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tv   CNN Newsroom With Poppy Harlow  CNN  March 8, 2015 11:00am-4:01pm PDT

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to mr. netanyahu may have an opportunity to make a fourth speech. but first he has to win the israeli elections later this week. thanks for being part of my program this week, i will see you next week. happening right now in the in the newsroom flight 370 vanished one year ago today. >> hundreds of pages of documents supporting back ground information have now been released. >>-plus hiding their faces behind pieces of paper. five suspects are now behind bars for the murder of juan of putin's biggest critics. and in dallas, police say an
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iraqi militant is shot and killed by an unknown assail lachblt. hello, everyone thank you for joining us the. new revelations today in the search for malaysia flight 370. it has been one year since the plane vanished and now a new report from malaysian authorities is raising new questions, among the findings is that the battery for the plane's flight data recorder had been allowed to run out, before the plane actually disappeared. investigators also say they found no signs of stress or unusual behavior among the plane's crew leading up to the disappearance. and there's still no explanation for why this fight veered so far off it's original course. richard quest has been going through the hundreds of pages of these documents. >> reporter: hundreds of pages of documents supporting back
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ground information have now been released and although they don't give us any information about what happened in the cockpit, we still don't know why the plane went missing or indeed where it ended up. they paint a very detailed picture of the aircraft it's systems, it's crew and how air traffic control performed on the night and it's not a pretty picture. on the equestion of the pilots there is simply no evidence that the captain is in any way unstable. in fact the reports specifically say the captain's ability to handle stress at work and home was good there was no known history of apathy anxiety, irritability, no significant changes in his lifestyle, interpersonal conflict or other stresses. neither the pilot, the captain nor the co-pilot had any financial problems. they had regular bank accounts
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regular insurance policies nothing out of the ordinary. in terms of what happened on the night. here we see a very different picture. congress fusion and chaos between ho chi minh and coup kuala limbumpurlumpur. could they have lost it in 30 days but have have been told previously they are good now we know they are not. the picture we are getting of what happened on the night, certainly contributed to the fact that now we have no idea whether r where the plane has ended up. >> all right, richard quest, thank you so much. the australian prime minister also addressed the search for the missing plane. he cautioned that people need to
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be realistic. >> can't go on forever. but as long as there are reasonable leads, the search will go on. >> 239 people were on the plane, and that means hundreds of family members are still without answers. anna koran takes a look at what the search means to them. >> reporter: on a simple chain around her neck danika wears her most precious possession. >> it's the only piece of his that we are close to. >> reporter: he kissed her goodbye and asked her to look after his wedding ring. he was heading to a mine site in kuala lumpur and he said if anything happened to him, the ring would go to the son who married first.
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>> my life stopped that day, so that's what i remember of my life. i'm purely now i'm existing people stay you ear cope're coping. >> for 12 months the mother of two has been desperately searching for answers, unable to come to terms with the fact her husband is gone. >> you have be here to think that someone, your best friend, you maybe husband, and the father of my children went through any of that. i don't want that for him. and it's the not knowinga inging that really eholds you. >> reporter: she holds on to eternal hope. >> if i'm alone, i think if he comes back i look at our wedding pictures if he comes
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back it would be amazing. our kids have grown too much it's been 11 months since paul left and we're coming up on his second thirlt bay birthday. >> reporter: saying the malaysians black of transparency has been just as appalling as their inge sensitive treatment of the families. and as is search continues for mh-370 but if nothing is found, the operation may be called off. >> that's so unfair where does that leave us? we can't move beyond the mh-370. they may be able to. but they don't come home to an empty house and two young children who should have their father here who has every right to be here and if not they are legally and morally contracted or committed to findinging them bringing them all home for us.
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and that's what they should do. >> with mementos of paul scattered all around the house, dani dani danika may never know what happened to him. >> i'll never stop thinking about him. he's done everything for us. he's amazing. achblgd i and i know if the shoe was on the other foot he would never stop looking for me and i won't stop looking for him either. >> and one of five men arrested in connection with the february killing of russian leader boris boris -- chechen police battalion, two of them -- he was shot in the back as he walked with his girlfriend near the
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kremlin. matthew chance is live for us now in moscow so matthew, what is the connection between the suspects especiallily the one that pleaded guilty so nemtsov. >> that's the really interesting question you have put your finger right on it. we don't know if there is any link to them. what the authorities say is that these people they have been charged noud edd now with this not just with carrying out the chilling also of organizing it as well. there are five systems that have now been for the most part charged, so the discuss pigs is that one of them drove the get away car and the three others were involved in some way in plotting and organizing the killing of boris nemtsov, who, if anyone ordered them to carry
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out this attack against boris nemtsov who you point out was one of the fiercest critics of the leader of russia. >> four of the men are chechen, putin has a long history of batting chechen rebels. is anyone questioning why chechens would want a putin opponent killed? >> well i mean there's a lot of speculation about why that might be. there's been in the russian media, conspiracy theories the chechens may have been hired by the enemies of russia the ukrainian government has been mentioned, as a matter of fact to carry out this killing in order to make russia look bad, certainly it's the position of the russian government that that was a provocation, in order to cast russia in afternoon extremely bad light. but i think the fact of the matter is that chechnya is an extremely loyal part of the country still, even if there's
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not a war there them. and there are now guns for fire there. and these individuals, if they are responsible for actually carrying out the attack could have just been hired by any party who wanted boris nemtsov dead. that they caught the triggerman doesn't exactly shed light on why nemtsov was killed. >> this is a mystery with so many layers and the layers just skipped deeper and longer. matthew chance in moscow appreciate it. now to selma alabama, where huge crowds are now krzing the edmond pettis bridge. what an extraordinary per, of course yesterday it was historic and extraordinary, yet later today the march is officially set to begin. you're seeing the mass of people who have collected here in these
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ely live pictures there. yesterday you saw the president of the united states there, and our live coverage continues through today, the marcherings will take to the bridge in a symbolic day. it was march 7, 1965. yesterday was the official date march 7, but traditionally, and for years now, john lewis and others have taken that walk across the bridge on a sunday, even if march 7 landed on a friday. so today you will see large masses of people who will cross the edmond pettis bridges. in 1965 it took five days over that march to culminate over a
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54-mime path. yesterday the president talked got progress and still work to be done. >> what they did here will reverberate through the ages. not because the change they want was preordained, not because their victory was complete but because they proved nonviolent change is approximate possible. that love and hope can conquer hatred. >> we have had live images today and you'll see live images tomorrow the initial walk expected to begin at 5:45 eastern time. and iraqi impimmigrant escapes isis object to be gunned down here.
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>> he had only been in the country for 20 days fleeing the r isis for the safety of texas only to be killed. coming up after the break we'll have the search for his killers. my tempur-pedic made me fall in love with mornings again. i love how it conforms to my body. with tempur-pedic the whole bed is comfortable. it's the best thing we ever did for ourselves. it's helping to keep us young. (vo) visit your local retailer and feel the tempur-pedic difference for yourself. they say after seeing a magician make his assistant disappear mr.clean came up with a product that makes dirt virtually disappear.
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a mystery in dallas, police say a -- he died right in front of his wife and bore. neck nick what do police belief? >> police have very little information. they say they're asking for the public's help. their best lead may be the surveillance video we're about to show you. crime stoppers offering $5,000 for information leading to arrest. this surveillance video shows
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the four men who may be linked to the murder of ahmed al jamali. the surveillance video shows where the 36-year-old iraqi immigrant was shot and killed. through tears his fatherly said al jamali recently escaped iraq for texas. his daughter's excitement for their life together was no secret. on saturday night jamili had gone out with his wife to watch the snow fall. >> there is no shortage of sadness for the loss of this beautiful young man, who has of course course -- only just come to this
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country 20 days ago. and we don't as texans want that to be the -- >> tests are ongoing now to determine if one more rifle was fired and whether the physical evidence that we have been able to get from the crime scene is related to any other offense. as you can see, we have little information to go on. >> reporter: for now this video may be the best lead police have to find the man responsible for the death of a man who left the threat of violence only to become a victim of it. a vigil for ahmed al jamali will be held in dallas at account is 1:00 local time. >> do police know whether this family whether he individually or he and his have ever been
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threatened or has anyone ever made any comments to them? >> that's what they're looking into right now. muslim community, they believe there's something more sinister here. but police say there's no indication of that they really don't have very much to go on right now. other than that surveillance video that we just showed you. still ahead, could two different terror groups made up of islamic extremism be joining forces? find out why boca haram may be headedy yredady to team up with isis. thanks for the ride around norfolk! and i just wanted to say geico is proud to have served the military for over 75 years! roger that. captain's waiting to give you a tour of the wisconsin now.
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a doll fichb trainer may have kimmed himself after video surfaced of him abusing dolphins. spanish police say jose luis barbaro was found dead his vehicle saturday. barbaro was expected to become vice president of the georgia aquarium in atlanta. his employer in spain is denying the abuse allegations.
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the christian community is mourning the loss of fred craddock. he was also called a preaching generalius genius. 2 the 86-year-old died friday the cause of his death has not been released. and unknown attackers fired dozens of rockets killing a u.n. peacekeeper and two civilians, at least 12 other people are wounded. and could bocako haram and isis be pledging alichbs. the nigeria base islamist terror group has proven to be every bit as cruel and violent as isis has
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been in the middle east. so nema do excellence officials believe this recording is authentic? >> well, we're still waiting to hear back from the pentagon but in terms of the idiosyncrisies and the adds pronunciation in terms of the words and the termology that he's keeping, this is what we have heard before. it does sound very much like him, and if it is him, this is the reason it's giving so many people pause for thought. if it is him, this will give boko haram from one -- all the way now down into west africa to one of the most successful terror groups on the african continue innocent -- what woumtd
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boko haram gain by pledging the isis? >> they're very much in -- the after can union has actually succeeded in eroding most of their territory. this was some pretty expansive territorial foot print and that is now very much under pressure. what they get from isis is much more sophisticated propaganda machines being deployed here a very different look to their video, and propaganda translates into the lifelines of foreign recruits and foreign donations and if boko haram continues to be squeezed, it's going to need a lot of that to turn back that tide fred. >> any evidence that the two are indeed coordinating anyone in intel who seems to believe that's the case? >> not as yet. but what we're seeing just purely from that new media arm,
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it's very similar to isis and the contacts we have reached out to are using that at the moment as proof that this could very well be happening, but until they run that voice recognition software we're not going to be have any answers. protests in madison, wisconsin after police shot and killed an unarmed 19-year-old. >> reporter: hi, fred, take a look at the house behind me this is the house where 19-year-old tony robinson was shot. it is still a crime scene two days later. why are police saying that police force was justified and why is the community so angry? next. ♪ turn around, barry ♪ ♪ i finally found the right snack ♪ [ female
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an officer responding to a disturbances call opened fire after police say 19-year-old tony robinson assaulted him. according to public records, robinson pleaded eded guilty of armed robbery last year. and the officer, aa 12-year department vet twrmpb are trafr -- why is so much being brought inabout the past of the officer and the victim? >> reporter: if you just look behind me fred it's almost day two and you can see that there's still crime scene, where this incident happened. take a look you see that there
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are madison police here guarding the crime scene and there are investigators inside of this house, very telling given the fact that it's been almost 48 hours. this the community has been angry, has been in fear, and they are asking for justice. >> hundreds of00 hundreds of glen trait demonstrate fors hit the streets of -- tony terrell robinson's mother devastated and overcome by emotion. >> my son has never been a violent person. never. and to die in such a violent, violent way. >> reporter: police paint a different picture of her son. scanner traffic capturing the dramatic the chain of events. >> look for a male black light skin. >> reporter: police say they
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received several calls about robinson friday evening, first about the teen jumps in and out of photographic and dodging cars. >> a call for the same suspect. >> reporter: then about an alleged battery incident. >> tried to strangle another patron. >> reporter: the situation escalating when robinson entered what families say is his best friend's house, officer malt kenny arrived heard a commotion inside and forced his way in. kenny -- robinson was administered cpr at the scene, but later died at the hospital. >> he was unarmed. and that's going to make this all the more complicated for the investigators, for the public to accept, to understand that deadly force had to be used. >> reporter: this is not the
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first time the 45-year-old officer used lethal force. kenny was commonexonerated for an incident that took blase years ago. >> he was a beautiful, beautiful young man. he stood 6'4" 200 pounds. >> reporter: >> reporter: robinson's aunt and grand ma speaking out for him. >> i'm hurt i'm frustrated i'm angry. >> reporter: as another family faces an all too familiar with anguish, the community zeals with an all too familiar question. was the use of deadly force necessary? >> and as we take another live look you can see a small memorial here, a sign of the solidarity of this community for
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robinson and for his family. as you have seen madison police officers behind me their police cruisers, you might be wondering why are they at the creamime scene, they are only protecting the cream scene. because by law, when there's a department involved shooting the police department doesn't get to investigate it. >> this was a friend's house, does that mean there were witnesses inside the home with robinson to see what happened just prior to the gun going off? >> you know, this family members do tell us that this is his best friend's house, that he used to hang out here all the time with his friends. one of the witnesses told us she was next door and she heard the scuffle, and she heard the gun shots, we're actually going to bring you that shortly in a few hours, but she describes the scene, very chaotic, a very thin
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wall between her home and the home where these shots were fired and she's going to explain what was going through her mind when she was hearing the scuffle. she explains that these kids as she calls them these 19-year-olds they were good kids like any other 19-year-olds sometimes they would be horsing around playing, but never drugs or alcohol, she mentioned, that they were good kids and that they were her next door neighbors. >> rosa flores thanks so much, we look forward to your next report. still ahead, live coverage of the bloody sunday commemoration march continues, cnn's ryan young is in selma, alabama. huge crowds yesterday and it looks even bigger today. >> reporter: the crowds here are enormous enormous. you can see all the people that have filled the streets.
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we'll have a live report. how people feel coming back here 50 years later.
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and we're continuing our live coverage of bloody sunday
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our remembrance march in selma, alabama. about one hour from now, marchers will be marching across the same bridge that -- anchoring our show from selma yesterday bringing to you president obama and u.s. congressman john lewis's speeches live for you, well said as you see in these live pictures a huge crowd ereremains. ryan young, you were in the thick of the crowds yesterday, and it looks like we have huge crowds today. is there something similar to yesterday or is there something different today? >> reporter: it's different today. i often wondered if the crowds are bigger here today than they were yesterday. look at the bridge, look at all of the people who have floodinged intoflooding
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edflooding -- flooded into this area, wanting to come out here to make sure they could cross the bridge on sunday. obviously start was lyly saturday was a presidential bubble so it was hard for people to get in here with so many streets being shut down. there are food trucks that now line the streets and people have come to make sure they're able to commemorate this moment in fact we're bumping into people who were here 50 years ago and we talked about the idea that you wanted to be here with your mother. >> i was here 50 years ago and so was mom. somehow we got separated back then, but i'm termdetermined for us to stay together today but yes e, we're here. >> reporter: when the president's speech yesterday, how did that resonate since you were here. >> it brought back so many of the memories of the struggle the struggle that is ongoing, a
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struggle that we must commit to take an active part in because we want what we deserve, we want freedom, equality for all people. >> reporter: and we talked about the fact that people are not always voting after people gave up their lives to -- how does it feel to know that people are not getting out to vote like they used to? >> if they only knew how many lives were taken, how many lives were lost and the struggle i think they would get out. but we got the keep going out there and reaching the people and encouraging them the significance of the vote and how hard it was to get the right to vote. and i believe that it's going to get better. >> people have lined up to see how they could do this. i want to walk over here just a little bit. and you said you were also here 50 years ago, and you wanted to be here too. >> i sure did. >> reporter: tell me why.
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>> i wanted my daughter and my grand daughter to feel what i felt back in those days 50 years ago and 50 years ago, it wasn't this many people. there wasn't. so the people that showed up was really impressive. >> reporter: when you see this crowd and how large the crowd is how does it strike you that there's all people of all nationalities and race? >> i never would have thought we would come this far, but we have a long way to go. >> reporter: when you heard the president's speech yesterday, what stuck out to you? >> it was a lot. just to even see him up there, you know, to speak in this day and ages to have a black president, i thought that was tremendous. >> >> reporter: we have heart that over and over that that hug between president obama and -- where he was down on the ground and now he's standing tall with the president. so many say that's the picture we will remember.
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when you look at this crowd, you have to look at this bridge it's more of a festive type mentality. >> it was an extraordinary moment and we know that march 7 falls on a saturday but today is a day traditionally, for many years now it's become the tradition of retracing those accepts and walking over the edmond pettis bridge and u.s. congressman john lewis and in other foot soldiers were there. have you seen any of them there today? >> reporter: you know quite honestly, all i see is a sea of smiling people. we haven't really seen the dignitaries, is so to speak, but everyone is walking together everyone wants to be here so we
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haven't seen the security that was sort of involved in that, but amount of smiley faces. >> we want to check back with you, and again, the actual march begins an hour from now. straight ahead, what time is it? apple is hoping that next time someone asks you that question that you'll be answering with their latest product. but first this open court report. >> with 470 straight wins and 7 paralympicic gold medals she is the most decorated player in tennis. she was left paralyzed after a risky operation to correct a birth defect. >> a prablg kl way of how to use your chair and then also the fact that you realize that you can still be part of it you can still be part of society and
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still have a really fun social life. >> r. >> >> we'll pretend this is one of those sports that you have to be really fit for, to move your chair, to move yourself on the court and be on time to get the ball. but you have to have the flexibility and the pace in your arm to hit a ball really hard. i think the fact that it's physical it's tactical it's mental and it has everything and that's probably why i love it so much.
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all right, checking our top stories right now, president barack obama tells face the nation that there's one thing that would make him walk away from a nuclear deal wither iran he says that iran has to have unprecedented transparency or no deal. benjamin netanyahu warned last week that -- baghdadi must not be trusted. the film has made $3737$37 million.
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the idea of a commuter watch, it's not new, apple's version will be apple is expected to review it's new watch tomorrow in stv, apple has said that the watch would cost about $350 and the high end version could be as much as $10,000. that would be apple's most expensive product ever. and in a new series for cnn, bill weir is traveling the globe to bring you many of the world's wonderers, now he finds out what it's like to wander the tortoises of -- >> reporter: after he tore down those fences and started charging tourists a couple bucks to wanter amongst them she is one of the richest guys in town.
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$300 a day, that's nice they're good business partners these big guys. >> translator: i can testify, it is more satisfying seeing a giant tortoise out here than in here. >> you can see more of bill weir's trip to the gallopagos islands. >> and a commemorative bloody sunday march straight ahead. normally people wear pants. yeah that's why i'm hiding captain obvious. not very well. i found you immediately. you know what else is easy to find? a new hotel with the hotels.com app. i don't need a new hotel room, i just need to get back into this one.
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characteristic. >> reporter: in 2008 on the day she graduated from college, jaycee and her parents were in a car accident caused by a teenager using a cell phone. >> i was shattered, i had a damaged liver, my lungs were both partially collapsed and i had a brain injury that put me on the edge of death. >> reporter: jaycee refused to give in. >> her call to action came after the driver who caused the accident wasn't convicted, there was no law against the use of cell phones. >> i tried to get a hand held ban and a texting ban, and finally it went into effect that texting and driving is illegal. >> reporter: and now the 28-year-old also speaks arrange
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the around the country to raise awareness. >> everything i have had? spite of having lost so much. part of life is getting hurt escaping unscathed, i survived for a reason and a purpose. to use my time honored planet to make lives a little bit better. >> and we have so much more straight ahead in the newsroom and it all starts right now. happening right now in the newsroom new evidence into what happened involving a malaysia airlines flight 370 which advantage vanished one year ago today. >> reporter: hundreds of pages of documents supporting background information have now been released. and a mystery in dallas police say an iraqi immigrant watching his first snowfall in
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his new american hometown is shot and killed by an unknown assailant. the news room starts right now. hello and thanks again for joining me. new revelations today in the search for malaysia airlines flight 370. it has been one year since the plane vanished and now a reporter from malaysian authorities is raising new questions. it says the battery or the plane's flight data recorder had been allowed to run out for more than a year before the plane disappeared. they also noungd nofound no stress or unusual behavior leading up to the time of the disappearance. cnn aviation correspondent
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richard quest has been going over the report. richard, what do we know about this expired pinger battery? how could it be that it went on for so long with common knowledge i suppose and it was dead? >> no >> reporter: there's a real controversy over this battery because the paper work fred the paper work said that the battery had expired a year private youly, however, when the investigators went to talk to the people, let me read you what it says, it's on page 60 of the report it was revealed that the computer system was not updated and the update removed the old battery, but didn't show the new battery installed. so what we have here ask the investigator saying i'm sorry, the paper work says it wasn't inal stalled, therefore i have to say it was expired. but the airlines saying no just look the computer shows
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that it didn't update correctly. so we believe that yes the bat battery was changed, what we have here is a snafu on the battery life. >> even if there was a battery in there, all of the devices, all of the technology used there was no ping that was detect detected but what does this discovery stay about the maintenance of that plane, the airline itself what is being led into this line of information. >> i think what we're seeing here is that we have got a huge amount of detail on the plane, we know everything that was wrong with it. we know everything that was right with it. the oxygen system had beenwas working, down to what had been repaired and what needed to be repaired.
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what we also see on this report is how air traffic control handled those first the few hours. one thing i think is most disskreszing and disturbing about what we have learned today, it is the level of confusion, the lack of urgency the black of somebody punishing the big red button about panic and confusion about this. let me give you a brief example they are supposed to alert, put out a distress alert within roughly an hour of a plane going missing, in this case it was more than 4 1/2 hours before that was put out. and what we have is air traffic control going backwards and forwards have you seen the plane, have you heard from the plane, have they heard from the plane? it really is very distressing to read. and here it is i mean there's 400 pages of this sort of stuff. >> yeah and it seems to underscore kind of messy too. so richard quest, don't go away
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i want to bring safety analyst and faa david sussy. what does this tell you about the jet or maybe even the airline itself? >> it tells me a lot because after 17 years of doing surveillance on airlines and doing maintenance inspections exactly for this type of thing, the commuter said one thing, and the paper work said something else. those have to line in if one's wrong and the other one's right i doubt that it's the computer that's right. i think it's the paper work that's right. so the idea that it was in the computer there's actually tags that go with that part and when that part is changed, that's the paper work that has to exist. without that, just simply enter into the computer but without
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that tag it doesn't even anything. so that tells me there were a lot of problems not just with this airplane but that's maintenance 101. that's the first thing you do. the things that have to be scheduled like that. every airline i have surveilled has done this properly. so there's something wrong flrks's aflrks. there's a deeper problem there. >> how does this pinpoint where the investigation goes here. >> there's a couple of things that can happen right now, and i know there's some work going on within asia airlines and the international civil aviation -- this is the silver lining of an accident. this is where you get to go through your entire airline, all the way down to the details, like richard was saying and divide out what's an airworthiness issue, what an rrr, all those things they may
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not have been clean on. you can bet right now they're going through that with a fine toothed comb. but as far as the investigation goes i think we're still waiting to hear something about the black boxes, to find out if the aircraft is actually in this intense search area. just stay the course and keep searching is the way they are right now. >> appreciate it gentlemen. russian state tv says a sixth suspect in the february killing of russian operations liter boris -- he then blue himself up. meanwhile one of five men arrested earlier as reported pleaded guilty and that man has previously served as an officer in a chechen police -- nemtsov
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was shot in the back as he walked with his girlfriend near the kremlin and math eye chance says rushsian police have no rinks between -- >> reporter: these people have been charged with this not just of carrying out the attack, carrying out the killing, but also organizing it as well. there are five suspects that have now been for the most part charged, so the suspicion is one was the gunman one drove the getaway car, and the three others were involved in some way of plotting organizing the killing of boris nemtsov, and what we don't know at this point because we're just at to the start of the trial, or perhaps because we'll never know is what may have molt vated them. what if anyone ordered them to carry out this attack against boris nemtsov, so that's still
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the big mystery hanging over this. >> as to the russian government says it believes the killing was a moveprovocation to cast russia in an extremely bad light. -- ridding iraq of islamic extremists but iraqi's future is uncertain if even forces reclaim tikrit. we'll go to baghdad for the latest. sterfest... ...red lobster's largest variety of lobster dishes all year. double up with dueling lobster tails. or make lobster lover's dream a delicious reality. but hurry this won't last long. ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you have enough money to live life on your terms? i sure hope so. with healthcare costs, who knows. umm... everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusive confident retirement approach. now you and your ameripise advisor....
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iraqi forces are getting closer to retaking tikrit. less than a mile away from saddam hussein's old presidential palaces. swachbd yesterday tikrit -- 40 to 50 females were able to plea the area. our ben wedeman is in south
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iraq. troops have been trying to retake the city since last summer why are they finally making this kind of progress now? >> i think fredericka the first thing is this time they're organized and they seem to be going about it in a much more deliberate manner. of course, if you speak to people at the front, they'll tell you it's because of the help they have received from iran the iranians have provided ammunition weapons advisors and of course on the scene is casim salamani which is part of the brigade from iran. but in general, i think it is they had some very bad experiences last summer several very unsuccessful indeed catastrophic attempts to retake tikrit so they have had a lot of time to prepare for this.
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and this time around it seems to be going mitch better than in the past. fled reek can? >> and then i wonder certainly reese, i know you're standing right next to ben there, but 24 your view why is this so significant that you would have these joint iraqi forces to be able to make this kind of progress? >> reporter: i really do, i think when we drove inthe other day, we drove up north, with all the iraqi veterans out there, which is mt. tampa, that roms through crick treat up to mosul. i was the way they had that secured with some iraqi police and the iraqi army they had it very well secured. i was very impressed with the leader ship that wiz going and
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the way they plavned it. again they're doing the same thing we are in tikrit. >> what explains this better of better coehesioncohesion is there something that has helped those forces work better together? >> the iraqis are the wurves making decision thals very key. we have met with some folks the other day from the embassy, and they said the same thing, this is the iraqis it's their fight, they are doing it. the americans are ow in mum bar. strategically, regionally some of the larger sunni nations should be having or probably having some issues with the iranians inside and what the
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this looks like when this is all done technically. is is it being reveal what the next front is? >> well really they have to count those chickens when they hatch. at the moment the focus is on tikrit. but we heard them talking about perhaps a new operation in the fallujah area as well. there's been a lot of talk about mosul, but mosul is a long way to tikrit and an even longer way to baghdad. a lot of preparation for that which will be the climax of driving isis out of iraq. similar is to what we have seening in tikrit, before they
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can finally focus their attention on mosul. we did hear pentagon officials talking about late industrial may, now you speak to anyone in the iraqi army brush that off, they say they've got a lot of preparation to go as i said, we'll see lots more battles like tikrit in mozal suddenly. still ahead, an iraqi immigrant in the u.s. for barely a month now is gun down while it snows in his texas neighborhood nick valencia tells us about the tragedy. >> he had only been in the united states for 20 days coming up the so much for his killer, you're watching cnn.
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stay they are increasing controls in that area trying to get more leads, right now they have very little to go off of. crime stoppers offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to an arrest. police say this surveillance video from a camera posted on a nearby school shows the four men who may be linked to the murder of ahmed al jamali. the 36-year-old iraqi immigrant was shot and killed. through tears his father-in-law said that al jamali recent left iraq to escape the growing threat of isis in north texas, he would also be reuniteded with his wife after more than a year apart. his excitement for their new life together was no secret. jahmahly had gone out with his wife to look at the snowfall.
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>> well educated. good environment, what he got? one bullet in his heart. >> there is no shortage of sas sadness for the loss of this beautiful young man who has only just come to this country 20 days ago, and we don't as texans want that to be his welcome. >> reporter: police are pleading for the public to help. >> tests are ongoing now to determine if one or more rival was fired and whether the physical evidence that we have been able to get from the crime scenes related to any other offense, as you can see, we have little information to go on. >> for now this video may be the best lead police have to find the man responsible for the death of a man who left the threat of violence only to become a victim of it.
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>> a memorial for al jahmahly will be held about 6:30 local time in dallas. >> and while police are looking for any kind of direction on this there's also a reward being offered, some sintd ofkind of incentive? >> any information from crime stoppers police say they have very little to go from but members of the muslim community say there may be something more center at play here. still ahead, our live coverage of bloody sunday the commemorative march continues, look at the thousands of people right there at the foot of the bridge, ready to march across. and stay awake during the day. this is called non-24. learn more by calling 844-824-2424. or visit your24info.com. ♪ turn around ♪ ♪ every now and then i get a little bit tired ♪ ♪ of
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hello, again, everyone.
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we're continuing our live cofferagecoffer coverage of the commemorative march of bloody sunday. van jones in the middle of the crowd, ryan you first, give us an idea of who was turned out today? >> wow, what a turnout so so far, i can tell you, people did sided not to wait until 2:30 for that official march time. people decided to go across the bridge on their own. there was a rumor going through the crowd that they were going to stop the march. but the people stayed no we're going to march across. we're not even sure of the officials who wanted to lead the march ever even reached this location until the swell of all
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the people who were pushing over the bridge. they're having a good time they're smelling as they go across the bridge. when you're standing there, you know how much history now, because everyone's been talking about it how do you feel the be here today. >> i feel like it's really cool that we can be here and that we can actually see the bridge that people walked on like 50 years ago. >> reporter: when president obama talked about the idea of the struggle not being over and the need to vote are you going to make sure that you kperexercise your rights to vote? >> i personally feel blessed and it's a privilege for us all to be here because at a certain point in history, we were not able to have this right. >> what >>. >> reporter: what's the crowd like to walk around and see everyone in the crowd. >> it's really crowded, but it's
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fun to see people come together all races, all ages of people coming together. >> reporter: you can see the crowd as they kind of swell over the bridge people tell us they were not going to stop to the idea of being able to stand here and walk across the bridge. so many people walked from home yesterday saying they wanted to be here on sunday and that's something they are able to experience a lot of smiley faces, a lot of messages about all civil rights and a lot of communities coming together to have this conversation on this bridge. >> it looks like many more young people there as well. van jones, you and i were standing there alongside one another when congressman john lewis and president obama came out and hugged president obama paying homage to all the foot soldiers but particularly john lewis, he was one of his biggest heroes and we heard the message from both of them who said
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yesterday was both a celebration and it was an occasion of renewal. how do you see marked differences between yesterday and today? >> you know it's really amazing because yesterday people thought we were at a peak moment i think there were maybe 20,000 30,000 people here. today may turn out to be even bigger. again, they have already taken the bridge. and also let's not forget there is a new civil rights movement of the coalition for immigrant justice, you had lois juerta. you also have people here from around the world. we have a bunch of women who are here from africa and they are bringing their protests. i want you to hear some of the music they're bringing to the streets.
quote
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♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ . >> so nice. so van, which african nation do they represent? >> reporter: well listen they represent south africa zambia, again, mozambique libya, so many different countries, beautiful, beautiful global protest culture here immigrant rights represented, women's rights around the world represented. the lesbian, gay, bisexual and
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transsexual struggle. >> he impressed upon that word we, being all inclusive, and we know that the ed monday pettis bridge and what happened on that bridge it not of course enlightened a nation those women there singing, represents southern africa southwestern africa so ryan does it appear that the audience is much younger today? many of the foot soldiers came out yesterday, a lot of the sig dpar dignitaries that represented the generation that stepped on that bridge 50 years ago, many of them now in their 80s, 90s, we saw amelia boynton who was 103, but today do you see the youth represented in a very big way today? >> reporter: i'm glad you brought up ms. boynton, and you
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can see the crowd for yourself so many brought kids and you can see all the different people what are here. so many young people are out with their parents, they of course were telling them they wanted them to be able to experience this. so we talked to so many college kids who say they never, ever nye about this story about recently and that people can understand that that movie helped educate them. so you can see this mix as you're walking this crowd of all nations and all colors and people are really having that conversation about this. >> that was an incredible moment right there. ryan young, cnn continue and van jones, cnn political comment commentator, in our live coverage, you all did a
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tremendous's job, and now we see how versatile you two are, and van jones, who knew you're now showing your political as well as your reporting choppings right here on cnn. one more thing. one last thing. the president's speech he hit voting rights really hard and so did eric holder today, so there's a movement not just a celebration of the past but you're going to see, i think a legislative agenda of equal rights this is a moment in history that's not just looking back, it's looking forward to. >> we saw that message hit home i think to a lot of people. it is an issue of reflection using this event to reflect, but at the same time think about the work that has to correspondent. ryan young. van jones, thanks so much gentlemen, appreciate it. we'll have much more of our live
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coverage from selma and much more of the newsroom right here. over the years we have all increased the amount of technology in our homes and that's meant increased demands of the electric grid. so we turn to solar and wind power as renewables became all the rage. being energy efficient is just to the start. imagine if your home provided all it's own energy for instance the heat from your tell investigation, powers your kof coffee maker. this house can do just that in the outside, it looks like any other home in suburban washington, d.c. inside it's a laboratory. >> we take 500 readings a day, every minute. >> the national institute of standards and technology or n.e.s.t. for shurks built this house that netzero is possible. >> so netzero energy home is a
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home that over the curesourse of a year produces as mitch energy as it consumes. we have a virtual family that lives here and they perform all the same functions that you would with your own family. so we have the vices, for example, that emulates a toaster, a blender, a hand mixer and all these devices operate at a precise time according to a schedule so the home is occupied as a house normally would be. >> in the first year, the house went way beyond netzero. enough information was left to drive an electric vehicle, 1,400 mimes.
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we're learning more about the fatal police shooting of an unarmed teen in madison, wisconsin. police say an officer responding to a disturbance call opened fire after police say the 19-year-old tony robinson assaulted him. and according to public records, the police chief says the
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officer, a 12-year department veteran had used force before. that's being investigated as well as the circumstances surrounding this recent shooting. rosa flores has more in madison wisconsin. >> reporter: hundreds of demonstrators hit the streets of madison, wisconsin. following the the shootinging death of an unarmed 19-year-old at the hands of police. >> i want to just let him know that i'm there. >> reporter: tony terrell robinson's mother devastated and overcome by emotion. >> my son has never been a violent person, never. and to die in such a violent, violent way. >> police paint a different picture of her son, scanner traffic capturing the dramatic chain of events. >> look for a male black light skin. >> reporter: police say they received several calls about rbs friday evening, first about the teen jumping in and out of
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traffic and dodging cars. then about an alleged battery incident. the situation us escalating when robinson entered his friend's house. officer kenny arrived, heart a commotion inside and forced his way in according to police. officials say robinson attacked officer kenny who then fired the deadly shots. kenny suffered a blow to the head robinson was administered cpr at the scene, but later died at the hospital. >> he was unarmed and that's going to make this all the more complicated for the investigators, for the public to accept to understand that deadly force had to be used. >> reporter: this is not the first time the 45-year-old officer used excessive force,
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officer kenny was exonerated from a police shooting 20 years ago. robinson's aunt and grandmother speaking out, not buying the account from police. >> and i think the cops shot hem because he was afraid of him. >> reporter: protesters calling robinson's killing their forget condition. >> i'm hurt. i'm frustrated, i'm angry. >> reporter: as another family faces an all too familiar anguish, the community deals with an all too familiar question was the use of deadly force necessary? >> and cnn rosa florez has been interviews witnesses in this investigation. of course we'll have much more from that interview coming up in the next hour of is newsroom. also straight ahead, what
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time is it? well, apple hopes the next time someone asks you that question you'll be answering with their lathe latest product. but first this open court report. is computing to empower cancer researchers. it used to take two weeks to sequence and analyze a genome; with the microsoft cloud we can analyze 100 per day. whatever i can do to help compute a cure for cancer, that's what i'd like to do.
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checking our top stories, president barack obama tells
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cbs's face the nation is there's one thing that would make him walk away from a nuclear deal with iran that iran has to offer a zeal with unprecedented transparency or no deal. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu warned last week that iran should not be trusted. and another mile phone for the clint eastwood film american sniper. the film has made more than $337 million, topping the hunger games, mocking j part one. and apple will preview it's new watch in san francisco tomorrow. it's apple's first for ray into into the -- >> reporter: one look at big ben will tell you here in london they take time seriously, versus
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seriously, as we koungd to the debut of apple watch, we're taking in five -- number word in tech but half have stopped using them. apple must convince millions that their wearable is better. >> i don't think it's going to be a wild hit of the sort that people are expecting. you know if you think about what the apple watch actually does it doesn't do anything better than the iphone already does. >> number four, what about asia? iphone sales are up 83% in china and momentum for apple products across asia is growing. sales of the apple watch could be strongest there. >> asia parts of europe, having the new new gadget is a big status things. in the u.s. i'm not so sure. number three, what about the
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apps. >> the watch comes in silver stainless steel, aluminum and an 18 karat gold edition costing thousands. it lets you check e-mails, texts an calls. but just like the iphone apps will be the key. if developers don't create eye-popping apps that help improve people's lives, the watch could fail. number two, what's in it for cook? >> it's the most personal device we've ever created. >> apple's ceo is going from strength to strength now, but this launch is crucial. it's the first entirely new apple device under his watch. and the number one question? how will investors react? wall street isn't expecting the watch to just sell millions rather tens of millions as appear the stock hits all-time highs, expectations for the watch may be unrealistic. >> people are already estimating
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this to be the fastest-selling product in apple's history, so you know there's very lofty expectations. it's going to be difficult for the company to exceed that. >> the apple watch proves times really are changing. like some other famous londoners -- ♪ time is on my side ♪ ♪ yes it is ♪ >> reporter: apple hopes time is on their side. samuel burke, cnn, london.
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all right. "saturday night live" didn't waste any times on getting their jabs in over hillary clinton's e-mails. >> those e-mails are clean as a whistle. this is not how hillary clinton goes down. i mean what did you think my e-mails said? hi it's hillary, i really screwed up on benghazi today. please. ha ha. ha ha. i wasn't born yesterday. i was born 67 years ago, and i have been planning on being president ever since. there will be no mistake in my rise to the top! if i decide to run. who knows? who knows? >> all right. well jokes aside, president
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barack obama is speaking out for the first time about the e-mail controversy. in an interviews with cbs' bill plant, obama said he's glad that clinton wants to make the e-mails public. >> mr. president, when did you first learn that hillary clinton used an e-mail system outside the u.s. government for official business while she was secretary of state. >> at the same time everybody else learned it through news reports. >> were you disappointed? >> let me say that hillary clinton is and has been an outstanding public servant. she was a great secretary of state. the policy of my administration is to encourage transparency. that's why my e-mails, the blackberry that i carry around all those records are available and archived. i'm glad that hillary has instructed that those e-mails that had to do with official business need to be disclosed. >> well you say that you have
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the most transparent administration you said it again just a couple weeks ago. >> that's true. >> how does this conveyor with that? >> well i think the fact she's putting them forward will allow us to make sure that people have the information they need. and while president obama is talking about the e-mails, hillary clinton is not. cnn's erin mcpike joins me from the white house with more on this. erin? >> reporter: fred political this has deepened some for hillary clinton over the weekend. she has not spoken about this publicly. she had the opportunity to last night at an event in miami. she didn't take it. bill clinton has also avoided talking about it. listen here. >> reporter: do you think your wife is being treated fairly with the e-mails? >> i'm not the one to touch that. i have an opinion, but i have a bias. >> tell us your opinion. >> president clinton, what's your opinion? >> thanks, folks. >> that i shouldn't be making news on this. now, more people are
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speaking out about it including scott gracin the former ambassador to kenya under clinton. he resigned from his post after he came under fire in part for using his gmail account. >> as i reflitted on it the last couple days it does appear like there was a different standard that was used in my case than has been used in hers. >> darrell issa the gop congressman who used to chair the house oversight committee was also on the show this morning, he called it a double standard said it was troubling, and diahn feinstein a senior democratic senator, said that is it said that clinton need -- we should point out that hillary clinton will be on stage in new york city at a theater in times square tomorrow at 11:00 a.m.
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about women's issues. erin mcpike, thanks so much in washington at the white house. we have so much more straight ahead, and it all starts right now. ♪ happening right now in the "newsroom" new evidence into what happened on malaysia airlines flight 370, which vanished one year ago today. hundreds of pages of documents supporting background information have now been released. plus hiding their faces behind pieces of paper. five suspects who are now behind bars for the murder of one of the putin's biggest critics. right now tens of thousands march across the edmund pettus bridge in selma, alabama. they have come to honor the men and women who made history there 50 years ago this weekend.
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hello again. thanks so much for joining me. a new report is out today on the search for malaysia airlines flight 370. that report from malaysian authorities is raising new questions about the plane's main nance. it says the battery for the plane's flight data recorders may have been allowed to run out more than a year before the plane disappeared. investigators are also looking more closely into the background of the plane's crew. they found no signs of stress or unusual behaviors leading up to the disappearance, and there still hasn't been any explanation for why the plane went so far off its original course. i want to bring in cnn aviation correspondent richard quest in los angeles, and cnn safety analyst and former f.a.a. safety inspector david psoasie. richard, you first. do we know if the pinger was allowed to expire? or whether it was oversight? i know there's some discrepancy
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over what's on paper documents versus computer. >> apparently what happened was when, according to the airline and indeed it seems to be accepted to some extent on page 60 of the record when they changed is the batteries on the flight data recorder the computer registered it had been uninstalled, but didn't register the new one had been installed. therefore, my understanding from malaysia is -- from people there is that -- the investigator in charge who wrote the report said the paperwork doesn't comport correctly, we can't say it was installed, therefore we have to say it was expired, but the airline is pretty certain that it was actually installed. by the way, there's no question of doubt on the cockpit voice recorders or any of the other pingers that were involved. >> so david, is this common that perhaps there may be documentation on paper that conflicts with what's on
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computer? >> well you know, when i do safety audits for airlines which i did for 17 years with the faa, you look at the paperwork first. you look at the cards, the tags that come off the pieces and that is the hard copy is what you look for. computer systems aren't necessarily the way to maintain your records, though it can be done if it's approved that way. but the fact there's a discrepancy, i believe as well as richard does that the batteries were changed but that the paperwork wasn't done properly. but that kind of indicates there may be something else down there. so as an investigator when we find things like that we continue to dig and dig and dig, because you typically when there's one thing, there's something else. on it's a tip of the ice birk thing, and most likely the battery was replaced. if theres a record the old one was removed. it probably was, but does
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indicate to me lacks paperwork, and that can indicate other things when you do an analysis. >> then richard, what is this about the documentation, talking about nothing that reveals something, you know anything unusual in the cockpit? no explanation as to why that plane turned and went off-course. >> and that is something we are none of wiser of today. i can tell you about the oxygen system. i mean what they have done -- i have to be honest fred. what they have done in this report they have stuffed it full of every bit of regulation concerns air traffic control in malaysia and in the surrounding districts. we know how many hours the cabin crew can work. i hate to use the word but they have padded it out with a lot of stuff, frankly that's irrelevant and really just makes it a fatter report to read. what is missing from this report is an honest discussion about
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air traffic control on the night, about how the alarm was raised about who -- when the military saw the plane going across the country. when did they raise the alarm and tell the civilians and prime minister and others. that is missing from this report. and i suspect it's missing from this report for a good reason. it's the achilles' heel of the whole issue. >> does this underscore this plane may never be found, if not for by accident? >> well i do believe the assumptions they are making. there's nothing in it that discounts the base frequently offsets, all of that they used to determine the southern track as opposed to the northern track. i believe they're looking in the right area but remember this is a massive area 28,000 square miles. that's incredibly huge. they have a long ways to go.
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i wouldn't give up on that area certainly yet, but i do think they're in the right area. the report tells us there were some robs, eye specially as richard points out between the military and radar discussions, which we now have in the united states. we do a good job of that today. malaysia has a ways to go. >> it all seems troubling. richard, what if anything does this say about malaysian airlines as an entity and if this report threatens its existence. >> no it certainly won't threaten the existence, and there's nothing in the report that is derogatory in any way. i'm not sure there will be to some extent about the airline, there's, you know we learn all about the training procedures. for instance how many hours. you're going to be at the airline before you're allowed to be a captain. you have to have at least 12 to 15 years of experience of
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flying so there's nothing in here that leads you to assume that there was something systemically wrong with the airline. that's really the problem here fred. we can parse this any way we like, but there's no evidence despite what some people think, there's no evidence one way or the other, and nothing further from this report. >> all right. richard quest, david soucie, thanks so much. russian state tv says a sixth suspect now in the february killing of russian opposition leader boris nemtsov killed himself today during a stand offwith the police. the report says it hammond in the capital city of the chechen republic as police were trying to arrest him. they say the man pa threw a grenade at police before killing himself. and one of the five suspects -- two of the men have been formally charge the other three are listed as suspects.
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nemtsov, an outspoken critic of russian president putin, was shot in the back as he walked with his girlfriend near the kremlin. christopher dickey foreign editor for "the daily beast" is with us from new york. christopher, we are now talking about six suspects that russia says were involved in this killing. does this have credence? is this believable? >> well i think you're going to get it get even more unbelievable as they try to spin out the mott investigationsivations for these people to have killed boris nemtsov. the problem here is he does not have a great record opposing islamists. his main opposition has been to putin. he's also been very much opposed to ramzan keterov, putin's man
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in chechnya. if you listen to what's coming out on russian television you would think this was a wild conspiracy carried out by people opposed to russian intervention in ukraine, in order to blame president putin and discredit him. it's going to get more and more and more confusing, but nemtsov's own family doesn't believe for a minute that this chechen conspiracy has much to do with the murder of boris nemtsov, and they do think that putin or his people probably were behind it. >> and if anyone were to be -- were to believe this chechen angle, what would the motivation be as to why chechens would want to go after this opposition lead center -- leader in russia? >> on some twitter feeds, you see remarks like nemtsov was jewish he was zionist, he was
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opposed to islam, et cetera but none of those were major components of his politics. it's much more likely the people who wanted to get rid of him wanted to get rid of him because he was a thorn in the side of the russian administration the putin administration and also of the katarov administration in chechnya. he was a constant and bitter critic of russian actions in ukraine. so i think it's very unlikely that we can find an incredible islami reason for murdering this man basically in the shadow of the kremlin. the mystery just thickens doesn't it? it gets murkier, as opposed to getting more clarity. >> it does. >> christopher dickey thank you so much. ahead, thousands of people commemorating the bloody sunday march. ryan young is in the thick of it in selma, alabama. >> reporter: and the crowds seem to continue to grow.
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you can see people pushing across the bridge. another hour another hour of people marching together. we'll have it coming up live, next. mouths are watering, and stomachs are growling. or is that just me? it's lobsterfest... ...red lobster's largest variety of lobster dishes all year. double up with dueling lobster tails. or make lobster lover's dream a delicious reality. but hurry this won't last long. ♪ turn around ♪ ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good around ♪ ♪ turn around, barry ♪ ♪ i finally
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proudly made in america. this is happening right now. thousands walks in the footsteps of the selma freedom fighter. they were met with billy clubs and tear gas by alabama state troopers and police. live pictures of the 50th anniversary remembrance march of what became known as bloody sunday. let's go to ryan young, who is covering today's historic event. ryan give us an idea of how this march is coming along. it looked like it was moving
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very slowly a lot of people on that bring all at one time. >> reporter: they're kind of self-walking across. we got moved to the side because so many people were pushing through. it seems like the crowds have swelled to be even larger. there's really no way in and out of here at this point. people coming from both sides. if you remember where you were standing there were food trucks and people eating and walking over together both young and old. we've talked about the resurgence of young people. walking back in this direction, because we met so many people along the way, people who say they have enjoyed the event so far. we talked earlier, you feld like you really needed to be here for this commemoration. >> most definitely. this is this is a memorable celebration, to see so many people come together just in remembrance of this day 40 years
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ago, it's just awesome. i mean in love and i'm happy to have my daughter here. take your thumb out of your mouth, to experience this. >> barack obama talked about moving forward, the idea that your daughter would have a different lifestyle in this country. how do you field about those words? >> most definitely. very powerful. i do believe in moving forward. i'm hoping that the new generation will forget the old ways of people in the past and just love one another. you know do not, like dr. king said do not judge them by the color of the skin but by the content of their character. please i mean just love. just love. that's all we need is love around here. this is awesome. if you're not here you should be here. this is awesome. >> reporter: and the crowds have swelled on their own. in fact it was around 2:00 when they decided to go across the bridge on their own. so far you can see that continual push to go up and in
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facts there are so many who are experiencing this. you love that people are getting along here. >> yes. normally somebody steps on their foot they get agitated. people is excuse me everybody is saying hello, speaking a lot of love and energy today in this whole area. >> >> reporter: what was it like when people started singing. >> my gosh it brought tears to my eyes. so emotional. i grew up in montgomery. my grandmother worked with rosa parks. she helped make history happen. and all these other elected black officials, it's just an amazing experience. >> every is coming together something they say they will always remember. everyone is taking pictures and having a good time. fred? >> thank you for bringing those sentiments and images.
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it would be a process getting all those people across the bridge and they have to come back. >> reporter: yes. we continue our coverage right after this. the real question that needs to be asked is "what is it that we can do that is impactful?" what the cloud enables is computing to empower cancer researchers. it used to take two weeks to sequence and analyze a genome; with the microsoft cloud we can analyze 100 per day. whatever i can do to help compute a cure for cancer, that's what i'd like to do. the bed reacts to your body. it hugs you. it's really cool to the touch. this zips off so i can wash it-yes, please. (vo) visit your local retailer and feel the tempur-pedic difference for yourself. i am totally blind. and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night,
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an iraqi man escaped isis only to be shot dead in texas barely a month after moving to the u.s. police say he was
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watching his first snowfall in his new american hometown when he was killed by an unknown assailant. he died right in front of his wife and brother. our nick valencia has been following this story for us. any new niches about leads? >> police have gotten back to us within the last hour and say they don't have any new information. we spoke to the council on american/lamic relates. we asked if ahmed had received any threats, they said no. crimestoppers is offering a reward for information leading to an arrest. police say this surveyillance video shows the four men who may by linked to the murder of ahmed al jamali. bullet holes show where the 36-year-old iraqi immigrant was shot and killed. >> trying to find a decent job to start his life. >> reporter: through tears his father-in-law says al jamali
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recently left iraq to escape the growing threat of isis. in north texas he would be reunited with his wife after more than a year apart. her excitement for their new life together was no secret. he had gone outside with his wife to watch the first-ever snowfall. >> we're looking for a safe place, well educated environment, good environment, what he got was one bullet in his heart. >> there is no shortage of sadness for the loss of this beautiful young man, who has only just come to this country 20 days ago, and we don't, as texans want that to be his welcome. >> reporter: members of the muslim community want to know if he was started because of his race. police are pleading for the public to help. >> tests are ongoing now to determine if one or more rifles were fired and whether the
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physical evidence that we have been able to get from the crime scene is related to any other offense. as you can see, we have little information to go on. >> reporter: for now, this video may be the best lead that police have to find the men responsible for the death of a man who left the threat of violence only to become a victim of it. a funeral was held for him yesterday, family and friends will hold a vigil at the scene of the crime today about 6:30 local time. >> there's been a lot of outreach. >> they've raised a lot of money. if you go to a go fund me site more than $20,000 has been raised for the family. from what we understand there's no indication they may go back to iraq even after this happened to them. they're just shocked and surprised. >> it's traumatizing. it's heartbreaking. >> they already were living a risky life in iraq and narrowly escaped so much violence there.
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>> you see the father-in-law, you can see that emotion on his face like what ahmed had been through to get here, only for this to happen. >> all right. nick valencia thank you so much. >> you bed. next protests in madison, wisconsin, after police shot and killed an unarmed 19-year-old. cnn's rosa flores is covering the story for us live in madison. she'll by joining us, next.
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hello again, everyone. thanks so much for joining me. i'm fredricka whitfield. in madison, wisconsin, a family is grieving and a xwhunt is demanding answers. after an officer responded to a
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disturbance call he shot and killed a 19-year-old. robinson was unarmed at the time but police say he assaulted the officer, who then responded with deadly force. under wisconsin law, police shootings are investigated by an outside agency. cnn's rosa flores is in madison. rhossa you just spoke with the madison police chief, and what did he say? >> reporter: as you mentioned, here in this state, the police department doesn't investigate, but an independent agency. the state doj is the one leading the investigation. i asked the police chief, i've been on the ground talked to a lot of people who are from us freighted and angry. you're still the police chief. how are you going to deal with that? he mentioned, fred first of all, we have to own up to what happened. we have to which this police chief has, he's been very forward about it. he's done several press conferences, saying what had
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happened. the allegations are, of course that this police officer shot and killed an unarmed teenager but he says he knows that it's an uphill battle because a lot of the people in this community are frustrated and angry. [ chanting ] >> reporter: hundreds of demonstrators hit the streets of madison, wisconsin. following the shooting death of an unarmed 19-year-old at the hands of police. >> i want to let him know that i'm there. >> tony terrell robinson's mother devastated and overcome by emotion. >> my son has never been a violent person never. to die in such a violent way. >> police paint a different picture of her son. scanner traffic capturing the dramatic chain of events. >> looking for a male black, light skin. >> police say they received several calls about robinson friday evening, first about the teen jumping in and out of
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traffic and dodging cars. >> got another call for the same suspect. >> then about an alleged battery incident. >> tried to strangle another patron. >> the situation escalating when robinson entered what family say is his best friend's house. office kinney arrived, heard a commotion and forced his way in according to police. >> shots fired, shorts fired. >> reporter: officials say robinson attacked officer kinney who then fired the shots. kenney suffered a blow to the head. robinson was administered cpr at the scene, but later died at the hospital. >> he was unarmed. that's going to make this all the more complicated for the investigators, for the public to accept to understand that deadly force had to be used. >> this is not the first time the 45-year-old officer used lethal force. kenney was exonerated for an
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incident that took place almost eight years ago, a fact that doesn't sit well with robinson's family and friends. >> he was a beautiful, beautiful young man. he 6'4" 200 pounds. >> reporter: robinson's aunt and grandmother speaking out, not buys the account from police. >> i think the cops shot him because he was afraid of him. [ chanting. >> reporter: protesters calling his killing their ferguson. >> i'm hurt frustrated, angry. >> reporter: as another family faces an all too familiar anguish, the community deals with an all too familiar question. was the use of deadly force necessary? now, one of the other obvious questions i asked the police chief were about the other tools this police officer had with him that perhaps could have avoided deadly force. fred he did say that this officer had a stun gun with him,
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but he said he can't comment about the use of deadly force or the use of that stun gun, because, of course the investigation is in the hands of the state doj. fred? >> rosa what about the events leading up to the confrontation? this confrontation ended up happening inside the house, as opposed to in public view. that only sounds like that further complicates things. >> reporter: it definitely does. a lot of times when these shootings happening in an open parking lot or an area that's open there are eyewitnesses people who witness, people who take video of the shooting and that gives the police and also the public an assurance as to what happened and what they're hearing from authorities, what authorities are telling them. in this particular case we don't know that there is video. that information has not been released. if that's the case but you're absolutely right. it happened inside so the
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situation escalates inside four walls, in essence. it's up to the word of the officer and of course in this particular case mr. robinson is dead. >> do we know definitively whether other people were inside that house at that time? >> reporter: you know we really don't know those details. what i can tell you is i talked to the neighbor who was -- who lives literally -- the walls are paper thin fred that lives right next to where this happened. so it's a house and it's two different rent at units. this woman lives right next door. she said she heard the entire commotion. she said she heard the altercation, it escalating. she heard the gunshots went to the floor, and you know for a moment those these gunshots could go through her wall. thanks god that didn't happen she says but of course perhaps we have a hearing witness, but not an eyewitness that we know about. >> interesting.
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rosa flores thank you so much in madison, wisconsin. still ahead, gop presidential candidates go back to iowa again. this time they're talking about corn and the economy. and they're also taking shots at hillary clinton using a private e-mail account while she was u.s. secretary of state. our political panel weighs in next. but first, here's this week's "ones to watch." >> harlem's land of -- >> from the tap to the charleston the jitterbug to the twist, more popular dances began life as underground sensations in america's afro-american neighborhoods. every decades it seems these communities create something fresh and vibrant. pop stars have been long tapping into this hidden treasure chest of moves, often transforming them into worldwide crazes. >> michael did not create the moonwalk. the moonwalk was something done on every street corner in america. twerking and booty dancing, they
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have done that in new orleans for the last 20 years. you know this is one guy named big freda, i remember he was upset, because he was like wow, i've been doing that forever and miley cyrus comes on tv and didn't even do it the right way, because i'm trying to keep up with the latest dance. the nene is doing the latest i don't know if you know -- i don't even know why they call it that. ♪ like it's wind through the leaves and trees ♪ it's long been a laboratory of the street dance, one of the residents, tommy the clown, is credited with creating the clowning style which evolved into crumping. >> here you struggle it's a struggle dance. these kids go through so much and broken homes, single parents, gang violence, drugs and stuff. it's a lot of anger to be built
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up that they are able to release through the form of dance. they battle one by one, some might spitfire or flip through the air, literally tear your head off without touching you on the dance floor and the crowd will be the judge. this is my body of proof. proof of less joint pain. and clearer skin. this is my body of proof that i can fight psoriatic arthritis from the inside out... with humira. humira works by targeting and helping
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in hillary clinton thought the uproared over her use of
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prifl e-mail would go away leave it to "saturday night live" to keep the story alive last night. >> those e-mails are clean as a whistle. this is now how hillary clinton goes down. i mean what did you think my e-mails said? hi it's hillary, i really screwed up on benghazi today. please. ha ha. ha ha. i wasn't born yesterday. i was born 67 years ago, and i have been planning on being president ever since. there will be no mistake in my rise to the top. if i decide to run. who knows? who knows? let's bring in our political panel, ron brown stein, who is also the editorial director at "the national journal" and doug hyde.
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gen, you were laughing i wonder if hillary clinton will laugh. >> it's hard for follow "saturday night live." that's not very fair or charitable on a sunday afternoon. look this is going to be a sustained hailed for her. it is a problem. the used personal e-mails, she's certainly not the only public figure. but still the idea that you're a public figure conducting public business, controlling it through your private e-mail and you are deciding what you classify as is in fact the public business and shared with the state department that's an unfortunate i think series of decisions. >> all right. so doug ron hinted to t there are others who use their personal e-mail.
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jeb bush governor walker chris christie, even texas governor perry. everyone admits to do it but i guess the difference is being -- should those things potentially have been conveyed or talked about on private e-mail. though remember there's no evidence nothing has been brought to bear to understand what may have been conveyor in her private e-mail. doug? >> i think a few reasons. hillary clinton is determining what we're able to see and not see. this is what makes people uneasy about hillary clinton. >> we don't know the content of it. without knowing the content of it. >> why is it an issue? >> she's determine whag we're able to see and not see. she's determining what the select committee is getting. that's not the openness and
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transparency that the president promised. it's also not what she proned to do. that's why people are uneasy. it reminds people of that immediately. i would say, talk about transparency. the only thing we know there were cops in ferguson that sent racist e-mails is because they had done that from official accounts. if they had done it from private e-mails, those bad cops would still be on the streets. those running for president, and how many found themselves at the iowa summit. who best ron, connected with conservatives? the biggest significant was something that probably won't effect the result. jeb bush kind of doubled down on this argument that he is going to hold to positions that might benefit him in the general
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election. he's unlikely to win iowa, frederickricka fredricka. but if he you know -- we've seen other candidates pulled to the right by iowa in a way that ultimately hurts. he reaformed his support, took positions that kind of clash with iowa and sent another signal that he does sbejd to run this primary process differently from others in the past. >> so do you, why is iowa still so important? >> well iowa is important, into you it's first in the country it's what winnows the process down. i think that's why jeb bush was very smart in his remarks. gop voters -- and not just with the agricultural event, but also jeb bush did very well at the chicken -- at the pizza ranch in
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iowa taking questions on every topic possible. that really can be a tense time for a candidate. jeb bush handled it well. because we focus on his last name so much not his first name, we forget he's jeb. if they run a smart campaign and with the staff it look likes they will but also a fresh face someone who is married to a hispanic someone who speaks spanish himself. ron, go ahead real quick. >> real quick point. iowa is more likely to anoint the chief alternative to jeb bush than jeb bush. the last two times it picked conservatives rick san torn mike huckabee who were limited in their appeals. the big question it would be a huge benefit for bush but if someone like scott walker has shown broader appeal you could have a horse race. >> fascinating stuff. >> anything can happen.
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>> i know. and it's right around the corner. thanks so much. we'll have much more "newsroom" right after this. you show up. you stay up. you listen. you laugh.
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welcome back. cnn's original series "finding jesus" airs tonight. tonight's episode focuses on john the baptist, and how he helped kickstart jesus' ministry. >> jesus by john is a crucial part of the story. it sells us if nothing else that jesus absolutely endorsed what john was doing. >> i myself came baptizing with water for this reason. that he might be revealed to israel. >> and it means that he endorsed john's message that god's people did need to repent. they did need to receive forgiveness for their sins. ♪
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wow, joining us from los angeles is rabbi joshua garway an early christianity professor. good to see you, rabbi. >> thank you very much for having me. >> some might be surprised to see a rabbi featured in a series about jesus. what inspired you to study early christianity? >> well 50 years ago it would have been peculiar a jew, much less a rabbi studying this field, but in the last 20 to 30 years, it's become not unusual at all. there's at least a handful of rabbis interested in this field. i guess i would say a whole barrel full of jews interested and i think part of it is that most people are beginning to understand that early christianity is very much a part of jewish history, seeing as jesus and john the baptist and all the other early important figures were jews. >> let's talk about some of the content and some of the
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discoveries that have been made. relics have been found purr pouring to be the bones of john the baptist. have sciencists been able to authenticate those bones? >> as far as i know what they can say is a certain group of bones can be securely dated to the 1st century to a man of middle eastern descent. it certainly doesn't rule it out, but it's a far cry from establishing certain proof that they are bones from john the baptist. >> and then what's your understanding or how do you appreciate the fact that john the baptist and jesus would come together as they would and that it would be john the baptist that kind of gets credit for, you know, inspiring his ministry? >> sure. actually from a his tornado's perspective. it may well be the relationship between john and jesus was as
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many forged by the early evangelists, the writers of the gospels, as it was something that actually existed in history. we can say for certain that jesus began his ministry by being baptized by john the baptist, but the nothing that john the baptist understood jesus as the one who would come after here the elijah to jesus' messiah, so to speak, may well be the creator of the authors of the gospels. >> rabbi joshua garroway thank you for joining us and the all-in "finding jesus" airs tonight at 9:00. we will be right back. 6 whoa whoa whoa! who's responsible for this?!? if something goes wrong, you find a scapegoat. ...rick. it's what you do.
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is where she grew up. what? (announcer) the 2015 subaru forester (girl) what? (announcer) built to be there for your family. love. it's what makes a subaru a subaru. . i've always loved to read. it kind of takes you to a different place. my mom told me when i was 8 that some kids don't have books. that shocked me because everybody should have the option to read. so i started by just doing a small book drive.
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and then told my parents that i wanted to collect and distribute 1 million books to kids in need by the time i turned 18. so welcome to the reading warehouse. i was 13 when i reached my goal. we have given books to about 16 countries and 40 states. all the pink squash -- my new goal is to distribute books to every state in the u.s. ends every country in the world. i am a preschoolteacher with english language learners. >> i'm looking for second through fifth grade. >> meeting the teachers is amazing. i hear all about the kids they serve. >> thank you, sweetie. >> thank you. >> keep up the good work. >> good afternoon. >> good afternoon. >> we have about 1280 students. a large homeless and highly mobile population.
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they're in great needs. >> when she came to my school i was so excited. she just gave us books for free. it was amazing. >> literacy is so important in education. i want kids to have a better life. i know that reading can do that. wow, we have featured a lot of young kids who are doing some extraordinary things this year. books, cups and food tell us about someone you know making a big difference in your community. nominations are open at cnnheroes.com. we've got so much more straight ahead in "newsroom." thanks so much for being with me. i'm fredricka whitfield. much more "newsroom" with poppy harlow is up next. \s . hi everyone. i'm poppy harlow in new york 5:00 eastern. well-begin in moscow. a shocking twist into the murder investigation of the
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high-profile russian opposition leader boris nemtsov. one of the suspects in that brazen killing has been blown himself up following a standoff with police. that's according to russian-state television. who was the suspect and what did he know? we'll go live to moscow in just a moment. also exactly one year to the day after malaysian airlines flight 370 disappeared, the mystery that gripped the world remains unsolved. for the families of the 239 people on board that plane, no words can describe their pain. the global hunt triggered widespread interest from people across this country and around the globe. everyone still wants to know how, how can a jumbo jet vanish without a extra is? we will bring you malaysia's brand-new report on the investigation. also our experts return with fresh insiding on what could have happened to malaysia flight 370. there are still many questions after the shooting of
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an unarmed black teenager friday by police in madison, wisconsin. the officer who fired the fatal round had used diddley force b. the teen who was killed also had a criminal history. our team just spoke with the police chief. we'll tell you what he said later this hour. first two teenager from australia are being investigated right now after border guards stopped them from leaving the country, reportedly in an attempt to join isis. the two are brothers they were from sydney. police say something found in their wlugage raised a red flag and of course then they were arrested. we don't know many more details, but we do know they were going to what the authorities call a conflict zone. the concept of westerners joining isis is not a new one. the u.s. government estimating there are about 20,000 so-called foreign fighters in the isis ranks from 90 different countries. north americans, europeans,
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western citizens make up more than 3,000 of them it is estimated. terrorism fills say about 150 u.s. citizens are believed to have joined isis. remember ten days ago two men in brooklyn oneman in florida, all u.s. residents were arrested before they could follow through on their alleged plan to join isis. for the first time you're about to hear the voice of a 20-year-old american man from ohio who said he wanted to carry out terrorist attacks in this country and wanted to kill the president of the united states. we're talking about christopher cornel. he was already on the fbi's radar when he was arrested back in january. now a local television station has exclusively spoken to him in jail by phone. take a listen to this short, edited clip of their one-hour conversation. >> in which i planned on tuesday september 20th in washington, d.c. would have been a great attack again america. even with my capture, the
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repercussions will not stop. although it would have been a major attack against america eevents that will follow are dangerous and more enormous. with the islamic state, i have connections, even corresponding for quite some time. the fbi finally caught on the past year -- >> was it their idea for you to plant pipe bombs at the capitol and have people running outside to shoot them? how would i contact someone? how did you do that? do you do that through, um you know youtube videos? >> encrypted messaging. >> can you give me an idea of other things. >> how to wage jihad in america.
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when i say groups you notice i mean what you would call sleeper cells. >> how dedicated were you to carry out this plan to wage jihad in america? >> i'm very dedicated. i'm a muslim. i'm so dedicated i risk my life. that should say a whole lot. >> if you weren't arrested buying two guns and 600 rounds of ammunition what would you have done? >> what would i have down? i would have took my gun and put it to ''bama's head pulled the trigger and unleash more bullets on the senate and the house of representatives and i would have attacked the israeli embassy and various other buildings, full of kafir. and wage war against -- obama is an enemy of aylal allah.
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>> you intend to do it if you ever get out? >> yes. >> is in retaliation for what? >> the continued american aggression against our people and the fact that america specifically president obama want to wage war against islamic state. >> i want to hear what you think is coming. >> what i think is comeing, many things. there will indeed be many, many attacks. there would be -- like i said we are raised to -- over the capitol, you know? i'm not going to give away too much. >> were you up until january in contact with people overseas? >> i won't give you that information, but i will tell you i'm in contact with many. >> how organized is the islami state? >> the thing is we are indeed here in america, in each and every state. we are here in ohio we're here
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in ohio in every state. we're more organized than you think. >> again, that was part of an hour-long conversation between our affiliate in ohio, and christopher cornel who is in jail an american allegedly planning to terrorize this country in his own words claiming that isis is here as he said in everybody state and as he also said more organied than you think. joining miss is christopher dickey and chris, listening to that what is your -- what's your takeaway? >> well he's basically reciting the boilerplate of isis propaganda which is all based on the idea that muslims are under attack being attacked by america, attacked by the west attacked by christians. what they're doing, all this is atrocities, all these things are justified in their own minds as some kind of self-defense. it's a classic thing.
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i wrote a novel 18 years ago about bringing terror to the united states in which all those same arguments were rehearsed. it's absolutely classic stuff. >> colonel reese, what do you make of his claims that he repeats a few times that isis is more organized than we think? >> i believe they are. they do have some organizational skills. i don't think they're as organized in the u.s. i think it's claim that you know, they're in 50 states sure, i believe it. we heard the last couple weeks, the fbi director say they have about 1,000 counter-terrorism investigations going on in every state. can did i lid i think he's blowing a lot of smoke. >> why do you think in a? >> again, he's a young kid. he's looking for the spotlight. right now he's sitting in prison, and i think his lawyers are telling him that he's got a long road ahead of him, and i think there's a lot of bravado coming out of him. he might have some communication
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with folks overseas they're trying to bring that bravado up but at the end of the day when he sits in his cell for a very long time because the fbi did a great job of hunting him down he'll start to realize that. my frustration is i know lots of muslims. they would shake their head at this young man, especially coming from the u.s. knowing these not what islam is all about. >> no question. he said i'm a muslim when indeed what his's trying to do is completely against the faith. >> he's a muslim convert. you've heard the frayed the zeal of the convert? they tend to cherry pick things that they think make them a muslim. his name is christopher, after all. not a typical name for muslims. >> let me ask you this this is one example of what we have seen so much of especially recently. you have the two australians being held by authorities. they thought they were possibly
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going to join isis. two men arrested in brooklyn one arrested in florida, young women in great britain traveling to sagedly join isis. why is isis so successfully winning at least the propaganda war? >> it's really good at propaganda even the look at the clips of isis troops training it's like choreography they're all sort of dancing across the screen as if it were in fact some kind of recruiting video. that's exactly what it is. they have beautifully designed recruiting videos that target young men ages say 14 15 to 25 or 30 that are very seductive, especially if you're an aimless loser lice christopher cornel who decides he's going to adopt his idea of the religion of islam and then wants recognition. what he wants is recognition. that's why he calls up a journalist and talks for an hour on the phone, even though it's
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obviously going to destroy his case in course. >> colonelees chris dickey was saying to me yesterday we are losing the propaganda war. we're not doing enough whether it's the government or other parties, to fight this on the web, if you will. i just wonder what really can be done that actually these people that are falling into isis's hands would watch and follow instead of the isis recruitment videos? >> sure. well i agree with you. i don't think we are doing a very good job of countering this information. i mean i said several weeks ago, why wasn't there a public service announcement during the super bowl? why don't we look at these big events where americans and young kids will watch are on youtube where they do these things. pretty interesting, i'm over here with ben wedeman's cnn's senior correspondent. several of the commanders he's been talking to and i've been listening to you know over here the iraqis how they talk
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about it is that isis is -- and they're trying to put it in perspective for the u.s. listeners, isis is just like a gang you know the crips and the bloods or whatever. that's all this is is gangs, and young kids are coming to a gang because they're looking for some type of prospect to be part of. i thought that was interesting that they talked about it over here that it was very similar to the gangs in the u.s. >> colonel reese, chris dickey thank you very much. on the other side of the break we'll get to the breaking news of a critic of president putin, one of the suspects blew himself up rather than being taken into police custody. a live report from moscow is next.
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conspiracy theories are swirling in the brazen murder of boris nemtsov.
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in the latest television a suspect in this killing has reportedly blown himself up. the suspect, a 30-year-old man who was holed up in a building in the capital city of the chechen republic as the police closed in he tried to escape apparently throwing grin gaze at officers before blowing himself up this all according to russian state television. the news comes as five other suspects have been arrested in nemtsov's murder but word that the sixth suspect is now dead raises more questions about this investigation. joining me live our senior international correspondent matthew chance who has been following this all along a lot of people had questions that anyone would be arrested at all. what do we know about the suspect who apparently blew himself up? >> reporter: well people that doubted anybody would be arrested but people also had doubts that those who may have been arrested would simply be
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scapegoats in an attempt to distance the authorities from the actual killing. a lot of people who support the oop position in this country believe the kremlin is ultimately responsible, though they deny any links. so far already five in custody, one individual detonated a grin nails in the chechen capital which is in southern russia. a guy called um. dadayev, a ethnic chechen as well from southern russia apparently has confessed to the killing, and the four other suspects one of them has been charged. >> matthew, does it strike you as odd that one of these suspects would just confess to is so quickly? >> reporter: um possibly
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possibly odd. i expect there will be a lot of skepticism out there that this is too convenient. other than the, you know chechnya is a lawless place there are guns for fire there. it's quite possibly these individuals could have been hired by somebody who wanted boris nemtsov dead, to carried out the killing. if these people are indeed responsible for the killing, it doesn't necessarily shed any light on who would have ordered that killing. as i say, it's a very lawless place in which i anyia. there are guns for hire. these could just be the trigger men. it may not give us any more clarity on why or who ordered the killing. >> this information is coming from russian state television the presumption is they're getting it straight from the reduction authorities. do you believe we can take these names of five people in their mid 30s, as key suspects?
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can they take them as face value? >> i think so. i think so in the sense they have all appeared in court today. that's not coming from state television. certainly the investigative committee that's been formed by the russian government which involves all sorts of branches of the russian security services say they have strong evidence from telephone records and from forensic evidence that these people are indeed linked. we have that confession as well. of course it's possible but again, the real issue is not who pulled the trigger to kill boris nemtsov, but who ordered the killing. the big concern is we're no closer to finds out that than we were at the beginning of this process. >> very quickly, nemtsov's daughter has been speaking about this. what is she saying? >> well i spoke to her a few days after after the first
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arrests had been made. she made the point, look it's the kremlin that she believes is u89ly responsible for the killing of her father have a lad mir putin, if not responsible for pulling the trigger or ordering the killing, at least responsible for creating an add motion sphere that opponents of the kremlin are regarded as enemies of the state. she said she did not believe the true killers would be brought to justice, there would be a cover-up, is what she was saying. >> matthew chance, thank you. when we come back it's been one near to the date sen mh will have 370, the flight disappeared. we're going to talk about a new report from malaysia. also families trying to grieve one year later. what obstacles did they run into in beijing? that's next.
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internet. which is perfect for me, because i think everything should just work. works? works. works! works? works. works. well if you can believe it more heartbreak for grieves families of flight 370. one year to the day that plane disappeared, some families wanted one simple thing, to honor their loved once at a chinese temple. they are denied. our david mckenzie was with them. >> reporter: this is family members trying to grieve and
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you're stopping up? 239 people died on this plane and you're telling me they can't come here to commemorate? >> more on that culling up but first, a kruvl battery on the plane expired more than a year before the flight's disappearance. the battery was on the underwater locator beacon and as you know a global hunt nothing, not one sing the piece of debris has shown up yet. >> people wanted to learn about and i have jails, ocean searching, radars the lack of answers still seems pretty unreal. we're bringing back or experts with the latest opinions. joining me to discusses also
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miles o'brien, and richard quest joins me as well. one of key things that starts out to a lot of people is the battery for the underwater locator beacon expired, maintenance made a mistake, they didn't replace it. is that a big deal or not necessarily? >> it is if it's true. it's on page 60. some are saying the battery actually was replaced but the paperwork was fally, but the reality is the inspector says in this report that the battery was not replaced. he has to go on the computer files on the data and there's no record. it expire? 2012 2 probably still was working, we just don't know.
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the pinger was working, yes, it is serious if it's true. it's serious, because so much effort had to go into finding this plane and it reliesed on pingers, which might not have worked. >> they are supposed to work for 30 days. to you, les, you believe possibly they were carrying some key batteries. others have said you have no way of knowing, you think that could be part of the cause? >> it's definitely part of the -- >> we're talking about the big one. >> they came from the island of pa nang the western edge of malaysia and were electricitied by 739.
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. 5400 pounds is a lot of batteries. the f.a.a. has revisited. from the fact when they go in a cargo pallet that's completely enclosed it creates its own little bomb inside. they have a characteristic of reigniting again. so this set something off in my head that my particular airline does not even allow any lithium batteries in the cargo hold. >> miles, you wrote an op-ed and talked about outdated technology and that may be part of the history here. why? >> it's interesting. you think about this pinger for example, the fact in this day and age we're looking for a multimillion declare airliner by dropping a microphone in the water and hoping we heard a
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distant ping. they we're verified that wasn't where the wreckage is so it's really scandalous the aviation industry that is allowed this to go on where we don't have some way, its of making it impossible to turn off transponders or additionally creating some sort of capability to stream data from an airport that's in fourth quarter. in canada first air is doing it right now. >> it costs money. >> it does cost money, but in the grand scheme of things a search like this costs more. >> i know you talked to the governing body in this. when will this happened when we'll have the real-time streaming data? >> whoa real-time streaming data is not coming yet.
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there are quite serious issues about bandwidth, computer and satellite capabilities. what we are looking at is all air krafl over oceans will have to be tracked at least once every 15 minutes. they're not prescribing a tick what are way in which it has to be done. this is a performance-based rule that will say every airline has to be able to be tracked every 50 minutes. miles is absolutely right. the scandal and disgrace post-447 it wasn't done and it's taken a year to get so-called ikao consensus. les, you are a pilot who flying 777s. is it scandalous? is it something that could not be allowed to happen again?
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>> i do fly with this. i go across the pond to longan with that technology. i wouldn't call it scanned louse. we found a hole in the system that should have been covered a long time ago. i don't see anybody conspiring to have ignored the situation. it's just a situation that's been going on for years, and we just discovered it with this incredible mystery that we're still dealing with. >> miles to you, final word on if you're hopeful that things are going to changes? >> you know i see a lotin indianaer indianaerin in -- inertia. there's technical details that need to be ironed out, but it can be done. if we all insist upon it meaning all of us who fly,
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there's a chance. >> miles, richard, les, thank you very much. much more throughout the evening. coming up next i'm going to speak with the wife of a passengers on board flight 370. she refuses to call herself a widow. she wants answers, because she -- you see the picture there of her with her husband of 20 years and their children. she will join me live, next. shopping online is as easy as it gets. ♪ wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers carpenters and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. we've made hiring anyone from a handyman to a dog walker as simple as a few clicks. buy their services directly at angiealist.com. no more calling around. no more hassles. and you don't even have to be a member to start shopping today! angie's list is revolutionizing local service again. visit angieslist.com today.
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for the families members of the passengers on flight 370, the pain is still -- for the families of chinese passengers even just the process of trying to pay ares for their loved ones is different. here's our david mckenzie. >> reporter: the family members of those on board flight 370, had planned to come here to the
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tempt in beijing to pay their respects one year on but frankly there are more police here than family at this point. some of them say they intimidated, normally i would be able to get through this area excuse me. norm 'i could, but through here are some family members, and they're not letting me get in. >> just come inside please. don't touch me. this is -- this is family members who are trying to grieve and you're stopping us 239 people died on this plane and you're telling me you can't come here to xhn rate. >> translator: i just want to know why the police are treating us like this. we're just looking for our families. why are they doing this? >> translator: march 8th last year my husband was on m--370. it was supposed to land at this time. he never came. eye just looking for my husband.
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>> reporter: though they wanted to come and commemorate after mh-370 has vanished they're basically intimidating the families. many of the families say they have been detailed several times by the chinese authorities. it's pretty tragic, a year on. david mckenzie, cnn, beijing. extraordinary. 239 people on board, 239 families' lives changed forever. joining me by skib, jennifer chong. thank you for being with me. >> thank you for asking me. >> your husband of more than 20 years, the father of your children was a passenger on this flight. what do you want people to know about him one year later? >> um yeah i want people to know that the family -- ands a horrific year for the family so much -- just to find answers of where our loved one is and it
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is so frustrating that one year on we still don't have answers of what happened that night on the plane and the whereabouts of my husband and the rest of the passengers. >> i know you said you do not consider yourself a widow. >> um yes, i don't consider myself and i hope that. >> until i see the evidence even one piece of wreckage. >> are you satisfied with the search so far? um no. they sent so much on the search. from the search not even one piece of wreckage. so obviously i'm not justified. >> this big record just came out
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from the team investigating what happened to the plane. i know it's long and i'm sure you haven't read through the entire thing, but from some of the headlines, is there anything that stands out about it that concerns you? >> yes, one would be the -- on the -- the flight recorders, i find that the airlines actually allows a plane to fly with dead batteries, and yet they are not treating the families properly. this is -- i'm speechless. >> you know malaysia airlines is getting a new ceo to come in and take over. i wonder what you can say in terms of being a voice for a lot of these families. what do you want to happen differently? >> um we hope that the airlines support the families for keeping
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the search on until they found -- and el hope -- what we want from the airlines is transparency transparencies and answers. >> and more care and sensitivities, and tried to provide more support to the families and organizations as well. to the individual names. >> jennifer i'm so sorry for your loss. we're thinking about you and all of the families of the 239 people on board, especially today. thanks for being with me. coming up next we're going to take you live to madison, wisconsin. that's the site of the shooting of an unarmed teacher. a live
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. is one of the most fascinating places on the planet fast becoming a paradise lost? tonight on "the wonder list questioner or bill weir takes us to the ga lap goss where he found a bird with quite the evolutionary back story. >> i am headed to a deserted island with a cold-blooded killer. >> all right. this is cool. >> people don't get to step on this. >> no no people don't get to come here. champion island. >> his name is carl campbell big-hearted in his love for animals, but cold-blooded in what he's willing to do to save them. >> i hear the cheep, the chirp. >> there's one up here. >> look he's right here. >> he's brought me to this tiny
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haven to look for the one creature that inspired darwin's ideas more than any other. >> what's up buddy? we came a long way to see you. >> the floriana mockingbird. >> he doesn't even seem to mind. >> when darwin came here he collected these guys with a stick. >> just whacked them with a stick? >> whist whacked them with a stick. >> this is didn't know to fear man. >> they didn't know how to fear anything. they don't have predators out here. >> there's maybe 90 left in the word. >> total. this is one of the world's rarest birds. >> bill weir joins me here. i love this episode. i love that your clothes had been tore quarantined. >> amazing. they're so airful. even anner rant seed or one fly or mosquito if it sneaks in on a plane, it can throw the hole eco system out of whack.
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we were the first human beings to set foot there in a couple years. we had to take all the clothes, give them to the ecuadorian government, and we didn't get them back. >> and this is the story how charles darwin got there, after divinity school. >> the captain of "the beagle" was sort of a manic-depressive and his family wanted him to have a traveling companion. the captain was a devout christian, and gives a ship to sail and he said this is my chance to prove the book of genesis. little did he know that who he was bringing look would change the views. >> i've not been the the ga lap goss. this is lava purposes create very different islands. >> that's the seed of darwin's theory on this island which has high mountains, that means
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clouds stop more rain grass, so there's tortoises that come there. on this island it's flat and desert so more iguana country, and each creature more adapted to the conditions around. if you're an animal love this is like the happiest place on earth, going back in time. >> even not at species are able to survive forever there, right? the last of this certainly type of tortoise that a lot of us associate with this ga lap goss eventually died so you talked about this inner battle of having to play god, basically on the island and what species to keep alive. >> sure. >> and what may have to be sacrificed. >> you'll see more later tonight, but in the case of these giant tortoises, goats, they invasive goats brought to the islands by whalers and pirates had eaten all of the turtle food. so they were starving to death.
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they realized my goodness, there's less than a hundred theft. they hired snipers and helicopters to shoot a quarter million goats over the course of five years in order to save this one creature. that worked. that was sort of a groundbreaking experiment in species survival. >> tourists are allowed. >> yes. >> i think 240,000 a year which is actually not a lot. >> compared to most resorts, yeah. >> did you think at all whether we humans should even be allowed to be in such a special place? >> absolutely. that is a real sort of faultline debate among conservations right now, sort of garden of edenists who believe some parts should no-go zones for human beings but others say that's not realistic. we're headed towards 10 billion. we have to learn how to coexist
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with these amazing creatures and be respectful but still progress and that's what this hour is really about. >> it's beautiful. you're pretty lucky you got to go. >> i am. >> exception appear cinematography. only here on cnn tonight. "the wonder list." >> thanks, poppy. meet the world's newest energy superpower. surprised? in fact, america is now the world's number one natural gas producer... and we could soon become number one in oil. because hydraulic fracturing technology is safely recovering lots more oil and natural gas. supporting millions of new jobs. billions in tax revenue... and a new century of american energy security. the new energy superpower? it's red, white and blue. log on to learn more.
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questions in madison, wisconsin, tonight following friday's shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer. matt ken he used deadly force before shooting a man in 2007 but that he was cleared of any wrongdoing in that case describing the incident as suicide by cop. on friday kenny was responding to a call when police say he was attacked by 19-year-old tony
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robinson and forced to fire. where does the case go from here? let's discuss it? joining me live in madison, rosa flores and also christian bar barbarisi. rosa to you, what more do we know about the circumstances of what really happened on friday night? >> reporter: you know poppy, if you look at the house that's behind us where this incident actually occurred it's actually two units. it's a house, but two units. i spoke to the woman who is right next to the unit where this incident happened and she tells me she heard everything unfold. so while we haven't heard from an eyewitness this is definitely a hearing witness. she says she heard all of these events unfold the situation escalated. she heard the gun shots and she has talked to authorities about all of this but it's just very telling because she says, you know these walls are paper thin and so you know, i deadasked
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her, were you afraid for your life? she said of course i was and she went to the ground because of it. again, investigators still here which is very telling. you see the crime scene tape and you see investigators and one thing that's important to know poppy is the police cruisers that you see are from madison, police. they're only protecting the perimeter because let's not forget that the investigation agency in this particular case is a state doj. >> right. right. right. of course the police can't investigate their own incidents and that law in wisconsin. christian, to you. i think it was interesting that madison police chief chose not to discuss robinson the teen's criminal history saying, quote, i am not here to do a character work up. what did you make of that? >> reporter: well the police chief has tried, even before this incident happened to really kind of let people express themselves and not really inject himself into what's going on beyond what he says his duties
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are which are to protect the right to assemble and the right to free speech and the chief after meeting with robinson's grandparent which is he did do he's sensitive to what they're going through and he just doesn't really want to i guess, play off their grief and intensify the situation. >> he said i'm not going to do that with a kid this young, right? a teen this young. rosa do we know if this officer was wearing a body camera because that got so much attention after ferguson. >> you know i just talked to the police chief, poppy, and i asked him that question and he said indeed no his police officers do not have body cameras. the obvious question is would he want body cameras for his officers and he said you know if the community wants body cameras he's not opposed to it but he did say that a lot of the times what happens is it gives you transparency but it might not give you what people believe is accountability and i said
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what do you mean? transparency is always great. what do you mean about accountability and what he said was it's about the laws. because what people see in this video might be lawful but people might not agree with it. so he says it might add some tension, and we were talking earlier and she was telling me that this police chief is very forward and you can probably talk about this more but regardless of what the circumstances are he's been out here and you were telling me regardless of day or night, he's out here talking to the media. >> any time we've had any kind of shooting not just by the police, but shots fired and the police chief does come out, addresses the public and lets us know what's going on and that's been his policy since he took office back in april for. >> lady thank you both. we'll stay on top of this story and bring you more when we have it. quick break. we'll be back in a moment. t, and stay awake during the day. this is called non-24.
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com you're in the cnn "newsroom." i'm poppy harlow joining us ging you live from new york. we begin in russia with the murder mystery that keeps getting more bizarre. accusations that go all of the way back to the kremlin and more people are dead. russian police trying to arrest a suspect in the killing of this
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man, a loud critic of russian president vladimir putin, his name boris nemtsov. one of the suspects in the killing blew himself up according to russian state television rather than be arrested. this happened in the city of chechnya. the five other suspects in nemtsov's murder are chechen, as well. the man who killed himself was one of a growing list of people that happened february 27 nothing moscow. let's talk to michael weiss, a fellow with the institute of modern russia and buck sexton former cia counterterrorism official and chris dickey editor of "the daily beast," let me begin with you, michael all of this coming from russian state television and as we discussed last week a lot of people were skeptical as to whether anyone would be arrested and now we have six suspects. >> right. look it's important to put all of this in context. putin's ascension to power came after appearing tough on islamic
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extremistism and he had the famous comment we'll rub them out in the out houses and his consolidation of power and also the result of cracking down on islamic extremism. so people in rush a at least those who van oppositional bent don't buy this at all and they think this is part of the same scenario. possibly pressaging another state crackdown or getting tough or security measures and not really aimed at terrorism and aimed at the opposition or what remains of it today. >> it's interesting, buck that one of the people who has been arrested and detained has apparently admitted to this. what do you make of that? >> i would expect something like that has happened. that's not surprising at all and they're checking off all of the boxes. one person didn't allow himself to get captured and another person has already confessed and it's almost as if this is playing out to a clear script. >> a play scripted by -- >> well that's what we're trying to find out still. the big absent issue here and
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the big thing we haven't been told is who gave the order or who could have given the order. i don't think anyone believes that these individuals came up with this plot and by themselves. you find the triggermen and they do tend to be chechen, the killing was another time when you had this but you never find out who actually said let's go engage in a -- >> behind a hired gun and who is behind it. >> we're trying to find the don, the mafia don, the head the guy who gave the order and we have the alleged triggermen and that doesn't get us closer to who did this? who ordered this? >> chris dickey will we find that out? >> i would like to start with the question of motivation. i mean why would these guys kill nemtsov? why would chechen islamists kill nemtsov? i can think why chechens might especially if they were working for ramzan bakhayev the right
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hand of vladimir putin and i don't understand why they would have an interest in taking him out. >> do you think, michael, that the kremlin would have to provide that answer the motive answer very quickly for people to side with them and believe them or no? >> let me go out on a limb and i think they have that answer. i think they had it the minute this was perpetrated. >> or even before. >> indeed. by process of elimination, the one they wouldn't consider is someone that's pro-putin. >> look at what they did within minutes of his being assassinated. this is a provocation designed to destabilize the russian government. chris says what is the motivation? they already have the answer. >> they're with the victims the "charlie hebdo" massacre. i was talking to andre, a russian journalist and probably the foremost expert on the russian security services. he said to me you would need at least three teams to perpetrate an assassination like this one
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of the most heavily vigilated places in moscow. >> the message. >> it sends a message if you're somebody that wants -- to silence opponents of the kremlin, obviously. >> they shoot nemtsov, six shots and four of them meet the target in his back and they spare his ukrainian girlfriend. >> train killers? >> clearly train. >> in terms of sending a message, messages have been sent and nemtsov is not the first here and also his opposition allies and those who have marched with him and marched by the way, in the streets of moscow less than 48 hours after his assassination are not quieted by this. >> we may not be quieted, but i can tell you they're very damn scared and they feel their lives are on the line and some are speaking out boldly and saying i'll double down and i'll take more risks and a lot of people are intimidated. i know people in russia who are getting calls from parents saying don't go out anymore. >> really? >> people not affiliated with the government or opposition? >> people that may be affiliated
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with the government -- or affiliated with the opposition one way or the other. journalists are intimidated and dissidents are being intimidated after davidenko. >> he's a former deputy prime minister and a representative of an entirely different direction and yeltsin doesn't go with putin and he goes with nemtsov and door number two and maybe it's a different country and his assassination is not just another politician or another journalist that's being silenced. >> it's the highest and biggest name. >> it's a change and it's a sea change. >> and nemtsov certainly was not on "charlie hebdo," his focus was on ukraine. >> and in this kind of a hit this way in front of the kremlin? this makes no sense. >> the kremlin wants to throw cold water on the idea that anybody in the russian government had anything to say to this. he was irrelevant and he doesn't matter. that's false, if you look at sanks passed by russian officials in favor of the
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ukraine and the dollar amounts of money that they were worth, stolen stolen whatever tracks with the work that nemtsov was putting on russian corruption. >> does putin care about what the west thinks about this? really? i think he does. >> he cares what happens internally. if this is designed to say we're at war with islamic extremism, the goal with the west is this i am your partner in counterterrorism. the same threats that you face isis al qaeda, i face them here and facing them since day one. putin was the first lead tore call george bush after nech. you need me russia and the united states need to work together. >> guys thank you very much. we'll have to leave it there. more on this story coming up. this evening, also very big story today. it has been one year to the day since malaysia airlines flight 370 disappeared. we just got this new report from malaysian awingorities and reveals a number of crucial things including a critical battery on that flight was apparently expired. it was the battery on the underwater locator beacon attached to the flight's data
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recorder. our anna koran is covering the story in kuala lumpur. >> reporter: hi poppy. you are absolutely right. that battery expired in december 2012. it's a maintenance issue which is a major oversight. did that hinder the search operation because that battery had expired? well we really don't know. obviously, the battery will still operating in the cockpit voice data recorder and there was some sort of beacon pings being emitted and as far as the flight data recorder that battery had expired. in that interim report which came out on the very day of the anniversary, the other things that it revealed was that the state of mind of the pilot and really poppy, it cleared him obviously of what has been going around which is the rogue pilot theory that perhaps it was the captain of the plane and mh370
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that decided to steer it off course and commit swissuicide. this is something that has been thrown around and the cause of much speculation and have you spoken to officials throughout the week from malaysia airlines and also from the malaysian government. they said it was baseless and false and obviously that there was a report coming out saying that the pilot and all the crew none of them were stressed. the behavior was exactly the same as it had been on previous flights, poppy. >> i think it's interesting we heard australian prime minister tony abbott answer some questions that were posed to him today, asking about the search and how long it will go on. he said look we're 40% through this search area right now, but he didn't exactly say it was going to go on forever. >> yeah. no he didn't. he said it cannot go on forever, but i thought what was interesting in that interview is
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that he said we are willing to consider another search if nothing is found in his priority area and a thought nautical miles off the coach of australia, this search is conducted by both countries are putting $60 million toward finding the wreckage and this sort of terrain is 400 miles deep and there are trenches and volcanos and it's proving to be a logistical nightmare for the search crew but despite that they are still searching and tony abbott saying if nothing is found this time they will continue with another search. ink its certainly good news for the families who are desperate, poppy, for some answers. >> that's a good point as you just heard from some of the family members in the last half hour. they want this to happen until that plane is found. anna coren joining us from kuala
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lumpur lumpur. where is the plane? one next guest says maybe in kazakhstan who wrote a huge extensive article and others say no way, no how. our panel weighs in next. normally people wear pants. yeah that's why i'm hiding captain obvious. not very well. i found you immediately. you know what else is easy to find? a new hotel with the hotels.com app. i don't need a new hotel room, i just need to get back into this one. gary? it's wednesday gary! i know that janet! hotels.com is more helpful than janet. your eyes really are unique. in fact, they depend on a unique set of nutrients. that's why there's ocuvite to help protect your eye health. as you age your eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite is a vitamin made just for your eyes from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. ocuvite has a unique formula that's just not found
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in the wake of malaysia flight flight 370's disappearance, theories about what happened to the flight were and continue to be frankly, endless. you have to ask, though without a shred of evidence any debris can any theory really be thrown out? let me bring in cnn aviation analyst and business correspondent richard qwest who joins us from los angeles and also 777 pilot and contributing editor les abbott and pilot jeff is with us. jeff i have to begin with you because your theory and you just read about it in new york mag is controversial and you've been getting feedback on it. you wrote this long article how crazy am i to think that i
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actually know where the malaysia airlines plane is? where is it? >> the only data we have about the last six hours of the plane's fight is seven handshakes pings exchanged between the many and the satellite and they definitively say that the plane went south, but since we haven't found any floating debris and we searched the sea bed and i wanted to ask the question is there any way that this evidence could be construed that the plane didn't go south? >> that it went north. >> that it went north. the electronics way of a 777 is accessible and the bay is often left unlocked and you can reach it through a hatch in the passenger compartment and if you got in there jowled access to the electronic brains and the machinery that sends the signal back to the antenna. it's conceivable that that data could have been tampered with and in fact a report issued today i think lends support to this idea. >> you believe it could be in
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kazakhstan. if the data remains and wasn't spoofed, and the path takes you to kazakhstan yes. >> richard? >> well i disagree with jeff that the report gives any credence to his theory. in fact i would say the opposite. the report actually says quite clearly that the satcom unit is not accessible for maintenance as jeff would have it and so the idea that -- look jeff has come up with a theory. jeff has been right. he was right on the pings. i'll be the first person to say hat's off if i was wearing one. he was right on that and i think he's slightly off the round with this one and if only because it accepts that somebody would come forward, two people or several passengers would come forward and they would be able to hike help you the carpet get into the bay, perform an extremely complicated satellite maintenance operation in a part of the equipment that might not
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be accessible or available and then land the plane, but i hand it to jeff. you have come up with a theory and i suspect time will prove you right or wrong. >> les? you are a 777 pilot. you know these planes. what do you make of jeff's theory? does it have potential? >> well jeff and i have debated this -- >> sparred. >> sparred a little bit back and forth and richard quest took the words out of my mouth and to get into that compartment is a total operation and you would have to disrupt the service and get down there and then you would have to have someone who had absolute knowledge of the a and ebay. there are a lot of electronics and i'm not familiar with it and even as a pilot it's not a place i would go on a normal basis and there are only a couple of occasions that my checklist would have me go down there. as a matter of fact my airlines policy is not to go down in this
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compartment. >> for you to write something like this i just want to know what you went through deciding whether you should write this or not, putting out a theory knowing that you would have critics and -- >> really? >> we all know this those of us who are on television right? >> yes. >> for you, you felt a real need to put this out there because we have so few answers. >> it's a mystery i've spent most of the last year going eyeball deep into the data on this and trying to break it down and trying to understand what it all means and frankly, the deeper we go into this the stranger it looks and frankly, what les just said i agree with it the case that most airline pilots don't know how to get in there and mess with the stuff in the way it appears it was messed with and that is a very sophisticated hiejjacker and very weird and my theory is preposterous. >> we have to look at the kind of theories that just are very strange because the case itself is very strange.
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>> richard quest, to you, looking at this one year in all of these theories that have been floated, what do you make of them and if they have helped in any way or if they've been painful for the families? >> i think the moment -- i mean i'm pleased to say that at least jeff does agree that the an mar sat datein the results show the plane did transmit the seven handshake handshakes and the extrapolation of that puts it in the south indian ocean at the moment. it is just going to be a punishingly slow process to find it. if that inmarsat data is right, and i think you and i can probably find common ground here, if it's wrong and if for some reason they've gotten that
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around their neck then you'll never find it. they've got no idea. they have absolutely no idea where this plane is and frankly, 600 pages of documents released today give us not a shred of evidence of where it is. >> that's what is so disappointing. richard, les, jeff stand by and we'll take a quick break. more on flight 370 when we return.
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it is without question one of the greatest aviation mysteries of all time. the disappearance of flight mh370. back with me to discuss cnn aviation specialist richard quest and also with me in new york author and pilot jeff weiss. let me begin with you, we were just talking about this. jeff has penned this ebook arguing this plane may be intact and may be in kazakhstan. you take issue with that saying where is the motive? >> oh absolutely. look jeff may be right and i'm going to keep an open mind on that but i'm -- or a partial open mind or a little open mind and i'll have a scintilla of openness to jeff's theory if i
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may, jeff but there is no motive and let's face it we went through all of the pilots' motive suicide, marriage breakup, all of which the report today says is not true. so until we are prepared to sort of suggest that some putin-esque conspiracy took place on an aircraft you do have to legitimately say, jeff what was the moatisttivemotive? >> and answer that question and this huge 600-page report came out from the malaysian authorities today. does that lend any credence or does that oppose your argument? >> okay. so two questions. motive first, there is no -- i mean ooh very hard to discern a motive and that's a criticism you can apply to any theory is this was intentionally done by someone and the leading theory seems to be pilot suicide. there are problems with that theory too. there's no good clear, obvious theory that makes a lot of sense
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that doesn't have any holes and so that'sa i a problem. it's not -- the theory doesn't start with motive and the motive falls out of the back that the mathematics take you to kazakhstan. >> no jeff. >> richard wants to jump in. >> you can't have your argument both way, jeff. you were the one who constantly has been looking for motive from the beginning. what was the reason? why did they do it? but now motive becomes irrelevant to your theory because it won't fit into your theory. >> is that fair? >> well no look. there's a bunch of potential -- >> if you say it's intentional doesn't it need a motive? >> no. if you find a guy standing over a dead body with a smoking gun you don't say what's the motive? you say did he shoot the person? >> you say was there motive or was this someone who was insane or one or the other? >> no. you're both missing the point
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here? >> we're both missing the point, yes, richard! >> you're both missing the point. oh come on you wouldn't have had time following crime, jeff. following crime here and the sanctions and all of that you would not have had -- i've read your theory you would not have had time to throw this together with the complexity involved to have actually done this if you are pro-putin, anti-western thing. you are both missing the point here. this was a highly complex event. it can't just be dismissed into the -- somebody did it without motive. if you're right, jeff if you're right nobody goes into the bay and reprograms the bfo, lands in kazakhstan and does it all because they do it on the whim of a thursday. >> richard, i have to ask you this before i let you go. can you give us the main important headline that you took away from this report out from the malaysian authorities today one year later?
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>> yes. the really sears point is the shambles of air traffic control that took place that night and the hours that went by before anybody really raised a distress flag add it to which the battery may or may not have been expired on the underwater locator beacon but the air traffic control, that's what we need to be concerned about tonight and not whether the plane is in kazakhstan. >> jeff weiss, richard quest, back in a moment.
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nbc news struggling to regain its footing after a series of missteps and behind the scenes drama. its latest troubles as you know have centered around the network's top anchor brian williams but there is a lot more to this story. brian stelter reveals some of the surprising troubles on his program "reliable sources". >> there is breaking news about the turmoil inside nbc news. this addition of "new york"
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magazine outside tomorrow has shocking stories about what led up to brian williams' suspension and we have gabriel sherman's story. sherman reports that many nbc journalist his been frustrated with williams for years before the embellishment accusations. in fact they'd been frustrated that williams had gained so much power internally and sherman paints a picture of a news division in disarray and with the "today" show on friday with nbc well aware that sherman's story was about to come out, burke moved has news chairman out and moved andy lack in. every single person in the tv news business does. he was with nbc during when katie couric and matt lauer became stars and when they made "meet the press" a sunday
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morning staple and now he's back to clean up the news division and has to figure out what to do with brian williams. he joins me on set for his first interview about the news story. number one most importantly, you're saying that brian williams is not the news division's only problem. this is about the "today" show and others as well. >> the brian williams scandal pulled the lid off of a cauldron of messes that have been going on at nbc news. >> which is why we see andy lack which come in. >> you can understand the brian williams crisis in the news division that has been reeling in the last year. it is unclear if he'll be allowed that the head of nbc has not made up his mind. >> truly has not made up his mind and the internal frustration with brian. he got so much power that there was no checks and balances which is how a discredited story like his iraq anecdote got on the air and where were his executive producers? where are the people fact checking brian williams?
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they were not there. >> he doesn't have a lot of fans internally right now. >> i heard many stories and one example is that he suppressed difficult reporting and investigative reporter michael isikoff was doing on the obama white house's drone program. he got an exclusive look about the justice department's memo about how the justification of killing american citizens with drones and brian williams did not want that on nightly news and he did not want a tough lisa meyers' investigative segment on obamacare. you have the biggest platform at the network for news and you don't want our tough reporting and that will be a tough bridge for brian williams to cross to come back and not only did i get the story wrong and now i'll roll up my sleeves and welcome the tough reporting on to the show. >> i just spoke with someone there and they'll let it speak for itself and i did not see an article that might be wrong. the first is about tom brokaw and let's put on the screen part of what you wrote about tom
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brokaw brokaw. around the time chuck todd took over as moderator "meet the press," at least your ghost is dead meaning tim russert and mine is still walking the building meaning tom brokaw. >> it's a very cold situation. how could brian williams get himself into this mess and the story i heard over and over again is he tried to live up to the brokaw's legacy. tom brokaw is an icon in the tv news business and brian williams followed him. so he always felt this deficiency that brokaw traveled the world and was a reporter and trafrled washington and trafrled the fall of the berlin wall and williams tried to inflate himself into brokaw's shoes and he told people that brokaw was frosty to him and that is one of the events that led to where we are today. >> this week we asked brokaw for comment and he declined. david letterman, the thing that got me most surprised is that williams pitched les moonves
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about succeeding david letterman. you attribute this to a high-level source and moonves wasn't interested and cbs declined to comment. >> he was choosing news or comedy? >> yes. the trouble he got into was once he decided to stay in the news business his, you know his heart was still in comedy. he loves late night. he was on letterman last year where he made a 2013 where he made some of those comments. >> right. there he is there. >> there he is and he re-signs his contract with nbc and he still wants to be in the comedy world and you can't be an entertainer or journalist. one, a journalist has to be willing to anger people. entertainers want to be liked. they're fundamentally two dint roles. >> last thing i want to say, there is still an opening at "the daily show" when jon stewart leaves. >> good to see you. >> thank you for that. you can watch brian on reliable sources every sunday at 8:00 a.m. pacific right here on cnn. coming up next cnn's
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special series finding jesus and this looks at john the baptist and it is fascinating and the creator joins me next. an unprecedented cnn event. he didn't vanish without leaving a trace. >> for the first time in history we are able to place these relics. >> and grasp at things that changed the world. >> this is really the moment of truth. >> this is the story of jesus. >> the rock upon which the church is built. >> an icon of skients i think obsession and it defined an archaeological piece. >> what do we really have here? >> why did judas betray jesus? somebody chose to write this. is this the burial shroud of jesus? >> what are the clues he left behind? faith, fact, forgery.
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he was a prophet and a preacher his message so powerful his name is revered centuries later, but who was the real john the baptist? it is the question explored in cnn's new series "finding jesus." here is a clip from tonight's episode. >> i think the baptism of jesus by john is a crucial part of the
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story. it tells us if nothing else that jesus absolutely endorsed what john was doing. >> i myself are baptizing with water for this reason and he might be revealed with israel. >> that he embraced god's message that people did need to repent and receive forgiveness for their sins. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> and just as he was coming up out of the water he saw the heavens torn apart and the spirit descending like a dove on him and a voice came from heaven. you are my son, the beloved. with you i am well pleased.
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>> it's at that moment that something profound changes in jesus and now he feels this vocation to go spread his own blessage. this is the beginning of jesus' ministry. >> joining me now, david gibson and co-author and creator of the series "finding jesus," faith, fact forgery. >> congratulations, by the way, it had a lot of viewers on the premiere episode. >> there is a real appetite for this. >> what's been the reaction? >> it's been overwhelming popular and there are believers and non-believers and not just those antagonistic to christianity and those who don't have education in the faith. they want to know who jesus was. is this the guy who changed history? >> so i watched this episode and it's very much sort of literally drilling into bone. you are literally drilling into one bone that is believed to be a finger bone of john the baptist. >> there are so many relics and
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we focus in this series and in this chapter in particular the bones of john the baptist in part because there are so many of them throughout the world, throughout europe. there was a joke even in the middle ages that john the baptist must have had six heads and 12 hands. >> because there were so many. >> and this trade in relics and it was a corrupt trade. >> that's one of the fingers that was just shown. >> and there are so many and the astonishing thing is can any of these be real? >> can they be? >> well i think so. you'll be surprised at what you find but they found some in recent -- in recent years that we looked at that you know people thought they must be you know more recent maybe a few centuries old drilled into them found dna that showed they were from a man living in the middle east. >> right. >> and the radio carbon testing showed it was 2,000 years ago. >> and the hard thing to prove or to jump is the time era, but what about same person? >> with all of these things like
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last week's episode on the shroud of turin, even if it's 2,000 years old and even though it's an image on the shroud of a man who was crucified there is always going to be a leap of faith that you have to make. we can take you right up to the edge there, but you know in the end if you want to believe that's an image of jesus and if you want to believe this is a relic of john the baptist. >> this is a series that marries science and belief. faith in something that is -- that is not tangible and faith in signs that it can proof that that belief. for you, personally was it hard to marry the two? >> no. because i'm personally catholic and we as christians believe in faith and reason. these are two things that go together and i think we so often see on the thing i love about the show and the book and this whole endeavor is we see skyness and religion at odds and
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they attack the critics and the believers. this is a rare patch of common ground that you have to come together and say okay let's do this research and let's explore and deepen our knowledge. if you're a believer i think it will deepen your faith and if you're a skeptic then you can at least come at this with a certain respect and a certain attitude of learning. >> did you face -- have you faced critics who look at this and say this is not what needs to be done? >> yeah. you get -- you know you get fundamentalist soss istists on both sides and we shouldn't be looking at the context and the historical jesus and just go by what's on the page and then the fundamentalists on the skeptical side and on the atheist side who say why are you even discussing this? some even ascribe to this theory that jesus was a myth. that he was made up by the first-century jews. >> can you give me a speak peek. tonight's episode is john the
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baptist. what else really surprised you in the series as we look to the episodes in the weeks ahead? >> well i think, a lot of what we're doing here is kind of debunking the debunkers. you see a lot of this stuff that pops up once in a while, the gospel of jesus' wife that jesus was married and he was married to mary mag dalen, they say. is that really the truth? we go back and look at these things and we poke holes in what needs to be examined more closely, but all of them i think are windows into the gospels and the jesus of history. so you know, not everything is a forgery, but some things are interesting fact as well. >> have you heard anything from the catholic church? >> they love it. we have a catholic priest farther jim martin is one of our experts. faith and reason we have a lot of people who are both believers and the top-notch scholars. >> if anything it is just fascinating because it's really a history lesson each and every one. >> it is. absolutely. >> congratulations. i look forward to it tonight.
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cnn special series "finding jesus," faith, fact forgery 9:00 eastern here on cnn. you won't want to miss that. coming up in the next hour the miracle baby really a miracle, how this young baby survived hours alone in a car submerged in a river. we're back after this. in new york state, we're reinventing how we do business so businesses can reinvent the world. from pharmaceuticals to 3d prototyping, biotech to clean energy. whether your business is moving, expanding or just getting started... only new york offers you zero taxes for 10 years with startup ny business incubators that partner companies with universities, and venture capital funding for high growth industries. see how new york can grow your business and create jobs. visit ny.gov/business normally people wear pants. yeah that's why i'm hiding captain obvious. not very well. i found you immediately.
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in the places where isis rules, the treatment of gay men and women is beyond cruel. the terrorist group has released new images meant to shock and of course to terrorize. we are including them in this report because we think it's important to show you how isis carries out its twisted form of justice. the names of the men in this piece have been changed. here's cnn's senior international correspondent arwa damon. >> reporter: these stills purport a man being thrown from the building. according to the last caption, he was stoned to death. his alleged crime, being gay. these images were posted by isis in the strong hold of raqqa. the series as well from january show an older man seated in a chair and then tumbling to the ground. also in january, these from isis in mosul. two men murdered in the same
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manner. in all the photographs dozens of people are seen watching the killings seemingly unfazed. that makes the atrocious act even more nauseating. >> the facial expressions are really scary because they're not scared of what's going on. they may be a little bit excited or happy to get rid of homosexuals in the city. >> reporter: syria was never a nation that accepted its lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans community. the country's laws criminalize homosexual acts punishable by up to three years in prison. since the revolution turned war, life for syria's lgbt community has become even more dire. >> it was not isis that forced noor to leave syria, well before isis emerged as a significant force. in 2012 noor saw this video. this was the only frame that is not too gruesome to show. the video depicts two men being
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beheaded. they're accused of being spies, but then towards the end of the clip a voice references a verse from the koran and noor says when he heard that it became one of the main reasons why he decided to leave. >> according to the posting the video was filmed in noor's home province. >> there is a very specific verse that says only the sin of homosexuality would shake the throne of god. so whenever we hear this on video or audio we know exactly that this meant for gay people. it was the moment of clarity, a moment of understanding that this -- this place is not safe anymore. >> reporter: sami and his partner consider themselves already married. they fled after sami's family found out they were together and a car tried to run them over. two hours later, sami's phone rang. >> there was a man that was first said this time you could make it and you survived but
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the next time you will not. >> in istanbul the couple lives in shared housing with other syrian men. when the isis photos emerged one of their syrian housemates made a sickening comment. >> he made the very absurd joke about he was so so amused and he had so much fun watching homosexual and he say now gay men can fly. >> fear of persecution continues to haunt them here. arwa damon, cnn, istanbul. >> fascinating, troubling report from arwa. thank you for that. >> coming up a police standoff in chechnya ends with a high-profile murder suspect blowing himself up. the details next.
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com you're in the cnn "newsroom." i'm poppy harlow. the hunted for perpetrators in what some are saying is a political killing is ongoing. five suspects have been detained in the shooting death of putin critic boris nemtsov, one man who russian authorities tried to
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arrest blew himself up and thatta cording to russian state. our matthew chance is in moscow this evening. >> police have named the suspect who killed himself as beslan shavanov a 30-year-old man from the chechen capital grozny according to state television. the building in which he'd been hiding was surrounded and there was a fire fight with the police. when he detonated a hand grenade that killed him. meanwhile, here in moscow investigators say they have now at least five suspects under arrest in connection with the killing of boris nemtsov, one of the five a chechen plan named zaur dadayev has confessed to the killing and the plot thicken, as well because the pro-kremlin leader of chechnya has now issued a statement essentially praising dadayev saying that he was a russian patriot, but also a muslim who was angered by
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