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tv   CNN Newsroom With Fredricka Whitfield  CNN  March 14, 2015 8:00am-12:01pm PDT

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happening right now in the "newsroom". >> it looks like an absolute bomb has hit it. it is devastating. >> packing winds of 155 miles per hour cyclone pam is churning in the south pacific. so far, at least six people killed and an island nation devastated. two days after two officers are shot and injured in ferguson, missouri the suspect is still at large, police chasing several new leads this morning, as the manhunt continues. plus -- >> let's go guys. come on. >> come on. >> pass her up. >> herculean strength used trapped for nearly 14 hours in a
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ravine after a terrible car crash. 18 month old lily survives and her entire rescue is caught right there on camera. you're live in the "cnn newsroom." hello and thanks so much for joining me. i'm fredricka witfield. we start with a state of emergency declared in the south pacific after tropical cyclone pam with the power of a category 5 hurricane struck the island chain nation of vanuatu. the fourth most powerful storm ever to make landfall took direct aim op the capital city of port vila. at least six people are confirmed dead. 20 others injured. and there are fears the death toll just could rise. wind gusts up to 200 miles per hour tore houses apart and knocked down trees. the australian red cross says
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shelter, food and water are urgently needed and an official from world vision it looks like a bomb. joining us is unicef acting chief parker. how bad is it in your assessment? >> i've seen many emergencies, fredricka, and many cyclones, typhoon typhoons. this is as bad as any. certainly the situation here is very grim. i would estimate that at least 90%, if not more of all housing and buildings in port vila have been heavily affected. >> so did people have shelter, generally? were there others who tried to ride it out wherever they were? they knew the storm was coming right? >> yes. the national disaster management office has been communicating or
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was communicating for a full week prior to the arrival of pam, as it was progressing south from the salomon islands, communicateing on radio and others ways so the population was prepared. shelters most people were staying at home, trying to ride it out. in reality many houses just were not built for this level of destruction. even the mobile the cell towers for relaying mobile are only rated officially for category 3. they cannot stand category 5. there's only one left in the country. >> i mentioned that urgently needed are food and water and medical supplies. if your view how many more days
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can people go before this assistance comes from other nations? >> for port vila itself people are relatively fortunate in the sense that there are some stocks, the private sector has been very supportive of the community, but the news out of port vila is just a wall of silence at the moment with communications down there's no idea of the impact damage to the north nor is there real clear view as to what has happened to the islands to the south where pam actually only left vanuatu landfall about 5:30 6:00 this afternoon. >> all right. unicef acting chief andrew parker thank you so much. i know you a lot on your plate as you try to assist people there as best you can. appreciate it. let's bring in ivan cabrera. ivan pam, where is it heading
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now? >> it's going to be heading to new zealand. the gentleman you spoke with and the people able to talk with you and me right now, are in the least affected areas. there are people right now that i must imagine are in much rougher shape. here's hawaii. take you to where we're talking about in the south pacific. the island chain of vanuatu. made up of several islands. vila the capital city. there is australia. the forecast in a second as far as where it's headed. i want to take you to the current stats here from tropical cyclone pam. when we talk about a tropical cyclone that's what we call in this part of the world would still be the equivalent of a category 4 hurricane. as it made landfall it was a cat 5. the winds at 150 miles an hour. but it is safely now moving away from the islands here. the damage is done and at this point we're going to be tracking this as a big rainmaker and there will be some gusty winds backing into the northern side the north island of new zealand that would happen at about 48 hours.
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we'll track that for you in the next few days here. i don't think it's going to be anywhere near what they had in vanuatu which, of course there, this was a historic storm. they had never seen anything like it. we never approached anything like a category 5 storm making landfall in vanuatu and it did and strongest landfall globally since typhoon haiyan which was back in the philippines a couple years ago. it is going to take a while before we realize the essentially the kalamty that is likely unfolding in those islands. >> thank you so much. we'll check back with you later on. here's an amazing twist to this story. cnn's bill weier host of "the wonder list" actually filmed his premier if you recall in vanuatu. it focused on the area's beauty and the remoteness but in what now seems a premonition, one resident expressed fears about rising waters on the island nation and how much devastation that would potentially cause and now this vanuatu being hit by
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the cyclone pam. bill weier joining us now from new york. so bill you know while you were there, you know, how in your estimation would people there be able to handle this kind of devastation? they already expressed concern about rising water but this is something very different? >> it absolutely is fred. it casts the whole hour we did there in a completely different light. what drew me to the place was the romance, the paras dice the sun kissed sugar sand beaches the fish all they could eat and all of that but very different when you think about riding out a category 5 storm in essentially a thatched hut. this is up in molta lava in the north. folks trying embrace tourism. give you a sense of where they're starting from they just got their first cement floor at the place we stayed. the owner poured all of his savings into it not realizing most westerners don't want to see concrete on vacation. told him to put sand over it.
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he was asking me how he could get a toilet paper holder. if he got that for his new bathroom he would get a recommendation for tourists to come to his bunga loo. the most basic level of development for the folks who had to ride out these insane winds in what you're seeing there, thatch sided, open sided huts. >> and that's in the northern portion you mentioned and we understand from ivan telling us it's the southern islands that got hit particularly hard. do you suppose that, you know the way of life is very similar? did you get a chance to see the islands or is there a big difference between, you know, existence north to south? >> even the places we hung out in the south, tanna, the island where the prime minister is actually from we spent some time in the village where people live like it is 100 b.c. grass skirts in the woods, ban yon tree houses and, you know, they're perfectly content. they know what the modern world has to offer, but, you know, we're so used to in the west go
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to an interior room get in the bathtub. there are no interior rooms much less bathtubs. these are hearty folks, survived in this part of the world and they would tell stories about the big hurricane i think in 1938 that split up different communities and shaped that society, and you now they're going to be talking about this one forever. the biggest ever. as one of the previous guests said what's so hard is all those cell towers the cell service, i was shocked to see how good it was, not to be able it to communicate much less get to these places and see how the folks survived. >> extraordinary view. thanks so much for joinings us. your perspective and what we believe to be these people being challenged like never before on being resourceful. host of "the wonder list" which airs sunday nights at 10:00 this week he's headed to greece. still ahead, new leads into who may have shot two officers in ferguson, missouri. ryan young is there.
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>> police officers still searching for whoever shot the two officers. those officers have been released from the hospital. we'll have the story coming up in a live report. i bring the gift of the name your price tool to help you find a price that fits your budget. uh-oh. the name your price tool. she's not to be trusted. kill her. flo: it will save you money! the name your price tool isn't witchcraft! and i didn't turn your daughter into a rooster. she just looks like that. burn the witch! the name your price tool a dangerously progressive idea. meet the world's newest energy superpower. surprised? in fact, america is now the world's number one natural gas producer... and we could soon become number one in oil. because hydraulic fracturing technology is safely recovering lots more oil and natural gas. supporting millions of new jobs. billions in tax revenue... and a new century of american energy
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police are chasing several new leads in ferguson, missouri for the suspect who shot two officers and also considering increasing the current $10,000 reward. it's been more than two days since those two officers were shot and wounded. at the end of a protest against the ferguson police department. ryan young is in ferguson for us now. how are they going about trying to find suspects? >> good morning. if you look behind me all quiet outside the police department, obviously, where the demonstration was happening when the shots were fired. they are still trying to find two people of interest they have identified and haven't shared with the media who those people are. there's been conversation about
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where the gunfire may have started, people saying they heard the muzzle flashes but people heard that video and watched the video of the bullets whizzing by. a very dangerous situation. law enforcement has been getting help from the community but they desperately want more phone calls. that's why that $10,000 reward is so important. in fact the police chief was talking about the situation very recently. >> this is really an ambush is what it is. i mean you can't see it coming you don't understand that it's going to happen and you're basically defenseless from the fact that it is happening to you at the time. and that is something that is very difficult to guard against when you a group of officers standing in a large group and then, you know you have gunfire, gunfire directed at them. >> it's a tragedy either way. it undermines everything that everybody is trying to do in this. it really does. i won't walk away from the fact that it is no the beyond the rel -- not beyond the realm of possibility having all the officers standing together and the fact that two of those
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officers were hit, that these officers weren't targeted. >> and some strong language being used about whoever opened fire on the two officers. in fact the attorney general called who did this, punks. some very strong language. i can tell you a lot of work to find whoever did this. it still continues and they're hoping like once i said before more tips will come in. >> ryan young, thank so much, from ferguson. still ahead iraqi forces are close to retaking a key city from isis. we'll get the latest and also find out why this is such a strategic battle.
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iraqi joint forces are taking a pause in their attempt to take back the strategic city of tikrit. they've recaptured about 75% of the city. reuters is reporting they have now halted their offensive for a second day while they wait for reinforcements. retaking tikrit is an important step for the iraqi government. isis has occupied the city since june of last year. it's close proximity to baghdad and also seen as a threat to iraq security. so what can we expect next in the fight against isis. cnn military analyst major general james spider marks in phoenix for us. good to see you.
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fewer than 200 isis fighters are holding out in the last part of the city. why is the fight for tikrit so important for isis? it's clear why it's important for iraq to hold on to it but why isis some. >> important for isis primarily because this is the first real i would say, robust engagement that's taking place between the iraqi security forces and isis. this is an opportunity for isis to stand up and if they can withhold tikrit or if they can cause some damage to isf, the iraqi security forces or if they can hold out on to a certain portion and remain in place and cause the iraqi security forces to galvanize additional forces this is a big win for isis big propaganda plot. >> are there any marked improvements? we've been talking about how they really have been upstaged by the ability and power of isis so have things changed in any way and if so why? >> well there are some results
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on the ground obviously, in tikrit, where isf is being successful but keep in mind fred that what the iraqi forces have alongside them right now, are shia militia and they are very -- and qods force and the iraqi core without getting into all these players. you have iranian influence in iraq that is significant and tactically available and making itself very, very successful in terms of these tactical engagements against isis. this is a big deal for tehran. they are exercising some very significant influence in this battle in tikrit. tactically that's good. the united states and tehran, very ironically share the same interests here in that we want isis to be destroyed. the challenge going forward strategically, obviously iran has the upper hand in terms of influencing activities on the ground. our advisors the united states
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presence certainly is robust and vigorous across the board, but we don't have troops on the ground that can really support the iraqi forces. that's the issue right now. when it's any port in a storm, the iraqi forces need help iranian are there, they're getting it. >> interesting that there would be this u.s. and iran, you know kind of parallel two strategic interests, but as it pertains to helping coordinate the joint iraqi forces would that put iran or the u.s. in the same company, you know, talking together for this military strategy or are those iraqi forces just independently receiving instructions and guidance and moving based on the iranian and u.s. influence? >> yeah. i would think very simply, iranian forces are saddling up next to the iraqi forces on the ground. they are providing tactical support, irrespective of the coordination details that iraq has very closely, very trusted,
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very deep with central command, the united states central command, which has the overall responsibility there in iraq. so iran is there and they're providing help at the tactical level. that's kind of how it's working right now. >> fascinating. spider marks thanks so much. good to see you. >> thank you. >> still ahead, new questions about an incident at the white house that put two secret service agents under investigation. cnn's erin mcpike is at the white house for us. >> we're learning that initial reports about this incident may have been overblown. i'll have more on that after the break. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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and the sigma alpha epsilon fraternity at the university of oklahoma is fighting back and lawyering up. the high-profile attorney for the disbanded sae chapter says he's not ruling out suing the school. plus -- >> let's go. >> come on. >> come on. >> rescuing baby lily. not only will you get to watch the incredible rescue unfold but there's a mystery here as first responders tell a bizarre story of hearing cries for help but now wonder weres those cries comeing from the baby? the "newsroom" continues right now. good morning again, everyone. thanks for joining me. i'm fredricka whitfield. cnn has learned some of the details surrounding the latest secret service scandal are being questioned. law enforcement continues to investigate what happened at the white house involving two agents.
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sources tell cnn allegations about drinking and driving, may not be true. joe clancy the new head of the secret service, is expected to appear on capitol hill next week to discuss all of this. ear rip mcpike joining me from the white house. is the direction of this investigation changing? >> i wouldn't say it is changing. there is an investigation. the department of homeland security is investigating, also there will be some talk about this on capitol hill on monday and tuesday, but our latest reporting does contradict or at least diverge from some of the original details. and what we know is that there were two senior secret service agents who were at a retirement party for one of the colleagues on march 4th at a bar in chinatown about 7 blocks due east of the white house. at the end of the evening the two agents drove in a government car back tots white house, where there was some suspicious activity going on. there had been a bomb threat and that was being investigated.
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so the two agents drove up to the barricade. the car nudged an orange barrel at the time. but as far as we know from what we're hearing from sources now, there was no collision, no damage no sort of confrontation and it may be that there was never even a suggestion that a sobriety test needed to happen. those two agents then went home. they have been reassigned in new roles in the secret service. but then here's where the trouble is. joe clancy who is the director of secret service was told about this five days later and that is what some are questioning. it's calling into question some credibility. has he really changed the culture of the secret service. and he will be testifying on capitol hill in private and public briefings on monday and tuesday. jason chaffetz who shares the house oversight committee spoke to cnn about this and here's what he had to say. >> this is a big moment for director clancy. he has the opportunity to help clean this up. how he does it the manner in
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which he does it i think he needs to send a signal that there's going to be a new age of accountability and that means communicating at the very top right away. >> reporter: and fred we should also point out that the only thing we have heard publicly from the secret service so far is that there is an active investigation under way over this issue. they have not put out any details yet about what they know of this incident. >> all right. erin mcpike, keep us posted from the white house. so is this more of the same for the secret service? is there a few problem here? joining me from los angeles is former secret service agent anthony chappa and also is with the office of professional responsibility for the u.s. secret service. anthony good to see you. so all of this sounds really strange, doesn't it? and does it seem like a case that's overblown or does this smell of a cover-up? >> well fredricka, let me say that i represent myself and i'm not a spokesman for the secret
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service, but the situation is one that it never is what it appears on its face. everything in my 25 years needs to be investigated and that's what's going on today. so that director chancey can inform those what happened. what is sad is that we're focused on the allegations, the agents in question you know, still have their rights prior due process, to explain what happened. i guess what is sad is that we're not focusing on the bravery of the uniform division officers that responded to that suspicious package and how they set up a net of communication and shared with all the ajoining police jurisdictions and one officer tried to apprehend the individual and stop the vehicle and ended up getting assaulted by the car and then the womans escaped and the agents and officers responded capturing the
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person finding that the device was a hoax device and having to charge her for assault on the officer. that's what affects a lot of us today. >> and those and what you spelled out does seem to be the business as usual, the expectation of the courage of secret service when tasked as they did carry out there, but what is unusual is yet another potential incident that certain li certainly kind of scars the image if not wounds the image of secret service. this investigation along with string of things that have happened in recent years from the prostitution scandal in colombia the breach in atlanta, on the elevator with the president, and the armed man who did make it too the white house, does all of this say to you that this really is the business of usual for the secret service or there is a problem, there are gaping holes and it does jeopardize the sanctity of what
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the u.s. secret service has always reptsds? >> i think this incident alone and many others that are very positive to say that here was a situation where two supervisors, you know had a focus of duty that even though they were off duty they could hear the situation was happening, felt that they needed to respond. and had they gone out for a sandwich and had a diet coke should they have responded absolutely. the fact that it's alleged they may have had attended an event and had a beer that has to be investigated. they went and the fact that the supervisors and officers felt the leadership was willing to listen to them and hear that there was a situation that needed to be investigated at the highest levels i think that speaks volumes of the new leadership and ability to report these things because director clancy has that reputation. he's willing to talk to the
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newest employee to the most senior employee. if you have an idea or concept or new solution he wants to hear it and he will put it in effect. >> anthony choppa thank you for your expertise. >> thank you very much. >> all right. words or actions, what defines racism? is it singing a song like the fraternity members at the university of oklahoma are in trouble for? many say they're not guilty of racism. even though they may have been singing it. and others disagree. what do you think? right after this. there's a gap out there. that's keeping you from the healthcare you deserve. at humana, we believe the gap will close when healthcare gets simpler. when frustration and paperwork decrease. when grandparents get to live at home instead of in a home. so let's do it. let's simplify healthcare. let's close the gap between people and care.
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. once again this week a story about people who are using offensive, derogatory racist language and then soon to follow apologies or explan fashions saying it wasn't racists but a mistake. quote/unquote, wrong and reckless. this week's students with the sigma alpha epsilon or sae fraternity led and took part in a racist chant. two of the students have been expelled by the university by the oklahoma university and friends and family say the young men shouldn't be labeled racists. >> that video does not represent his core personality. unfortunately as things are, that might define him for a while but it does not define him personally. >> parker rice is a charismatic, good person with a good soul and spirit that i feel truly did not believe in or did to the
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truly understand what he was saying. >> 19-year-old parker rice seen in the video, helping to lead the chant song released his own statement apologizing and saying, quote, i know everyone wants to know why or how this happened. i admit it likely was fueled by alcohol consumed at the house before the bus trip but that's not an excuse. yes, the song was taught to us but that, too, doesn't work as an explanation, end quote. joining me to talk about why there seems to be varying views of what defines racism pakneel joseph editor to the root.com and tough universities center for the study of race and democracy, good to see you, and tim wise author of "color-blind and dear white america" and cnn commentator van jones. all right. good to see you all. >> good to see you. >> good morning. >> panil to you first, parker rice says down in his apology statement it was wrong and
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reckless but is it more than that? i mean we're talking about lynching the "n" word "n" words will never be a part of this fraternity, can you separate the racist language and the person using it? >> well no. fredricka, i don't think you can in this instance. i think it's an example of anti-black racism that even 50 years after selma is really glour rishing in parts of the -- flourishing in parts of the united states. especially college campuses but throughout our political, social democratic institutions and i think young millennials like the 19-year-old boy who i am sure is an empathetic compassionate young man in other ways is existing side by side with the racist anti-black sentiments that he's fine with and his cohort is fine with. i think there's something wrong and the family can't say he's a fine young man who made a mistake. what they're not understanding he's articulating what he's been
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incull cating these years, anti-black racist sentiments. he can enjoy black bodies on the football field at ou but when it comes to joining his fraternity he can -- this song that creates a hostile climate for african-americans because it's a hostile climate that black students are facing at ou. >> tim, what is the explanation? i'm not asking you to speak for these young people but we're talking about this is another example of something that happens, it is offensive, it clearly sends a very strong message and makes a lot of students very uncomfortable, particularly those who are black, but you have the young students who say in their apologies i was wrong and reckless and done mean anything how is it taking college age kids that explanation is enough? it's not enough. are they racist or not racist is
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the wrong discussionp whether or not they are at their core racist people isn't the issue. they were willing to participate in the performance of racism and that's been the bigger issue. there were plenty of white folks that didn't own other human beings. there were plenty of white folks who did not actively discriminate in their businesses during segregation but they sat back and collaborated with it they participated in it and we've got to remember racism is not just about individual bad acts it's about systemic inequality. these young men, i would say, even if we give them the benefit of the doubt say they're not horrible racist people that might be worse. what does it say good people caring people r willing because of group pressure group think or this society's training to participate in racism and until we get to the place where white folks are prepared to stand up and challenge this not just be passively nonracist, but actively anti-racist, we're going to have these kind of things happening. >> tim, does it underscore that some people just don't understand what racism is?
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they don't know how to define it? they don't know that, you know uttering a few words can be just as harmful potentially as, you know carrying out an act? >> i think they clearly don't know what it means, but any time we think about a word that ends in those letters, isms, not just ideologies we're talking about systems of inequity capitalism socialism, racism as well it's not just individual prejudice, it's systemic inequality and as long as we continue to perform acts of individual racism that maintains a system of inequity and that's what we need to be focusing on and talking about. i remember when i was in college there were two crosses burned at tulane university my senior year 1989 and '90 and both times the individuals who did that said well i'm not sure it was racist. the first cross was only two feet tall as if somehow we can measure hatred with a slide rule
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and decide it's not rice racist. we're intent on staying saying there are bad people over here and good people over here. good people can be caught up in bad systems and bad conditioning and act out in racist ways even if deep down they're good people. >> and, you know, last weekend, you and i were in selma and the nation celebrating a milestone 50 years after the edmundpettus bridge and having this discussion precipitated by college kids there have been a string of situations that really has raised a lot of eyebrows when paula deen apologized for the use of the "n" word you know some people thought that wasn't enough it didn't seem sincere enough then rudy giuliani recently saying he's not like you, talking about the president of the united states and then fashion police juliana rancic saying a disney actress
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and singer smelled because of her dreads. this van, in your view what does this say about america, what does it say about people who either say blame it on alcohol, or maybe have a sense of humor about it i really didn't mean it i mean what's going on here. >> well i cannot improve upon the first two comments what i can -- i understand and agree, if you pull back something interesting is going on because of social media, digital media, people have -- are no longer able to present a unitarry self. everybody has their public face and other stuff. even those part of the is conversation. if you taped everything we said for 48 hours, we might be shocked to hear some of the things we've said, you know just offhand comments or something about a woman or rich people or republicans, whatever. i would hate to hear a playback. what does it seen in it means that the idea are you a racist
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or not a racist is the wrong thing. are there times, moments where you act or think racially incensesensitive thoughts. >> you're saying you can't get hung up on the label or whether you or not a racist or the actions or what do you mean? what beyond that then? >> what i mean is that people are complicated. so what i think is going to be happening more and more is more and more of moments that you thought were private are going to be held up for public review and we will find lots of people are inconsistent they feel one way in their heart but they sometimes act differently. guess what? i know i'm not supposed it to eat doughnuts. sometimes i do. that does not make me a terrible person. it makes me a human being. we have to have a conversation about it. people are so quick to say oh, my god, i am never racist never had a racist thought, bone in my body that's just not true. and so then we wind up with these crazy conversations. i think more and more we're going to have to accept that
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people do act from a multiplicity of impulses some of them are racist as tim said in a society like this let's have a honest conversation about the fact that none of us are perfect but when these moments come up the prefabricated phony sounded apologies make it worse not better and so the people apologizing need to come from a different place but those of us who hear the apology need to think there but for the grace of god, let me show grace, hope nobody is recording me tomorrow. >> all right. van jones, tim and joe, thank you so much. that is breaking the surface. we could go deeper in the conversation because it is a deep and very big problem and then we'll talk about the legal aspects of that -- that have been provoked by the actions of a few of those students at oklahoma university. thanks to all of you. that's later on this hour. and we'll be right back.
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. . ♪ ♪ i'm almost done. [ male announcer
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] now you can pay your bill... ♪ ♪ ...manage your appointments... [ dog barks ] ...and check your connection status... ♪ ♪ ...anytime, anywhere. ♪ ♪ [ dog growls ] ♪ ♪ oh. so you're protesting? ♪ ♪ okay. [ male announcer ] introducing xfinity my account. available on any device. all right. welcome back. we have dramatic new voluntary today, which captures the amazing rescue of an 18-month-old girl found in a partially submerged car. a police officer's body camera captured the scene last saturday. the car was upside down in the utah river in spanish fork utah. and inside that car unknown to
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the rescuers baby lily had been hanging upside down in her car seat for some 14 hours in freezing temperatures. the officer leapt into action to help first responders and the fisherman who actually found the car. and inside the car, they found the mother lynn jennifer grossbeck, dead. and then this. >> anybody here? hello? >> got it. pass her up. pass her up. pass her up. right here right here. >> go go go. >> thank you! >> wow, the video shows the officer racing the girl up the hill to awaiting ambulance and then all the way to the hospital. there, lily actually made a full recovery, and has since returned home with her father. aww, as you see there. amazing survival story. tonight you get a rare inside look into britain's royal family. cnn has an exclusive interview with prince charles.
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he talks candidly about his love for his wife camilla and what it's like to live a very public life. >> it's a peculiar thing. sometimes the camera. but also inevitably you can be perhaps a bit more relaxed but it's slightly more private. meeting people without being totally surrounded all of the time by the dreaded camera. >> oh that dreaded camera. well tonight you can see the rest of this rare sitdown interview conducted by our own max foster with the prince there. don't miss "spotlight charles and camilla" tonight at 7:30 eastern time. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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♪ ♪ i'm almost done. [ male announcer ] now you can pay your bill... ♪ ♪ ...manage your appointments... [ dog barks ] ...and check your connection status... ♪ ♪ ...anytime, anywhere. ♪ ♪ [ dog growls ] ♪ ♪ oh. so you're protesting? ♪ ♪ okay. [ male announcer ] introducing xfinity my account. available on any device. ♪ [upbeat music] ♪
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defiance is in our bones. defiance never grows old. citracal maximum. easily absorbed calcium plus d. now in a new look. ♪ >> woo! >> how important is this to do together? >> you know accountability is huge. and i feel like we would hold each other accountable. we have the same goals. if you don't want to work out one day but i do let me help motivate you. >> is this going to be more supporting each other or some friendly competition? >> i'm a little bit swimmer, just a little. >> he's awesome. >> yeah right. no i think the -- i really just
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want to support each other. i just want to make it fun for both of us and help one another. >> your husband, what are you more concerned about? >> i'm concerned for us to stay on track, to make sure we really stick with it. and i think having that team support, knowing that four other members are doing it with us too, that's a pretty cool thing. >> any doubt right now joel is going to have difficulty crossing the finish line? >> i'm concerned because she had back surgery last year disk bulge. because she is delivering babies all of the time, that's not easy. and i was a little concerned. but she has the strongest work ethic i've ever seen. so i don't doubt at all she'll finish. we may have challenges but there's no one that can outwork her. so i'm really excited. i know she'll finish. >> you're going to cross that finish line together. >> sounds good. >> all very exciting. all right. this too is pretty exciting. it's a return that has been 14 years in the making. serena williams back in the tennis tournament she once refused to play in. cnn sports coy wire with us
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now. it's incredible. >> yes, it is an incredible story. this is an emotional return to indian wells, california last night for serena williams. she hadn't stepped foot on the court since this ugly scene in 2001. she was booed and she and her family hit with racially charged insults. she says she has forgiven everyone and now it's time to move on and be strong. it was a lot different scene this time fred. serena heard the crowd cheer. she got a standing ovation. it moved her. she got a little emotional and teary-eyed. but then the world number one got back to doing what she does best and that's slamming the court. serena won in straight sets 7-5, 7-5. after the match, she admitted she was nervous but knew this moment was much bigger than that. >> it was a really big statement, you know. and i felt like you know even to have an opportunity to have someone mention a statement like that was quite interesting.
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but it felt really good. it definitely feels like one of the biggest moments and the proudest moments of my career. > wow. one of the proudest moments. so why now. why did she decide this was the time to end this boycott? >> she was 19 then. so she was young. and there came a point she can't imagine going back to the place where people were shouting racial insults to her and her father. and for a long time it was really difficult for her to even imagine going to play there. but now she's 33 years old. and she felt it was a good time for her and america to step up and say we can be better. we are better. she felt that by stepping out on the court, she would be making a strong statement that no matter what happens to us or to our families in life it's not what happens to us it's how we go through it. so we can let the whole world know we're strong we're not going anywhere. and we're going to continue being the best we can be. so that was her mode of operation. everything going on in ferguson
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and everything we're seeing with oklahoma that video -- >> we just had a discussion just ten minutes ago about, you know racial chants and the use of derogatory terms, and actions and why it seems that some people kind of are confused about what defines racism. >> absolutely. and it was a bold statement and at the right time by the world's number-one female tennis star. it was awesome. >> that's a nice complete package, full circle for her journey. thanks so much coy. appreciate it. so much more straight ahead in the "newsroom," and it all starts right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com happening right now in the "newsroom," two days after two officers are shot and injured in ferguson the suspect is still at large. police chasing several new leads today as the manhunt continues. plus -- >> it looks like an absolute bomb has hit. it is devastating. >> and packing winds of 155 miles per hour cyclone pam
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turning in the south pacific. so far, at least six people killed and an island nation devastated. and is it an overblown incident or a cover-up? new questions today about why two secret service agents are being investigated after allegations of drunken driving on white house property. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." hello again, everyone and thanks so much for joining me i'm fredricka whitfield. police are chasing several new leads in ferguson, missouri for the suspect or suspects who shot two officers. they are also considering increasing the current 10,000$10,000 reward. it's been more than two days since officers were shot and wounded in the protests. let's bring in stephanie elam in ferguson. stephanie, where does the investigation stand now? >> reporter: well at this point, fred they continue to look for those suspects. they're saying they don't have
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anyone in custody, but they're not calling this a cold case. they say the investigators are working around the clock to try to identify who may have been behind the shooting of those two police officers late wednesday night at the end of that protest. they also continue to talk to several people within the community, and that $10,000 reward that is out there, they're considering also increasing that to see if they'll get more leads on what exactly transpired and who was behind this heinous activity of targeting these two police officers fred. >> now, all of this happening, the police chief has stepped down the city manager, a judge has resigned and then there are people calling for the mayor to do the same. how is that influencing the climate there in ferguson? >> right. well, this all coming on the heels of that department of justice report and looking at some of the racism they found when investigating the department. out here last night, even in the driving rain there were people out here protesting the ferguson police department. but there was also a small group
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of people who were out here saying that they were backing not just the police officers but also the mayor. mayor knowles here in ferguson he spoke to our sara sidner and this is what he had to say. >> you were here during all of the madness that has unfolded in this city. >> sure. i can tell you this. there's ways to remove me if that is the will of the people. i've stood for office five times over the last decade. and won every time. this past time just a year ago, less than a year ago now, i was unanimously or unopposed for office. >> so you're not going anywhere is what you're telling us. >> unless the residents decide to remove me. but right now that's not the indication i get. >> and so right now it sounds like mayor knowles is sticking around. does not plan on going anywhere as you heard him say. and at the plagues everything is calm. but as we know it's when night falls the protesters come out. but the tone last night, way more calm way more controlled.
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a lot more conversations between members of law enforcement and also people out there protesting. it didn't have that anger we have seen in other nights fredricka. >> stephanie elam keep us posted from ferguson, missouri. appreciate it. today in the south pacific, paradise turned into destruction and a state of emergency was declared after deadly cyclones struck the island chain nation of vanuatu. tropical cyclone pam took direct aim, killing at least six and injuring at least 20 others. the storm is the fourth most powerful ever to make land fall equivalent of a category 5 hurricane. pam had wind gusts up to 200 miles per hour when it hit, tearing houses apart and knocking down trees. and today vanuatu's president is in japan at the united nations conference. ironically focused on natural disaster reduction. he asked the world for help. >> i'm speaking with you today with a heart that is so heavy.
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i do not really know what impact cyclone pam has left on vanuatu. we have experienced a form of disaster at one time or another. today, we are appealing for your assistance. >> the australian red cross says shelter, food and water are urgently needed on the island and one emergency worker told cnn it looks like a bomb hit port villa. ivan cabrera is with us now. there have been some discrepancies or is it -- i guess equivalent of a category 4 or category 5 hurricane? does it depend on -- >> yeah so -- >> the region? >> it does. absolutely. so they're all called tropical cyclones everyone in the world. that's the technical name. but depending on where you are, if you are in the atlantic basin, we call them hurnls. if you're in the west pacific,
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typhoons. the name doesn't really matter. this was the equivalent fredricka, of a category 5 hurricane. and i must tell you as we zoom in closer here and show you the latest the death toll remains in the single digits. i would be very happy, but i would be shocked. i think this has the potential to go into the hundreds if not more. there are going to be villages here that are probably going to have been obliterated by the storm, just because of the structures that they live in. they just can barely sustain a tropical storm or category 1 hurricane. not this. this was a category 5 storm that rolled through here the strongest storm to ever hit vanuatu, the island chain to the north of new californiaedonia here. 150-mile-an-hour winds, still the current wind speed at the core of the storm but continues to move south and east and weakening here. so the worst is over. so at this point, it's a matter of getting the help those people are going to be in desperate need of the next several days especially the smaller islands here. so there is new zealand.
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we are monitoring this closely here for automatic land. this is the north island of new zealand and the next 48 hours expecting the storm to arrive at -- in a weakened fashion here gusty winds, certainly and heavy rain. but not going to be the formidable storm it was as it passed through vanuatu. historic storm, second strongest to make landfall across any part of the world since 2015 the typhoon that hit the philippines. >> keep us posted. and we're hoping for the people there living in those villages they might be all right. in an amazing twist to this story, cnn's bill weir host of "the wonder list" focused on the area's beauty and remoteness. but in what now teams to be a premonition, one resident expressed fears about rising waters on the island nation and how much devastation that would cause. bill weir joining me live from new york. that really was prophetic, wasn't it that people would
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express their concern about that and they're not only dealing with high water, but they had to deal with devastating winds, destructive force winds. >> yeah. i was actually speaking with the prime minister, and he was raising what many low-island nation leaders do the extension threats of rising sea levels. but what's so staggering you get so seduced by the beauty of this place, when the sun is shining. you forget this is a very real possibility. it's easy to row majority size the simple life until the wind starts blowing at 100 miles per hour. what worries me about the friends we made there, as well. it's one thing surviving those winds, huddling together in a banyan tree. what now? i mean there is no refrigeration. these are folks who kind of live hand-to-mouth. it's what they can grow the fish they can catch on a given day. add an injury or two to a village, add a swamped-out boat
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to that equation and suddenly it becomes a matter of survival as they wait what may take days and weeks for first responders to arrive to some of these places. >> oh my goodness. and so is this -- are these islands flat are these mountainous islands? because you -- you know you think of so many stories of particularly coastal areas or mountainous regions where people talk about knowing the weather, knowing the climate when they live off the land like the people that you met, and they would go to higher ground stand a better chance of withstanding certain stormsystems. is that the case here? >> folks live on 60 or so. some are mountainous. you know, typical volcanic south pacific islands, and there is high ground for those folks. but what do you do when the wind blows. others are on these low attos inches above sea level, so they have no high ground to flee to as well.
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just imagine. it's one thing riding out a storm using new york as an example, you know find shelter. imagine riding out super storm sandy in a tree. that's the amazing reality for these kids here. >> thanks so much for bringing their story and their point of view in your journey. "the wonder list" airs sunday nights at 10:00 eastern time. and this weekend, tomorrow night, bill is going to be taking you to greece. still ahead, two officers in ferguson, missouri shot. a manhunt now underway and calls for the mayor to resign. how can this deeply torn city recover? i'll ask one of the nation's top cops. [ r&b slow jam playing ] ♪ yeah, girl ♪ ♪ you know, i've been thinking about us ♪ ♪ and, uh, i just can't fight it anymore ♪
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continue to swirl around ferguson's police force, and how it moves forward. missouri state highway patrol in st. louis county police have now taken over protest security there. so could this be a first sign that an even bigger overhaul is coming to that department in ferguson? and that ferguson police are unable to perhaps control the streets around them? cnn's brian todd has more. >> reporter: the police call it an ambush. two officers shot almost killed. it followed a night of street fights between protesters following the resignation of ferguson's police chief. from an exasperated st. louis county police chief, a window no how tough it's been to maintain control. >> i want everybody here to understand how difficult this is to do it. the exact perfect way. >> reporter: last summer there were many complaints that police were overly militarized, showing too much force during protests. they were they were criticized for not doing enough allowing looting and other violence.
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have the police lost the streets of ferguson? >> the police are trying to find their way. they're trying to find their footing. they're going to be criticized harshly one way or another. >> reporter: a ferguson police official tells cnn they have not lost control of the streets. but others say their loss of credibility is what got us to this moment. >> a failure to engage with the community has cost them the trust that is needed to be productive. >> reporter: and that may have come back to haunt the police in the moments after the officers were shot. an official with the st. louis county police tells us at least initially, many potential witnesses were reluctant to give information to investigators. ron hossco is a director who has worked with several police departments. he says the average mind-set from this moment on is one of survival. >> how nervous are they and what are they thinking going in? >> policemen are human beings first. so the first thing you're thinking about is how do i come
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out of this situation tonight intact. you're thinking about the person that the police officers next to you. >> reporter: is there is a strong trusted figure among police who could bring calm? captain ron johnson was a visible presence in ferguson last summer walking the streets, trying to tamp done tensions. will he be called upon again? officials across the state are silent on that. the challenge for police going forward if there are protests just how are they going to keep the peace? some protesters have said in ferguson and elsewhere, police with kevlar vests and shields have been too provocative and have come on too strong. ron says now more than ever officers have to protect themselves. brian todd cnn, washington. >> cedrick alexander, the president of the national organization of black law enforcement executives is also a member of the white house task force on 21st century policing aimed at strengthening the trust among law enforcement officers and the communities they serve. all right. good to see you.
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good seeing you again. >> okay. so we're now at the situation in ferguson. we've got two police officers shot and injured. what does this say about the climate between some people in the community and the police. this happened during a peaceful protest. is there more to this? >> our hearts and prayers go out to the officers injured. we're glad to know they're released and in the care of their families and we wish for their speedy recovery. it was sad and unfortunate, uncalled for, unjust and certainly did not help in any regard particularly those that were there that night who were exercising their first amendment right in a peaceful way. but we cannot allow for that incident to take away from those who are trying to make a statement that is positive. >> is that in your view in any way undermining whatever progress may have -- may have occurred there in ferguson? there are some people who
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thought they were encouraged by the doj report encouraged by the removal or the stepping down of the police chief there, and does this shooting undermine i guess some momentum of moving forward? >> well i think what the shooting does quite frankly, is just clearly states that those who were involved and we hope they're caught very soon. but those who were out there that night, marching peacefully in regards to whatever they believed in in terms of response of the chief resigning or scathing report that came out, we have no way to validate that in any way. and i'm in the going to attempt to do that. here is the most important thing, i think, fredricka, in all of this. this community has to move forward now. it has to move forward. and i would hope in light of that incident that that police department all the police departments there locally and the community, are beginning to talk. so as they move forward and as
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the change that we are continuing to see takes place in that community every day, you have to take this as an opportunity to begin to forge and build relationships now. >> does this in any way -- is it an indicator that policing is more dangerous for police? i've heard a lot of dialogue from various people who represent law enforcement in various and recent days many say it's much more dangerous today to police. is it really? is there any difference? >> it is a challenge. it certainly is a challenge today. policing certainly comes with dangers. >> does a danger already exist? >> it already exists. >> police officers are wearing vests, they have guns. they aren't usually the ones who we think are most vulnerable. >> the point is this. it is a dangerous profession. in light of everything going on in the country today, all of this gets magnified. and the important piece is that we have to take the opportunity now to support our police because the job that they're
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doing oftentimes and the calls they go to are very unpredictable. and things can happen very, very quickly. but now is the time to be having those conversations, building those relationships. because the mere nature of being in law enforcement, the mere nature of the job itself, you're going to come upon people who are going to be dangerous. but we have to do more as a police department across this country in making sure we connect with our communities, large and small, and keep that going, because when something does happen fredricka, we're in a much better place to have conversation and move through whatever that challenge is together. >> and quickly, yes or no should the ferguson police department be dismantled start from anew? >> what the ferguson police department should be is that community has to make that decision. and that community has to look at experience it has to look at its leadership. >> meaning when the community elects its mayor or city manager. those are the people who actually end up helping to pick
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and select a police chief. >> absolutely. >> because ordinary citizens don't get the opportunity to do that. >> they don't. but what has to happen is that community has to look at all the evidence that's been placed in front of them and that community has to make a decision as to who they want for elected officials, appointed officials. that's not for any of us out here to decide. people who live in that community does. because the next whoever is in charge of that community or the city manager, whomever they're going to be the ones who set the tone for what they hope their police department looked like what they hope their court system looked like. they have to -- so that community has an opportunity now to engage itself fully into a process where they have an opportunity to make some choice. >> all right. cedrick alexander, thank you so much. i know you're in town for a conference of law enforcement around the region. all the best -- >> around the country, yes. great conference. >> around the country. that's what i really meant to say. thank you so much. appreciate it. all right. we'll get more on cyclone pam
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tropical cyclone pam is the fourth-most powerful ever to make landfall equivalent to a category 5 hurricane. pam had wind gusts up to 200 miles per hour when it hit, tearing down houses and knocking down trees. joining me now is storm-chaser
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james reynolds from hong kong. so, boy, this is quite the hit there in vanuatu. how does this compare to what you have seen hit that region? >> well, fredricka, this was really at the worst-case scenario for vanuatu. really what made this storm so bad is not only the fact it was a category 5, right at the top of the scale of intensity, but the fact that the track it took just passed over one island after another. the most populated islands in this island chain. so really they couldn't have caught more bad luck in this instance fredricka. really very, very devastating situation. >> oh my goodness. so our bill weir had been to the region and described that folks don't have a lot of options when it means trying to get out of harm's way. what do you envision people did when this storm started hitting landfall? >> well you know the outer islands of vanuatu are
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incredibly basic. the people live in really nothing more than thatched huts don't have metal roofs. it's like pond fronds so extremely fragile infrastructure. and really it's a case of just learning what the information and the safety practices that have been passed down over the generations when cyclones affect these areas. these local communities have to call on that knowledge and experience to really keep themselves safe. so you know they can't really rely on outside help from the capital city because these islands are so remote and the infrastructure is so basic. >> and only in recent years do they even get cell towers. have you tried to contact anyone there? >> i -- absolutely. i personally haven't got in touch myself with anyone there. but from what i've seen on social media i've been monitoring twitter very, very carefully the last 24 hours. i have seen reports coming out of the capital city fort villa,
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but no news out of the outer islands and this is of great concern. >> it is indeed. james reynolds thank you very much. appreciate it. the fraternity kicked off the university of oklahoma campus for singing a racial chant about to take action. alpha epsilon has hired big-name attorney who says not now. so what is that attorney going to be asking for? we'll take up this case with our legal guys right after this.
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the letters s-a-e are spelling trouble for at least a second time. that's the national fraternity sigma alpha epsilon, the fraternity that got itself kicked off campus at oklahoma university and two of its members expelled for singing ugly racist songs. now things are getting worse at another campus. the university of washington-seattle a black student group says they were insulted by racial slurs by members of s-a-e. >> that's when they started shouting and then flipping us off and saying you apes why are you here get out of here. >> it's absolutely unacceptable and something we would never let slide by. >> we are ultimately trying to find out the truth of the matter. every member of my organization is as offended and frustrated by the situation, in my opinion.
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>> let's bring in our legal guys avery freeman, law professor in cleveland, good to see you and richard herman good to see you as well. the two allegations plaguing this frat. and now s-a-e has hired a big-name attorney. let's listen. >> as i said at the beginning, this matter is not one that seeks a legal solution. we seek to invite the university and its leadership president borne and his designated representatives. and where appropriate, we consider it a good idea to invite representatives of the american civil liberties union in oklahoma and the oklahoma city chapters of the naacp. we believe that working together in a positive manner
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we can find a solution that is acceptable to everyone to make this a teachable moment and educational moment for what is seriously a flawed incident. >> steven jones represented timothy mcveigh and now representing sae. what is the objective here? attorney jones says this may be an issue of due process denied particularly in the case of oklahoma university richard, that expulsion happening before due process. is this a valid direction? >> you know fred mr. jones is a sophisticated, very bright attorney. and he knows, like we have talked about before for about $250 anybody can sue anybody. and here technically, are there due process violations yes there probably are. could there be a due process hearing. yes, there could be. do we know the result of that? we know the result of that.
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here is the situation, fred. this timing could not be worse for sigma alpha epsilon with the country reeling from selma, the anniversary of selma, from ferguson from garner in new york. racism is number one on the list these days. and to have an incident like this at the university of oklahoma and get magnified to the extent it is is unbelievable. now, this is not a local fraternity. it's a national fraternity and i read in the paper today, the national fraternity has disbanded the fraternity at the university of oklahoma. so they don't exist anymore. whether the university does it or not, they're gone. so i looked at their mission statement. i picked out their mission statement. and the mission statement -- the creed this fraternity goes by is we like to be deemed true gentlemen. that's their mission statement. they have utterly failed. >> it doesn't matter what their decision statement is. >> it's over they're going to be ostracized. >> what about the students
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though? because the parents of the students might want to say, wait a minute should my kids have been expelled on these grounds. and so avery, if we're talking about due process and this attorney saying they had the right to at least give their side of the story before being expelled. at the same time isn't there a code of conduct and expectation of students' behavior on campus? and does the oklahoma university president, david borne, have this discretion to say this is -- this violates the code of conduct, and so you're out of here? >> well -- >> without legal challenge. >> doing legal analysis not talking about gentlemen. what the legal analysis is here is as an organization sae has absolutely no due process rights. they are gone. they are there as a privilege. the individuals, however, fredricka, and this is very important -- it is a public university. they are entitled to notice. they are entitled to a hearing. david borne, who frankly is wonderful, but should know better should have suspended
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these students given them notice about what they did wrong, and had a hearing. and based on that evidence he has the right to do the appropriate remedy there. but the violation of rights is not even in question here. these students have a right to a hearing notice and the summary expulsion was absolutely unconstitutional. >> really? okay. so on that note then richard. we are talking about a public university. and that means that all students should feel comfortable being able to attend go to this school. but if you have racist chants that certainly creates, you know an unsavory atmosphere uncomfortable atmosphere and thereby, the president would have discretion to say this behavior is unacceptable or on the grounds of first amendment rights will he be challenged? >> you know fred the university is partially federally funded and state funded. there are constitutional protections afforded to the
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students of this fraternity. but we know the result of that investigation. we have looked at the video. it's not any great shakes uncovered in this investigation. that's why the attorney is very sophisticated. he's trying everything in his power to try to keep the fraternity alive by entering into some sort of rehabilitative some sort of approach. >> that's not the issue. >> how does this benefit -- ultimately? >> they will lose. >> who would it benefit, ultimately? because one of the -- the two parents of the other young man, levi petit, also expelled said he's going to have to live with this the rest of his life. so the damage is done. so how could the reputation of the kids be resurrected or sae from an incident like this? >> sae is gone fredricka. the reputation of the children is gone. the issue here is due process. those kids have a right to a
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hearing. they're supposed to be using a surgical fiscal pep. if not, you throw away the constitution. the behavior is reprehensible, but we have a process, fredricka. and when we throw that away the constitution is nullified. >> so quickly, does this mean the parents or students will be able to sue the school? >> the students -- >> yeah. >> they could sue the school. but the attorney is telling us he's not going to sue the school. >> he's trying to sell it. >> it sounds like nothing is definitive. he said he's not really sure which direction we're going to take. >> right. there is still an investigation going on. >> it's going to get settled. that's what's going to happen. >> richard avery, thank you so much. always appreciate you gentlemen. even more fun when we're all talking at the same time. but somehow i still understand everything. all right. good to see you guys. thank you so much. see you next weekend. much more in the "newsroom" right after this. something entirely new is being built into bounty. dawn. new bounty with dawn. just rinse and wring so you can blast
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election benjamin netanyahu is on the ropes. the latest poll show the prime minister running behind a mild-mannered politician. now, the prospect of a major upset at the hands of isaac hertzog known as boojy. >> there's fatigue. there's a lot of disappointment by -- from benjamin netanyahu. i think his era is over. >> focused more on his current job, netanyahu has been slow to get on the campaign trail but quick to blame, pointing to a quote worldwide effort. money from around the world is funding a grass roots get out the vote drive with one goal, get rid of bb. after six years, the relentless focus on security seems to be falling flat among many israelees who want health care
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and welfare reform. >> increasing inequalities the widening of the gulf between the haves and the have nots. there he's vulnerable. >> tens of thousands of people filled the square this weekend to drive home the message in an anti-netanyahu rally. the prime minister has doubled down on his security platform. with a major speech to congress now featured in a new campaign ad. and hedging on his commitment to a peace deal with the palestinians leading to a two-state solution. hertzog says netanyahu has a growing brand warning about israel's closest ally. >> i think he failed. and i'm trying to call his bluff. >> while netanyahu is slipping in the polls, hertzog has remained pretty much squintconsistent.
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there are plenty other parties that could do very well on election night and who they support will be the key factor in whether netanyahu holds on to his job. elise labott cnn, jerusalem. also straight ahead, police body cameras have been in the news a lot lately to reduce crime fighting. but those capture something pretty amazing like this rescue of an 18-month-old girl. the dramatic images, next. lind. and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night, and stay awake during the day. this is called non-24. learn more by calling 844-824-2424. or visit your24info.com. why do i take metamucil everyday? because it helps me skip the bad stuff. i'm good. that's what i like to call, the meta effect. 4-in-1 multi-health metamucil is clinically proven to help you feel less hungry between meals. experience the meta effect with our multi-health wellness line. i take prilosec otc each morning for my frequent heartburn. because it gives me...
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the story of an 18-month-old girl rescued after hanging upside down in a car seat for some 14 hours in a submerged car made national headlines. and now we can see the actual rescue take place, thanks to a police officer's body camera. cnn's shasta darlington shows us the dramatic effort to save baby lily. >> new body cam video from one of the spanish fork officers as he rushes to the overturned car. >> what have you got? >> you can hear their desperation as they try to flip the car. >> ahh! >> they soon discovered 25-year-old lynn jennifer gross grossbeck, dead in the driver seat. but they do find a survivor. >> hello! >> they pull a tiny body from
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the wreckage and run up the hill. >> she's definitely hypothermic. she is freezing. >> patting her back and willing her to live. >> come on, sweetie. >> they perform baby cpr and rush her to the hospital. 18-month-old lily was submerged in the river in utah for 14 hours. she survived hanging upside down in freezing temperatures in the upper 20s with no food or water. >> anything had been different, she might not have made it. >> brock royal was the emergency room are doctor who saw lily when she was rushed in. of course you can see how pale she is and how cold and stiff her arm is. >> four days later baby lily playing along as her father sings old mcdonald in the hospital. the best for those who fought so hard to save her. >> it gives me goose bumps to hear the urgency in the voices of those rescue workers.
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it's no wonder she was called the miracle baby. and we have heard from the spanish fork police department since, and they told us lily's left the hospital they had an opportunity to visit with her with the family and they say she is happy and healthy. for the time being living with her aunt and uncle. it's an incredible story, fredricka. >> it is an incredible story, and what a testament to those rose rescue workers who worked feverishly and tirelessly to get that baby. thank you so much for bringing that update on baby lily. shasta darlington appreciate it. much more in the "newsroom" right after this. sweet mother of softness... charmin!!! take a closer look at charmin ultra soft and you'll love what you see. not only can you use less, but you can actually see the softness in our comfort cushions.
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a sculptor is someone who with a an idea and set of materials draws something in space. >> the challenge for me is how to you do you say you'll of that power in the best way to make something in reality. >> one of the best-known sculptors working today shares his thoughts on the state of the art. and we have enlisted two prominent voices an eminent art
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critic and the director of london's tate modern museum to select their ones to watch. >> my first reaction to the need for scale as an artist was to go absolutely nano. >> when i work i try to be playful and not to have prejudices about what is ugly or nice. >> tonight, you get a rare inside look at britain's royal family. cnn has an exclusive interview with prince charles and he talks candidly about his love for his wife camilla, and what it's like to live a very public life. >> it's a peculiar thing, sometimes the camera. but also inevitably you could be perhaps a bit more relaxed when it's slightly more private
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or when you're meeting people without being totally surrounded all of the time by the dreaded camera. >> the dreaded cameras. tonight those dreaded cameras go inside to let you see the rest of this rare sitdown interview conducted by our own max foster. don't miss "spotlight: charles and camilla" tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time. we have so much more straight ahead in the "newsroom" and it all starts right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com happening right now in the "newsroom" -- >> looks like an absolute bomb has hit. it is devastating. >> packing 150-mile-an-hour winds, cyclone pam is churning in the south pacific. so far, six people killed and an island nation devastated. and some who served this country are still not getting timely care at america's v.a. hospitals.
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cnn's investigative unit found many are still waiting months just to see a doctor. plus -- >> oh! >> let's go guys. come on! don't get squished. >> here, pass her up pass her up. >> amazing. trapped for nearly 14 hours in a ravine after a terrible car crash, 18-month-old lily survives and her entire rescue caught on camera. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." hello again, everyone and thanks for joining me i'm fredricka whitfield. we start this hour with destruction in the south pacific after deadly tropical cyclone pam struck the island chain nation of venue watt uvanuatu. the president has declared a state of emergency and is pleading to the world for help. and the united kingdom pledged
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$3 million in relief. cyclone pam is the fourth most powerful cyclone ever to make landfall. it tack direct aim on port vila killing 6 and injuring 20 others. tore houses apart and knocked down trees. the australian red cross says shelter, food and water are urgently needed now. an official with the emergency aid group world vision told cnn it looks like a bomb hit port vila and some villages decimated. earlier i talked with unicef's andrew parker who is in vanuatu and witnessed the destruction. >> i've seen many emergencies, fredricka, and many cyclones typhoons. this is as bad as any. certainly the situation here is very grim. i would estimate that at least 90%, if not more of all housing and buildings in port vila have
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been heavily affected. >> horrible situation. let's bring in now cnn's ivan cabrera with more on this. so is it likely that the greatest threat from cyclone pam is over? is there another mainland or chain of islands that can be hit? >> no. it's actually moved out of the way here i think. i think we're now going to move into what is going to be a long process for the recovery for those folks out there. and let's just bring you up to date on what's going on a recap here. made landfall our time march 13th yesterday 9:35 a.m. on the east coast, sustained winds at 165 miles per hour. again, that's the equivalent of category 5 hurricane in the atlantic basin, why we're covering this story. that is the strongest landfall globally planet-wide since 2013 and strongest ever to hit vanuatu. and the other reason we're covering this story, the island chain nation is very vulnerable to these storms. we have not had a strong one like this hit them and they are not prepared for this. some of the villages some of the pictures i've been looking
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at literally we have people that are living on trees. so i must imagine there are some villages that are just going to be completely wiped out on the back side of this storm now as we take a look at the winds at 150 miles per hour. still a formidable storm. so yes, fredricka, thankfully we have run out of islands to deal with. so now it's over open water. we have a land mass now and it's new zealand. and we're going to watch this closely. it does have a potential to bring some very strong tropical storm-force winds perhaps getting to hurricane-force wind gusts in about 48 hours as it heads off to the south. but nowhere near what they're going to have to deal with in vanuatu the next several days. >> gosh very tough trying to recover for that. and then of course finding anyone else who may be injured. >> some of the tiny villages so difficult to get to them. and there may not be much left. >> gosh, ivan cabrera, thank you so much. appreciate that. if you want to help the people of vanuatu, head to our impact your world website at c cnn.com/impact. and cnn's bill weir was in
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vanuatu just weeks ago filming the premier of his show "the wonder list" and gave him a unique perspective of the island nation's people and fragility. earlier today he told me how difficult it will be for vanuatu's people to handle this kind of natural disaster. >> we spent some time in this village where people live like it is 100 b.c. it's literally grass skirts in the woods, banyan tree houses. and you know they're perfectly content. they know what the modern world has to offer, but, you know we're so used to in the west go to an interior room in the bathtub bathtub. there are no interior rooms, much less bathtubs. these are hardy folks. they have survived this part of the world. >> bill weir's new show "the wonder list" airs tomorrow night at 10:00 right here on cnn, 10:00 p.m. eastern time. now to the manhunt in ferguson, missouri. authorities say they have new
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leads in their search for the person or persons responsible for shooting and injuring two officers at the end of a wednesday night protest outside the ferguson police department. cnn's stephanie elam is in ferguson with an update on the investigation. anything new in their search? >> reporter: well they continue to search for whoever is behind the shooting of those two police officers late wednesday night, just as the protest was winding down. what they are saying is that this is not a cold case they continue to work around the clock. investigators are looking to find any clues. they have done plenty of interviews and continue to interview people. there is a $10,000 reward out there, and they're considering increasing that if they think it will help them get any answers. but as far as where the investigation stands and what they think happened here's what the chief of the st. louis county police department had to say. >> this is really an ambush is what it is. i mean you know you can't see it coming. you don't understand that it's going to happen and you're basically defenseless from the
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fact that it is happening to you at the time. and that is something that is very difficult to guard against when you have a group of officers standing in a large group, and then you know you have gunfire directed at them. it undermines everything that everybody is trying to do in this. it really does. now, i won't walk away from the fact that it is not beyond the realm of possibility that having all those officers standing there together and the fact that two of those officers were hit, that these officers weren't targeted. >> and there are people from the community, surrounding communities, coming out to support the police officers even last night in the driving range, standing outside to say they are behind the police officers showing their support from that as well as people who have been protesting saying this is not the way they want to go about things fred. >> and stephanie, is there a feeling there that people think these actions may have undermined any hope they had for moving forward, especially after
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the most recent doj report? >> well that's a huge part of it is finding out how this community is going to go forward after that doj report. and one constant thing that has come up is one of the resignation of the police chiefs of ferguson. now that's happened. he is going to be departing next week. there is also calls now for the mayor to leave. the mayor saying -- telling our sara sidner he's not going anywhere. if the people of ferguson want him to leave, there are ways to go about that. and we know that some people are saying they're organizing to make that happen. but others are saying they just want to continue to see change. you have seen a will the of people out here protesting throughout the time since mike brown was killed on august 9th. they have been out here and it's been quiet. and one thing we did see last night sl as well is some video of law enforcement, folks from law enforcement speaking with people who are out here protesting. and they were having a calm conversation where they perhaps did not grow on everything but sharing ideas back and forth. and that's something that does happen out here in ferguson. and it may not get as much of
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the attention. but still, you can see the people out here protesting a lot of them do not want to be associated with someone who would hide out in the shadows on a hill and shoot at two police officers. so you do see these two different ideas out there, and it's very, very clear that people do not support that. >> yeah. a situation that makes everybody nervous. stephanie elam thank you so much in ferguson. the u.s.-led coalition led ten air strikes against isis in the last day, and eight of them took place across iraq and the other two were in syria. in the strategic city of tikrit combined iraqi forces have taken -- have certainly been taking a battle from isis fighters. they have managed to take back about 75% of the city so far b. you not all battles against isis are going as well. we're in baghdad right now. jam anna there is a fierce battle in ramadi. what is happening there right
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now? >> reporter: well fred according to senior officials, local government officials in anbar province to the west of baghdad, iraq's largest province predominantly sunni, and mostly under the control of isis. now, according to these government officials today, two suicide bombers driving bulldozers attacked a building used as an outpost by the iraqi security forces there. it's an eight-story building. they use it really for monitoring and also sniper positions. and according to the officials, what the bombers did was the first attacker detonated the explosives by the concrete barriers opening the way for the second suicide bomber also driving a bulldozer to strike the building. and according to the senior official we spoke to it flattened this building. at least two members of the security forces were killed and five others were wounded. the concerning thing here for iraqi officials, fred is that this is the fourth consecutive day of attacks that we are
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seeing taking place in ramadi. isis on wednesday launched an offensive, a very complex and coordinated attack using multiple suicide car bombs and also more than 150 mortars, also striking the city. and we have seen this taking place yesterday, the day before. more attacks taking place with a focus on ramadi. for months now, the group has been trying to capture what remains of ramadi. officials we have spoken to there say that as they come under pressure as isis is under pressure in tikrit by the iraqi forces there, it is trying to strike back there. and the strong message there from the group that it is still capable and able carrying out such deadly attacks, fred. >> my goodness. all right, thank you so much from baghdad. still ahead, the u.s. secret service has a new boss but the latest incident at the white house is calling into question whether anything is changing at the agency. we'll talk about that, next.
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i could talk to you all day. all right. cnn has learned that some of the details surrounding the latest u.s. secret service scandal are now being questioned. law enforcement continues to investigate what happened at the white house involving two agents. sources tell cnn allegations about drinking and driving may not be true. joe clancy the new head of the u.s. secret service, is expected to appear on capitol hill next week to discuss in part this incident. joining me now from washington is former cia operations officer, and a former counterterrorism adviser, joshua katz. joshua good to see you. >> nice to see you too. >> do you think there is a big misunderstanding here or does this have the makings of a cover-up? >> well i think the investigationses are going to be ongoing, investigations from the
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secret service, dhs. congress is going to launch its own investigations. so it's really too early to tell. but we do know that there has been a culture of integrity issues culture of doing the wrong thing, and at times thinking they're above the law. >> for a long time? this culture is deep-rooted or is this a new thing? >> this is not a new thing. i think one of the more popular or well-known instances is the colombia incident. but the incidents have been going on for a while and it's ingrained in the culture. and when i was on the hill we talked about this. and i think that you know mr. chaffetz has a daunting task ahead of him, because the jurisdiction on the hill is very, very complicated. >> so when you say it's in the culture, i'm just trying to understand specifically what. like overstepping one's bounds feeling an overabundance of kind
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of you know security in the job, and so whatever goes is fine or is it a code of silence? what is it that is demonstrative of a culture? what's happening? >> it's a great question. and i think the answer is very complicated. the answer is all of the above and more. unfortunately, you know the -- the very proud men and women at the secret service are being overshadowed by a few that really believe that they're above the law, that the rules don't apply to them. that they can basically get away with whatever they want. and in this instance whether it turns out to be true or false, i think the new director has a daunting task and really needs to restore that integrity, that honor, back to the core in the secret service. >> how would he do that? >> well i think in this case if this turns out to be true the director has to be very swift and he has to act very decisively and the punishment needs to be severe. but he also needs to go
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throughout the organization and start cleaning house, and make sure that this culture is rooted out and really plucked out of the secret service, because at the end of the day, the american public i think is losing trust in their ability to actually protect the president. >> and then i wonder you know that seems pretty daunting. the clearing house as you put it because to be a secret service agent, we're talking about elite forces here. you just don't, you know advertise we're looking for a few, you know folks here to fill the gaps you know sips others have now been asked to leave. i mean how difficult is it to replace people? is it more difficult to remove a culture or change a culture than it is to you know have a new rank and file? >> well it's very challenging to replace the culture. i think in this case the culture that we're talking about, this -- this above the law culture s not throughout the
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organization. so the organization is not -- we don't need to throw the baby out with the bath water, so to speak. but the director does have a daunting task. and he's got to cut out that cancerous culture. and he does have to start recruiting. they need to bring in new blood. and they need to be a little bit more transparent, and i think that the director working with both congress and dhs has an opportunity here to do that and to do that for the sake of protecting the president. >> interesting. all right. joshua katz thank you so much. pleasure having you. >> thank you very much. >> all right. still ahead, tensions between washington and moscow are at their highest level since the cold war in the view of many. and now growing concerns about a new russian cruise missile that officials say could reach the u.s. that's next. but first, here's this week's fit nation challenge.
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>> woo! >> how important is this to do together? >> you know accountability is huge. and i feel like we would hold each other accountable. we have the same goals. like if you don't want to work out one day, and -- but i do let me help motivate you. >> is this going to be more supporting each other, or is from going to be some friendly competition? >> i'm a little better swimmer, just a little. >> he's awesome. >> yeah right. i think i really just want to support each other. i just want to make it found for both of us and help one another. >> your husband. what are you most concerned about? >> i'm concerned for us to stay on track, to make sure we really stick with it. and i think having that team support and knowing that four other members are doing it with us too, that's a pretty cool thing. >> how many doubt that joe is going to have any difficulty crossing the finish line? >> i'm concerned because she had a little back surgery last year disk bulge. you know because she is delivering babies all of the time. that's not easy. and i was a little concerned. but is she has the strongest work ethic i've seen.
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so i don't doubt at all she'll finish. we may have challenges but there is no one that can outwork her. i know she'll finish. >> we're going to cross that finish line together. >> sounds good! >> fit nation trichallenge brought to you by sitery california maximum. highly soluble, easily absorbed. defiance is in our bones. defiance never grows old. citracal maximum. easily absorbed calcium plus d. now in a new look.
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the cold war may have ended a quarter century ago but
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tensions have spiked amid russia's involvement. military advancements could pose a threat to the u.s. cnn pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, reports. >> reporter: defending against vladimir putin's russian military aggression is about to get harder. the head of norad, the north american aerospace defense command, warning a new generation of russian cruise missiles could strike critical military raid doors and missiles inside the united states. >> the development of the cruise missiles they have that have a long range. that from the russian -- from eastern russia they can range critical infrastructure in alaska and in canada that we rely on for a homeland defense mission. >> this is the missile, a nonnuclear long-range cruise missile now in the final stages of russian development. its 2,000-mile-plus range gives
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them the ability to fire from near their own coastline. it's highly precise, flies low, and is difficult to detect. >> if we don't have the ability to detect it we can't defend against it. >> that means not just alaska is at risk but even the eastern united states from potential missile launches in the atlantic. russia has already doubled its bomber patrols around u.s. coast lines in the last year. now ten a year. more than 100 around europe. the most flights since the cold war. in the last month, several u.s. officials publicly sounding warning. >> russia's provocations are only more worrisome in light of vladimir putin's intense focus on building up and modernizing russia's military forces. >> the top u.s. commander in europe even raising nuclear weapons concerns. >> there are those dual-use
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weapons systems that could very easily be nuclear or nonnuclear and our ability to tell the difference between one and the other is very tough. and this is very worrisome. >> that's cnn's barbara starr. she tells us norad also believes russian is doing this to see how the u.s. military responds. in ferguson, missouri tensions are high after the shooting of two police officers. can can police and citizens come together to heal their town? we'll talk about that with a retired police detective and a st. louis alderman. when it comes to good nutrition...i'm no expert. that would be my daughter -- hi dad. she's a dietitian. and back when i wasn't eating right, she got me drinking boost. it's got a great taste and it helps give me the nutrition i was missing. helping me stay more like me. [ female announcer ] boost complete nutritional drink has 26 essential vitamins and minerals, including calcium and vitamin d to support strong bones and 10 grams of protein
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from a dry mouth. hello again, everyone and thank you so much for joining me. i'm fredricka whitfield. day three in the manhunt for suspect or suspects who shot and wounded two police officers during a protest in ferguson, missouri this week. the late troubling event of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer last summer. and this week the police chief quit and so did the city manager and the top court clerk was fired for sending racist e-mails and the long-time city judge also stepping down. and there are calls now for the mayor to resign as well. so what is the future for policing in ferguson, missouri? joining us right now, antonio french st. louis alderman in
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ferguson and joining us via skype from new jersey tom vernie retired detective from the nypd. >> good afternoon. >> mr. french the state and county police taking over protest security in ferguson. the state has taken over the city court. what is the feeling right now about what can and should be done to kind of fix so many things there in ferguson? >> yeah. people have their plates full right now. it is a lot to be done. the resignation of the chief and the city manager were the first steps of a long journey of steps that need to be taken. we sincerely hope the police are successful in tracking down that individual that shot the police officers the other day. i think that was a potential setback. but what we have seen is people have stayed focused in trying to repair the system of injustice described in the department of justice report. and so it's not just a few resignations that people are looking for. it's really a change of a system
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that exists not just in ferguson, but in neighboring municipalities as well. >> and do you feel like a change in the system means that say, the ferguson police department would need to be overhauled the police chief already stepped down. but would there have to be a next step such as starting anew with all personnel? >> well i think it's required to have change in leadership. so those folks that were responsible for the culture that is described in the doj report, that allowed that culture to fester they need to go. and so we have seen two resignations of high-ranking officials so far. there may need to be more. but as far as the future of the ferguson police department that is a decision that the people of ferguson are going to have to make. we have some elections coming up in ferguson in a couple weeks. hopefully new voices will be added to the city council. and they'll have to take a hard look at what direction the city wants to take. >> and tom vernie what do you think is needed for our ferguson
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police department? is it an issue of an overhaul and then how hopeful should people be at that juncture? they wouldn't be certain of who would be coming in and what that would mean for the city. would it promise better -- a better relationship between the community that it would serve? >> you know i think the steps they have already taken are good steps. i mean i don't think anything less would have been acceptable to the community. so you know the chief -- we talk about this chief had a very long successful career. and that can't be ignored, either. you know the doj report did, you know have a number of findings that showed some sort of systemic issue there in ferguson which, you know to what part he maid played in that is up for debate. now that he is leaving, the new chief is going to have their hands full trying to put that place back together. in a more positive and productive light. and that will take a lot of input from the community, as well.
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>> and what do you mean by that the input from the community? is there promise that community policing could -- i mean has room for improvement there, particularly in ferguson. and how much of the onus is on community, in your view tom? >> well i think there's work to be done on both sides. i mean you clearly have a community that does not trust their local police department right? and then you have the police especially in light of the two recent shootings, don't trust the community. so that's -- let's call it what it is. there's a large level of distrust there. so there needs to be a repair of mutual trust between the police and the community and vice versa. and i think when the community -- when the new chief comes in and some systemic changes are made maybe improvements in training i mean you have policing in that area for quite some time. i don't know if a complete wipe of the police department is necessary.
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i think some reforms and procedure need to be potentially made. some reforms in training some new and improved training. i think that will start the ball rolling. >> okay. >> and some community relations programs that will get the community more involved with the police would definitely be helpful. that's what we did in new york city over the last couple decades. and the crime reduction in new york city is not an accident. the community had a large degree to play with that. because of the close relationship that was built with the nypd. >> so antonio french, real quick then restoring trust. there's a lack of trust on both sides. so who makes the first move in your view on trying to restore trust? the community, or the police department in ferguson? >> well i think it's key that the next leader of the police department making the effort number one to make the police department more reflective of the community. and so it's unacceptable that you have a 70% african-american population but a police department that has almost african-american officers. that creates a problem. so you should have a department that reflects the community.
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i think that will help. it would also help to have a leader that does a much better job than the previous chief of being able to maintain the connection with the community. so there aren't two sides. and that eventually you get to the point where there is one community, not two sides of a community. >> all right. antonio french tom vernie thanks to both of you gentlemen. i appreciate it. >> you're welcome, thank you. straight ahead, police body cameras have been in the news a lot lately in terms of ideas about helping and crime-fighting. but those cameras can also capture something pretty amazing. like this. rescue of an 18-month-old little girl. the dramatic images, next. i am totally blind. and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night, and stay awake during the day. this is called non-24. learn more by calling 844-824-2424. or visit your24info.com. bring us your baffling. bring us your audacious. we want your sticky notes, sketchbooks, and scribbles. let's pin 'em to the wall.
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all right. baby lily the so-called merely california girl made national headlines after rescuers found her hanging upside down in a submerged car in span iraq fork utah. she had been stuck there in freezing temperatures for 14 hours and now we can see the actual rescue thanks to a police officer's body camera. cnn's shasta darlington joins us from new york with more on this. shasta this was quite the dramatic rescue with a very happy ending for the baby. >> it really is fredricka. i mean, she was being called the miracle baby so you get the idea. but when you just watch this video, you hear the urgency in the voices of the rescue
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workers. you see they didn't give up. and you realize how amazing it truly is she survived. new body cam video. you can hear the desperation as they try to flip the car. >> ahh! >> they soon discovered 25-year-old lynn jennifer grossbeck dead in the driver's seat. but they do find a survivor. >> hello? they pull a tiny body from the wreckage and run up the hill. >> she's definitely hypothermic. she is breathing. >> patting her back and willing her to live. >> come on, sweetie. >> they perform baby cpr. and rush her into the hospital. 18-month-old lily was submerged in the car in the frigid spanish fork river in utah for about 14 hours. she had survived hanging upside
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down in freezing temperatures in the upper 20s. with no food or water. >> if anything had been different, she might not have made it. >> brock royal was the emergency room doctor who saw lily when she was rushed in. >> you can see just how pale she is and how cold and stiff her arm is. >> four days later, baby lily playing along as her father sings "old macdonald" in the hospital. the best reward possible for those who fought so hard to save her. and you know there was a time during those rescue efforts when they actually couldn't feel a pulse. we've talked to the spanish fork police department since then. and they told us that lily has now left the hospital. we can see how happy and healthy she is. they visited her, saw for themselves. she is temporarily living with her aunt and uncle. a happy story, fredricka. >> that is amazing. all right. thank you so much shasta. thanks for bringing that us to
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us. appreciate it. straight ahead, with a new chief at the helm veterans administration hospitals say they have been cleaning up their act. but drew griffin found that may not be the case in at least one va hospital. i am totally blind. and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night, and stay awake during the day. this is called non-24. learn more by calling 844-824-2424. or visit your24info.com. bring us your baffling. bring us your audacious. we want your sticky notes, sketchbooks, and scribbles. let's pin 'em to the wall. kick 'em around. kick 'em around, see what happens. because we're in the how-do-i-get-this-startup- off-the-ground business. the taking-your-business- global-business. we're in the problem-solving business. 400,000 people - ready to help you solve problems while they're still called opportunities. from figuring it out to getting it done we're here to help.
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all right. there are new revelations that at least one va hospital may be failing its patients again.
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a cnn investigation last year revealed some veterans were being put on secret waiting lists. president obama visited the phoenix v.a. medical center on friday a place where, as you reported at least 40 veterans died while waiting for appointments. the president went for a status report of sorts, meeting with the new v.a. secretary, veterans and employees there. and while much has changed at the v.a. cnn's drew griffin has uncovered evidence that the skrchlt v.a. in los angeles is still making veterans wait hiding wait times and possibly misleading congress on exactly how long veterans are being forced to wait for care. >> reporter: it's still happening. thousands of patients at the greater los angeles veterans medical centers have been waiting more than three months just for an appointment. the detailed evidence comes from the v.a.'s own documents obtained by cnn, and confirmed
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by medical and administrative sources inside the greater l.a.va hospital system. new patients seeking care are forced to wait the longest, sometimes months to see a doctor. records show this january 15th more than 1,600 veterans who were new patients were waiting 60 to 90 days for an appointment, another 400 veterans have been waiting up to six months. and the documents provided to cnn show the lengthy wait times are still happening. all of this comes ten months after the head of the v.a. generic shinseki was forced to resign because of mismanagement of the exact same issue. now listen to what one v.a. official from los angeles told congress just last month. >> how long is the average wait time for a new patient at the greater l.a. medical center? >> the average wait time for a
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new patient right now is about four days. >> that statement is simply not true. according to these v.a. documents, and a half dozen doctors and administrators within the hospital who spoke to cnn, the average the average wait time is ten times greater. it's not four days. it's 44 days. the delays are even taking place at the los angeles clinic for mental health where documents show more than 300 veterans seeking mental health care have been waiting 30 60 even 90 days. specifically asked about mental health wait time that same va official dr. sky mac dougall, told congress the wait time is no different she said just four days. >> it's true for mental health as well. >> according to va documents and a half dozen sources interviewed by cnn, that is not true. this chart shows as of march
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1st new mental health patients in los angeles are waiting an average 36 days just to get an appointment. los angeles va officials wouldn't talk to cnn about the discrepancies instead sent a report explaining the report given to cnn doesn't include same day or same week appointments for those veterans needing care quickly. typically account for less than all 10% appointments are not representative of the whole patient population. the va is sticking by its own man, that new vets waited just four days in january, just eight days in march. the real truth say that doctors and administrators cnn interviewed is wait times for patients at the los angeles va medical centers extends into weeks and months and are a serious problem.
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>> what is so disappointing about this is even after a $16 billion bill that congress passed and the president signed to try to fix the va and even after a lot of the managers responsible at the one out in phoenix were fired or some have resign resigned we're still facing the same basic problem. you just can't seem to trust the numbers coming out of the va bureaucracy. that is what has now congressional investigators looking into all of this. fred? >> all right. extraordinary. thank you very much drew griffin and his reporting. up next a candid prince charles talking about his wife in an exclusive interview with cnn. >> she's, i think, brilliant in the way she's tackled these things. more on prince charles, camila and their trip to america next.
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on tuesday prince charles and his wife arrived in the yiegs. and the royal couple planned to meet with president obama and send some trips. it comes a few days before their tenth wedding anniversary. max foster got an interview with the prince. you'll see it in a cnn special airing tonight and he asked how
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camilla has handled the spotlight. >> people cannot believe it's been ten years, and in that time she found her public role. is it a challenge? >> you can imagine it's been a real challenge. i think she's been brilliant in the way she's tackled these things. >> max foster joining us live from london with a preview of tonight's special. i know, you and the prince are like this. what did she share in his view of america and his journey around the corner? >> interesting. i mean they visited america for the first time as a couple right after their wedding. at the time she was very unpopular. america, like the rest of the world was, is in love with princess dianna.
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she faced play cards with vicious words. somehow over the last ten years, certainly brits have warm talked to her as she sort of, you know the spin machine around her. it calmed down and they allowed her to be herself. prince charles felt it was a good time to start talking about his wife. he very rarely talks to anyone but let alone about personal feelings. that's what he was doing here. that's exceptional, really. he also looked back at the other u.s. tours, and he's very very fond of america. >> i must admit a quite a lot of them -- presidents of the united states. >> and quite often those encounters have taken place at the white house. during charles' tours of the united states. >> this is a country that you've visited many times officially and privately. >> i think i've been 20 times or
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something the last 45 years. >> as prince charles and the duchess of cornwall prepare for their upcoming four-day tour of the u.s. he granted me an exclusive interview. he shared memories of past visits. >> i remember the first time. we were invited my sister and i at 1970 at the white house by president nixon for the weekend. that was quite amusing. there was a time when they were trying to marry me off. >> reporter: ten years ago camila joined charles. their first official overseas visit. [ cheers and applause ] in 2005, a first joint overseas
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tour with your new wife. what are your memories of that visit? >> i remember we had a very very jolly time in california i seem to remember. and there was a friend there. >>well they're excited about arriving. they arrive on tuesday, i think. we'll wait to see the reaction. he also talked about a upcoming next royal baby which i'm sure we'll be covering. >> you know we're going to be covering. you'll probably be there in the delivery room giving us another exclusive. >> please no! >> wouldn't that be something. all right. max foster, thank you very much. we're going to be watching of course this evening max's interview with prince charles tonight at 7:30 here on cnn. we have so much more straight ahead in the news room. it all starts right now.
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happening now in the news room. >> it looks like an absolute -- devastating. >> packing winds of 150 miles per hour cyclone pam is turning in the south pacific. at least six people have been killed and an island nation devastated. two days after a two officers are shot and injured. the suspect or suspects are still at large. police are chasing several new leads today as the manhunt continues. and is it an overblown incident or a cover up? new questions today about why two secret service agents are being investigated after allegations of drunken driving on white house property. you're live in the cnn newsroom. hello everyone. thank you for joining me.
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devastation and destruction today in part of the south pacific. an island paradise has been turned into a complete disaster zone. it was slammed by a deadly storm as powerful as a category five hurricane. at least six people were killed after cyclone program took direct aim at. >> the sound of wind gusts up to 200 miles per hour as cyclone pam slammed into the south pacific island of vitamin watt tu. endangering the lives up to 250,000 people >> itting loose like absolute devastation here.
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roofs are ripped off everywhere. it looks like an absolute bomb has hit it. it's devastating. i'm just driving around what you can drive through. there are a lot of roads that are blocked off. trees have fallen across in some piles so high you can barely see over the top. the water is incredibly rough. there are some villages that have been just absolutely decimated. there are local -- which are native roofs they've been blown away. >> most of us in the hotel ended up sleeping underneath the facilities in the bottom. i've been through many cyclones
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including in 2006. it was phenomenal. >> it's one of the strongest cyclones ever to hit the region. people took cover in churches and schools. the capital city to port vila suffered flooding and power cuts. at a conference in japan, the president spoke with a heavy heart as he made an appeal for international healthy. >> i'm speaking with you today with a heart that is so heavy. i do not really know what impact cyclone pam has left. >> we're heading to evacuation centers and we're working with the government here. how can we provide the shelters and all the agencies on the ground. it may take weeks before the full extent of the damage is known. let's bring in cnn tom now.
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>> it is horrible. think of the damage from hurricane sandy or hurricane katrina. isabel, isaac, even andrew in florida. this is stronger than that. a lot of these villages don't have a cinder block or a stone. here is the west coast of the u.s. you can see hawaii. the sea across northern areas of australia. warmest waters on the planet now. this week in the world weather center we were covering four different cyclones. it's all the same. they spin in another direction in the south. look at the winds speeds and notice the purple. the strongest winds on the east side. that's important to note. it's still a massive storm but sliding away from the islands. when you look at the storm port vila. this is the capital city 50,000 live there took a direct hit. we started seeing a trend over land. two islands down 1200 people live there. it's a large village without one
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brick in the community. so they're outdoors. it's a vulnerable area. storm surge 26 feet. winds up to 200 miles per hour. a category five equivalent strength. not only the strongest to hit van watt tu. it's the second strongest in the entire south pacific in the history of records. here is port vila, fuji is on the edge of the screen here. as we get into the area there are homes along the coastline. why not? you're in paradise. look at the population. this is vila bay. about 82 islands, about 60 are inhabited. many locations are thatch roofs. it will take weeks to find out the damage and get the death toll which no doubt is going to rise. because it was so strong. it is diving to the south. it's getting into cooler water now. they're watching on the north island of new zealand. as we keep our eye on that our
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thoughts are with them. they have to clear the runway. >> there is no getting in there, period. debris is everywhere. >> horrible. >> tom, thank you so much. that was a comprehensive great report. appreciate it. right now police in ferguson missouri are desperately trying to find the suspect who shot two officers during a protest at a ferguson police department. police are chasing leads, canvassing the streets and talking to citizens. police were fired on at the end of the wednesday night protest and one officer was shot in the face. another in the shoulder. let's bring in stefanie in ferguson. how are the officers who were shot? how are they doing? and where is the investigation? >> reporter: unbelievably both of the officers even the one shot in the face have been released from the hospital and are recovering at home. on the investigation side though that continues around the clock. law enforcement is saying they're searching for whoever is behind shooting these officers. they say they have interviewed
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several people around and talked to witnesses, they're looking for any clues to who might this be. they do not have anyone in custody at this point. but they continue to work throughout the community to see if they can pinpoint who it is and keep these conversations going to find out who is behind shooting them. at the same time you saw out here last night there were people out here protesting. there are people out here protesting on two sides. you saw people protesting the ferguson police department and also people out here who were supporting the police department. supporting law enforcement and, also some saying they support the mayor of ferguson as well james follows. there are calls he should step down after the doj report taking look what happens happening in ferguson. he said he's not going anywhere. this is what he told us. >> reporter: why should you trust you since you were here during the madness that unfolded? >> sure. i can tell you this there's ways to remove me if that's the
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will of the people. i've stood for office five times over the last decade and won every time. less than a year ago now i was unanimously or unopposed for officer. >> reporter: so you're not going anywhere? >> unless the residents decide to remove me. right now that's not the indication i get. >> reporter: we have heard there are some organizations that are working to see if they can get the signatures here in ferguson. nothing official with the city just yet. and as far as the protests out here at the population right now it's calm but at night we see people out here no matter the weather. they're still coming out here to protest. what we did see last night was a conversation between law enforcement officials as well as people who were out there to protest. and many saying they do not want to be caught up with the people who are out here doing the shooting and the agitating. they want to see change in ferguson and they don't believe that's the way things are going to get better. >> stefanie elam thank you so much. secretary kerry is getting ready to face iranian officials
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for talks on a nuclear deal just days after iran's supreme leader blasted that letter from republican senators. how kerry says it could impact talks. each day was fueled by thorough preparation for events to come. well somewhere along the way emily went right on living. but you see, with the help of her raymond james financial advisor, she had planned for every eventuality. ...which meant she continued to have the means to live on... ...even at the ripe old age of 187.
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the clock is ticking as john kerry heads to the next round of nuclear talks with iran. kerry is trying to get a deal done by the end of the month, he's going to switzerland tomorrow to meet with iran's foreign minister. in egypt today, kerry slammed the letter 47 republican senators sent to iran. it said any nuclear deal might not last if it doesn't have congressional support. iran's supreme leader lashed out calling the letter trickery. and today kerry said it could become an obstacle. >> we have urge edd ed heard some comments
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by the supreme leader about the letter sent by the 47 senators. until i engage in the conversations, i cannot gauge on a personal level that reaction though i can tell you from common sense that when the united states senate sends a letter such as 47 senators choice to send the other day, it is a direct interference. >> i'm joined by steven collins and senior reporter for cnn politics. good to see you. could the letter really have a significant impact on negotiations? >> yes, i think it could. because it could affect the concessions that iran's negotiators are prepared to make in the talks in switzerland. john kerry will be attending tomorrow. you know there's this clear opposition to the deal in congress and if you are in the position of an iranian negotiator you might think this deal has possibly not gotten much chance of surviving beyond the presidency of barack obama.
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but when a new president possibly a republican comes in in 2017 that this deal could die. i think it could affect the concessions iran is prepared to make or the iranian negotiators could give the impression they believe that the deal won't last and they can use that idea as leverage in the talks. >> you know, at the same time it seems like it's pretty public knowledge a world over what kind of relationship the president has with members of congress and that this just, you know further exempt fies the attention between those two branchs of government. why would it be the feeling this would impact negotiation between two countries when it's the president -- the leader of one country and the leader of another? >> well, because sooner or later congress is going to get to weigh on the deal. the administration has decided not to negotiate a treaty which would mean it would have to submit the deal for congress and get to get a two-thirds majority in the senate of approval.
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so does negotiating and executive agreement and within the rights within the institution to do that. sooner or later, the congress is going to be asked to lift some sanctions on iran in return for iran remaining about a year away from the point where it can build nuclear weapon. that's the whole point of this deal. so the president for the next two years, can use his power to lift presidential sanctions, he can ask u.s. partners to lift their sanctions. sooner or later congress will be asked to lift the sanctions. it's clear there's not a major majority in congress to do so. it's not just republicans. there's a bunch of democrats who believe it's going to be a bad deal. it's not going to keep iran from having infrastructure that one day could use to build nuclear weapon. so sooner or later whether it's now or in two years time congress is going to have to weigh in on this. >> and of the 47 republicans, are any of them backing away now from the letter after the backlash? >> some of them have sort of said it was done a little bit
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too quickly. maybe there should have been more thought about this. i have talked to some republican sources on capitol hill and they say it might have been a mistake for tom cotton and others to address the letter directly to iran. it looks like they were trying to interfere in the process. >> why wouldn't they have thought about that beforehand before signing it? >> that's a good point. they could have addressed the letter to the six nations as well as the united states that are taking part in the talks. what happened in practice was the fact they addressed iran took some of the tension away from the fact the arguments they were making. they were saying it was a bad deal. that congress couldn't sign on to this. so in fact they may have diminished their impact. i think you can say that both this letter and the visit to the united states in the speech to congress by prime minister benjamin netanyahu of israel a couple of weeks ago has made some democrats who are skrept call of the deal coalesce around the president. they don't want to go against
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their president even though they like the deal. and paradoxly these things have given president obama more leverage. >> stephen colinson thank you so much in washington. appreciate it. you can follow stephen's reporting on this at cnn.com/politics. we'll be right back.
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all right. checking top stories. a lawyer for the now disbanded eded sigma alpha open slon some of the members have gotten death
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threats after video surfaced showing a bus full of sae members taking part in a racist chant. attorney stephen jones says there are no plans right now to sue the university but it is not clear what legal action might be sought. and a public funeral will be held today for tony robinson in madison, wisconsin. the 19-year-old teen was shot and killed by a police officer last week. robinson was unarmed. police say robinson assaulted the officer who then drew his weapon and fired. and two wisconsin girls will stand trial as adults for allegedly trying to kill a classmate to please the fictional internet character slenderman. 12-year-old morgan geyser and 13-year-old are charged with attempted homicide for allegedly stabbing the girl 19 times back in may. each teen could face up to 65 years in prison if convicted, according to the associated press. and still ahead, new questions are being raised about
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the investigation into two u.s. secret service agents who were accused of driving drunk. could the story be changing? that is next. but, first, here is this week's cnn money innovate with rachel crane. >> it's a terrifying fact of life. doctors make mistakes. and that's why artificial intelligence start up is turning computers into cancer detecting radiologists. >> what we're trying to accomplish is to create what we call data-driven medicine. >> the way you're doing it is with computers not people. >> that's director. we use something called machine learning. it's where you get a computer to figure something out by looking at previous examples. we take the information about you as a patient and compare it to the previous 50 million patients to find the people that have had the exact same symptoms and tests and so forth and figure out how did they get
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better? what happened to them? and then we can use that insight to decide how best to treat you. >> do you think that this software that an lettic can help save lives? the software will for sure save lives. it won't just save lives, but it will also save a huge amount of stress. >> we have algorithms that can find earlier and more accurately whether or not you have lung cancer. if we can find out that early, you have a 400% better chance of survival. >> analytic is still in technology the bleeding edge technology piqued the interest like this oncologist who is the chief medical officer. >> you are a radiology oncologist. do you think these systems and computers can read scans more efficiently than you can? >> artificial intelligence is much more consistent and systemic in interpreting these skans. most of these interpretations by radiologists are just that subjective interpretations where as algorithms are unbiassed dmap
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hello again. thank you for joining me.
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what happened at the white house involving u.s. secret service agents. some of the details surrounding the latest scandal are being called into question. sources tell cnn allegations about drinking and driving may not be true. joe clancey, the new head of the secret service is expected to appear on capitol hill in the coming days to discuss in large part this incident. aaron mcpike joins me now from the white house. what more do we know about what did or what didn't happen? >> reporter: well what we know is that on the evening of march 4th these two senior secret service agents were at a party that was about seven blocks away from the white house. it was a retirement party for one of their colleagues. there was drinking obviously, going on at the party. whether or not those two secret service agents took part in that we don't actually know those details. later in the night those two agents drove a government car back to the white house and at the time at the border of the white house there was a suspicious area because of some
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suspicious activity. there was a bomb threat and there were secret service agents investigating that bomb threat. the car with these two agents drove up to the barricade, nudged an orange barrel but there was no collision. there was no damaged that we know of. no confrontation. it may even be there was never even an ask for a sobriety test for either of the secret service agents. that was, of course what was initially allegedly there had been some suggestion that a test needed to happen. a lot of these details are now in dispute. what we also know is that joe clancey, the secret service director was not told about it until five days later. because of that people are calling into question whether protocols are being followed at secret service. whether clancey can turn around the agency and restore some credibility. jonathan a former secret service agent was on cnn earlier today. here is what he had to say about that. >> joe clancey is driving the bus right now. he's the head of this agency. he needs to get ahead of these
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issues. everything that happened in the past we need to learn from them we need to move beyond we need to start developing managers within the secret service that can move our agency forward. >> the other thing we need to point out, fred is that secret service has not said anything publicly about the incident. none of the details, just they're investigating some alleged misconduct. >> have those two agents been reassigned? are they still on duty? what is their status while the investigation carries on? >> fred they have been reassigned to other non-operational roles. one was the second in command and charge of protecting the president and those two agents have been assigned to different jobs. >> thank you so much. to the investigation to the shooting two of police officers in ferguson missouri. investigators say they're following several new leads, but the ferguson police department may be in for a complete overhaul according to some.
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u.s. attorney general eric holder said he's prepared to dismanned l the entire force if that is what it takes to ensure discriminate story police practices targeting african-americans are destroyed. our next guest insisting gutting the force is a must. mark o'mara writes everyone in the ferguson police department needs to leave from the top to the bottom. the police department should be completely reinstituted under department of justice control in a manner that ensures that citizens of ferguson receive the type of public service they pay for and deserve. cnn legal analyst mark o'mara joining us now from orlando, florida. all right. good to see you. you're not saying bring in a whole new contracted police force, but you're saying under the department of justice under that entity should a new police force be brought in. how would that work? >> well, first of all, the reason for it -- i don't mean it
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as an indictment of each and every cop in ferguson. the problem with it is because of what happened in ferguson. because we focussed on ferguson we have identified a huge amount of mistrust from police throughout the country. particularly in the black community. i think that we should look in ferguson and say, look we know the department of justice report says there's a real legitimate concern and that the black population looking at those concerns are legitimate themselves. why not take this as an opportunity to go back in redoing it from ground zero and show everyone throughout the country not just the black community that when we find a problem that obviously exists in ferguson we're going to fix it and we're going to show we can truly do it the right way. maybe, you know, two years from now we'll look back fred you'll go there and have a special that says ferguson pd 500 days later and see we can do it the right way and start rebuilding trust not only in ferguson where it's really
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needed but throughout the country. >> what about in the interim. it sounds like something, if it is indeed a viable option and one that, you know is likely to come to fruition that it still, you know a long way away. so what in the meantime in terms of policing and the community and the building of trust and enforcement and protecting and serving in the interim? >> the logistics will be difficult. i don't make light of what it's going to take. it's going to take some extra money and manpower. what i suggest in the interim as we build up to it we have department of justice involvement oversight. we might need to bring into new leadership to the ferguson police department. we might have to have some unintended quote, victims of this new ferguson police department but i think that the opportunity cost of having to reinstitute the department is worth the benefit we'll have. and i agree this is not an easy process. look at what we've done for the past seven months in ferguson.
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the money that was spent, the emotions that have played out, the concerns we have. if we can actually bring in the department of justice, somebody who can start with a fresh slate, then we're going get them one thing we have to have and that's the rebuilding of the trust in the community. it's worth whatever the cost. >> and has this shooting of two police officers the injuring of these two police officers changed the dynamic in any way? >> i think evidence is there is still an ongoing legitimate problem in ferguson. i think that shooter that attempted eded assassin is a lone actor. i don't think it was part of the peaceful protest. it is evidence there's an enormous amount of emotions wrapped around ferguson. if we do it affirmatively we'll have a positive result. if we try to use a band aid then those people who want to take advantage of the situation are going to do it. >> thank you so much from orlando. good to see you.
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>> sure. still to come. stunning video released during the boston bombing trial. the car-jacking victim of the brothers running for his life at a gas station and begging for help. the story next.
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testimony resumes monday in the death penalty trial of admitted boston marathon bombinger dzhokar tsarnaev. so far 50 witnesses have told their stories. the images of human suffering they have shared are so heart wrenching that many in the courtroom gasp or everyone, you know have tears. cnn's debra for rick has more. >> reporter: fred people in the courtroom were on the edge of their seats listening to the calm understated testimony of a man who lead investigators to the marathon bombers. possibly preventing another attack. these are the images the jury
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saw last. carjacked by the boston bombers. racing away from his captors. franticly begging a store clerk to call 9-1-1 before crawling to a storeroom to hide. >> they have guns. they want to shoot me. >> it was the break boston had been waiting for since the marathon attack three days earlier. he testified that tamer lynn pointed a gun at him and asked do you know the boston marathon explosion? i did it and i just killed a policeman in cambridge. that policeman was shot six times. once between the eyes. surveillance video shows two shadowy figures identified as the brothers approaching the cruiser. the brake lights flashed as the brothers tried to steal collier's gun. the confrontation lasts 50 seconds before the brothers run away. >> it sounds like somebody is hitting a trash can really loud.
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>> prosecutors laid out their case in pain staking detail showing the jury how the investigation unfolded. with the fbi releasing these images of the suspected bombers. two men in baseball hats carrying backpacks walking together through marathon crowds. dzhokar stops first taking his place behind several families and children. his brother walks to the finish line where he stands just below the red and white flag. several minutes later at 2:49 p.m. he calls his brother and then -- [ [ explosion ] >> then dzhokar begins to quickly move away from the backpack he left on the ground. as his bomb detonates energy seems to push him forward. the wounded lay shattered torn open on the ground. three people are dead. 30 are so severely wounded they are clinging to life. the jury heard from trauma nurse
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who saw her husband's detached leg and tried to help him not realizing she herself was on fire. prosecutors showed her burned clothing. it matches my scars, she testified, both of her legs now am amputated. then 23 minutes after the terror attack across the charles river in cambridge, dzhokar tsarnaev enters the whole foods and pays cash for a half gallon of milk. that night he tweets "ain't no love in the heart of the city. stay safe people." within 72 hours his brother will be dead and dzhokar will be hiding in a dry dock boat writing a manifesto explaining why he and his brother did what they did. dzhokar tsarnaev's lawyers have barely cross examined any of the witnesses and didn't dispute any of the images linked to the car-jacking or the shooting. >> thank you so much. straight ahead the body cam
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video that shows the rescue of baby lily. she was trapped in a car for up to 14 hours. hear the reaction from the rescuers as they find her. coming up. i've lived my whole life here in fairbanks, alaska. i love the outdoors, spending time with my family. i have a family history of prostate cancer. i had the test done and that was when i got the news. my wife and i looked at treatment options. cancer treatment centers of america kept coming up on the radar. so we flew to phoenix.
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to a religious document that many christians have never heard of gospel of judas.
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tomorrow night our new cnn series "finding jesus" taking a look at the manuscript. it could hold new revelations about judas' betrayal and the life of jesus. >> jesus wanted to be sacrificed. he asked judas to betray him and judas says why me? he said because you're the closest to me. i beg you to do it. ly understands what is happening. he's helping jesus. he knows that because of what he has to do he's going to be hated forever. forever. >> judas is doing what jesus wants him to do. look god sent jesus to die for the sins of mankind. someone has to betray him. someone has to fulfill this mission.
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jesus is saying i have to die on the cross in order to do what i was sent here to do. >> wow. i want to bring in the chairman of the department of religion and arcologist featured in the series "finding jesus". it's a very different story, you know the gospel of judas. how did this come about? >> the gospel of judas surfaced on the anticty market several years ago. it doesn't come from a controlled archaeological excavation. that's the first of the interesting problems it presents. it's in terrible condition. it wasn't taken proper care of. so there are places where it's impossible to read the text. where we can read it scholars disagree on what it actually says. but what it might say is that judas was doing what jesus wanted. that he's not the bad guy. >> but instead a good guy. the hero? >> hero might be a bit of an
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overstatement, but he was doing what jesus wanted. this is unprecedented in early christian history before. >> there was even any doubt from you all, the film makers that this is real authentic. it is a story worth telling? did you all feel at all reticent? >> no i think the public really enjoys seeing what the cutting edge of scholarship is. it's but my students at the college speak are like this. you show them where the i think of our knowledge is and they get interested. this is the edge of our knowledge. the gospel of jewudas is not likely to be a forgery. but figuring out what it means is complicated. >> what has hat journey been like? most people like they know. they have the answers. they read the bible. they have read the history books. they listened to scholars such as yourself but now this series has been rather enlightening for many who thought they knew it
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all. >> it has been precisely because we're asking these questions that aren't often put out there in public. what was the relationship between john the baptist and jesus? we talked about that last week. and this week judas maybe not a bad guy? now, of course there is evidence and logic that we're going to invite the viewers to think about with us. for example, the gospel of judas comes from 300 years after jesus and judas. does a document that is that late tell us much about what happened 300 years earlier? maybe. maybe not. >> all right. this has been exciting. you have four more installments or three? >> judas and three more. >> wow! and personally for you, has it been rewarding? >> it's very rewarding. i enjoy the chance to talk to the general public about what i can get to do. it's always fun. >> fantastic. we're learning a lot. byron mccain, thank you so much. watch "finding jesus" tomorrow
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night 9:00 eastern time on cnn. what a pleasure. we'll be right back. bring us your baffling. bring us your audacious. we want your sticky notes, sketchbooks, and scribbles. let's pin 'em to the wall. kick 'em around. kick 'em around, see what happens. because we're in the how-do-i-get-this-startup- off-the-ground business. the taking-your-business- global-business. we're in the problem-solving business. 400,000 people - ready to help you solve problems while they're still called opportunities. from figuring it out to getting it done we're here to help. [ female announcer ] we help make secure financial tomorrows a reality for over 19 million people. [ alex ] transamerica helped provide a lifetime of retirement income. so i can focus on what matters most. [ female announcer ] everyone has a moment when tomorrow becomes real. transamerica. i am totally blind. and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night, and stay awake during the day. this is called non-24. learn more by calling 844-824-2424.
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>> pass her up! passer up! incredible that's the moment that baby lily just 18-months
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old was re cuescued. the story made national headlines and thanks to a police officer's boyd camera we're seeing dramatic images of this rescue. for the first time cnn darlington has been following the story and joins us from new york. this is amazing to watch. >> it really is. it hammers home exactly why they're calling lily the miracle baby. and it gives us an inside look into what these rescue workers go through, the quick decisions they have to make and shows us not only the physical but also the emotional efforts they put in. they just didn't give up. new body cam video from one of the officers as he rushes to the overturned car. >> what do you got? >> you can hear their desperation as they try to flip the car. they soon discover 25-year-old
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lynn jennifer groesbeck dead until the driver's seat. they do find a survivor. they pull a tiny body from the wreckage and run up the hill. >> she's definitely hypothermiaic. patting her back and willing her to live. they perform baby cpr, and rush her into the hospital. 18-month old lily was submerged in the car in the frigid river in utah for about 14 hours. she was hanging upside down in the freezing temperatures in the upper 20s with no food or water. >> if anything might have been different she might not have made it. >> this was the emergency room doctor who saw lily whether she was rushed in. >> you can see how pale she is and cold and stiff her arm is. four days later, baby lily playing along as her father sings "old mcdonald" in the
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hospital. the best reward possible for those who fought so hard to save her. we've had some good news from the spanish fork police department lily has left the hospital police were actually able to visit her with her family. they say she's happy and healthy and temporarily living with her aunts and uncle. >> oh my gosh. that's so uplifting. what about the car accident. is there an explanation why the car went off the road in the first place? >> you know, they're still investigating that. they believe that her mother was on her way home but i think one of the more impressive things here is just when they first found lily she didn't have a pulse. and so the fact they kept on applying cpr, they didn't give up. i think what makes me think most about this is just knowing that whatever kind of accident -- the workers going to work just as hard for us i hope. >> oh my gosh. certainly. that's an amazing story. and it really says a lot about
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the will to live for the little baby lily as well. thank you so much. appreciate it. thank going to do it for me. thank you for being with me all afternoon long. more of the news room straight ahead with poppy harlow. cnn news room i'm poppy harlow. we begin with a state of emergency in the south pacific after tropical cyclone pam struck the island chain of vanuatu with a furry of a category five hurricane. that's what it was e lentquivalent to. the city of port villa looks like a bomb went off. at least six people are dead. that number will likely rise as search teams comb through the area. there is no power,

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