not at least being radicalized, but that they were getting ready to go somewhere for a very long time? >> you know the situation is different from each teenager and their own family situations. we did speak to a couple of families you know in saying that look they are kind of said they wanted to go. we tried to talk them out of it. did anyone know specifically they were going to leave on a specific day, no. what seems to be the dividing line are people are coming forward to say we should have spoken to authorities sooner and we didn't. fred these teenagers were reported missing essentially to authorities when it was too late. of what they're trying to do now
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is put together the puzzle. how many were serious about crossing the border to turkey to get to syria. how many have managed to get to syria or are they in some kind of a training camp or now in turkey and perhaps just afraid to come home? it is a very, very complex investigation, four confirmed with links to jihadists and perhaps trying to go over to syria. but the investigation is open on many more cases, and that fredrico owe security officials here saying quite openly look we believe radicalism is a growing problem in this country, and something we have to really work hard to solve. fred. >> and then of course questions about this montreal professor who may have some sort of connection with the kids. to what degree? >> well it's interesting. he claims he doesn't have a connection that only one of the kids attended one of his schools on a couple of occasions. but one quebec newspaper, "le press," reporting, look we have pictures of him with another one
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of these teenagers who allegedly has gone to the militant east to join isis. the problem fredricka, is look this guy is known to authorities here. he's under what they call a security certify for six years before the courts determined he was not a security threat. many parents are asking what is this guy doing teaching in a community college if there is any threat at all that perhaps what he is preaching is giving some inspiration to these young people. of course fredricka, he denies it but authorities looking very closely, not just at the links to this professor, but other links they might have had in these colleges in these high schools, and any kind of threat to radicalization there. fred? >> all right. paula newton in montreal thank you so much. still ahead, new developments in the case of two young girls accused of trying to kill their friend and classmate because they say the fictional horror character, slender man, told them to do it. now the attorney for one of the girls says she should not be tried as an adult. we'll talk about that with our
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legal eagles richard herman here in atlanta, and avery freeman, joining us from cleveland, right after this. i love how it conforms to my body. with tempur-pedic the whole bed is comfortable. it's the best thing we ever did for ourselves. it's helping to keep us young. (vo) visit your local retailer and feel the tempur-pedic difference for yourself. ♪ how did i set a new personal record today? i started with a test run. then i got a solid night's rest in a great room. and before i hit the road, i hit the breakfast bar where i got my fuel for the next 26 miles. great endings begin here. and now when you choose choice twice, get a night at no price at 1,500 hotels.
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prosecutors in wisconsin say two young girls who tried to kill a classmate in order to please the horror character, slender man, should be tried as adults. the girls were 12 at the time they lured another girl into the woods and then stabbed her allegedly repeatedly.
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an attorney for one of the girls says the case should be moved to juvenile court. now we're getting a chance to hear from the girls themselves. their words are very chilling. nick bore with affiliate wisn has the story. >> reporter: while the two then 12-year-olds are charged with trying to kill their friend last memorial day weekend, the fictional creature slender man, is also a central character. in the recorded interviews with police for the first time we hear them explain, annisa the first to come across his tales on a website called creepy pasta wiki. >> horror stories to purposely scare you. >> they had these proxies as people call them. >> reporter: annisa says once she showed the stories to morgan the two quickly began to believe the stories were real. >> morgan said hey, i think we should be proxies. and i was like okay. how would we do that? and she said we have to kill. >> reporter: morgan admitted the plan targeting her long-time
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friend was hard to explain. >> she was my only friend for a long time. >> why would you hurt your only friend? >> it was necessary. >> reporter: these interviews are only public because their attorneys sbrus introduced them as evidence. we wondered why they would want such an unflattering picture out in the public. the the a defense attorney not representing the girls, explains. >> you're always worried how your client presents for potential future proceedings. here there appears to have been a decision made to present video evidence because it would support a second degree intentional homicide attempt at this critical early stage that could get the children back into juvenile court. >> reporter: that means demonstrating the girls truly believed slender man was real and was a threat to them and their families. in milwaukee, nick bore wisn 12 news. >> let's bring in our legal guys now, avery freeman, joining us from cleveland, although you should be here in atlanta.
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we're going to have to get our calendars together. and richard herman in new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who did make his way here to atlanta. so we will -- we're throwing you a big old hug, though avery. >> there we go. >> all right. very serious topic. let's talk now about whether these girls should be charged as adults. we're talking about morgan geyser and annisa weir, charged with attempting first degree murder placing the case in adult court. so richard, is that where it belongs? of course, their attorneys arguing they were just 12 at the time. this should be in juvenily court. but should it? how do you make that determination? >> that's the argument. and the issue is can a 12-year-old be rehabilitated so that they have a chance at life. you know to live a life. if they're tried as adults and the prosecutor had the choice here to go with first degree or second degree. had he charged him with second degree the girls could have been tried in juvenile court, faced a situation where if
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convicted, stay incarcerated up until about the 25 years of age. get rehabilitation and treatment. that's what they need. and then have a chance at life. if they get convicted now in adult court, charged as adults they can get up to 65 years in prison. they're going to be in prison for the majority of their life. is that right? that's the moral dilemma here. >> so then avery, doesn't the argument also have to be made about whether these young girls knew what they were doing. you know were they psychotic, were they delusional? when you listen to the audiotapes videotapes of these young girls, at least one of them talking about it felt like air. it didn't necessarily feel like she was stabbing a person. but they couldn't stop. and when you hear that you wonder is there a mental argument to be made here of them not really physically and mentally being present at this moment and does that assist in trying to determine whether they should be tried as adults or juveniles. >> well and that's what the
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judge in this case fredricka, is going to have to conclude one way or the other. and we're expecting that ruling on the 13th of march. for me in terms of my services as a probation officer, the juvenile court, my years as counsel and even serving on the bench, i'm absolutely convinced that when -- and by the way, the plot -- the plot for the stabbing was developed when they were 11 years old. it was the 12th birthday that preceded the stabbing. but there is no way on earth -- we've heard medical testimony about the incapacity of children at this age, these two girls. so it strikes me that even though the prosecutor is going to try them as adults and there's precedent, believe it or not, in wisconsin, trying 12-year-olds as adults. i think ultimately this case belongs in juvenile court. >> you do. >> if there is any chance of rehabilitating these children it should be exercised.
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warehousing them for a lifetime fredricka, is the wrong thing to do. >> huh. and you're in agreement with that too, richard. i guess i'm surprised to hear both of you you know talk about that because we're talking about such a heinous crime, and we're also talking about, you know stabbing seems like a much more passionate way of murdering somebody. and -- >> and planned. and planned. >> and planned. especially planned. you know nearly a year in advance. and -- >> right. >> it almost seems like you know an argument can be made that maybe these young girls, even though they were just 11 in the planning and the 12 alleged execution of this crime, they were also a little precocious. maybe they were a little adulter, bigger than their years. because, boy, this is such a heinous offense. >> justice kennedy, supreme court, recently opined that immature kids lead to immature acts in some sum and substance. but here fred one of the girls was diagnosed with schizophrenia.
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>> right. >> and it's believed by interviews they have had with medical personnel they truly believed -- if they didn't kill this girl their family and friends would be killed by this slender man. >> so then the makers of a slender man, would they in any way be held culpable liable being instrumental in -- >> no. >> in luring or convincing these kids to do this? >> i don't think so. i think the thrust here is going to be -- >> i think it's a great question actually. >> but will these young girls who are now 12 years old, will they have a chance to live a life after the age of 25 if they get convicted. >> yeah. >> or are they going to spend perhaps 65 years in prison. wisconsin is a very difficult state for this type of prosecution. they allow it as avery said and we'll see. >> avery real quick, why is that -- is there a window of opportunity there, possibly in that argument? >> i don't -- you know what i think some of the parents knew that at least morgan was involved in this. that's a question. a civil question that really
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needs to be answered. we balance that against first amendment, freedom of expression. but you know what i think children vulnerable kids can fall prey to this sort of thing. and that's a question that remains to be seen. >> scary. i don't know. all right. avery freeman thanks so much. richard herman. we've got a nice shot of your tie, richard, while you were here. that was just a funny little camera move. we got a little creative there. >> and thank you, richard, for warming the seat up by the way. >> that's right. you know we've got another seat for you here avery. so we'll get our calendars together the three of us will be here you know arm in arm. it's going to happen soon. >> wonderful. >> thanks so much. much more in the "newsroom" after this.
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innish the prime minister responded today to the destruction of ancient artifacts at the hands of isis. he calls the vandals barbarians and vowed to hunt them down. the prime minister made those comments today while reopening iraq's national museum which was ransacked during the fall of baghdad back in 2003. and president barack obama has taken much criticism in this country for not referring to isis as islamic extremists. but one middle east leader agrees with mr. obama. fareed zakaria sat down with jordan's king abdullah. >> president obama has gotten into a little trouble, or at
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least received some criticism, because he says he doesn't want to call groups like isis islamic extremists, because he doesn't want to give them the mantle of legitimacy by acknowledging that they're islamic. do you think he's right? >> i think he is right. and i think this is something that has to be understood on a much larger platform. because they're looking for legitimacy they don't have inside of islam. when we're asked in this debate you know are you a moderate or extremist, what these people want is to be called extremists. they take that as a badge of honor. so to label islam under the term of extremists and moderates is completely wrong. so i think by making this compassion that they're extremist muslims is working exactly what these people want. no we're muslims. i don't know what these people are. but they definitely do not have any relationship to our faith. >> and you can see fareed's full
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interview with jordan's king abdullah sunday 10:00 a.m. eastern right here on cnn, fareed zakaria "gps". a football player who once faced charges of child abuse went around the nfl. we'll tell you what's on the line with his case. i sure hope so. with healthcare costs, who knows. umm... everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusive confident retirement approach. now you and your ameripise advisor.... can get the real answers you need. start building your confident retirement today. would you be willing to give up sharing your moments? sacrifice streaming all night long? is it okay to drop a connection, when you need it most?
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we have much more straight
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ahead in the cnn "newsroom," and it all starts right now. would somebody please put this dress back in the closet? >> blue and black. >> tan and white. >> blue and black. >> well i saw white and gold and anyone who says differently is nuts. not since the mondayica lewinsky scandal has there been a frenzy over a blue dress or maybe you see it as gold. >> i hate it. >> it's a conspiracy by the white and gold people to make the blue and blacks look crazy. >> how can people look at the exact same photo and see different colors? better ask an eminent ophthalmologist. >> people have spent their lives studying this tell me they know this exists but in the 30 or 40 years in their careers, they have never seen a single picture bring out the difference like this one is. >> reporter: what? taylor swift tweeted, i'm confused and scared. ps it's obviously blue and black. speaker of the house, john boehner, concurred on hash
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tag thedress. >> all our perceptions are colored by quirkiness of our wiring. >> reporter: dr. julia haller says individuals differ in how we perceive color, and there is something about the lighting the angle and the digital quality of this image that makes our brains susceptible to processing it by adding or subtracting white light. >> does anybody get this? >> i can officially confirm that the color is royal blue with black trim. >> reporter: the company that sells the dress for 77 bucks says sales of this particular design are up 850%. they may start making it in white and gold. >> if i could find a dress that changed colors for different people i would buy it. >> reporter: but in this case it's the image, not the dress, that changes color. for some it changes right before their eyes. >> now the black is gold. i know i'm old, but i'm not dead yet. >> reporter: you're confident that you understand this. >> well -- >> reporter: while scientists grapple, legos made their own
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versions of the dress. and those run-away llamas that captured america's heart were soon wearing black and blue and white and gold. this is the like the mona lisa of ophthalmology. jeanne moos cnn, new york. >> leonardo would have loved this. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com happening right now in the "newsroom." >> critics of the government credit techs of putin, bad things seem to happen to them. >> yes, unfortunately, what i say of russia all of 19th century. >> eerie words from outspoken boris nemtsov, who was gunned down in the streets of moscow. authorities saying today his murder may be to destabilize the country. plus a global hunt for missing teens. why there are fears that they are joining isis. and an 11th-hour reprieve to
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keep money flowing to the u.s. department of homeland security. but the funding fight is definitely not over. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." helgen i'm fredricka whitfield. new information in an execution style murder yards from the kremlin. boris nemtsov, an outspoken critic of president vladimir putin, was shot several times in the back friday night as he crossed a bridge. with him at the time was his female companion. she's a ukrainian model. here's what else we know. investigators say the murder was carefully planned. president putin promises nemtsov's mother her son's killers will be punished. officials also believe they found the car thought to be used in the murder. nemtsov had been arrested several times for criticizing putin. the last time in 2011. his life had been threatened recently even on social media,
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and a fellow opposition leader says nemtsov was working on a report of russian troops in ukraine. and just weeks ago, nemtsov said he feared being killed by president putin. and last year he told cnn's anthony bourdain he was aware of the risks of criticizing the russian government. >> you were supposed to be dining at another restaurant this evening. and when they heard that you would be joining me we were uninvited. should i be concerned about having dinner with you? >> this is a country of corruption. and if you have business you are in a very unsafe situation. everybody can press you and destroy your business. that's it. this is a system. >> reporter: meet boris nemtsov, he was deputy prime minister under yet knelt sin. >> critics of putin, bad things seem to happen to them. >> yes, russia all of 19th century. not of 21st. >> reporter: this is a case of a
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known enemy of putin, stricken with a bout of radioactive pelonium. are you concerned? >> me? about myself? tony i was born here 54 years ago. this is my country. russian people are in very big trouble. russian court doesn't work. russian education declines every year. and i believe that russia has a chance to be free. has a chance. it is difficult, but we must do it. >> and world leaders have condemned the murder and president obama is actually calling for an independent investigation into the killing. fred pleitgen has more now from moscow. >> reporter: gunned down in the heart of russia's capital. investigators worked the crime scene where boris nemtsov's body lay on one of the main bridges across the river. law enforcement officials say nemtsov, one of russian's most prominent opposition figures, was struck in the back by several bullets.
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the killing happened right next to the kremlin walls and right in the vicinity of saint basel's cathedral. boris nemtsov was walking with a friend when a car stopped and the assailant immediately opened fire. as mourners laid flowers and lit candles, speculation, who did it? some blamed the government of vladimir putin. others disagree. >> this is a strict message to all of us hello, you have the guy who works for you, who is against your leader bam, bam, bam. who will be next? >> we have some small part of in russia people who want to break putin. and maybe they make it to show other people in other countries, how bad putin. >> reporter: it's not clear who
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is behind the killing, but boris nemtsov had many enemies. he was russian's deputy prime minister in the late '90s, but joined the opposition after vladimir putin came into power. and was jailed several times for criticizing the government. vladimir putin condemned nemtsov's killing, and offered the family his condolences. he also launched an investigation into the murder and said it bears all the hallmarks of a contract killing aimed at provokeing unrest. illia is a friend and political ally of nemtsov's, one of the first at the scene and strongly criticizes russia's president. i don't know who ordered the shooting he tells me but i strongly believe it's russia's government and personally vladimir putin who are responsible for it. vladimir putin is responsible for creating the atmosphere of hatred in our country. they have incited hatred for all dissidents and for boris nemtsov.
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nemtsov was set to take part in an opposition rally, criticizing russia's role in the ukraine conflict this sunday. instead, they will now be a march of mourning for one of russia's most eloquent opposition voices brutally silenced forever. fred pleitgen moscow. call it a close one for the department of homeland security who almost ran out of money. minutes before president obama signed a bill to extend funding to dhs, but just to another seven days. erin mcpike is at the white house. now what? >> reporter: well look fred it's only seven days that they have extended funding for the department of homeland secured. so the house has to vote again. the senate may obviously have to as well. but the senate on friday did pass a clean funding bill that would fund the department of homeland security for another year. it's the house where they're finding this trouble. but pressure is beginning to build on house speaker john
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boehner to bring that bill to the floor. i want to play for you something that new york city police commissioner said on the air earlier today. >> if you have a problem with the immigration issue, take it to court. do whatever you have to do but do not hold up funding for the department of homeland security. it's just -- it's outrageous. it's dangerous. and it puts us in jeopardy. >> reporter: and there are a number of more moderate republicans in the house, in the senate including the first department of homeland security secretary, tom ridge. i spoke to him earlier today. he said look republicans have made their point on immigration. they need to move on. but house speaker john boehner is still getting these threats from some conservative congressmen who want to oust him as speaker if he doesn't hold the line on immigration. and let me read to you a comment we got just yesterday from steve will mac, republican congressman from arkansas close to the
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leadership. he said it's a hell of a position to be in. i just can't imagine the frustration the speaker must have now. although we should point out that we don't know that conservatives would necessarily have the votes to oust speaker boehner. those threats are still out there, fred. >> erwinin mcpike at the white house, thank you so much. to the race for 2016. it's still a year out, but later today, conservatives rallying in washington, d.c. will release their straw poll at cpac the conservative political action conference. this week conservatives have been voting from a who's who of potential republican candidates for president. senator rand paul of kentucky has won the last two years of the straw polling. one of those hoping to kickstart another potential bid for the presidency is former texas governor rick perry. he sat down with our dana bash to talk about the presumed democratic challenger. >> reporter: hillary clinton. you've talked about some questionable donations to the clinton foundation.
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what exactly do you think is wrong with these donations? why does it raise questions for you? >> i think most americans realize that a phone call at 3:00 in the morning to the president of the united states about an issue that deals with a foreign country, that is given maybe tens of millions of dollars to the foundation that she oversees is not right. and it's not only the appearance of impropriety. it's also the ethical side of this that i think most americans really have a problem with. and i'm really concerned about not just going forward, but what has been received at the clinton foundation over the course of the years. and how that affects this individual's judgment. >> she was secretary of state, so you could argue that she sort of you know -- they're going from the pool that she's
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familiar with if that makes sense. >> you can argue that but i think it falls flat in the face of the american people when it comes to are you going to trust an individual who has taken that much money from a foreign source. where is your loyalty. >> all right. again, many conservative republicans in washington for the cpac conference and that straw polling we talked about earlier, it will take place at 5:00 eastern time today. and, of course we'll have the results for you on cnn later. all right, up next the hunt is on for some missing canadian students. it is feared they have gone to syria to join isis. we'll get the latest from montreal. e heart health. heart: i maximize good stuff like my potassium and phytosterols which may help lower cholesterol. new ensure active heart health supports your heart and body so you stay active and strong. ensure, take life in. so,as my personal financial psychic, i'm sure you know what this meeting is about. yes, a raise.
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there's an international hunt on to find at least four teens who may have gone to join isis. authorities are concerned the canadian students are either on their way to the middle east or are there.
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it's believed they flew from montreal to turkey in mid january. the teens' whereabouts are now a mystery. paula newton has more on the story from montreal. >> reporter: smart, kind and normal. that's how many are describing 18-year-old shyma, a bright young student now missing in the middle east possibly on her way to join isis and syria. at the high school she once attended students say she was well-liked and social. andy knew shyma, she was his tutor a couple years ago. what was your impression of her when you were tutoring her? >> she was really smart. a normal girl. so -- yeah. >> reporter: and did you get the impression then she was very religious? >> no not really. >> reporter: no. >> just like normal talk. >> reporter: normal talk. that's how it seemed to those who knew shyma until she went missing earlier this year. one of at least four possibly more people from montreal whose
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families fear they may have been lured into joining isis. three of the missing teens attended this community college across town and at least one attended classes taught by adeal shakawi, a muslim teacher accused by the college of spreading hate speech in the classrooms he used for teaching arabic and the quran. police alleged he was an al qaeda sleeper agent who received training in afghanistan. he spent six years being watched by canadian authorities. but in 2009 courts determined he was not a security threat. he says he only met one of the missing students on a couple of occasions, and he says he is just trying to integrate young muslims, not radicalize them. still, he and his classes have been suspended from campus while police try to determine what could have led these teens to possibly join isis. >> all right. so where isdoes the search go from here? i want to bring in phil mudd
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cnn's counterterrorism analyst and spent two decades as a counterterrorism official at the cia. phil good to see you. >> thank you. >> all right. so police are saying these teens have likely already made it as far as turkey and it will be difficult to track them. so what are the mechanisms in which to perhaps even look back surveillance to see if they made their way into turkey and then made their way out into sear syria. >> i fear they're lost already. we have talked about thousands of youths going from europe and the united states and canada over to syria. there are intermediate areas, professionals, terrorist organizations, used for these kinds of operations. we call them back at the cia filters filters, professionals at moving human beings providing documents. i suspect they're in syria already and we won't hear from them again until, for example, isis uses them in some kind of video campaign. so i'm afraid that some children from canada are lost. >> and that's part of the
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problem, because it doesn't take long. i mean you arrive into an occura in turkey a few hours drive to the syrian and iraq border. i've been to that region covering other things and it doesn't take that long. and it's easy to kind of disappear, very porous borders. so in what way can turkish authorities assist other governments when there is some suspicion of a young person who may be lured by isis? it seems as though they've got to make that phone call really immediately, because it's so quick to kind of disappear. >> that's right. there are a couple aspects you can look at. first, obviously, is looking at turkish airports to look at unaccompanied youth going through there. but i'm sure these folks were met at the airport. the term we used is facilitated through the airport, that's the first line of defense you have. people aren't flying obviously directly into syria and iraq. they're going through other routes to get there. the problem, of course if you
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look at travel figures out of the united states or canada or western europe to places like jordan or turkey places that border syria, the numbers are awesome. you can't sort through that number of people. the second issue of course is looking at the border itself. the amount of border territory you have to cover, the experience -- >> you're talking about the border between turkey and syria. >> too much space. yeah. too much space. >> so are there big concerns or are the concerns growing in terms of the radicalization of canadians, just as there is great concern particularly in europe we've talked about that in the past few weeks, of the thousands being recruited from european nations? what about canada? >> i think the concerns have to be growing, because we have seen a history of it in canada already. canada has large immigrant populations that i think are vulnerable. and then you have the classic characteristics of youths vulnerable to this kind of recruitment we're seeing in this case. a 15-year-old? that's not an adult. that's a child who is vulnerable to an older figure like this
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professor, who i suspect was a catalyst here, persuaded these girls that what they were doing was appropriate. the last thing i would say is again, something we have seen consistently in these cases for more than a decade. the speed with which someone can turn a switch on from being a nice kid in school to someone who wants to go over to syria to travel that can be as quick as days or weeks. so security services don't have a lot of time to figure out what nice kid has decided in the course of a week to go over to turkey to get into syria. there is just not enough time in that course of radicalization. >> yeah it is pretty extraordinary to hear how rapidly the mind-set could be influenced and changed. all right. phil mudd thank you so much. appreciate it. >> thank you. still ahead, new questions about the shooting of a mexican national by police in washington state. lawyers for the victim's family say police shot the man in the back. police insisting that is not the case. cnn's rosa flores joining me now from new york. rosa. >> reporter: hey, fred we have a copy of the autopsy excerpt
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that the family attorney says proves that this man was indeed shot in the back. i'll take you through the dramatic details, next.
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what's that thing? i moved our old security system out here to see if it could monitor the front yard. why don't you switch to xfinity home? i get live video monitoring and 24/7 professional monitoring that i can arm and disarm from anywhere. hear ye! the awkward teenage one has arrived!!!! don't be old fashioned. xfinity customers add xfinity home for $29.95 a month for 12 months. plus for a limited time, get a free security camera call 1800 xfinity or visit comcast.com/xfinityhome. an investigation is under way in washington state, and to the shooting of a mexican national by police earlier this month. officers reportedly fired 17 times in the confrontation with antonio zambrano montez.
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officials and representatives for the victim's family agree on that much but different autopsies tell different stories. cnn's rosa flores is following the story for us from new york. what is the latest here where is the conflict? >> there's a lot of controversy here fred. there are two independent autopsies by two different independent pathologists and -- but let me take you through this. because there are a lot of different moving parts. this is the case of an unarmed man shot and killed by police and it's all caught on tape. you're taking a look at the video on your screen. and what you see is 35-year-old antonio zambrano bran montez running from police. there is a lot of traffic and this man turns around and puts his hands up and shots are fired. police say here's what you don't see in this video. and this is what happened beforehand. police say this man was throwing rocks at cars and at officers
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that at least one of those rocks was the size of a softball that he hit several officers the officers gave him verbal commands to stop and that the man was actually tasered before those even shots -- before those shots were fired. now, police do say, like you mentioned, fred that 17 shots were fired, and that five to six of those shots actually hit zambrano montez and they say that none of them hit him in the back. take a listen. >> we do know this from the preliminary autopsy report. there were no shots in the back. >> now, here is where the plot thickens because two different autopsy reports from two different family attorneys show that five -- that not five or six shots hit the man. but that six, seven or up to eight shots hit the man, and that at least one of those shots hit him in the back. and we have that autopsy excerpt, because this is what attorneys are releasing, and
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they're saying you can take a look at this and you can see that indeed one of those shots is in the buttocks, which is in the back of this man. and so that's where they say, wait a minute there are discrepancies here. there was excessive use of force, and at least one of these shots hit him in the back. the coroner's report has not been finalized and all of this is still under investigation. >> and then who is leading this investigation? >> well there is actually a tricity organization a special investigative unit that is in washington that investigates officer-involved shootings that involve benton and franklin counties. this is in franklin county. and so it is not made up by the pasco police department, the pasco police department is actually not involved at all in this investigation. instead, it's other police agencies including local and county agencies. fred? >> all right. and the family of course has
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an attorney. they have filed this lawsuit. but what is it that they're asking for specifically? >> you know there are two family attorneys. one family attorney is representing the widow in this case and there is another family attorney that's representing the parents of this man. now, the family attorney that is representing the widow, i just talked to him moments ago. he tells me there was an -- a prior attorney representing the widow, and this man had filed a claim for $25 million, three days after the death of zambrano montez. now that this attorney has taken over he with drew that claim, because the widow didn't know that this attorney -- he said the widow didn't know this attorney filed a $25 million claim, so that claim, fred has been withdrawn. the attorney tells me this morning that he plans to investigate thoroughly. understand the case well before a claim is actually filed. >> all right.
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rosa flores thank you so much. still ahead -- >> you're welcome. >> -- top democrats will be skipping israeli prime minister's netanyahu's speech to congress next week. will the issue strain the relationship between the u.s. and israel? i'll ask a former u.s. ambassador edward walker, next. it's your data! all your unused data and if you switch now, we'll even give you 10 gigabytes of free 4g lte data on the spot. 10 gigabytes of free 4g lte data. only from t-mobile. meet the world's newest energy superpower. surprised? in fact, america is now the world's number one natural gas producer... and we could soon become number one in oil. because hydraulic fracturing technology is safely recovering lots more oil and natural gas. supporting millions of new jobs.
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hello again, and thanks so much for joining me. i'm fredricka whitfield. a developing story out of egypt,
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where an egyptian court has listed hamas as a terrorist organization. in a statement from gaza the islamist group called that decision quote, shackocking and take rouse. ian lee is joining us from cairo. what led this court to make this decision? >> reporter: well fredricka, it seems pretty straight forward. this court declaring hamas a terrorist organization. but in actuality, it is quite vague. i talked to a veteran egyptian lawyer who explained that this court really didn't have the jurisdiction to make this sort of ruling that -- that this court -- or that should have gone to the prosecutor general, and then to appeals court. a different avenue to declare hamas a terrorist organization. this is under a new egyptian law. but this doesn't come as a surprise. as the muslim brotherhood here in egypt is considered a terrorist organization it
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declared in 2013 hamas a branch of the muslim brotherhood. in egypt, they are seen as one and the same. although it will be difficult for them moving forward. egypt has been a broker of peace between israel and hamas in the past and it's uncertain now what the status of their representative here in cairo is. could he be detained now, and tried as a terrorist, fredricka. >> and so ian, what's the real motivation here? why would this court find it necessary to attach this label to hamas, and why now? >> reporter: well relations really soured between egypt and hamas after the 2013 overthrow of then president mohamed morsi. he came from the muslim brotherhood, a big supporter of hamas. now egypt has accused hamas of the instability and saying they are helping create that instability. they're also accused hamas of
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helping criminals or helping prisoners from egyptian jails releasing them a jailbreak of sorts, during the 2011 uprising. so the government here is making these cases against hamas, saying that they are really trying to destabilize the country, and that's kind of where we're seeing this verdict right now. >> hmmm. all right. ian lee from cairo, thank you so much. we're going to talk further on this with ed ward walker former u.s. ambassador to israel and egypt. joining from the washington bureau, this is quite the surprise we get a chance to talk with you on this matter as well because this is a court ruling that really just happened. so how do you interpret what is happening here. why would this egyptian court want to make this ruling make this designation that hamas is a terrorist organization after so many years of not doing that? >> well it has something to do with their relationship with the united states. we consider hamas a terrorist organization the israelis
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consider it a terrorist organization. and the egyptians have been facing a very serious problem in the sinai which affects both their security and the israel security. so i think it makes a lot of sense. now, the problem is of course that morsi was part of hamas, and the former president, morsi was part of hamas. and so there's got to be all sorts of accusations against the israeli regime. sisi. but it seems reasonable they would then follow through with their basic threats that if you don't support us you get out of the way. >> so do you see this as egypt doing this as an appeasement to the u.s.? >> no no i don't think so. i think this is a totally internal matter. it has to do with the military government that's running egypt now. it has to do with a long history of hamas opposing the military. but also the really serious problems they've had in the
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sinai in which the egyptian military has been targeted and they're -- members have been killed. and they need to do something to bring that under control. >> would this designation in any way spark some other new matter? would it be a catalyst in any way for a problem? >> well yeah. i mean it can cause people to come out on the streets again, and egypt has had a lot of problems with this. it's undercutting the egyptian economy. it's challenging the authority of the government. so yeah it can cause more complications in the future. >> all right. so we shall see what happens. meantime in just a matter of days three days as a matter of fact the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu, will be speaking to a joint session of congress in the united states without first involving the white house, which is typically protocol. national security adviser susan rice says the invitation to netanyahu and the visit to washington is in her words, destructive. listen to what she had to say.
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>> what has happened over the last several weeks by virtue of the invitation that was issued -- >> by the speak of the house. >> by the speaker and the acceptance of it by prime minister netanyahu two weeks in advance of his election is that on both sides, there has now been ininvestigatejected a degree of partisanship which is not only unfortunate, i think it's -- it's destructive of the fabric of the relationship. >> and a number of top democrats, including vice president joe biden, who normally sits behind the podium at joint sessions of state of the union speeches he will not be attending this speech. so in your view is this damage to netanyahu and his position in israel or even on the world stage, or is this more so damage to the u.s.? do you see it straining u.s.-israeli relations? >> look of course it's straining the relationship between us and between israel. we have a big serious difference of opinion on how to handle the
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iranian account. and that's the basis for this concern on the part of netanyahu, both netanyahu and the president have legitimate reasons to be concerned about that account. so will this hurt u.s. relationships? not really. i mean our relationship is built on a fabric of so many different lines of strong lines between us. our militaries our economies and so on. that's not going to change. and we have every interest in trying to work together on the iranian account, as well. we have the same objectives. >> so where is the potential gain by netanyahu addressing joint session of congress especially if his words on how to address iran differ from the white house? who is gaining anything here? >> well i don't see who is gaining, but it wasn't netanyahu invited him, after all. it was boehner who invited him. and if anybody is to bear the blame for this i would start looking at the speaker. why did he do it? he's been around the block a few times. he knows what this would entail
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and it would embarrass both the president and netanyahu. >> all right. former ambassador edward walker thank you so much for your time. appreciate it. >> you bet. they have legalized pot in the district of columbia now. we'll tell you why that can create a bit of a headache for law enforcement. it's happening. today, more and more people with type 2 diabetes are learning about long-acting levemir® an injectable insulin that can give you blood sugar control for up to 24 hours. and levemir® helps lower your a1c. levemir® comes in flextouch® the only prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension. levemir® lasts 42 days without refrigeration. that's 50% longer than lantus® which lasts 28 days. today i'm asking about levemir® flextouch®. levemir® is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir®
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it is now legal to smoke and grow marijuana in washington, d.c. the capital of a country that still doesn't even allow that on a federal level. and washington, d.c. is a federal city. and some on capitol hill are not so fired up about it. here is cnn's miguel marquez. >> are you guys happy to be here? >> yeah. beyond happy. >> reporter: happily and legally. smoking up in the nation's capital. >> for the first time ever recreational marijuana is being spoken without regulation taxation in barack obama's backyard. >> reporter: no one at this midnight pot party a stranger to using marijuana. but for those who enjoy it being able to use it legally, a new and nearly emotional experience. >> for the first time i feel safe and i feel respected and i feel comfortable. >> reporter: not everyone so satisfied. the chairman of the congressional committee overseeing the district of
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columbia insists the city is breaking the law and allowing residents to smoke. >> free reign on marijuana use, i just continent buy that. i just don't think that's the way they should operate. so states rights yes, but washington, d.c. is not a state. >> reporter: congress has stopped d.c. from allowing recreational sales, but the cultivation, possession and use here now legal for anyone over 21. what is this going to be called? >> capital hemp. >> reporter: when will you open? >> we're hoping to open by april 20th. 4/20. >> adam eidenger started initiative 71 after his head shop was raided he and his staff arrested the business shut down. they raided your old shop? >> yeah the police raided two stores in the middle of the night, 35 police officers. >> reporter: he says it was that very treatment sparking his passion to legalize marijuana here and more.
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>> we didn't just focus on passing a marijuana initiative but focused on making sure that politicians were elected that were going to support us once they got in office. >> reporter: a sort of pot revolution that is happening here in washington. a simple but powerful message. >> it's very weird to be able to do this on a camera and know it's okay. >> reporter: miguel marquez, cnn, washington. >> all right. so what kinds of legal battles does this set up? let me bring in cnn law enforcement analyst and former fbi assistant director tom fuentes. so the political battle aside what kinds of issues does this bring up for law enforcement? we're talking about a federal city and you've got federal law enforcement and you've got local law enforcement. is this going to be complicated? >> yes, fredricka, it's going to be complicated, because the district of columbia is not a state. so the administration the obama administration has you know reduced the efforts, let's say, or held back on enforcing some of the federal laws of marijuana
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into states that have legalized, but they're states. so you know, has that position. but in the case of the district of columbia it's not a state. it's more like a colony belonging to congress. so you have these members of congress making threats against the mayor, threatening to put her in jail. you know threatening to take action. using a law called the deficiency act, which says that they need permission in the district of columbia to spend money and -- excuse me the district was not appropriated to spend money to allow marijuana to be grown or to be used recreationally. so it's more of a political battle than a law enforcement battle. i don't think -- i think it's going to cause a delay in anybody being arrested or the legalization to open a shop and sell it. i think all of this is going to kind of end up on hold until they resolve some of these issues. and, of course you have the unprecedented thing of imagine in this country a politician
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goes to jail and it's not for political corruption or public corruption. that would be -- that might be a first. >> huh. so it's very complicated, because while it is not -- this does not allow the selling, the selling or even gifting or exchange of marijuana, but people are able to grow it in their homes. so how will this be enforced? because we're talking about behavior that's kind of behind closed doors in your home as opposed to you know law enforcement, federal or even local, being able to enforce it just on the street. >> well what happens there is if somebody contacts the police or contacts dea and says i was at somebody's home and i saw the plants growing and they have too many or, you know they're violating the law, they have more than the few ounces being allowed under this law. so there's -- there's a number of ways that that could happen that the police would be asked
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to take action. and, of course you have members of congress saying we're going to want to take action against the mayor and against the city officials if they allow this to go forward. and they're going to use the -- basically their right to say district of columbia is not a state. it's a subsidiary of congress under their thumb. >> very complicated and very fascinating. nonetheless. tom fuentes, thank you so much. >> thank you. still to come the only man who possibly knew spock best. william shatner talks about the loss of his friend and "star trek" legend leonard nimoy. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ great rates for great rides. geico motorcycle
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all right. how is this for a tribute to "star trek"'s leonard nimoy. they tweet the vulcan salute from the international space station flying over boston where he was born. he played mr. spock on "star trek" died friday of lupg disease. he was 83. william shatner remembers him and the phrase mr. spock turned into sy-fy legend. >> a wonderful phrase live long and i would like to think that the prosper is not just to
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make good money, but prosper in evolving yourself as a human being. which is what i think leonard was trying to do all his life. ♪ ♪ >> nothing would be the same about spock if leonard nimoy had not played him. >> that may be correct, captain. >> the attempt to restrain the emotion, to not show what's behind the eyes to suffer silently but suffer in spock's case to be in two worlds, to be torn that -- that resinated in a lot of people. he had this two finger thing, which i can't do. the vulcan salute made up on the spot. i thought it was a wonderful creation. leonard and i, every so often
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made an appearance together and i think together we were stronger than apart. my great memory of leonard was not only how strong he was, he was very powerful, he was a swimmer, butfuls his laughter. [ laughter ] entwined in life. we got on stage together. he broke me up all the time. so far back we may have not been in love from the very beginning, certainly in respect, but as time went on and i saw the beauty of the man, his moral morality morality his fascinating arm to ideals that he kept close to his heart, i learned to admire republic and love him. leonard wrote a book saying i am not spock, and what he meant by that was i'm spock, but i'm so much more. >> i can't stay it strongly enough thank you, thank you, thank you, and may each of you
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live long and prosper. ♪ ♪
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what's that thing? i moved our old security system out here to see if it could monitor the front yard. why don't you switch to xfinity home? i get live video monitoring and 24/7 professional monitoring that i can arm and disarm from anywhere. hear ye! the awkward teenage one has arrived!!!! don't be old fashioned. xfinity customers add xfinity home for $29.95 a month for 12 months. plus for a limited time, get a free security camera call 1800 xfinity or visit comcast.com/xfinityhome. all right. look at the top stories now, in iraq the prime minister responds today to the destruction of ancient artyifacts at the hands of isis calling
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and vowing to hunt them down. he made those comments while opening iraq's museum opening in the fall of baghdad in 2003. >> in a new development, the court ruled the boston marathon bombing trial will stay in boston. jury selection in the trial is now set to begin next week and three people were killed and 250 injured in the april 20 13 bombing near the marathon's minnish line. the missing oscar dress is back. los angeles police are pretty sure the pearl encrusted dress found in a hotel bathroom is the $150,000 creation. the dress disappeared from the hotel room after being worn to the oscars and l.a. police say, yes, they received a tip.
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hello, thank you so much for joining me. we're following develops in the they toll shooting of a russian opposition leader in moscow. a long time critic of vladmir pew fit, shot in the back while walking across a bridge yards from the kremlin. at the time he was with his female companion, ana, a ukrainian model. she is considered a key witness to the crime and told another opposition leader there were several men in the car containing the gunman. we are in moscow so fred was he supposed to give an address on ukrainian crisis? in fact this weekend? >> reporter: yeah absolutely. there's several interesting factors to that. on the one hand he was to attend a rally tomorrow here in
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moscow where the main feature of that rally was going to be russia's policies in ukraine, and another thing he apparently said that he had some new information on what exactly was going on in ukraine. we gather this from opposition sources, however, it's unclear what that information was supposed to be. now, after what happened of course what's going on now, and it was at the rally to take place tomorrow is going to be a morning rally instead. what happens is there's a march of mourners that's going to go through central moscow mourning the death of boris, and so things have changed, but one of the things that i want to hit on as well fredricka, the model, playing a pivotal role. i spoked to one of his friends yesterday, and what happened was after this incident here is that she called this friend and he was over here in about ten minutes and saw flying here
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