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tv   CNN International  CNN  April 5, 2015 2:00am-3:01am PDT

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a somber day in kenya as the nation mourns those killed in the al shabaab attack. this, as survivor stories reveal the extent of the horror. a little rain can't stop the masses as pope francis presides
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over easter mass at the vatican. a live report coming up from rome. the ultra thin models joined by the man who asked israel to do the same thing. welcome to viewers in the united states and around the world. you are watching cnn news room. we begin this hour in kenya. the african country is observing three days after national mourning after the university massacre. thursday, al shabaab stormed the campus of the college killing 147 people and injuring close to 100. kenya's president vowed retaliation for the attack and condemned those who support al shabaab. take a listen. >> we tell those that believe it is possible in kenya. we are one indy visible
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sovereign and democratic state. that fact will never change. our forefathers bled and died for this nation and we will do everything to defend our way of life. >> as you can imagine, emotions remain high since the devastating attack. that may explain the unusual move authorities took with the bodies investigators say were involved in the rampage. they paraded them through the streets. david reports but we must warn you the image you are about to see are disturbing. >> reporter: a gruesome parade through the town. the images far too shocking to show unblurred. following a convoy now. the police have piled what they say are the terrorist bodies into the back of a truck. the whole town is coming out to see. the alleged gunman locked in an embrace, wrapped in an orange top driven to a primary school for viewing.
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in the baking sun, the stench is overpowering. some in the crowd want more. you want them to be burned? >> yes. >> reporter: why? >> because they are the ones that killed innocent children. >> reporter: perhaps they want to prove their killed the gunman or perhaps they just want to avenge the dead. they are driving the van next to the crowd so people can inspect the bodies. it is getting chaotic here. they skirt away those suspects of killing so many. now they evacuate the students who survived the terror, searching their bags for explosives, universities shut down. clinton says his girlfriend was murdered with six of her friends. he says the gunmen slit the throats of the men because they didn't want to waste their bullets. >> they were slaughtering. >> reporter: these students came
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here to build a better life. now, they are leaving broken. their friends lost in brutal violence. their future is uncertain. cnn, kenya. >> for more on the story, we bring in soni for the latest on the attack. she joins us live from nairobi. you have been speaking to some of the survivors of the attack. what have they been telling you? >> reporter: a lot of anger. emotions are still very high here, not just from the survivors but from the kenyans. yesterday, members of the public from the area with a high population of somalis there. they took to the streets protesting the idea of creating a sectarian divide between muslims and christians and we expect more protests. there's also a demand by the opposition.
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some members of the opposition for kenya to pull out defense forces. there's already exhaustion and impatience when it comes to the public. you can imagine how the families are feeling. yesterday, about ten buses left. more than 600 students and 15 members of staff who survived the attack were taken to their homes as some of them arrived here in nairobi. most parents were advised all the students will be brought here and some of them were disappointed because some buses left directly to their homes. as you notice, most of the students were from other parts of the country. we talked to a few people who are still struggling to find their loved ones. the last messages they had from them was on thursday for most. they say they haven't been able to contact them since they have looked through the list of those survived to the list of those in the hospital and the mortuary.
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it was a very cold and wet night in nairobi. they have gone through such a long journey, more than five hours drive to nairobi. their bus broke down on the way. one student fainted. most of them were still in their bare minimums that they were wearing when the attack happened. they were happy to be reunited. one gentleman was waiting to be reunited with his loved one. one woman was very emotional. take a listen. >> translator: i came here at 6:00 a.m. this morning and i have been waiting. i have been waiting. i was holding out hope i would see my sister. i'm very excited. god loves me. i'm very excited. i don't even have words. very happy. >> with your friends, watching bullets. thank god i made it.
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>> well, the government has released a picture of a most wanted man who is said to be the master mind of this attack. five people are in custody. three were caught trying to flee to somalia. they coordinated the attack and two others found within the school. one is a tanzania. another is said to be a guard in the school. he is said to have helped the perpetrators. according to the students, they knew their way around the school and this could explain the reason. >> one of them could have been a guard. soni with us from nairobi. the time is seven minutes past midday. thank you very much, soni. i want to turn your attention to yemen. fighting is escalating between
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houthi rebels. security officials say saudis are targeting military officials within yemen's capitol. is u.n. says people have been killed in the conflict in two weeks. a man from the state of california died in a rebel attack last week. his family says he was visiting his wife and child to try to bring them back to the united states. this video shows french forces evacuating dozens of people out of yemen. things are so bad, russia and the red cross issued a cease-fire for people to get food, water and aid. richard has more on that side of the story. >> the u.n. heard russia present a draft resolution for a humanitarian pause for people to reach and provide assistance to those suffering in yemen as fighting rages. not everybody is on board with the resolution.
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some think it didn't go far enough or include a call for political dialogue between the warring parties. saudi arabia recognizes the need for assistance but is pondering the russian request. >> the desire to provide assistance is something we share. the mechanism is something that will have to be discussed. >> reporter: western countries and jordan indicated they were not happy the proposal didn't put the blame on the houthis. >> we got to this position because the houthis, over and over again violated cease-fires, took military action, took action by force instead of engaging in a political way. the only way out is to return to genuine political talks on an equal basis, not using force. >> the president of the security counsel said perhaps earlier in
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the week they might meet again to discuss russia's ideas. everybody shares the concern over what's happening on the ground. u.s. president barack obama addressed it in his weekly address. mr. obama has to sell the plan to the u.s. congress, which may be an up hill battle. he says it will make the world safer. take a listen. >> this framework is a result of tough, principal dpliplomacy. it's iran's program and cutting off every pathway iran could take to develop a nuclear weapon. >> all sides have until june 30th to reach a comprehensive deal. you are watching cnn news room. still to come, france is changing the way we see cat
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walks by banning certain models from fashion week. plus, a rainy easter sunday in st. peter's square. thousands gather for the pope's mass. you are looking at live pictures. we'll have a live report from rome. [ male announcer ] you wouldn't leave your car unprotected. but a lot of us leave our identities unprotected. nearly half a million cars were stolen in 2012. but for every car stolen,
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from self-proclaimed fashion capital of the world banned ultra thin models. violators could end up in jail. they voted to combat anorexia that affected 40,000 french people, most of them teenagers. models need to be above a certain body mass index, that hasn't been determined yet. anything below 18.5 is underweight. agencies that hire underweight models could be fined $82,000 and jailed for six months. like france does now, israel has a law against too thin fashion models. it went into effect in 2012. this video is from a reel on reel campaign behind a photographer who after years of shooting anorexic women became a crusader to save them. he had a model recovering from the disease die in his arms.
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thank you very much, sir, for joining us and taking time this morning. let me get your reaction, first of all torks the move by france to ban ultra thin models. about time? >> i think it's the right time. i know they tried in 2007, yeah, 2007. the fashion industry didn't give them a hard time. they didn't succeed. i hope this time it's going to be. i didn't see one thing is very important. we are talking about the show. if you take a normal woman -- i didn't see nothing about the show. the second thing, i think paris is the center of the fashion industry. they have to understand, under the clothes, there is a person. it's not a piece of flesh. it's not a piece of meat. they have to fit the clothes to the woman, not the woman to the
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clothes. if france is going to do it, i hope it's the beginning because it's epidemic all over europe and all over the world. >> explain to us the photo shop law as many see it. what exactly does it mean? >> this means you can't take a model that is less than 18.5 bmi. it's so skinny, 18.5. we used to shoot 20, 25 years ago. what happened. the second thing, using photo shop to cut size. we use it to change the body. it's unreal. when you take a normal woman and talking about a healthy woman and taking photo shop, you think nothing. now, you can see, you know, that children know they are going out from the house. everything about them is unreal. at least they know. everybody knows that what you see in the picture is real.
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i want to be like the girl in the picture. now, everybody knows, it's unreal. you can see most of the companies use skinny girls, but they are not cutting size. the pictures coming to be very, very real. what happened, in the last two weeks with international start up, we showed the commercial. it's like the rabbits. most of the company, because it's coming from the client, want to see the real. they want to see the real thing. until now, it's unreal. you can see everything that cut another size, another size. they cap between two and three size. it's crazy. >> you managed to get the passage of this law. it took ten years to get that.
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now, in the united states. how is that going so far? who are the decision makers you are trying to influence here? >> i see, you know, they start to do something. i think they have a problem. what we have in the beginning, you can't -- you can't -- you can't stop someone to work any job. >> freedom of occupation. >> freedom of occupation. they have to know, they are not letting me -- i'm using drags. they have to know that they are taking a girl and make them celebs. half of the woman how to look, to eat or not to eat. there's more they have to know. if someone is coming and she's going to be a model, she's going to be responsiblresponsible. to be responsible is to be real.
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the difference between is coming every season like that. all the people in the media are using drags. they use everything. what is important is that the designer has to understand, there is a person under the clothes. if they understand, they are going to use a woman, not just a piece of flesh. that's what happened at fashion show and in the studio. they are using not model, they are using a boy in woman's clothes. >> he is a fashion photographer for us in tel-aviv, thank you for much. we wish you the best in the campaign. now, thousands of the faithful, the moment to remember. they are celebrating easter sunday mass with pope francis at this very hour. we'll take you live to vatican city. you are looking at live pictures, just ahead. ♪
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raining early. it hasn't stopped thousands of people from standing in st. peter's square for hours waiting to hear the pope give his easter sunday message. easter is considered the most important day in the christian calend calendar. it commemorates that jesus rose
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from the dead three days after he was crucified. you are looking at live images there. we want to turn to ben. it's incredible looking at the pictures. earlier, it was raining. now, it has stopped. people are waiting to hear the pope's message today. >> reporter: that's right. this is one of the height of the christian calendar here in rome. of course, they are waiting for his address, that's the address to the city and the world. now, we understand that some of the themes he'll be touching on, of course, is one of the themes is the plight of christians in parts of africa and the middle east where, for instance, this week we saw militants rule that the somali group went into a kenyan university, killed 150 students there going from
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room-to-room looking for those who are christians and killing them on the spot. we see the situation in iraq where thousands of christians who lived in that area since almost immediately after the birth of christianity feel that they now must leave. they are driven out of their homes and seeking refuge elsewhere given that isis is pushing them out of their hometown. very somber occasion this easter, given the plight of christians in so many parts of the world at the moment. isa? >> ben for us in rome. thanks very much. easter morning will be unseasonably cold for many people across the eastern united states. derek van dam joins us now with more. >> people getting used to springtime conditions, then they wake up on easter sunday and all of a sudden, it's 20 degrees below what it was this time yesterday.
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that's what they are feeling, at least along the east coast of the united states especially where you see the shading of purple and pink. washington, d.c. is 20 degrees colder than yesterday. on the flip side, a warming spell across the midwest including chicago, kansas city and the colorado rockies. we have freeze watches and warnings across kentucky and parts of tennessee into northern alabama and georgia. these are the temperatures we are waking up to early sunday morning, flirting with the freezing from knoxville to nashville as well as northward into indianapolis. here is the easter day forecast across the united states. the big apple, 61 degrees, a bit of rain in the forecast. scattered thunderstorms for the houston area. denver, warming up to 73. warming up in the west coast, temperatures nearing 68. some good news for the west coast of the united states, specifically california. we have been in a century or a drought that has been worse --
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has never been worse than a century's time. we have much needed rain in the forecast that is going to help build up the snowpack across the sierra nevada mountain range. we have late season snowfall that will help fill up the reservoirs for fresh drinking water late into the summer season. this is good news. rain stretches as far south to los angeles. could pick up a half inch. i'm going to leave you with phenomenal photos just off the wire. this is taken from an airline just off the florida coast. this is sebastian inlet florida. those are sharks in the water. more spectacular photo. you can see the groups or masses of sharks that pilot spotted off the coast of florida. something you wouldn't see me or isa swimming around in. i am not going to brave those waters. in case you are wondering, a
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group of sharks is a gam, a herd, frenzy, school or shiver. a few different names for a grouping of sharks. >> you are quite right, i would never venture into these waters. i am chicken. thank you very much. if i don't see you again, have a very nice easter. >> you, too. >> thank you. after a two-year break, back up and running. the european organization says the large collider restarted sunday after a reprofit. scientists hope it will unravel mystery of dark matter, what keeps galaxies together. it makes up 84% of the universe. it will reach twice the energy as before. experiments will begin again. heart break for a family during a vacation in the u.s. virgin islands.
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why investigators opened a criminal probe. the iraqi military is targeting. just ahead.
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you are watching cnn news room. let me bring you up to date the top stories we are following. kenya has begun three days of mourning for the victims of the university attack. al shabaab threatened more violence after killing the
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students on thursday. ceremonies will be held to remember those who died. clashes in yemen called for russia to call for a humanitarian cease-fire. the air strikes aimed at houthi rebels. investigators in france left the germanwings crash site in the french alps. they have gathered all the main evidence including 2,000 dna samples and flight recorders. they believe the co-pilot purposely crashed the plane last month killing everyone on board. two u.s. teenagers are in critical condition after a trip to the u.s. virgin islands. his father still can't move or speak. they may have been exposed to a harmful pesticide. investigators say it is now a criminal investigation. >> reporter: a trip to paradise turned nightmare. a family of four fighting for
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their lives. authorities investigating whether they may have been poisoned staying at this hotel in st. john in the virgin islands. two boys are in comas, in critical condition after traces of a gas compound commonly used in pesticides were found in their villa at the resort. the family fell ill after the unit directly below them was fumigated. the e.p.a. banned the use of this chemical in the u.s. because of its acute toxicity. they told cnn the pest control company, terminix fumigated the lower unit on march 18th, in the middle of the family's stay. the family's lawyer, compared the chemical to serin gas, a deadly weapon used in chemical warfare. the u.s. department has opened a criminal investigation. they monitoring air and
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environmental samples to figure out what happened. terminix told cnn, it is committed to performing all work in a manner safe for customers, employees, the public and the environment. it is looking into this matter internally and cooperating with authorities. we are thinking about the family and join the community in wishing them a speedy recovery. it is odorless, cause zing injury to the lung and nervous system and could be fatal if inhaled. after the fumigation, the father, steve, was found in a coma. the boys and their mother were having severe seizures according to the attorney. the parent's condition improved after they were air lifted back to the mainland, united states. the mom, teresa, was releaseed from the hospital. the father, steve, is conscious, but unable to talk. the agency is working to determine how this happened and will make sure steps are taken
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to prevent it from happening to others at these vacation apartments or elsewhere. cnn, new york. turn your attention to iraq. a senior iraqi official tells cnn tikrit was out of control after isis militants were driven out of the city last week. the official says he witnessed at least 20 houses set on fire and more than 50 shops looted. they ready their next offensive against isis. arwa damon spoke with iraq's defense minister with plans to take back mosul. >> reporter: tikrit is being touted by iraq and the u.s. as a success, at least when it comes to the first phase of iraq's war against isis. comparatively speaking, it may have been the simplest of battles the nation faces. the question is, what's next. >> translator: liberation of tikrit put us to the next phase to move north and west to anbar.
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theoretically, the plans are set and we have the majority of supplies we need. >> reporter: iraq's defense minister says it's not just having the military power to take mosul. >> translator: the battle is unique. it's iraq's second largest city of 2 million people. we have to take this into consideration. isis will fight fiercely for this city. according to our intelligence, they have tunnels and bunkers. they will fight full force for mosul. >> reporter: iraq's military units, at the request of the defense ministry are going through intense training with u.s. advisers. >> what is it that the units being trained are actually receiving because the u.s. was here for close to a decade training up the iraqi army. what failed then that is forcing us into the situation right now? >> the problem wasn't with the training. it was with the building of the
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army. it wasn't built in a way to face these challenges. it was built to be a conventional army. iraq is facing terrorism and we only have one counterterrorism division. >> a mistake neither iraq nor the region can see happen again, given how checkered the battlefield dynamics are. >> you have the iraqi army, then the police then you have the iranian advisers, then you have the americans in the sky. i mean, it's a lot of moving parts of nations that aren't necessarily natural allies. it puts the government and yourself as minister of defense in a very tricky position because you have to balance these different interests coming together in this one arena. >> it really is difficult. >> translator: of course, it's an important subject. this is where you see the role
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of the commander. you have to deal with convent n conventional forces and volunteers. those volunteers come from everywhere, young and old. there's no connection between them. there are no regulations and rules to control them. it's a difficult and big challenge for the iraqi leadership. >> reporter: the time frame contingent to the situation on the ground and whether or not they can rise to meet the challenge. they face new challenges in the rebels as isis advances further into the country. the fighting near damascus. nick peyton walsh reports. >> reporter: the conflict at the heart of so much of the sectarian violence in the region, the syrian civil war has just taken a significant turn with rebels, some of them aligned with al qaeda, making substantial advances. it was a seismic moment in the
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four-year war. in serious, somewhat lost in the turmoil engulfing the region. after months of dead like, suddenly, a key city changed hands. rebels ranging from al qaeda to moderate islamists swept in. refugees flooded out. a sign that perhaps rebel backers in the region had taken the gloves off. a worrying moment of descendents for the front, al qaeda's affiliate. above all, a huge blow for the regime. one of the four major cities in the north now firmly in rebel hands. days later, to the south, another major regime asset fell. the main southern border crossing points with jordan were also taken decisively by rebels. a similar, yet less unified mix taking a vital regime leak into
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jordan. another blow for the assad regime, which sat comfortably watching isis' rise. yet, less comfort for them seeing this very close to damascus. isis fighters calling out for rebels to surrender in the refugee camp. home to long term palestinian refugees. it's been emptied, starved, but very close to regime strongholds in the capitol. clashes continue as major parts of syria's landscape change hands yet again. human suffering beyond quantify in the balance. they said saturday, 90% of that refugee camp was under the control of a mixture of isis, islamic state and the syrian al qaeda affiliate. there is clearly a lot of momentum against the sere yum regime in keierre yas.
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this is one other nightmare, complicating an already turbulent region. nick peyton walsh, cnn beirut. >> chris from the u.n. relief spoke to cnn about the dry sis in syria. take a listen. >> the levels of humanity that we have seen have now descended to further levels of inhumanity. people are carrying in their battered homes. we have reports of fighting in the streets. we have reports of aerial bombardment. this has to stop. the syrian crisis from the ground are appealing to the humanitarian, international community to listen to us. the political actors have got to take meaningful action. it was always a place where human rights meant very little. we are seeing it descend
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further. 18,000 civilians, including 3,500 children right now are in grave peril and we need to stop them. we need to save their lives. >> remind you the u.n. says syria's civil war killed more than 200,000 people thus far. hundreds of people took to the streets of rio de janeiro to protest the shooting of a boy. there was a heavy police presence. the boy was shot by local criminals. the president accuse police of being responsible. they used stun grenades and tear gas. the president called for those responsible to be punished. cuban media are showing photos of fidel castro saying he is full of vitality. you can see the media says the
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chance meeting happened monday in havana. it is the first time the 88-year-old has appeared in public in more than a year. now, from distraught families to village witnesses, the germanwings crash is imprinted in the minds of many. their stories coming up, just ahead. rightabreva can heal itold sore, in as few as two and a half days when used at the first sign. without it the virus spreads from cell to cell. only abreva penetrates deep and starts to work immediately to block the virus and protect healthy cells. you could heal your cold sore, fast, as fast as two and a half days when used at the first sign. learn how abreva starts to work immediately at abreva.com don't tough it out, knock it out, fast. with abreva.
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welcome back to cnn news room. investigators left the germanwings crash site in the alps. they are not expected to return to the site and have private security watching over the wreckage until it can be moved. officials believe the co-pilot deliberately crashed the plane killing everyone on board. you can't imagine seeing that one day. chilling words from the man who saw the plane crash into the mountain. carl takes us into the village where grieving relatives are learning to live with the tragedy. >> reporter: this should have been the view from the window seat, high in the sky. instead, it may have been their last glimpse of life. >> translator: i saw the plane heading down the valley and i
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said it's going to hit the mountain. i ducked my head. it seemed to veer left. after that, i saw the smoke, he says. the people seem wary of outsiders in the close-knit mountain villages. he tells me what's troubling him. it's terrible, you can't imagine something like that. one day, it will come back to haunt me and give me nightmares, he says. those first airlierial images s the flight went down in a treacherous, inaccessible ravine. investigators warned us to stay away. it's still a while before dawn, but we are going to the trail head. the aim is to try to hike into the crash site. i thought the families deserved to see where they loved ones lay. >> there's a bit of frost this morning. now the sun is coming.
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getting up here is hanging on to tree routes and grass. you can see why they are going to have to fly anything out by helicopter. few people live up here. a few sign posts point the way. it's taken us hours to hike in, but we finally found the spot, down there in the steep sided valley they are doing the saddest job of all. from my vantage point above the crash site, it seemed recovery teams were clinging on by their fingertips. so steep the sides of the wind blown gully. so lonely, those travelers lying down in plastic shrouds. for more than a week, rescuers refused to bound to nature, r k risking their own lives, treating the dead like they were family. i have lost friends in mountains in the past.
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code is never to leave anybody in the mountains, he says. at a simple memorial close by, the living came to weep for their dead. the village mayor vows he will cherish them and never forget. we have a duty to look after their memories. we must share the pain of the families, he says. this young woman felt ready to share a few thoughts of her big brother. he was an iranian soccer journalist aboard the flight. >> he said to one of his friends that if someone killed in the flight, it will be okay because it's for one and you are in the sky and your sky will go. he spent eight minutes -- >> reporter: they came to lay a
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wreath. >> there is not a single hour where we don't think about this terrible accident. >> reporter: he's admitted the co-pilot on the flight first reported mental health issues to lufthansa in 2009. can you tell us why you didn't stop a man with psychological issues from flying your plane. he wasn't giving answers, but i hope he heard the question on everybody's lips. families may never really find out why but just, perhaps they can discover peace amid these mountain meadows and crystal streams. solace from a sister who desperately misses her brother. >> for us, we just -- we just can't calm or serve this picture he is the king --
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>> reporter: there, up where her imagination flies, they are all kings of the alps. carl pen haul cnn, france. [ male announcer ] you wouldn't leave your car unprotected. but a lot of us leave our identities unprotected. nearly half a million cars were stolen in 2012. but for every car stolen, 34 people had their identities stolen. identity thieves can steal your money, damage your credit, and wreak havoc on your life. why risk it when you can help protect yourself
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check out 10,000 wisconsin fans celebrating in the streets after their team knocked off the undefeated wildcats, 71-64. kentucky was hoping to be the first team in decades to have a perfect season. some of their fans were a little out of control after the loss in lexington. 31 people arrested. it was rowdy and hostile. duke beat michigan state by 20 points. it didn't hold much drama. this sets up the championship game monday night between the wisconsin badgers and the duke devils. marches hit the streets of indiana in protest of the so-called religious freedom law. they carried signs and chanted. you can see the law could allow people to discriminate against
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gay and transgender people amid backlash indiana's governor signed an amendment based on race, religion, disability or sexual orientation. in a few days, a piece of musical history will hit the auction block. they decided to day bye-bye to a manuscript that made him famous. a generation knows it line by line. nick parker has the story. ♪ so, bye bye miss american pie ♪ ♪ drove my chevy to the levy, but the levy was dry -- >> reporter: a song that defined a generation, an 8:36 ode to the social upheaval of the 1960s and early '70s. the original manuscript he hoped could make people dance is up for sale. >> it's the creative process from beginning to end. you see great moments of
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inspiration. you see him attempting thing that is didn't work out. the direction he was going in that he didn't want to follow. so, these word that is we all know so well and are fixed, weren't fixed in the beginning. >> reporter: 16 pages of scribbles and scratches and the iconic words that made the final cut. ♪ long, long time ago ♪ i can still remember how that music used to make me smile. >> reporter: the song became a number one hit in 1972 and stood the test of time making the song of the century list by the recording industry association of america. ♪ february made me shiver. >> reporter: he acknowledges the february that made him shiver was about a plane crash that killed buddy holly and others. much of "american pie" remains a mystery. >> you can hear it in coffee shops. it's ever present. and, that makes it a work of popular art.
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it also happens to be a work of high literary art. it gets constantly discussed and debated about what the lyrics refer to and might mean. >> reporter: don mcclain said song writers should make a statement and move on. his music has always spoke for itself. yet these questions remain. ♪ now, do you believe in rock 'n' roll ♪ ♪ can music save your moral soul and can you teach me how to dance real slow. >> reporter: the manuscript goes on sale april 7 and is expected to fetch $1.5 million, more than john lennon's sold for, but shy of bob dylan's "like a rolling stone." it broke a record when it sold for $2 million last year. nick parker, cnn, atlanta. before we go, we have amazing images to show you. saturday, the state of texas got
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the ultimate forecast. nasa astronaut scott kelly tweeted this image. now, along with the picture, looks like houston and austin have weather headed your way. last week, kelly began a yearlong mission. the stretch is the longest any u.s. astronaut has spent in orbit. spectacular. that does it for us this hour. thank you for joining us. for our viewers in the united states, "new day" is just ahead. for everyone else, i'll be back with a check of the headlines in a moment. don't go anywhere. i've had moderate to severe plaque psoriasis most my life. but that hasn't stopped me from modeling. my doctor told me about stelara®. it helps keep my skin clearer. with only 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses... ... stelara® helps me be in season. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections
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♪ new details emerging this morning, of the gruesome terror attack in kenya by al shabab. a victim's family receives a phone call from a gunman and hears her last words. >> to join pope francis on this easter sunday. you're looking at live pictures. we have his message to all of the world catholics in a live report. also college basketball upset. thousands celebrate in the streets of

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