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tv   CNN Newsroom With Fredricka Whitfield  CNN  April 4, 2015 8:00am-11:31am PDT

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massacre in kenya. helen titus smeared her dead friend's blood on her own face and playing dead herself. she said "i just soaked myself with that blood and they skipped me." for more than two days another young woman hid in a closet buried in clothes, drinking body lotion for hydration. her name is cynthia, and this morning she is out of hiding and safe. we'll hear from her in a moment. in the meantime al shabab terrorists are warning they are not done after thursday's attack killed 147, most of them students. this morning, they are vowing that kenya's cities will run red with blood. let's bring in cnn's christian purefoy in garissa, kenya. christian, you were able to speak to cynthia about her ordeal. she was the one who hid in that closet. what more did she say? >> reporter: yes, it's times like this that you really look for some sort of hope amongst the horror and at about 9:00
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this morning over 48 hours since the attack happened cynthia, a 19-year-old girl was discovered hiding in a cupboard by the military and during that time after that 48 hours all she had to drink, this is quite remarkable all she had to drink was body lotion. here's what she had to say.
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cynthia described how she had her eyes closed but could still hear all of this going on. she didn't see what happened next but we spoke to one medic who went in shortly after the military who said that when those young students were made to lie on the floor, he said he saw gunshots to the back of the head. cynthia was still in shock when we saw her, but the military when they went in and they found her, they had to bring in the principal back to the crime scene to say to her, it's okay cynthia, these people are not going to hurt you. christi? >> all right, christian purefoy, thank you so much appreciate that. six people in england are now in police custody.
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they are accused of terrorism offenses related to syria, five men and one woman were arrested in the southern port city of dover. searches are under way at the homes of several of the suspects. police say the group did not pose any immediate risk to the public. meanwhile two illinois men have been indicted for allegedly conspiring to provide support to isis. u.s. army national guard specialist and his cousin were arrested last month. they are accused of plotting a terrorist attack on an illinois military facility. prosecutors say the two men will be arraigned on april 8th. if convicted of the charges against them both men could face 15 years in prison. three american women are also now in federal custody facing terror charges. cnn's jason carroll takes a look at the accusations of a homegrown terror threat.
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o detonate a bomb in the united states. in the 29-page complaint, the u.s. attorney details how the women allegedly expressed their support for "violent jihad." prosecutors say the women researched and acquired materials needed to make various types of bombs, including vert leiser a pressure cooker device and multiple propane tanks which authorities say siddiqui kept in her apartment building. >> my client will enter a plea of not guilty even when there's an indictment. she and i will address everything in the courtroom where it belongs. >> reporter: authorities say the suspects were not after civilians but instead the police and military even taking inspiration from the funeral of slain police officer rafael
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ramos, believing a crowded police funeral would be an easy target. they say velentzas considered osama bin laden her mentor and praised the 9/11 attacks on the world trade center and was obsessed with pressure cookers since the boston marathon attack according to an undercover officer. siddiqui had repeated contact with al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and wrote a poem which appeared in a jihadi magazine. in it lines such as "no excuse to sit back and wait for the skies rain martyrdom" and "taste the truth through fists and slit throats." she according to a law enforcement official close to the case the women came to the attention of investigators through another terrorism investigation. people in velentzas 'neighborhood say she's married
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with a young daughter sometimes argued with her husband but nothing to indicate she had jihadist leanings. >> they're very lovely people. i know i saw the fbi this morning but i didn't know that was what is regards to. that is so crazy. >> reporter: jason carroll, cnn, brooklyn, new york. >> is this evidence the threat of homegrown terror is growing? rick francona former military intelligence officer and jonathan gillian, former fbi agent and navy s.e.a.l. joining us here in atlanta on set with me. good to see you as well. jonathan to you first, what does this tell you about the growing threat of home terrorism or perhaps even what does it say about the counterterrorism efforts? >> well i'll tell you, both of those questions, the first thing i think this really starts to show everybody the lone wolf definition that we always use, the reality is these are homegrown operatives. let's look at it that way
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because you don't necessarily have to go to some type of a tryout or boot camp to be a part of isis, al qaeda or follow mohammadism. you have to say i believe in that and swear allegiance to it. >> these women we have learned said they were inspired by the marathon bombing in boston. >> right but they are a part of this fundamental belief system they were inspired by it and so they raised their hand and say i want to do this. so that's the first point is that people need to realize anybody that's in that religion if they're in an inspirational moment they can be guided by this. the other thing that we really need to look at here is that this woman that was just on there a second ago saying she had no idea what was going on. >> blending in. >> it's a closed society and the people that will be able to spot this are muslims themselves and i think this shows that our counterterrorism efforts are still moving forward, but sources in and around islam, in and around the mosques and as a
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part of those things that's going to really be the biggest tool that we could ever use. no technology will ever be greater than that. >> colonel, hearing what jonathan is saying and describing how people are inspired working on their own, it would seem as though that would make it even more difficult for counterterrorism specialists to find to weed out, but does it not seem that in recent weeks, if not even months we're seeing a number of arrests that speak to the effectiveness of counterterrorismerts? are you inspired by what seem to be a stripping of arrests? >> well i'm encouraged by the string of arests but it's frightening to know these people are out there and i think we're just getting to the tip of the iceberg right now. as jonathan said these lone wolf attacks are hard to detect and hard to stop because we know we've caught some but we don't know that we've caught all so it's quite the problem for everybody. what's interesting in this particular case is now they're trying to recruit women and
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we've seen a huge effort to try and bring women into the isis fold, have them overseas as jihadi wives. now we're seeing them being recruited as actual operatives inside the united states. this is an interesting trend but i think law enforcement has a real challenge here and i think jonathan is exactly right, how do we get the information inside this very very closed community. >> so real challenges particularly as it pertains to women being targeted to carry out, to be followers. what are the challenges that you see, jonathan for law enforcement in particular to locate them to suspect them number one, and then to actually make an apprehension or find enough evidence in order to arrest? >> the biggest challenge for law enforcement is opening their mind opening their mind and actually looking at people and saying it's possible that they will be an attacker. >> now we're going back to that slippery slope with the whole profiling. you looking at someone and suspecting you potentially are
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up to no good. there has to be more than that. >> you're exactly right. i'm saying going beyond profiling and as the colonel would tell you in the military when we plan our operation we look at all contingencyies and try to have a very robust plan before we go out. there's a lot of kids walking around out here and there's a big draw to the cnn studio here. we had to start looking at anybody as a potential, even kids could be used and have been used overseas. it's just a matter of time before they take the tactics that are proven there, and bring them over here. kenya is a perfect example. they've started using malls, now universities those are very soft targets, where there's little or no protection and over here they've shifted from just simply having support from the females to actually having females that can carry out akz ta, we've been seeing that for years. >> colonel, al shabab is threat thing more attacks on soft targets in kenya and one has to
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believe just as you heard from boko haram threatening more in algeria and al qaeda and isis threatening beyond the borders where we're typically seeing them. how does counterterrorism get ahead, anticipate especially since we see an evolution of attacks, we've seen that since 9/11. we've seen it even in "charlie hebdo's" recent attack. >> we're getting better at this. if you look at the background of the kenyan attack at the university there was intelligence that almost predicted that. maybe not the specific university but we know that the soft targets are very lucrative and al shabab wants to go after them trying to punish the kenyans. the kenyans developed a good capability although as jonathan will tell you, you only have to be right once to create that significant emotional event and that's what these attacks are aimed at create fear create dissension and cause people to question their own law enforcement capabilities. so i think we're going to see more of this and there's going
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to be a shift from these harder targets to these malls and university shopping centers. it's a huge problem, and i do not envy my law enforcement colleagues. >> and so jonathan how do you see the road ahead particularly as it pertains to counterterrorism what kind of predictions would you make in terms of potential targets? >> we've been the experts in the field that actually study this stuff from an attacker's point of view we've been saying for well over ten years that soft targets are what are going to be hit now. they've shown that you can go to university in kenya and kill 150 people with guns. you don't need airplanes. it's just a simple fact that they use grenades, they use guns in boston they used crude bombs. we need to look at soft targets and forward thinking these things. >> when we say soft targets what do we mean? right now most people are convinced that anywhere is a soft target. >> i tell you the biggest thing that people in general can look at is any place that people
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congregate and let their guard down stadiums and arenas at the end of a football game there's going to be 50,000 people conjugated in one area because they're trying to leave, the end of a marathon which we saw in boston religious institutions malls, tall buildings where you go to work every day, these are targets that are somewhat, you know a good comparison to that is the attempt or whatever happened where the two people drove their vehicle into the nsa the other day. that's a hardened target. they didn't get close to the building. one was killed the other injured, that say hard target so to do an effective attack -- >> because there's reinforcement of security present. >> that's correct. >> but any other place where you don't see reinforcement, you talk about the stadiums as you leave the stadium, in the stadium you have protection. >> it's hard in the stadium but here's what you have to realize. stadium on a sunday night at 2:00 in the morning there's nobody there there's no target there. there's critical times and critical areas in and around these soft targets and here's what everybody has to realize.
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if i want to steal from you, i have to figure out how to get in take what i want and get out. if i want to attack you all i have to do is figure out where you congregate and i go there and attack you. it's much easier. >> colonel, a last word or anything you want to add to that concept of how anyone is to go about their business on a day-to-day basis and try to protect themselves? >> i just want to underscore as jonathan said how difficult this is to defend against because you can't be everywhere all the time. you can't defend every target and as you shift your focus of what you're going to defend then the attackers will simply move somewhere else. they will go where the defenses aren't. so as he says if you're targeting a stadium and they see police protecting that target they'll go somewhere else, they'll go to the mall where everybody else is at the stadium so it's a difficult problem set. >> lieutenant colonel francona and john thank you for talking
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to us. coming up it was supposed to be a fun-filled family vacation in the tropical paradise of st. john. instead it turned into a nightmare, when the entire family became very sick. the shocking cause of their illness. >> then a wild brawl breakdown inside a casino and 300 people get involved. crazy video. much more of that straight ahead. your purse is starting to look more like a tissue box... you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin®. because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. zyrtec®. muddle no more™ . so...you're sayin' you'll give me my credit score for free... right! now you're gonna ask for my credit card - - so you can charge me on the down low two weeks later look, credit karma - are you talking to websites again? this website says 'free credit scores'. oh. credit karma! yeah, it's really free. look, you don't even have to put in your credit card information. what?! credit karma.
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officials say a pesticide at their rented luxury villa may be to blame and the justice department is now launching a criminal investigation. sarah gannam joins me with more from new york. how is the family doing? how long had it been before anyone noticed they hadn't seen the family to find hem in a coma or seizures? >> i just got off the phone with a family attorney and i have to tell you, unfortunately, the parents are doing a little bit better but unfortunately the boys are still in pretty bad shape. the attorney told me they were "in rough shape" and i want to run through this for you. the parents teresa devine and steve esmond are doing better but their teenage son sean who is 16 years old and their son ryan, who is just 1 years old still in critical condition at a children's hospital. the family was air lifted back to mainland united states after falling ill after a fumigation of the villa beneath the one where they were staying on st.
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john. this was scary, fred the older boy had blood in his lungs, his heart was failing. one of the boys has brain damage right now. the father he's now awake, but he can't talk and the mother has been released to occupational therapy because she had a lesser degree of exposure the attorney told me but he also said this is a long recovery. methylbromide is like sarin gas. it attacks the nervous system and the environmental protection agency says traces of it were found in the family's villa, even though the fumigation was done below. methylbromide is not allowed to be used indoors because of acute toxicity. the epa has a restriction on it. the resort which is owned by seaglass vacations, told us the pest control company terminix fumigated march 18th, smack dab in the middle of the family's vacation nine days in the u.s.
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virgin islands. the epa clearly states methylbromide is restricted because it's odorless and causes injury to the lung and to the nervous systems and could be fatal if it's inhaled. the u.s. department of justice has now opened a criminal investigation, the epa is monitoring the air and environmental samples at that resort and working with local agencies to figure out what happened. terminix told cnnen in an e-mail it is "looking into this matter internally cooperating with authorities." they said "we're thinking about the family and we join the community in wishing them a speedy recovery." a spokeswoman for the epa told cnn it is actively working to determine how this happened and will make sure steps are taken to prevent this from happening to others at a vacation apartment or elsewhere, and just to wrap this up fred the attorney told me he said "this is the most horrifying story in the world. >> it really is. oh my gosh that is just heartbreaking. we of course are hoping the best for that family.
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sarah ganam, keep us posted on where this investigation goes. still ahead, investigators have left the site of the germanwings plane crash, and guess what? they're not going to be returning. we'll explain why, next. hey, you forgot the milk! that's lactaid®. right. 100% real milk just without the lactose. so you can drink all you want... ...with no discomfort? exactly. here, try some... mmm, it is real milk. see? delicious. hoof bump! oh. right here girl, boom! lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort. and for a tasty snack that's 100% real dairy try lactaid® cottage cheese.
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in tulsa, oklahoma a volunteer deputy inadvertently
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shot and killed a suspect in a drug and gun bust. police say 73-year-old robert bates thought he was pulling out his taser during the violent arrest but instead grabbed his pistol and shot the suspect who later died at a local hospital. bates has been put on administrative leave while officials investigate the case. attorneys for real estate icon and murder suspect robert durst call his court proceedings in louisiana torture and they want it to stop. the 71-year-old's lawyers filed a motion yesterday in new orleans where he faces weapons and drug charges. they asked a judge to find no probable cause and accused authorities of trumping up charges to delay his extradition to los angeles. durst is also wanted for murder in a high profile cold case out of california. and wow, this wild and violent brawl caught on video at one point at many as 300 people
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were fighting at this casino in queens. you can see chairs being thrown as well as punches. police say three men have been arrested, and an officer was sent to the hospital because of injuries. owe fishes say they aren't sure how it all started in the first place. and the last investigators have left the germanwings crash site in the alps as the investigation moves into its next phase. there will be further analysis of the flight data recorder which has now shown that co-pilot andreas lubitz purposely used the controls to speed up the plane's descent. investigators are taking a closer look at mobile phones recovered from the crash site. let's bring in cnn's will ripley, who has been following the investigation from dusseldorf. does this mean the ground investigation has been completely wrapped up since investigators have left that area? >> reporter: the investigation at the crash site is now wrapped up, fred. this is a significant development in this investigation, because it shows that the folks who have been on
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scene now for a week and a half have recovered everything that they need as far as key evidence to figure out exactly what caused this plane crash. we've seen the pieces come together all week but they've recovered now the two black boxes, the flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder. they recovered all of the human remains, 150 dna profiles they recovered some 470 personal effects including 40 mobile phones which have been heavily damaged, all of that has been taken to a separate location being analyzed and then there will be essentially guards watching over the plane debris and in the coming days a private company will company, they will collect the rest of the aircraft debris they will take that to a separate location as well where the investigation will continue and will continue for quite some time but for the moment at the crash site the work has been completed. they will clear it out, and then they'll move forward as they try to put together the pieces in this horrible story as we've seen with andreas lubitz deliberately flying this plane
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into the french alps mountain range. >> what about the many mobile phones what kind of condition are they in and what might investigators hope they can actually retrieve from them? >> reporter: this is a really important aspect of any crash investigation because a lot of times people are conditioned when things start to happen they pull out their mobile phones and they start rolling, they start taking video or photos and these phones were severely damaged because we know fred the plane hit that mountain range at 420 miles an hour. however, earlier this week two different tabloids released what they believe is a transcript of some video that was taken and retrieved from a sim card. while the phones itself may be damaged, some of them may have sim cards, they may be able to pull video, pull files, photos that sort of thing and any piece of evidence that they can find to figure out what it was like in the final moments they will be doing that and that will be analyzed in a lab in france, fred? >> will ripley thank you so much from dusseldorf germany.
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chaos continues in yemen as hundreds of al qaeda prisoners freed by rebels now roam the country. one of the freed, the most wanted terrorist leaders is settling into one of the country's presidential palaces. take a look at these images right here. more of it next. you forgot the milk! that's lactaid®. right. 100% real milk just without the lactose. so, no discomfort? exactly. try some... mmm, it is real milk. lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort.
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i can wear whatever i want to wear. al ka la join over 500,000 women who've discovered always discreet underwear. for more stories and your free sample go to alwaysdiscreet.com so bladder leaks and feel like no big deal. happening right now in "the newsroom," chaos continues in yemen as hundredens of al qaeda prisoners freed by rebels roam the country. one of the most wanted terrorist leaders is settling into one of the country's presidential palaces as you see in the images. then with just days to go before the city council election in ferguson missouri, we get a new look at racist e-mails sent by some police officers including pictures of ronald reagan holding a baby monkey more
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behind that story, plus -- >> get your car off of it! >> a family races to get away from flames in the back of an rv. you're live in the "cnn newsroom." hello again everyone. thank you for joining me. the u.n. security council is holding an emergency meeting to discuss the growing crisis in yemen. the international red cross is calling for a 24-hour pause in the fighting to bring medical help into the country and all of this as new pictures apeer to show an al qaeda leader in one of the presidential palaces. cnn cannot confirm the authenticity of the photos. khaled batarfi and others were released earl whier in the week. the u.n. estimates at least 500 people have been killed since
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the saudi-led air strikes were conducted last month. they're trying to remove houthi rebels backed by iran. cnn's nic robertson is near the yemen/saudi arabia border. nic, what is the latest on the efforts to restore some kind of control in the country of yemen, if not even return the president to the country? >> reporter: well certainly aden seems to be the place where most of the fighting is still going on. we understand the houthis had made gains over the last couple of days, this he appear to be pushed out. saudi arabian special forces in a non-combat role are there trying to organize and help the resistance. they've also been involved in the parachuting in of communications equipment and weapons. the bombings continue particularly over on one of the houthi strongholds in the north. what we are hearing from the international community from the red cross is that they are calling for a pause in the bombing campaign. they say there's a humanitarian
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need for that. they say they've got plane loads of medical equipment they're not able to fly into the country right now, 48 tons of equipment, they say, which is enough to take care of about 2,000 to 3,000 people for several days. their concern is that medical facilities in the country are running out of supplies running out of equipment to treat the wounded. 519 people according to the u.n. dead and aid in the stountown under the extreme fighting they need to get out of their houses if only to get food so this is a very big concern and they're adding that on concern of khaled ba batarfi from al qaeda. if that is him in the presidential palace, al qaeda will use that to take control of provinces and towns so they can expand their influence in the country and beyond its borders.
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fredricka? >> nic, while 500 people have died during what's being attributed to the saudi air strikes, what more militarily whether it be saudi arabia or some of its multinational allies what is being done militarily to try to restore some sort of stability in that region if not try to weed out some of these houthi rebels? >> reporter: well the uae flew its first missions bombing missions into the country overnight last night. the egyptian navy has vessels just off the port of aden and we're also learning that there's a very strategic area right in the sea sort of off the tip of aden in the south of yemen at the moment. there's an island there, and according to saudi sources, houthis are trying to put weapons systems on the island backed by iran. what is important about this island is that eye lan sits at the narrowist point in the sort of if it you will end of the
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persian gulf where all or so much of the world's oil supplies pass by boat a choke point, if you will on that waterway and we're told saudi special forces have gone in there as well to take care of that houthi threat. fredricka? >> nic robertson, thank you so much along the border with yemen in saudi arabia appreciate it. the white house is going on the offensive today and trying to sell the nuclear deal with iran to members of congress. everyone from president obama to officials at the state department are calling lawmakers this weekend, trying to make their case as to why this current deal the framework for this deal may be the best option for preventing iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. i'm joined now by ali reza nar author of "iran after the bomb" and in boston jim walsh, international security analyst and christopher dickey at "the
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daily beast" joins us from paris. the president says this is i'm quoting him now "our best option by far." ali, is it? >> i agree. i think that we're getting a good deal. if you look at the plan of action the framework, the fact sheet that was released iran is making a lot of concessions, giving up a lot of its century funlgz accepting intrusive inspections, and i think right now things look good for the united states and the p5 plus 1. there's outstanding issues between the two sides that have to be resolved but there may be obstacles. this is a breakthrough. >> christopher who could happen in the two or three months to undermine or strengthen this framework? >> a the love things. you have to listen to what people were saying. they said again and again all the parties to this agreement kept saying that nothing is agreed until everything is
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agreed. so this is really not signed sealed and delivered. this is an idea of what might be signed sealed and delivered three months from now, if it then. my guess is the negotiations will once again be extended at that point, because there are a lot of issues that are absolutely critical. on the iranian side there has been an attempt to say the deal is done sanctions will be lifted and then sort of in parentheses in fine print, "when we've met our obligations under the agreement." meeting those obligations means those intrusive inspections, giving up a lot of the enrichment facilities it means almost shutting down the hardened facility that has been a key to the program in many ways all those things are very problematic and already all the hardliners in iran are attacking those points of the supposed agreement. of course in the united states the u.s. senate the u.s. congress is incredibly
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skeptical. nobody wants to be accused of driving the united states into another war, but it's very easy for people like senator cotton to conup and say this is a bad agreement and we don't want iran to have nuclear weapons, as if they then have a solution to that. their solution will be to try to block anything put forward by the obama administration without offering any alternatives. >> so jim, i know you were nodding on some of that in your view, is this promising or problematic problematic, one of the words that christopher used there? if we could show that screen again, these are some of the things that are in that deal and we heard the president, obama really reiterate this, talking about the reduction of the centrifuges by two-thirds to 6,000, reducing these enriched uranium stockpile. also on the list iran would not build a new water reactor. the president said this is the best defense. are you in agreement, promising or problematic? >> well i agree there's still a
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lot of work to be done but i am very encouraged by this fredricka. i judge it two ways. i look at the provisions of the agreement itself and compare it to other things that we have knowledge and success with. looking at it itself i think it's unprecedented. it would represent a commitment by a country to a level of inspection that no country has really done before. i think it's unpress departmented in negotiated agreements and there are lots of parts here. the water reactors you suggested they'll scratch what they have and start over, they'll ship out their spent fuel. there will be more inspectors the number of inspectors on the ground now that number will increase and their mandate will be expanded and when i think you compare this agreement -- now we ain't there yet, but if we get -- >> in your view what does it take to get there? >> well i think the political advantage has gone to the president because he had something that is more detailed and more robust than people expected and he says this is you know the best thing we've
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ever had in terms of our own proliferation agreement so it will be hard i think for democratic senators to walk away from democratic house members. there may be a bill in congress that causes problems, but i don't know if those sorts of bills will be able to sustain a veto and i think that's what would happen. >> and ali, as it pertains to congress really it's the issue of sanctions, less about all the other details in the framework, but how could that potentially be a road block for that framework, in your view? >> and that's i think one of the unclear elements of the sanctions relief. iran is very concerned that it should get sanctions relief up front. iranian officials stated that's the case but that's in reality is going to take a while for iran to get sanctions relief. it has to demonstrate compliance with the agreement, and that might take a few months but i think iranian officials have been support tif of this deal conservatives in iran have come out and supported it and the
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supreme leader has so far been quiet, but before in the past he has said that iranian negotiators are heroes they're doing important work for iran so i don't think there's actually that much hard line opposition in iran to this deal. some people have made noises but iranian officials are spinning this as a victory and let them. they have to basically satisfy their own constituents. >> all right, ali reza ndr, jim walsh, christopher dickey thank you, gentlemen, appreciate it. >> thank you. still to come the racially charged e-mails that got two ferguson police supervisors and a county clerk fired. those e-mails now revealed. offensive jokes and pictures one even showing former president ronald reagan feeding a baby monkey with the caption as it relates to president obama. we'll talk about that next. your purse is starting to look more like a tissue box... you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief.
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welcome back. we're getting our first look at the racest e-mails exchanged between ferguson missouri city employees. those e-mails were cited in a federal civil rights inquiry last month. they were released cnn's ryan young takes a look at the e-mails. >> reporter: we get our first chance to look at some of the e-mails for the first time and we're not going to show you all the e-mails but we want to show you a few of them speaking with the folks in fergsonuson they felt the police department and some city officials were racist. now you get to see the e-mails
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they were trading back and fortd. the first shows ronald reagan holding a monkey and the caption says "rare photo of ronald reagan baby sitting barack obama in early 1962." it shows you more photos and target the first lady. group of women we blurred the top of the photo and says "this was a high school reunion for the first lady." these e-mails caused three people inside the ferguson city government to step down. the last e-mail compares dogs to welfare recipients i'll read part of this e-mail "i wanted to get welfare for my dogs the lady says i couldn't so i explained to her my dogs are mixed in color, unemployed, lazy and can't speak english" and goes on to say he was able to get welfare for his dogs looking at the e-mails you talked to people in ferguson you obviously understand another debate will be had after some of the e-mails came to light. >> ryan thank you so much. still to come a roadside
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inferno, an rv engulfed in flames. >> flames out of the back window. >> hear from a good samaritan who ignored the flames to save the people inside.
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ay in
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indianapolis. four teams, thousands of fans and college basketball's biggest weekend. but this week, the big story out of indiana was not basketball. the national spotlight was focused on backlash over the controversial religious freedom law. critics called it a license to discriminate against the lgbt community. andy scholes is live in indianapolis. how much has the controversy distracted or impacted tonight's games? >> reporter: well you know, what fred it almost overshadowed this whole final four weekend here in indianapolis. it was a big distraction throughout the week. there was protests and what not. it was -- they were worried this would bleed over into the final four festivities. ncaa's headquarters is down the street from downtown indianapolis and the ncaa they put a lot of pressure on the indiana legislators to get this law changed in time for the weekend and they were successful the fix got in and we could finally start concentrating on the exciting games we've got here tonight. and the big story is going to be
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can kentucky can they complete the journey and have a perfect, undefeated season two games away from being 40-0. and this wildcats roster is just stock full of nba first-round picks. an amazing team. and these wildcats are well aware of how special it would be to be the first team since the 1976 indiana hoosiers to go undefeated. >> it would be just a blessing. can't even put it in words. at the same time it would be a tough two games to win. but if we do complete that goal i wouldn't even know how to put it in words. >> winning the national championship that's the biggest thing and that's our goal. that's been our goal since the beginning of the year. he wanted to win it all, and we're so close to it. we just need to capitalize on opportunities and play the game we know how to play. >> reporter: the other match-up duke is going to be taking on michigan state. and on the call for tbs tonight you can former blue devil great,
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grant hill. i asked him, what's tougher, playing in the final four or being on the broadcast for the final four. take a listen. >> sitting over there with jim nance and bill that's fun. you do have to be prepared. you've got to do your prep work. and make sure that you know these teams and we feel pretty good about that. but definitely playing is more hard -- more difficult and more challenging than broadcasting. >> reporter: turner sports is doing something really cool. the national broadcast on tbs starting at 6:00 eastern. and if you're a super fan, we've got you cordvered with the team stream. for duke-michigan state, spartans home announcers on trutv and the blue devils on tnt and wisconsin taking on kentucky that's on trutv. and kentucky will be airing on our sister station, tnt. so fredricka, if you're a big-time fan -- >> options.
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>> turner channels -- you can listen to your home broadcast and really get the homer feel for these games tonight. >> that's fun. put you there. that's what everybody wants. you can't get a ticket to be there, this is the next best thing. all right, andy scholes, thanks so much. appreciate it. and, of course hey, later on today, don't miss our cnn bleacher report special. all access at the final four, 2:30 p.m. eastern time with rachel nichols, coach kaye and steven smith. all right. we'll be right back. financial noise financial noise financial noise financial noise
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com happening right now in the "newsroom," incredible stories of survival emerge from the students who survived a bloody college campus assault in africa. when the gunman came in she hid on top of a cupboard. >> one woman actually drank lotion to stay alive. and another covered herself in her friend's blood. and investigators are
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recovering dozens of cell phones from the germanwings crash site in the alps and we're learning stunning new details about the actions of that co pilot in the days leading up to the fatal crash. plus -- >> get your car off of me! >> the race to save a family trapped in the back of an rv as it goes up in flames. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com hello again, everyone. and thank you so much for joining me. i'm fredricka whitfield. we start with another breath taking story of survival from this week's massacre in kenya. a 19-year-old hid in a closet buried in clothes, drinking body lotion for hydration. and today cynthia is out of hiding. safe. and we'll hear from her in a moment. and today kenya's president declared three days of mourning for the 147 victims most of them students. this is al shabaab terrorists issuing a new warning they are
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not done with their killing spree. they're vowing that kenya's cities will quote, run red with blood. let's bring in christian peer foye in kenya. tell us more about cynthia's ordeal and then also deal with the continuing threat. >> reporter: well fredricka, it's at times of absolute horror like this you try to look for some sort of hope. and after 48 hours in the top of a cupboard under blankets in what must have been just darkness 19-year-old cynthia was found by the military this morning. now, when we met her, she was still in a great deal of shock, but here's what she had to say. >> and then i decided to go to the wardrobe. in the wardrobe we have a small
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rooms. and then i covered myself with the clothes. and then these people were in our room. and then they found others who had hidden themselves. they told them to go out. and when they were outside now, they told if you don't know how to read to them in the muslim whatever and then you lie down. and then if you know you go to the other side. >> reporter: now, cynthia told us that she closed her eyes but she could still hear all of this going on. her friends being told to lie flat on the ground fredricka. and we spoke to one medic who went in after the military to tell us what happened next. he said he saw gunshots to the
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back of some people's heads. so you know although there is hope there is still such horror and more stories we're sure coming out. now, cynthia was in such shock that the military when they found her, they had to bring in the principal to the screen of the crime to tell her it's okay. these people are not here to harm you. fredricka. >> all right, christian, thank you so much. meantime the president there and others still responding saying they are trying to be vigilant because the threat from al shabaab continues there. meantime an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council is under way in yemen, and the international red cross is calling for a 24-hour cease-fire so it can can bring in aid. all of this as new pictures appear to show an al qaeda leader in one of the presidential palaces. cnn cannot confirm the authenticity of these photos. more than 200 others were freed
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from prison by al qaeda militants early in the week. nic robertson is near the yemen/saudi arabia border with more on this. how serious is this prison break? all right. it looks like we lost nick robert vonn there. we'll try later. the red cross is not alone in calling for this break in the fighting in yemen. russia called the emergency meeting of the u.n. security council, hoping to get a pause in the violence to get humanitarian aid into yemen. cnn's richard roth is at the u.n. with us now. so richard, the arab league seems pretty unified in trying to remove these iranian-backed rebels. but to what extent? >> well the security council is having its first meeting on yemen since saudi arabia and other gulf countries came to the aid of the now it appears former president after he appealed for international assistance.
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so what's going on now in this closed-door meeting, a bit of emergency talks to really start to brainstorm at an initial stage. however, it was russia who called this meeting, and it is russia who is now behind closed doors, presented a draft resolution which does call for some sort of humanitarian pause. of but other diplomats from other countries say it's really not exactly a resolution of a humanitarian pauses. there is no call for an end of aggression by the houthis, and there is no call in the russian draft for political dialogue which many countries here want. however, elusive that appears now. the british deputy ambassador peter wilson said for now his country and others support saudi arabia. >> it's that we continue to support the saudi-led action in yemen, legitimate request from president hadi. all civilian casualties are ones
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we deeply regret. we remain fully committed to ensuring the law is complied with and proper access given to agency who is need to get access to grant relief. >> the british diplomat says what's needed above everything else is some sort of political dialogue that has broken down repeatedly in the last few years in yemen. fred? >> and realistically, what kind of leverage can the u.n. really have given the circumstances in yemen right now anyway? >> that's right. even the u.n. special sizer for yemen is apparently here in new york. some countries want him out in that role. it's a tall order for anyone trying to keep the peace there where aggression and violence rages. >> all right. richard roth thank you so much. appreciate that from the u.n. keep us posted. all right. still ahead, the last investigators have left the germanwings crash site in the alps, and dozens of cell phones are recovered. we're live from dusseldorf, next.
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all right. again, a u.n. emergency meeting is under way at the u.n. as it pertains to yemen. all this while al qaeda leaders get out of prison in yemen. it is pure chaos in that country. cnn's nic robertson is joining us at the saudi/arabia border. these are big can concerns that now al qaeda leaders who were imprisoned now have the run-of-the-mill in the country even pictures showing at least one leader in a presidential palace. what can can be done at this point? >> reporter: well one of the things is -- would be to extend any humanitarian pause that the u.n. is calling for, to get real dialogue and talks going between the yemeni government and president hattiedi and the houthis. the houthis are rejecting calls
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for these talks at the moment. and calling for the saudis to stop the air strikes. the saudis saying the houthis need to put down their weapons and hand back control to legitimate government. that seems to be at a stalemate and plays directly in al qaeda's hands. you get the jill jail break, and he goes into the presidential palace to show off that he's free and he's got the run of the town there, and this is what al qaeda has done in the past. it tries to take advantage, and then extend its the control and influence. of course that's a threat to any of our al -- any of the people al qaeda wants to target. us in the west and the saudi government here the saudi rural family targets of al qaeda as well. but the humanitarian situation is causing a lot of can concern, as well. aid in that port city in the south is where a lot of fighting is going on. still a lot of casualties being taken there in the fighting. 53 people killed in the past couple of days there.
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so that's a significant concern. and that's where the aid agencies like the red cross want this pause so people can get food and bring medical supplies in fredricka. >> all right. nic robertson, pretty curious situation. thank you so much. meantime in europe the last investigators have left the germanwings crash site in the alps. investigators are now focusing on analysis of the flight data recorder which has now shown that co pilot andreas lubitz purposely used the controls to speed up the plane's descent. and investigators are looking at mobile phones recovered from the crash site. let me bring in cnn's will ripley following the investigation from dusseldorf. does this mean the ground investigation has completely wrapped up that investigators have left the alps? >> reporter: it has, fred. and the crash investigators have left that site. they have left the mountain range. but their work will continue in the days weeks and months to come. what this tells us and this is pretty significant and new today. that they have now recovered
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everything from the crash site that is most substantial, has the most value in the investigation. so you're talking about the two black boxes, the fight data recorder cockpit voice recorder. have recovered they believe all of the human remains. they have 150 dna profiles now being evaluated to get some closure for the families of the people who were on board the flight. they have also recovered some 470 personnel effects, including 40 mobile phones which are very heavily damaged, but each of those phones will be taken to a lab and analyzed. and if there are phones that have a sim card that may have been -- stayed intact in the crash, there is the possibility that passengers may have recorded video of the final moments. of course, all of this will be used as they try to put together a more complete picture of exactly what was happening. we already is a pretty complete picture, given the sense there has been so much information that has been leaked over the past week and a half. and, of course also information released including that analysis of the flight data recorder which shows that andreas lubitz intentionally set the plane on a course with the
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french alps and also increasing the speed of the plane as it went down hitting the mountain range at 420 miles per hour fred. there is also a task force that's been formed here in germany. their work will begin in force on tuesday. they'll be looking at every aspect of this crash investigation to figure out what went wrong and try to prevent it from ever happening again. fred? >> all right. will ripley thank you so much. let's talk more about this. i want to bring in from new york les abend, a cnn aviation analyst and pilot with thousands of hours of flying most of them on a triple 7. okay so given the information that will just gave us we're talking about the co pilot increasing the speed, which speaks to the premeditation of whether it be called a mass murder or a homicide. in your view even though it seemed already clear to investigators that the co pilot intentionally did this by locking the cockpit, by programming this rapid descent, in your view, what difference
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does it make this distinction in a criminal investigation, if the could pilot did it and he is dead does this remove any culpability from the airliner? how does this advance anything? >> well that's a great question fredricka. and i echo what will says with reference to this is just one phase of the investigation that is now complete. and i applaud the investigation team in the -- in the organized way they go about this. it's an example. anyhow i think to your question the problem stems from the initial screening process of this -- of this young man. i mean this is a friend of mine equated it to trying to get into harvard to qualify to get into this training program, which is a start from ground zero flight training program. somewhere along the line he was constantly supervised 250 hours worth of flight experience and simulator training all
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together. a lot of instructors should have observed this kind of behavior. and then as we know there's a report of him leaving, which is very untypical. >> the training. >> during the training process. exactly can. and this should have in and of itself thrown up a red flag. all through that process, and getting to -- back to germany to train on the airbus itself. somebody should have seen something that was off. and i think that's where we should look on this aside from the fact that he set the autopilot and let's extinguish between vertical speed and regular speed. he set the vertical speed. in other words, the descent rate down so they could reach the mountains quickly. >> this becomes less about the co pilot, because there should have been red flags and more about the airliner training or anyone around him, leaning to some culpability. leaning to some liability. why someone didn't say something sooner say enough.
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so then you're talking about broadening out, which potentially could be the lawsuits from the survivors of those killed who say, wait a minute lufthansa, germanwings, somebody knew something and didn't do anything to prevent this? >> yeah can right, fredricka. listen just -- i fly, you know with a time i have close to 25,000 hours of time. i fly with mostly one individual at this point in my career. and you get to know every aspect of that person's life even if it's the first time you've flown with them. sometimes you can spend 14 hours at a clip with that person in and out of the cockpit. and even on a layover. so you notice when something is a little bit off. even if it's a brand-new individual. so yeah i'm not -- i'm no psychiatrist. but i know pilots well enough to know that you know something isn't quite right. and i think lufthansa missed something in this whole process. >> maybe that's why the silence is so deafening from lufthansa
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or other fellow pilots anybody who knew him, except for the ex-girlfriend who we know has spoken to a publication. but it's been very quiet since hearing from the ceo initially at lufthansa. les abend, thank you. >> we're in shock as pilots. we really are. but thank you, fredricka. >> thanks so much les, appreciate it. from new york. still ahead, "fast & furious 7" speeding to the top of the box office. what's driving the success of paul walker his last movie? next. >> lives in a world that doesn't play by everyone else. like it or not, you and your friends are a part of it now. e with type 2 diabetes are learning about long-acting levemir® an injectable insulin that can give you blood sugar control for up to 24 hours. and levemir® helps lower your a1c. levemir® comes in flextouch® the only prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension. levemir® lasts 42 days without refrigeration.
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talk about being in the right place at the right time. a good samaritan springs into action to save a family from a burning rv. gail pascal brown from wesh has this amazing rescue. >> get your car off of me! >> reporter: ross thompson who happens to run a business called the rv doctor and his son were coming down u.s. 27 in lake county when they saw this motor home on fire. >> i looked over and i saw there was still a car attached to it and i was concerned and saw one man running around the outside, so i didn't think there was anybody else there. because it was so engulfed i figured they were outside. >> reporter: but they weren't. he helped to them while his son caught it on his cell phone. another man driving an
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18-wheeler also stopped to help. >> i noticed there was a foot sticking out the back window. so i stopped, we ran across up to the back window and rescued a mom and their daughter. and got them out. because they couldn't get out. they were trapped. the whole front end was en dwufl gulfed. >> reporter: joe riley and his friend and daughter were headed to michigan when his right front tire blew out. >> it seemed like the tire was ignited and on fire almost within milliseconds. and the flames just come up. i ran out the door with the fire extinguisher trying to put the tire out and got burned all over. >> he ran back into the coach, through the front firewall and was inside. and we couldn't find him. >> reporter: they did find him, riley went back for a second fire extinguisher. the tires were popping and melting from the flames. but there was another concern. a 100-pound propane tank underneath the coach. >> and the fire was working its way back towards it. so i was yelling at people to get away from the coach from the
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toxic fumes. if that tank blew it would have been worse. i think god put me there at the right place and right time to help people out. >> wow, frightening close call there. that was gail pascal brown from wesh reporting. all right. well it is now on the pace to be the biggest money-making film of the year. the seventh installment of the "fast & furious" series starring the late paul walker and vin diesel hit theaters this weekend. >> let's get to work. >> hey, are you freakin' out? >> no. >> yes, you are. >> should somebody just walk me through what we're supposed to be doing? >> jesse, you didn't think it could get any better huh? >> here we go. >> on the edge of your seat there with tyrese vin diesel. the list goes on. paul walker of course and lewd
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ludacris and brian stillter. what is it brian, about this movie. we know posthumously paying homage to wall pock paul walker. but there is something else. >> yeah there is others that is making this film a success. and who knew this was going to be a hit. but as the numbers are coming in this weekend, it's actually outpacing all of their projections. so as the hours go on it's doing even better than expected. look at this chart of all the top movies in april ever. this is opening weekends for big april movies. you see "clash of the titans" in 2010 "fast & furious" and "captain america" up until today the biggest april opening weekend ever. that made about $95 million. well "furious 7" will make $150 million this weekend. it's going to be way beyond any april movie opening weekend ever. by the way, it was pacing like 115, 120. then people started seeing it
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thursday night and friday. the analysts said maybe 130, 140. now this afternoon they're saying 150. universal is the maker of the movie. they're being cautious. they're saying 149.5 million. but no matter what it ends up being, it's going to be a record. >> so this is almost like a summer you know blockbuster movie season already. >> that's what's striking. what i'm about to say is ridiculous fredricka. it feels like spring barely in most of the country but in l.a. summer. this is the unofficial start of the summer movie season and that's what universal was hoping for. this is the kind of movie people would typically see in may or june or july or august. so by having it come out in april, hollywood is hoping this is the start of a very good summer box office season. last year was not so hot. earnings were down for a lot of the big hollywood studios. people started to wonder are people going to go to the movies in the age of netflix and amazon. >> i remember that conversation. >> something like this goes to show there are certain movies
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big franchises people do go to the movies to see. >> and you think about these stars in this series of movies they don't have to do anything else. who knew it would have this kind of longevity -- i know they want to do other things. but is that michelle rodriguez? she has made a name for herself in this movie series. and i heard her talking about how she never puts on you know a dress -- during these shows. and she finally got a chance to do that for the red carpet and how fun that was. but, you know ludacris even tyrese. >> by the way, you know, you're mentioning all these actors and actresses. many of them are various minorities. this is not a movie that reflects the america 50 years ago. this is a movie that reflects the america of today. we're also seeing that in television this season. all the biggest hits in prime time network tv are shows that have diverse casts. and universal was wise with this bringing on the rock for example, bringing on and keeping cast members. it really has a diverse reflection of the country. but i do think there's interest
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in paul walker and how they're able to have him in the movie. he's partly computer generated in the movie -- >> isn't his brother in some way -- didn't he have to play a role the completion of this? >> that's right. he filled in because they were still making this movie in 2013 when paul walker died. i'm sure some people are coming out to the theaters to see how they did it, to see how the movie happened. and for some fans it's been rather emotional to see the movie yesterday and to see him in it. the fact this is number seven -- the cultural critic dislikes these sequels. but people like him. box office movie-goers love sequels. that's why we see more than ever. >> i think i've seen the first one. i never followed throughout. but now i've got to see number seven too. i'm on board. all right, brian. thanks so much. appreciate it. good to see you. >> you too. much more in the "newsroom" right after this.
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all right. >> hello, i'm fredricka whitfield. this time of year it's nearly impossible to overshadow college basketball. but indiana, well it happened. more specifically it was the state's so-called religious freedom law, the legislation generated so much backlash that it prompted the state's biggest newspaper to print this not-so-subtle front page message to indiana governor mike pence. fix this now. the law was revised, and there was a similar story taking place in arkansas. governor asa hutchinson refusing to sign a religious freedom bill into law until it was revised to mirror federal legislation.
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joining me now, our cnn senior political analyst, ron brownstein brownstein elsy grammarson and page pate. before we begin, gentlemen, let me play this sound from mike huckabee a potential 2016 candidate, speaking this morning on cnn with michael smerconish. >> you said earlier this week it won't stop until there are no more churches. and it occurred to me and i listened to the totality of that interview, it wasn't the lgbt community that i think caused the reversal in both arkansas and indiana, but rather business interests. you know traditionally republicans supporting business interests, whether it's entities like walmart in your home state, angie's list in indiana. react to that alliance, the alliance between the gay/lesbian community and transgenders and
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those with the gop. >> well michael, first of all, the reason that those corporations put the pressure on indiana and arkansas was because the militant gay community put the pressure on them. i found it a little hypocritical when you have companies, even -- and i love walmart -- big company in my home state. but they do business in china, for gosh sake. i don't think the chinese are exactly the paragon of human rights. you've got apple computer they're selling apple computers in saudi arabia. is tim cook going to pull out of there? i don't think so. he doesn't mind making millions if not billions of dollars in cultures and countries where human rights are really an issue. and for anybody to try to draw some comparison between what's happening by not getting a wedding cake made and people having you know their hands cut off or being hanged or in prison i mean -- that's -- i find that a stretch. and i think these corporations
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really ought to either be consistent quit making money from these countries that are really oppressing human rights and quit bowing to the pressure and just sell their stuff. that's what they're in business for. sell stuff. >> but that's the argument -- but governor that's the argument that's made from the other side about the baker and the florist and the candlestick maker. you're in business to make a cake. just bake a cake and go home and be be a good christian, whatever that means. >> a lot of people will do that michael. they will bake the cake. but shouldn't they have the discretion? that's really once again the issue. if they want to turn the business down they're not turning down the business of being open being willing to serve any customer what they've got on the shelf. again, it's the religious liberty when people are asked to do something which they believe violates their conscience. >> all right. did this just become more complicated or is there more clarity here? so page to you first. huckabee is saying it's an issue of discretion versus
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discrimination. and he is drawing the parallels of human rights violations u.s. doing business with countries that are accused of such and so he's drawing some parallels to the religious freedom law. and that people should in the case of their religious beliefs be able to discriminate or in his view show discretion of who they want to do business with. >> well i think discretion -- >> i think this is becoming even more confusing as opposed to being more clear. >> i think it is. and that what happens whenever you try to mix politics and law. discretion is one thing. certainly a business has the right to decide hey, look this wedding is too big for me or too small for me. i don't want to do it. but if there is a state law or local ordinance or any type of regulation that says hey, business you can't discriminate based on race gender sexual orientation, then that law should be upheld. and i really don't think that these statutes will allow these businesses to discriminate. that was the intent. but when you look at how the
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statute read and is working in several states for 20 years, no one has been able to legally discriminate and use this law as a defense. >> but ron, isn't that where we're going with those who have been defending this law, that perhaps this will be license to discriminate? but they don't want to use the word discriminate. >> that is the charge. but i actually do think we have reached a moment of greater clarity and it's the opposite of what the sponsors of the law originally intended. i think the up shot of this enormous controversy in arkansas and especially indiana and the enlistment of the business community decisively on one side of this debate is to i think from this point forward to establish the principle that businesses are going to have to serve all potential customers, and that if you look at what was put in the law in indiana, it was the exact opposite i think of what the sponsors intended when they started out. and the idea that you would be able to say no we do not want to serve same-sex couples i think is now going to be increasingly outside the pail. >> so you're saying as a result
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of the revision offering clarity. >> i think it does offer clarity. >> okay. >> i think it does offer clarity, because i think politically it made clear the original position is untenable. >> all right. so lz this will carry on into the collections because mike huckabee is a candidate and very much defending this religious freedom. >> well you know first of all, i would like to challenge the idea that the original intent of writing this bill was about some of the issues that started with 20 some years ago when the federal law was first enacted. when you look at the time line when this went through the pipeline this came after indiana first tried to do a same-sex marriage ban and failed. this comes as mike pence's name is being floated around as a possible 2016 candidate. he ignored his republican mayor of indianapolis pleading with him not to sign this bill. he ignored the chamber of commerce pleading with him not
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to sign this bill because he wanted to make sure he has some sort of conservative cred to be able to tout if he didn't throw his name into that hat. so i'm not sure if the original intent really had to do with protecting religious freedom in the indiana bill. now, to answer your question further, when you look at mike huckabee who has a new book who is trying to test the awards himself and see if it you can get enough conservative energy to decide what he will do in 2016 it makes sense he would defend and criticize anyone who attacks this bill because like pence, he wants to position himself as a conservative favorite for the general election. >> and i wonder is it really about religious freedom, or is that just the title of this law? but, is there a knew anlsed language here instead, ron? is it really an issue of people feeling like their religious freedoms are being trampled on or threatened or is this a sake of using this word as a cloak in
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which to say there are some people who we don't believe are deserving of the same rights and freedoms as everyone else? >> well i think there's multiple things here. clearly, there are, you know people who feel their religious freedoms are being constricted by public policy decisions and we saw that with the hobby lobby case last year. but i think this does speak to a broader sense of unease in portions of the country about the cultural and demographic transition we are living through, which is profound. and what you see in mike huckabee's comments is an indication of kind of the magnet magnetic pull the pressure that republicans face. about half their base are evangelical christians primary voters. half the primary voters are regular church attenders. and many of those are unhappy with what's happening. the problem they've got is that the underlying current of public opinion and overall society is moving in the other direction. and what we have seen over the past week not only from mike pence but many of the 2016 contenders is how difficult it
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is to straddle that widening divide. and this is going to be a real challenge for them in 2016. they've got a lot to look forward to on the economy to argue about on foreign policy. but on these cultural issues a very difficult road i think, ahead, squaring the preferences of their base with the direction of the overall country. >> all right. everybody, thank you so much on that. i know we're not done with this topic. it will be back. thank you. all right. still ahead, the defense in the boston bombing trial rests after a day-and-a-half. now the real work begins trying to save dzhokhar tsarnaev's life perhaps. or are seeds being planted of reasonable doubt. we'll talk about that next.
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to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. ask your doctor about viagra. closing arguments in the boston bombing trial are monday after the prosecution spent weeks laying out their case in extreme detail a guilty verdict would seem like a foregone conclusion. in fact attorneys for dzhokhar tsarnaev even said it was him who helped carry out the attack in boston. they said that in the opening statement. well the defense team appears to be focusing more now on the sentencing phase. they're hoping to avoid the death penalty by convincing jurors that dzhokhar's brother, tamerlan was really the mastermind behind all of it. let's bring in our legal guys avery freeman, civil rights attorney and law professor in cleveland. good to see you. i like the pink.
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>> oh -- >> and new york criminal defense attorney and law professor joining us from honolulu. you've got the pink too. we've all got the pink memo. i like it. feeling it today. >> all balancing out. >> that's right. richard, you first. because, you know the defense says that dzhokhar was manipulated by his big brother. but did you hear that in court to convince the jurors that dzhokhar really had -- really no input in this entire operation, and that he was manipulated? that he was the victim? >> fred this is one of the most difficult challenges for any defense attorney a case like this. and i know the defense attorneys have done cases and done miracle cases where these defenses have saved the lives of the defendants. but this is boston massachusetts. this is a very proud community. this was the boston marathon.
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and the way the prosecution ended by showing bodies exploding at the finish line fred i don't care if the great daniel webster is resurrected in this case here. there is no way if i'm a juror sitting in this case i could possibly not vote for death penalty for this guy for fear of my own life living in boston. this guy, even though one-third of these federal cases get convictions, fred there is going to be enormous pressure on this jury to give death penalty. this will be a flash verdict monday going right to the penalty phase. there are no mitigations here. everything is aggravating. he's going to get the death penalty. >> and that would seem very convincing but avery, we are talking about a very catholic city. many catholics don't believe in the death penalty. but let's talk about in large part about what the defense tried to hammer you know the point. how they tried to hammer the point. five main points in particular. that tamerlan the big brother's fingerprints were on the tools. and the cell phone that dzhokhar had was compared to tamerlan's location.
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the jihadi propaganda on tamerlan's laptop. tamerlan's searches and dzhokhar's typical social media activity which seemed fairly innocent enough. is that enough to convince the jurors that he's deserving of the death penalty? >> well number one, there's no reasonable doubt, fredricka. we are quite correctly so looking at what's going to happen at the penalty phase. i agree. i see no mitigating consequences. the idea that tamerlan has the power -- you look at the video, you look at all the other elements that you've identified. i see no mitigation whatsoever. if there were ever -- and i have a problem with death penalty. i must tell you, fredricka, if there is any reason to have it it is dzhokhar tsarnaev. this is the case where it's warrant warranted. i don't see how -- and they are miraculous lawyers, have done great work. i just don't see how they beat
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death penalty here. >> yeah and that defense attorney has a track record of avoiding death penalty for many folks. eric rudolph among them. >> right. >> go ahead, richard. >> this is not virginia. this is not virginia. >> doesn't matter. >> this is boston massachusetts. >> doesn't matter. >> fred 19 years old when it happened. product of fractured marriage. extreme influence by his older brother. these are the arguments that are going to come in front of this jury. i think it's already in play. i think -- >> they're not going to work. >> avery and i agree, very rarely do we agree. but we do on this one. >> we agree today. >> i know. and it's quite enjoyable even when you do agree, because you still find things to disagree about. but bottom line on this one, you agree. just don't agree on how you get there. but that's okay. that's why we love you. >> well we got there. >> all right. richard, avery thank you so much. appreciate it and happy easter weekend. >> you too. >> all right. we'll be right back. why do we do it? why do we spend every waking moment, thinking about people?
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of the north georgia mountains, a famous moon shiner from the 1930s to the '60s. his whiskey was strong enough to fuel a car and cure the common cold. i was 2 years old when he died. i guess the recipes laid around until now. >> the moon shine is mainly corn brown corn and cane sugar. we are hand-crafted. the ladleing done by hand. >> this is done my granddaddy's gift shop. we can do tasting here. now we're in georgia and middle tennessee, but our goal is to get it in all 50 states. this is my granny's cooking recipe called apple brown betty. >> that's good! >> this is our 140-proof. high octane. >> music is my first love and my passion. i met waylon jennings when i was 13. now i'm the lead singer and it's called waymore's outlaws. ♪ we're the same old outlaws
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that we used to be ♪ >> what better thing to be doing than drinking when listening to music? >> let's have some moonshine now. what do you say? all right. the ncaa men's basketball tournament begins just hours from now. n indianapolis. four teams, thousands of fans college basketball's biggest weekend. what a combination. cnn sports anchor rachel nichols is live in indianapolis with a look at all of the action. that's a whole lot of excitement going oranges right? >> absolutely. the biggest storyline here is kentucky's quest for perfection. you, of course don't have to be perfect to win the ncaa tournament. you can have a loss along the way, but kentucky is trying to do the whole boat. it's been almost 40 years, fred since the team went undefeated all the way to win a championship and they're trying to become the first team since 1976 to do that. now, i sat down with coach john calipari and asked him, hey, is this really how you want to
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bring your team into the tournament? there's some coaches who feel like you should approach this a little differently. take a listen. >> there are some coaches who think, oh it's better to lose one along the way, relieve some of the pressure. do you put any credence in that or is that just an anathema to your competitive nature? >> no there's losing breeds losing. it puts losing in their minds. i don't believe that. and the only other thing is do you think there would be less pressure on us to win this thing, whether we had one 7-11? we're all in the same boat. everybody is 0-0 this weekend. >> now, of course kentucky has that mission, but wisconsin, the team they're going to be playing, fred they've got a mission of their own. wisconsin played kentucky in the same stage of the final four last year. they thought they had the game won, and then in the final seconds one of kentucky's stars, aaron harrison hit a three-point dagger just broke hearts across the midwest.
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so they want revenge. it's going to be a fantastic match-up. we've also got duke facing michigan state, which is kind of a cinderella pick the only number seven seed with a bunch of number ones. a fun day. >> and we're excited about your show coming up 2:30 eastern time. what should we look forward to because you're going to be joined by coach k too of duke? >> absolutely. we've got sitdowns with all the final four coaches, exclusive material a bunch of behind the scenes stuff with the players, things you don't get to see on the regular broadcast. if you're a fan of any of the teams or just love this event, even if you're not a huge sports fan, we bring you with all the character and flavor of the entire weekend. lots of fun. and i've got steve smith and clark kellogg joining me. a little cnn flavor bleacher report flavor everybody from the turner family coming. >> hence the word all access! we're there with you, 2:30 iron team. thanks so much rachel. so much more straight ahead
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in the "newsroom" after a short break. why are we so committed to keeping you connected? why combine performance with a conscience? why innovate for a future without accidents? why do any of it? why do all of it? because if it matters to you it's everything to us. the xc60 crossover. from volvo. lease the well equiped volvo xc60 today. visit your local volvo showroom for details.
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com p happening right now in the "newsroom," incredible stories andr p and surviving and surviving emerging from the studentsstudents whop students who survived a bloody collegep collegecollege campus collegep collegecollege campus assault
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in kenya. when the gunman came in she hid on top of a cupboard. >> one woman drank lotion in fact to stay alive for hydration, and another covered herself in her friend's blood. and then with just days to go before the city council election in ferguson, missouri we're getting a new look at racist e-mails sent by ferguson police officers including pictures of ronald reagan holding a baby monkey and the story behind that. plus -- >> get your car off of it! >> the race to save a family trapped in the back of an rv as it goes up in flames in florida. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." hello again and thanks so much for joining me i'm fredricka whitfield. today al shabaab is threatening more bloodshed in kenya, and the country's president is calling for three days of mourning for the 147 victims of thursday's
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terrorist massacre at a college campus there. at the same time we're learning of two remarkable tales of survival. helen titus stayed alive by lying on the floor, smearing her dead friend's blood on her own face and then playing dead herself. she said quote, i just soaked myself with that blood and they skipped me. for more than two days another young woman hid in a closet buried in clothes to avoid the terrorists. christian purefoye has more. >> reporter: fred it's at times of absolute horror like this you try to look for some hope. and that's what happened with 19-year-old cynthia, whose found in the top of a cupboard about 9:00 this morning after hiding for over 48 hours since the attack first began. she's told us all sorts of stories about how she survived. perhaps the most remarkable one is that she had to drink body lotion to try and rehydrate
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herself. here's what she had to say. >> and then i decided to go to the wardrobe. in the wardrobe we have a small room. small rooms. and then i covered myself with the clothes. then these people went in our room. and then they told my other roommates who had hidden themselves they told them to go out and when they were outside, they told them if you don't know how to read in the muslim word whatever you lie down. and then if you know you go to the other side. >> reporter: cynthia described how she kept her eyes closed but could still hear what was going on.
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how her friends were being made to lie face-counseldown on the ground. we spoke to one medic who went in with the military after the attackers were killed and he said he saw students on the ground face-down with bullet shots to the back of the head. sin is thea was still in shock when we met her, but when the military found her, they had to call the principal of the university to come back to the crime scene and tell her that these people were not going to hurt her. fred? >> all right, thanks so much christian purefoy reporting from comprehend kenya. three american women are now in federal custody, facing terror charges one accused of trying to join isis. according to court documents, key owna thomas posted statements on twitter that led officials to believe she was trying to smoreupport the terrorist organization. she also conducted online research into indirect travel routes into syria.
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if convicted, she could face 15 years in prison. i want to bring in jonathan gilliam, former fbi agent and navy s.e.a.l. we're talking about someone in the pennsylvania philadelphia area and other two women in new york who are now facing charges of conspiring about trying to build a bomb. so what does this say about the profiling of potential terrorists? we're looking at women and we're talking about not teenage girls who were you know looking for another life but now talking about grown women. >> right. you know fred we have to start looking at the reality of who could potentially be used as an attacker. you know in kenya, for instance they use kenyans to do a majority of the attacks, because it's easier for someone who is a native to blend in. of. >> and they believe many were kenyan because many witnesses say they heard the swahili being spoken. >> and it's much easier to use somebody of that nature there.
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here you know female -- using females, using children eventually could potentially happen. i've seen in iraq where during voting they have used somebody who had down syndrome and wheeled him up in a wheelchair and they you know blew that person up. these are the ways that we have to start forward thinking. and i applaud the fact they caught these people. but here's something that has to be pointed out. the muslim community, they're the front line of the defense on this truly. they have to start identifying these people themselves. and if they don't, and this comes out that there are people in these mosques, those mosques should be looked at heavily, heavily by law enforcement. >> so now this really is speaking to the terror at the root of terrorism. this means that everybody, no matter what your political, religious persuasion, you're now being conditioned to think that everyone is suspect or has the potential to carry out something
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to bring harm to you and your family in any place, whether you're in a public park on the subway. so this is the most difficult thing in which to defeat for law enforcement or for counterterrorism, because now it also means you're acting for people general populist. >> here's how you defeat that. it doesn't matter what color they are, male or female young or old. they're going to act a certain way when in a certain environment. when people are coming out of a baseball game they act a certain way. we're a lot like cattle. we move with the herd. but if somebody is acting differently, you can identify that behavior because it just doesn't fit in. and that's where the majority of people can really make the difference. you know what's normal. you come to work here every day. if you see something that's not normal, you report that. and you let law enforcement handle it. but if you just ignore it which, you know, i live in new york in a big city.
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you tend to just look the other way. it's time now to stop looking the other way. >> so back to your other point you were making about it really is put to the onus in large part on muslim community leaders. because that seems to be a common thread of some of these most recent arrests in particular. that they are alleging that it's their religious commitment to the muslim faith the islamic faith as to why they are doing these things. but then when you have mainstream muslim leaders who say, we are conveying that message, but we aren't worried about the faithful. we're worrying about those who are being convinced to perhaps either misconstrue the followings of islam or are showing other vulnerabilities as to why they are roped in. so who do you turn to? what do you do? >> good question. so here's what my recommendation is for the muslim community. take religion out of it. if someone is there and they're acting inappropriately, because there is an appropriate way to
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act when in a mosque. when you're a muslim in the united states there is an appropriate way to act. talking about killing and bombing people is not appropriate. >> is that a conversation that's right out in the open? >> inside -- no it's not out in the open. it's in the mosque. and a mosque is a closed community. islam is a closed community. so is judaism. so -- there's other religions and other aspects of everyday life that are closed. when something is not normal it's up to that mosque to make sure that they either take care of it or tell the authorities. but if -- >> and then i expect is that the conversation that's really happening in mosques? >> i can tell you from my past experience on the joint terrorism task force, there are pockets of things that happen in mosques, and the mosques know about it but they just don't want to do anything or say anything because of the heat that will come on them. i'm telling you, the day now has come where the heat is going to come on them if they don't take care of it themselves. you know i have some muslim
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friends, and we all agree that it's time for the muslim community to step up and start forward thinking this themselves and be an integral part in the solution not just trying to avoid the problem. >> jonathan gilliam, thank you so much. we'll talk again, because your expertise really is so widespread as a former navy s.e.a.l. former marshal. the list goes on. >> i get bored easy. >> that's the navy s.e.a.l. pin there. you've got your hands on all of it. we'll talk again about another topic coming up. thanks so much jonathan. still to come a roadside inforeigno and family desperate to escape. >> there is a foot sticking out the back window. >> you'll hear from a good sa samaritan samaritan. >> and voters go to the polls in ferguson, missouri tuesday. we'll talk about the potential change of city leadership and how it could potentially make a difference.
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tuesday is election day in ferguson, missouri. voters will be asked to elect a new city council. and for a city that has been struggling with racial tension following the shooting of michael brown, it is hoped a new city council will help bring some change. we're also learning details about the extent of the racially charged atmosphere in ferguson even before michael brown. e-mails are now being released from the doj investigation into wrongdoing by the police department. and they are ugly and offensive and help substantiate the doj conclusion that there was an atmosphere and culture of racial bias. these e-mails were sent between the city's top court clerk and two police supervisors, all of whom have been fired or resigned as a part of department of justice investigation. cnn's ryan young got a look at some of these e-mails. >> this first photo shows ronald
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reagan holding a monkey and the caption says rare photo of ronald reagan babysitting for barack obama in early 1962. you can feel the offensive nature by just looking at the photo. it moves on to show you more photos. they even target the first lady you can see a group of women. we blurred the top of the photo and it says this was a high school reunion for the first lady. >> all right. let's talk more about this. joining me now is cnn political commentator, lz granderson. good to see you. so i do not take pleasure in helping the hateful e-mails to get on an even bigger platform. but now that they have been publicized as a result of the doj investigation, in large part do you feel like publicizing this kind of hate also inspires people to perhaps go to the polls who may otherwise not find themselves going to the polls to vote on tuesday? >> you know that's going to be really difficult to figure out. of it's going to be a wait and
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see in my perspective. when i was down there covering ferguson one of the questions i asked repeatedly was why don't you vote why don't you vote. and there was a large sense of disenfranchisement and a lot of focus on trying to get people to register to vote in the months that follow michael brown's passing. but then the midterm elections came about, and those numbers were still poor. so even after all that was going on the midterm election comes through and voters did not come out to vote. 12% showed in april of 2014. i don't know you know if we can expect a large turnout or not. >> and well that really is disconcerting too, because that's another potential setback. because you heard, especially after the michael brown shooting and the unrest the racial strife there were many people who said if only we could take better control of those who are in positions of authority that perhaps that would help create a different atmosphere. and if you don't go to the polls, if you don't vote people
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in or out, then perhaps you can't really make an impact. >> you know we know from the stats that the majority of the people that did indeed vote voted democrat. and former congressman barney frank said something i'll always remember. and that is when the right gets upset, they march to the polls. and when the left gets upset, they march in the streets. well hopefully that changes. and people can finally feel empowered to go to the polls and make changes as necessary. i also want to caution, just because you've got black people in the city council doesn't mean things will change. the community itself still needs to roll up its sleeves and get things done for itself. it can't just say now we have a city council with three black people on it so that means there will be justice. that's not the way it's going to be done? >> but city council also plays a large role in the makeup of your police department your police chief. the hiring of officers as a result of the police chief or even sheriffs that are put into place, right?
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>> yes, absolutely. and i'm not trying to say that won't help in the process. but at the end of the day, the community itself needs to rally around each other, educate each other, make -- encourage each other, make sure they're getting registered to vote and stay on top of the issues. so they aren't just voting for people based upon skin color or party, but based upon actual facts they have researched themselves. >> right. that's the argument that has to be made. but then the question is who in that area is influential enough to help make that argument to help engage people to see that when you do go to the polls, there is a difference made because there is a sense of complacency by many that felt powerless and their vote doesn't matter. >> well historically in the african-american community, the black church has been the epicenter of us both in terms of socialism and as well as in terms of political activism. and when i was down there, many, many people who were in front of the microphones in front of
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crowds helping to keep the peace and inspire and motivate were from that cloth, that cloth in terms of religion in terms of pastors, people working in the clergy. so hopefully, what has long been a strong tradition of black community and church being active politically will continue to inspire people to go to the polls and as i said before make sure that they are informed so they aren't just voting based on knee jerk reaction but have done the work themselves so the people that represents them actually will be working for them. >> all right. lz granderson thank you so much. good to see you from new york. all right. still ahead, the most horrifying thing in the world. that's a quote. that is how a lawyer is describing a delaware family's dream vacation. he says they were apparently exposed to a pesticide in a nearby villa. why he likens that pesticide to sar ran nerve gas. across america people, like basketball hall of famer dominique wilkins, are taking charge of their type 2 diabetes... ...with non-insulin victoza. for a while, i took a pill to lower
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my blood sugar but it didn't get me to my goal. so i asked my doctor about victoza. he said victoza works differently than pills and comes in a pen. victoza is proven to lower blood sugar and a1c. it's taken once a day, any time. and the needle is thin. victoza is not for weight loss but it may help you lose some weight. victoza is an injectable prescription medicine that may improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes when used with diet and exercise. it is not recommended as the first medication to treat diabetes and should not be used in people with type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. victoza has not been studied with mealtime insulin. victoza is not insulin. do not take victoza if you have a personal or family history of medullary thyroid cancer multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2, or if you are allergic to victoza or any of its ingredients. symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include swelling of face lips, tongue or throat fainting or dizziness, very rapid heartbeat
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the most horrifying thing in the world. that's how one describes a delaware family's dream vacation. this after apparent exposure to a strong pesticide in the virgin islands last month. they were found in their luxury villa next to another that had been treated with pesticides. the father is now in a coma. the mother and two teenage boys at the time having seizures. the two boys are still in critical condition, and one with brain damage.
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and now the u.s. justice department is launching a criminal probe. cnn's sara gamin joins me. >> reporter: i talked to that family attorney and thankfully the parents, theresa divine and steves is doing better. the boys are still in critical condition in a coma at children's hospital in philadelphia. their attorney told me they are in quote, rough shape. he said the whole family was airlifted here after falling ill after a fumegation of a villa beneath the one where they were staying at the resort on st. john in the u.s. virgin islands. this is very scary, fred. the little boy -- the older boy, i'm sorry, had blood in his lungs. he had -- was near heart failure. his heart was failing. and one of the boys now has brain damage. now, of course they're both recovering at the hospital but
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the parents' conditions are improving slightly. the attorney told me that the father has woken up from his coma. he's conscience but can't talk. and the mother was released from the hospital to occupational therapy, because she had been exposed to a lesser degree of this chemical. now, the attorney also told me that this is a long recovery because this chemical is like sarin gas. and the environmental protection association says traces of methel bromine were found indoors, even though it's not legal to use it inside in the u.s. because of its acute toxicity. now, the resort which is owned by sea glass vacations, told us the pest control company, termin ex fumigated march 18 right in the middle of the family's nine-day vacation. the epa clearly states meth al
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bromine is restricted because it's odorless and causes injury to the lung system and can be fatal when inhaled. >> gosh. so now we're talking about the punishment. the culpability. who is to blame here. and how this resort is going to endure that. are we talking about department of justice looking at criminal investigation, which leads to fines? or what would happen? >> the u.s. criminal justice department -- u.s. department of justice has opened an investigation. they're looking into it. so is the epa. epa was sent down by a u.s. senator and there is an open investigation. termin ex said they are cooperating with authorities. they said we're thinking about the family and we join the community in wishing them a speedy recovery. a spokeswoman for the epa told us they are actively working to determine how this happened.
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and how to make sure they -- they take steps to make sure it doesn't happen to others. at these vacation apartments or anywhere else. >> anywhere. yes. it's unbelievable. sara thank you so much. all right. straight ahead, we've got so much more in the "newsroom." the iran nuclear deal is signed and sealed. well not really. it's going to be signed and sealed eventually if there are no new renovations made by june 30. but what happens in the meantime? next.
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all right. welcome back to the "newsroom." now that president obama has a framework of a nuclear deal with iran the white house has unleashed practically all of the top lieutenants to sell this agreement to u.s. congress. cnn's sunlen serfaty is at the white house. this is unprecedented if you talk to people who say they never remember a deal like this being offered to get iran to come to the table like this. so what is the sell to u.s. congress? what are they working on? >> well it is a big sell fred. and this has been an aggressive full-court press by the white house to sell this deal especially to congress. they know that many members of congress are skeptical. so president obama is reaching out directly himself. he's on the phone, calling members of congress reaching
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out to the top four congressional leaders. even bringing this big sales pitch to his weekly address. >> this framework is a result of tough principle diplomacy. it's a good deal. a deal that meets our core objectives including strict limitations on iran's program and cutting off every pathway that iran could take to develop a nuclear weapon. >> and the big argument the white house is making to members of congress is that they want members to look at what the alternatives to this deal would mean. they say it would be a greater risk for war and less accountability for iran. now, some on congress don't buy that argument including republican senator tom cotton. >> this deal still may not be consummated by june. but the alternatives to this deal is a better deal with continued pressure through the credible threat of military force. and more sanctions. and if necessary, having to take military action.
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>> reporter: and there are a series of bills just lined up waiting to go ready for when congress gets back from recess in two weeks. these bills are going to challenge the president on the details of this bill -- of this deal that's being worked out with iran. and the white house has issued at least one veto threat here on one of the bills most notably by senator bob corker getting a lot of democrats, fred to sign up on that bill. there are many democrats who say they want more say in the final contours of the deal that gets worked out through iran. so this is going to be a messy fight ahead. >> yeah it does seem messy and it's two to three months in the making of it right? sunlen certify vatty, thank you. congress getting on board for the framework with iran. let's bring in larry sabido from the university of virginia, and ron brownstein senior political analyst and editorial director of the national journal.
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good to see you. so larry, you first. is this, you know usually the order of business? how customary is this that the secretary of state would carry through this kind of diplomacy at the request of the white house, a framework with five other nations developed, and now u.s. congress could vote on a bill as it pertains to sanctions before this multinational june 30th deadline could come to fruition? >> well this is unusual procedure in a number of ways. but remember fred the white house has defined this eventual agreement as an outline now. the agreement, if reached, would occur in june. this is an executive agreement, meaning the president can implement it unilaterally as opposed to a treaty which would require a vote of the u.s. senate and two-thirds of the senators present voting voting to affirm the treaty. now, the question really is whether congress is going to take action in the interim
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between now and june to make the situation more complex. everybody agrees that congress is going to have to take a vote at some point. about the sanctions issue. they levied sanctions against iran and they're going to have to remove them at some point. >> well that's -- can i stop you right there? >> sure. >> is it really removing sanctions, or is it relieving sanctions? because we see some congressional leaders are using the language saying removing or lifting sanctions, but the white house is saying relieving sanctions. is this a battle of semantics? is it different or really the same? >> no i think it's much more than semantics. you know fundamentally, you have republicans, but also a lot of democrats who simply don't support the iran deal. but remember the president has the veto pen. and it's still going to be difficult, although it's possible to get two-thirds votes in both the house and the senate to override a presidential veto which has never happened during the obama
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administration. >> okay. so ron, take it from here. because there are some members of congress who are arguing this is not going to be an issue of veto power for the president. >> well look i think that from an institutional, as well as ideological perspective, congress is going to get a say on this. i think the administration is coming to recognition that congress -- members of congress are going to want to vote and are probably going to give themselves the ability to you know render a verdict on this. now, the question will be whether that is done in a way that has the ability to overturn the agreement. and i think that democrats who would be required to reach that two-thirds majority to overturn the veto are going to be very reluctant to do anything between now and june that would be seen as scuttling the talks, particularly because a number of voices have viewed the preliminary agreement as stronger on many fronts than expected. so i think from an institutional purgative point of view congress is going to have some say on this. it is very much an open
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question though, whether democrats, though many are skeptical, are going to be willing to provide the votes to ultimately derail the negotiations. >> and all of this is very complex, but perhaps making it more complex, you've got senator bob menendez whose name is on both congressional bills, that speak to sanctions as it pertains to any kind of iran deal. and now he's facing you know a dozen charges, bribery charges among them. so one has to wonder how much his fate or his legal battle in any way as a distraction or impacts what congress can or cannot do as it pertains to this iran deal or these bills -- these proposals at hand larry. >> well menendez was a problem for the administration. and he was a strong opponent apparently of the iran deal. but, of course now that he's been indicted even though he's remaining in the senate even though he retains his floor privileges he is no longer the ranking member -- ranking
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democratic member on foreign relations. so in a sense, that's a break for the administration. also i agree with ron that once this is passed i think the corker bill will be passed. it will be sent to the white house. the president is going to veto it. and at that point, the president and the white house will be able to convince enough democrats, particularly in the senate not to derail these negotiations and to sustain the veto. so we're just going to delay this until the end of june or july of the summer. eventually congress is going to have to do something about the sanctions, although the president does have the right to lift the sanctions for up to two years. >> all right. and ron, last word on that. ten seconds or less. >> real quick. i think, fred, in many ways the debate may be less about the specifics of this deal than about whether to deal with iran at all. i mean the argument from prime minister netanyahu has been echoed by a lot of the republican critics, which is do we want to make a deal with iran at all while they are in so many other ways pushing against our
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interests in the middle east. and i think that threshold question is going to be hard to argue that you could get a much better deal than iran would sign absent military force, which as you saw tom cotton open the door to. >> yeah, he sure did. >> but short of that i think the key is going to be whether you want to deal with them at all. and that's going to be a threshold the president has to cross. >> and the president has the last word and says it's not an issue of politics but one of war and peace and he is deferring to peace. we'll see what happens. larry saab dough, ron brownstein thanks so much. and we'll be right back.
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a terrifying scene on a florida highway. an rv engulfed in flames with a mother and daughter trapped inside. a good samaritan explains the rescue. >> get your car off of it! >> reporter: ross thompson who happens to run a business called the rv doctor and his son were coming down u.s. 26 in lake county when they saw this motor home on fire. >> i looked over and i saw there was still a car attached to it. and i was concerned. i saw one man running around the outside, so i didn't think there was anybody else there. >> reporter: but they weren't. he went to help while his son caught it on his cell phone. another man driving an 18-wheeler also stopped to help. >> i noticed there was a foot sticking out the back window. so i stopped, we ran across right away ran up to the back window and rescued a mom and their daughter. and got them out. because they couldn't get out.
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they were trapped. the whole front end was engulfed there was to way they were going through the front door. >> wow. and with the quick action of those good samaritans everyone was able to walk away from that inferno with no injuries. all right. a look at our top stories now. record rainfall in kentucky led to widespread flooding in louisville and dozens of water rescues for fire and police teams. officials say they know of at least one fatality. a woman who drowned trapped in her car, caught in high water. and an escaped inmate is back in custody following a statewide manhunt across illinois. convicted murderer kammron taylor was captured this morning when someone alerted police to a suspicion person who turned out to be the wanted criminal. taylor broke out of jail two days ago after assaulting a prison guard. and now video you just have to watch. this is round rock texas, where police gave chase -- when a buff loan known as big boy jumped his
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barbed wire fence and made a run for it. it's the sixth time he has escaped this week. so big boy's owner says he's looking for a new home where the buffalo can roam. college basketball's biggest weekend is here. the ncaa men's basketball tournament begins just hours from now, and the ncaa was also in the news this week for its strong influence on indiana's controversial religious freedom law. rachel nichols is live now in indianapolis. so let's talk about this confluence of events. the law was impactful, but at the same time some in the ncaa who made an impact on that law. >> reporter: absolutely. remember the ncaa is headquartered here in indianapolis. they are a major employer about 500 people. plus much more importantly, they bring business events like the
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final four to indianapolis pretty often. and these four days are expected to bring half a billion dollars to this community. that is a big foot to be able to put down. and that really speaks to the power of sports in this country. we love sports. it is a place we put a lot of our money. so when sporting organizations want to make a push with social change they are a big economic engine to do so. the ncaa president got involved. actually met with the governor here and senior republican lawmakers. and told them that this is not an environment that they would feel comfortable doing business in the future if they didn't make an amendment to this law. so some very serious threats here by the ncaa. i sat down with kentucky coach john calipari to talk about the impact of the organization at large and why it was so important for them all to get involved. take a listen. >> look i'm in a seat and i say this all of the time. that if i just watch game tape i'm cheating the position.
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you're in a position to do good. to move people in the right direction. or in the wrong direction. and i think what we're doing as coaches, all of us to say this is where we stand on this. >> reporter: all four coaches involved here in the final four came out against the initial law, asking for an amendment. the ncaa as i said got very involved trying to help broker behind the scenes that amendment. and they have issued a statement since saying they are pleased with the direction things have gone here in indianapolis. >> wow, very influential. all right, rachel nichols, thanks so much. and you can see more of rachel and her team 45 minutes from now. she's going to be with steve smith, clark kellogg, with her special "all access" at the final four, starting 2:30 eastern time. still to come the mystery of mary magazine da-lynn and the persistent questions of whether she was the wife of jesus.
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all right, a reminder tonight's ncaa games are on tbs. you can listen to the local broadcasters on trutv and tnt. enjoy the final four. some biblical scholars say
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mary magdeline could have played a role of lover and wife to jesus. we take a deeper look at their lives and the speculation the two may have been married and may have been parents. >> another lost gospel that of phillip, suggests a different reason for peter and the other disciples apparent dislike of mary. >> all of those tantalizing theories about jesus and mary gagdalene really jump from one passage, the juiciest stuff we have ground zero for the theories there was a relationship between jesus and mary magdalen. >> in the early christian communities, mostly missionaries were missionary couples. it makes sense that jesus himself could have been part of one. >> as a first century jewish
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man, it would have been incredibly likely jesus woef been married during his lifetime. >> this is high stakes stuff, so if jesus, the son of god, was married, maybe he had children. if he had that intimate relationship people want to know and if he had children, there could be people wobd wondering around today with holy blood in them. >> oh, my. joining us from new york one of the religious scholars seen in the clip, you seemed very excited about the notion of these two being together and not just being together but maybe being married and possibly being parents. make the convincing argument why people should be on board with that. >> the more convincing argument for why they should be on board? well here's one part of the argument. that is that as josh said on "finding jesus" in the clip you saw, it would be unusual for
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jesus, as a jewish man, around the age of 30, not to have been married, and you have suggestive references in the new testament text and other texts that do not make it into the new testament saying there is a partnership there. what we've been trying to do in the show in particular, and what i've tried to do in my work is get deeply into the issue and figure out if there's truth behind the idea perpetuated in places like "the da vinci code." >> what more evidence is there that viewers of this finale can feel enlighten by? >> evidence is a really tricky thing dealing with texts that are this old. there's so much we don't know. unfortunately. that for me that's the mystery of the work that makes it exciting, trying to really tease out what we've got. there is not any evidence. i'll just lay it out there. there's 0 evidence that jesus
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and mary magdalene were married. last week a text came out introduced by karen king at harvard referring to jesus speaking about his wife. he does not say his wife as mary magdalene, but my wife dot, dot, and then it breaks off. we don't have any other information. that's the first time there's ancient text he refers to his wife. we don't know if that's forged text. that's something we are working on, carbon dating to figure it out. what we do in "finding jesus" is look at other texts we've had that talk about the relationship between jesus and mary magdalene. they say she was his companion and loved her more than all the other disciples, which is interesting. she's put in with the disciples,
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and there is evidence for at least one of the disciples, peter not cool with that saying you love her more than you love us to which his answer is more or less like duh, why do i love her more than i love you. is that evidence -- >> i'm sure he said it just like that. >> exactly, just like that, that's how jesus spoke in the first century, but there's no other direct evidence. there's evidence that's from absence in a way that when mary magdalene is spoken of in the new testament, she's associated with a place. usually when women are spoken about in ancient text they are associated with a man, right? it's the wife of so and so or the mother of so and so and mary magdalene is just associated with a city. that's an interesting thing. again, it does not say they are married, but what is says maybe she was not married, but associated with him in other
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ways. >> fascinating stuche inging stuff, and we'll watch it. thank you so much. >> thank you. >> be sure to tune into the season finale of "finding jesus" tomorrow night at 9:00 right here on cnn. across america, people are taking charge of their type 2 diabetes... ...with non-insulin victoza. for a while, i took a pill to lower my blood sugar but it didn't get me to my goal. so i asked my doctor about victoza. he said victoza works differently than pills and comes in a pen. victoza is proven to lower blood sugar and a1c. it's taken once a day, any time. and the needle is thin. victoza is not for weight loss but it may help you lose some weight. victoza is an injectable prescription medicine that may improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes when used with diet and exercise. it is not recommended as the first medication to treat diabetes and should not be used in people with type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. victoza has not been studied with mealtime insulin. victoza is not insulin.
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hello, again, everyone and thank you so much for joining me. this hour we learn about a breathtaking story of survival from the massacre in kenya, a 19-year-old hid in the closet for more than two days buried in clothes and drinking body lotion for hydration. now she's safe. families of the 147 victims of the terrorist attack are grieving and kenya's president is calling for three days of mourning to honor them, and even before the dead can be buried al shabab terrorists issued another warning saying the cities will run red with blood. let's bring in david mckenzie.latest on the threat and the president's words of mourning? >> reporter: they threatened cities saying they will be bathed in blood and will continue terrorist attacks on kenya in the wake of this deadly
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ter were atok that left more than 140 dead in this school this university here in northeast kenya. we were with the students those who survived saying many of the class mates have been killed some are still say are missing, and they were taken to safety today, out on busses back to the capital nairobi. meanwhile, that story of a 19 -year-old student who hid in a closet underneath clothes for 48 hours. she would not come out when the police came and asked her to come out. she asked for the school principal to come so she felt convinced she was safe. >> wow, unbelievable. the president says there's three days of mourning for those kill yet, at the same time facing a threat from al shabab saying there's more. how can this country try to better secure itself? >> reporter: it's a very difficult proposition certainly,
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here in this part of kenya, borders with somalia they are porous people slip in and out, and what we learned about the gunmen is perhaps they spent significant time in kenya speaking swahili and a local township language which suggests they could have deep ties in kenya. the most wanted in this case is someone who spent a lot of time in kenya, and rs in fact in fact was a kenya-s kenya-s kenya-somali. we have a link to home grown terror. they will continue to fight in kenya, taking soft targets until the military moves out. a disturbing thing that happened today i feel i should share, the kenya authorities placed who they say were the dead gunmen after many hours of them being dead in the back of the truck, drove them through town we were on scene, and somehowed them to
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the townspeople to prove that they had, in fact killed them and they do not get away, horrifying scenes. they took the bodies to a primary school to a soccer field, in fact to show them to the population. so, certainly, very raw emotions here in northeast kenya. the president says he will vow to retaliate by any means necessary, but he faces an extremely interesting proposition to stamp out the threat. >> terribly sad situation. thank you so much. meantime the u.n. security council is holding an emergency meeting. russia called the meeting to push for break in fighting to let workers and the country into the country, and the international red cross also called for 24-hour halt in the fighting. all of this as new pictures appear to show an al qaeda leader in one of the presidential palaces. cnn cannot confirm authenticity of the photos and more than 200 others were freed from prison by
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al qaeda militants earlier in the week. the u.n. estimates that at least 519 people have been killed since the saudi-led air strikes began last month. they are trying to remove rebels from yemen backed by saudi arabia's chief rival, iran. the last investigators left the crash site in the french alps. they are focusing on analysis of the flight data recorder which now shows the co-pilot lubitz purposely used the controls to speed up the plane's decent for it crashed, and they are looking at cell phones recover the from the crash site. here's a look at the develops now. we are following the investigation from germany, and we have a criminal defense attorney who has handled numerous federal cases and has helped resolve international criminal cases around the world, and we have a former fbi agent
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and former air martial. will to you first, does this mean that the ground investigation is over? that investigators now left that french alps site? >> right. the investigation in the french alps is over a new development as of today. this says they have recovered the key pieces of evidence talking about the two black boxes, the flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder. they recovered dna profiles for 150 people, of course because of the force of the impact the plane hilting at 400 miles per hour there were no in tact remains, which think about the fact that tomorrow's easter this is not the easter that those families were planning for. they recovered those recovered 470 personal facts, including, as you mentioned, 40 cell phones most of them severely damaged, but they'll look through the phones specifically to see if they can glean anymore indication of what was happening
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in the final moments of the flight if there's video or whatnot, but to the investigation, even though the crash site is cleared, it will continue for many months in laboratories in warehouses and they will clear out the rest of the debris later this week and bring it to a separate location as well fred. >> thank you so much. let's turn to paige to talk about the investigation. will said the ground investigation is over because searchers left the french alps but that does not mean the entire investigation is over. in fact, it means the homicide or murder investigation is really just in its infancy. when you hear this paige, first of all, the evidence is clear that the co-pilot did this intentionally. he's dead. why does there need to be an investigation tagged murder or homicide. what's that infer what's next? >> well i mean, a great question. a lot of people wonder why do a criminal investigation if the co-pilot is dead. you can't imprison him.
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he's no longer with us. you can't go after his family because he did this. under european law in france and germany, there's the possibility of prosecuting a corporation, a business. >> now you're talking the owners, the managers. >> and supervisors, and assuming no one was involved in planning this there's a criminal case for not murder but a manslaughter type defense based on negligence. should you have known he was in this position? >> does that mean the doctors are in the realm as well? >> there is that patient-doctor confidentiality, but in a case like this talking about life or death or someone's job puts the lives of hundreds you know potentially in peril, does that change the investigation? >> it does. there's a responsibility. it's the same for lawyers as well. most of our considerations are privileged but if you tell me something that i believe is going to lead to a future crime, then i have an obligation to disclose. >> okay, so, when we talk about
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culpability, those knowing how much they knew at what stage of the game how do investigators get at that? there's been notes that the investigators found at the apartment of the co-pilot but does there need to be more that shows that more people knew where there were red flags? >> the way investigation unfolds is think of it as a pie, and there's different pieces of the pie. once you get one piece, you start to work that piece and try to develop a full pie, right? and what -- you were just saying a second ago there, about if an attorney knows about something, it's their responsibility for a future crime to then report that. the same thing has, you know is the case with the medical industry and i really think as investigators go forward, they know it was not mechanical errors in the plane so they can concentrate on the fact on what balls were -- where they drop the ball as far as the medical industry the airline industry,
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love than za who knew there were issues with the guy. i see lawsuits all over the place with this. >> it seems like it. thank you so much i know we got so much more you know that makes this case makes us curious, but i have a feeling we'll talk about it again. it's not over. it really is just the beginning. thank you so much. still ahead, the amazing rescue story of a cast away who says he spent 66 days stranded at sea. it's a remarkable story. do you believe it? next.
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24-year-old tyler and brook are the founders of yik yak. you can send anonymous messages and receive chatter in a 1 preponderate 5 mile radius. >> we saw a problem where there's select few twitter accounts that held the campus voice. everyone should be able to have this power, and so we democracy it and gave it to everyone. >> fast forward a year later, the app is exploding on college campuses across the country. >> basically, every campus in america.
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>> at vanderbilt they posted something about his brother getting a full body blood trapsz fusion and 700 people showed up to match this brother. >> that's the upside of the anonymous discussion forum. downside? anonymity leads to bullying or harassment. >> how do you help with the cyber bullying? >> we have filters for name personal information, just generally offensive things. >> they have growing pain one professor complained after discovering demeaning yaks after her lectures. >> for the people who have been bullied or bully, what's the responsibility? >> there's federal laws in place preventing sharing user information, so that we're limited in way we can do that but in cases of imminent threat or harm we work with law enforcement to do what we can. >> a man adrift on the ocean is
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rescued after more than two months. he says he's grateful to be alive, but others think his story may be too good to be true. martin savage has more on the story of survival. >> reporter: frank jordan hugs the son he thought was dead and by all rights louis jordan should be. the unemployed truck driver lived aboard his sailboat in south carolina. last january, he headed out to sea, he say rs to go fishing. bad timing. >> this reporter hanging on for dear life hanging on to her vehicle there. >> reporter: remember the blizzards this winter? they caused huge waves at sea, sending his boat tumbling. >> capsized and i broke my shoulder and many things were broke. >> reporter: a rollover in a storm can be a sailor's worst
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nightmare as depicted in "all is lost." for jordan it was just beginning. with his mast and rutter broken electronics fried, jordan says he was on his own. he may have battled 19 more storms and weather fronts off the carolina coast, running out of food and water so he collected rain to drink and grabbed fish with his hands. >> put hand in there slowly and him up quick. >> after 66 days rescued by a container ship 200 miles from the nearest land. a coast guard helicopter raced to the scene lifting jordan from the deck and to his heart sick parents raising him from the dead. >> in the cabin, eyes in the cabin. >> but when jordan walked from the helicopter into the hospital he looked good. incredibly good.
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>> you'd expect severe sunburns blisters a bunch of medical issues that could be wrong with him. >> reporter: rescue swimmer was the first to care for him on the flight back to land. >> for him to be in his current state was amazing. >> coast guard officials said they found no reason to doubt jordan's story, noting his father contacted them january 29th to report his son and boat missing. >> here it is. >> reporter: and petty officer got another view of jordan only those on the rescue chopper could see. jordan's face, when they reached shore. >> when we got over land there was the biggest smile on his face and you could tell he had been through something serious. >> way what a story, thank you so much. still to come it's april, but there's plenty of march madness left. set for tonight's final four tipoff and we are joined live from indianapolis next. in my world, wall isn't a street. return on investment isn't the only return i'm looking forward to.
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all right. the ncaa men's basketball tournament begins hours from now in indianapolis. four teams, thousands of fans issue and college basketball's biggest weekend. cnn sports anchor is live for us now in indianapolis. so everyone's asking the questions, you know can kentucky become the first team to go undefeated go all the way? your predictions?
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>> reporter: this has become a huge story line, fred. look, it's not enough to try to win the ncaa tournament or anything, but now they have tor perfect. but that's the position they put themselves in, and i sat down with the coach and asked how he prepared his team this week and he used an unusual analogy, you know the famous triple crown winning horse, secretary? that's how he brought it up this morning, even though kids were not alive. take a listen. >> secratariat was told to back you have he's going to win, he's fine, don't go too hard. the trainer said this horse runs he loves to run. that's what we're doing. he trained him even harder. and they won the bby 26 lengths. this is my message the last week i trained them hard. we scrimmaged. i know it's dangerous. we scrimmaged. >> no injuries right?
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>> believe me i walked out of the gym, like oh. >> so those kentucky players are ready, and we'll bring you so many of those kinds of stories coming up just next on the final four all access bleacher report special we have here on cnn at 2:30. you'll see me ditch the jacket run inside and give you great stuff with clark kellogg and steve smith. we have coming up later on our sister network, watch the main broadcast of the games on tbs, just the regular broadcast for all of us national fans but if you have a big duke fan, and you want to go to tnt, find a team stream duke flavored broadcast, or trutv, a michigan state flavored broadcast. later, there's kentucky they will be on tnt, which for the kentucky fans, wisconsin fans tune into trutv for your game and the rest of us are straightforward broadcasts watch on tbs.
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we'll be glued to the sets ratings off the charts and people are loving the turn. fred i can't wait. >> i love it. no excuses, we'll take you there. if you're not there, you will be there by way of all the different routes. >> soon. >> that's cool. thank you so much appreciate that. >> reporter: i'm going to run inside. see you soon. >> ditch the coat head inside for all access at the final four that's today at 2:30 eastern time just five minutes to run inside, rachel, hurry, hurry. we'll be right back in a moment.
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all right. checking the top stories now, the u.n. security council is holding an emergency meeting at it pertains to yemen now, an arab led coalition continues to bombard rebel targets and the u.n. estimates at least 519 people have been killed since last month. saudi arabia is trying to remove rebels from the area. after slaughters 147 people at a college in northern kenya this
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week al shabab terrorists threaten to strike again releasing a statement, quote, our message will be written to you not by words, but with the blood of your people. dig their graves and prepare their coffins now. thank you so much for being with me here in the news room. right now, all access in indianapolis with rachel. >> reporter: welcome to indianapolis. we are inside lucas oil stadium. you know as home to the indianapolis colts during football season but this weekend, it's home to the time four. in the next half hour you'll get an exclusive behind the scenes look behind the biggest event of the year, the coaches, the player the emotion of the event gripping the entire country. this is all access at the final four of the cnn bleacher report special. >> everyone talks about g

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