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tv   CNN Newsroom With Fredricka Whitfield  CNN  April 25, 2015 8:00am-12:01pm PDT

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striking. >> so grateful that he took the time to talk to us there. we do wish you a wonderful rest of your weekend. but don't go anywhere. >> someday here we'll turn it over to fredricka witfield. she's got a lot coming up in the next hour of cnn news room. >> we do indeed. thanks so much you guys. it was a very profound moving evening for so much of america to watch. >> yeah yeah. it was. >> thanks so much. >> thanks fred. >> hello, everyone i'm fredricka witfield. are you in the news room. the 11:00 eastern hour. right now, more on this breaking story. all right i'm going to go back to my colleagues victor and christi. it looks like we're having some audio problems with my microphone. can you explain a little bit more about the breaking news that we're following -- well now it looks like -- they have us. we're working it out. that's what we do here. we have problems and then we work it out, people.
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we're headed back. breaking news we are following in nepal right now. more than 800 people have been killed after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake rocking that country. the earthquake hit around madeday local time. the epicenter less than 50 miles from the capital of kathmandu. hours later the area was shaken again with a series of at least 15 aftershocks. the earthquake triggered landslides on nearby mount everest and some of nepal's ancient historical sites have been devastated. there's a frantic search for any survivors among the crumbled buildings, the united nations in fact is reporting nearly 40% of the country has been affected by the earthquake. let's get more now on the devastating quake, ravi agrival is cnn's india bureau chief, he's in calcutta india, not far from nepal.
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tell me more about what was felt and what kind of efforts are under way to try to find any survivors. the many impacted? >> well here in colcutta we felt some tremors, but the real story is out there in kathmandu, in nepal. and obviously the epicenter, which is about 50 miles northwest in kathmandu. as i speak, rescue operations are under way in kathmandu and other parts of nepal. this is an extremely difficult operation. kathmandu is a very cramped, densely populated city. many buildings have collapsed, people are trapped under the rubble. it's nightfall and it is also raining. it's treemly difficult to reach people who may still be trapped. on the other hand you have situations where in rural nepal. it's mountainous and people, there's been a lot of damage there as well. so authorities are really
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struggling to reach people on both ends here. a major crisis for nepal. >> okay. and ravi on a good day it is difficult to get to that region. >> we're talking about assistance on a huge scale that will be needed. can you give us an idea of what kind of obstacles are in the way for rescue teams to get into this region and by what means would they be able to get there? >> well this is incredibly hard to begin with on a good day. as you point out. i mean -- so again, in kathmandu itself you know just to put this in context for our viewers, i mean this part of the world, infrastructure tends to be very very weak. you know roads aren't as wide there isn't a robust emergency response system. the police system the ambulance system the health care system none of these systems are you know what you would imagine them
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to be in the west. well it's very difficult here in this part of the world in nepal and india. and countries like that. so the struggle is much greater in a place like this to reach people who may be trapped. you know phone lines are down. it's very hard for us to reach people there. there's electricity lines are down. the water supply is down. so you know the problems seem to be mounting for nepali authorities. the airport has been closed. really it is all hands on deck out there. >> keep us posted. right now we go to jamie mcgoldrick, the u.n.'s administrator on the ground. we heard from ravi although said the airport is closed it's very difficult to traverse, to get to the hardest-impacted area. how might your teams be getting
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there? >> yeah i mean the actual earthquake was the impact in kathmandu is in crisis here. the buildings up there in the city crowded city very close to each other, many of the old buildings have collapsed. as a result of that many people trapped in the buildings, many injuries one of the things we face is trying to get the hospitals able to absorb all the wounded people who have suffered. in that sense and at the same time trying to get access into the epicenter of the actual crisis. sand the trouble there is the fact that the roads have been badly damaged, landslides and blockages. and some of the areas and the footprint of this earthquake takes up about 40% of the country accord together government sources, as a result of that the spread of need is going to be quite dramatic. the spread of casualties is going to be dramatic as well. i think having access is going
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to make the challenge of the international community supporting the government of nepal much greater than in other situations. >> when you mentioned the footprint of the earthquake is 40% of the country. that's very vast. what is the kind of equipment and what are the tools that your teams ordinarily would have and how are they going to get their tools and equipment in given the restrictions of the passes to this earthquake area? >> the assessment of what's needed. army helicopters were sentd up to get a look to see how many people we can estimate would need assistance. and then we are looking for medical, looking for shelter, looking for heavy lifting equipment. both search and rescue and also to clear the roads, to make sure that we can have easy access do the affected areas. and that's the situation we have right now.
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we're meeting tomorrow morning again with the government to try to plan how we can go about doing that. meanwhile, international assistance is arriving. some planes coming in this evening from neighboring countries, bringing in the much-needed material to do the search and rescue and to do the heavy lifting equipment. >> so when you mentioned the use of helicopters and you know you need heavy lifting kind of equipment in order to be brought in are we talking about some of the personnel rescuers actually being repelapeled into the areas by helicopters? >> the roads are quite basic at the best of times. not knowing the situation on the ground can you only imagine they've been damaged in some way. otherwise we're going to need to have some sort of capacity to actually get to those sites and assess the areas. more importantly to get to the sites to deliver much-needed assistance. and the assistance required will
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be in some cases quite heavy. how we're going to do it is by helicopters and by roads, having the heavy equipment to clear the roads and get the work done in repairing, is something we have to factor in our response equation. >> all right. jamie, thank you, we know you have a lot of work to do keep us post the as you are able to do so thank you so much. meantime other new developments today in the death of freddie gray in baltimore, maryland. that city's police department has just released this new video from city surveillance cameras that they say could help with the investigation. it shows some of the moments before and during gray's arrest. this comes after a huge admission from baltimore police that the commissioner admitted that officers made inexcusable mistakes in the arrest of gray who died days after he was taken into custody. all of this as protesters are expected to show up demanding answers and vowing to shut down
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the city in a massive rally. cnn's joe johns is live for us now in baltimore. so joe, are the demonstrators who are planning to gather are any expressing that they are relieved or do they feel like the video has in any way kind of closed some of the gaps or filled some of the holes? >> i think organizers of the protests today have called for the arrest of police officers involved. in the situation that led to freddie gray's death. so it doesn't sound as though everybody is satisfied with the information that's come out so far. but we'll hear more today. it is certain that police are concerned at this stage, that there might be traffic problems in the city. on a saturday evening. in the afternoon of course you'll certainly have a lot of people out and about. and then you'll have a big rally and a march through the streets.
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that's going do create challenges for police. meanwhile, fred we do know that we have new information and new pictures from the many surveillance cameras around baltimore city. now adding a little bit more detail to what we know about the day freddie gray was taken into custody. >> new video from baltimore police showing different angles on the arrest and transportation of freddie gray, the camera views released on the police department's youtube page. >> the video footage of every cctv camera that may have caught even a single moment of the incident is under review. >> one clip shows gray interacting with police. minutes later the same camera shows the arrest scene with the police transport van. from another camera a police van is seen stopped and another prisoner loaded. the footage is from hundreds of surveillance cameras in the area as police try to piece together
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the video timeline. >> we're refining our investigation, we're getting closer and the picture is getting sharper and sharper as we move forward. >> but the surveillance video released is not as sharp as the video that was shot by eye witnesses on april 12th showing gray's arrest. less than an hour after he was detained officers transporting him called for a medic. gray subsequently slipped into a coma dying a week after his initial arrest. the surveillance video comes as police admit mistakes were made. >> we know he was not buckled in the transportation wagon. as he should have been. no excuses for that period. we know our police employees failed to get him medical attention in a timely manner multiple times. >> and in the strongest language yet baltimore police talking about possible charges against officers for the death of the 25-year-old. >> if someone harmed freddie gray we're going to have to prosecute them. and so giving too much
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information out to you on the front here now may jeopardize that prosecution. >> two challenges ahead for police in baltimore dealing with whatever crowds may develop here today and again on monday during the dpunl. they also have to wrap up that investigation as they've said before next friday. fred? >> joe johns, keep us posted. hundreds of people expected to take to the streets of baltimore later on today. >> here's the quote -- i have the soul of a woman. those are the words from olympic gold medalist and reality tv star bruce jenner. his interview with diane sawyer on abc last night confirmed speculation that he will soon transition from male to female. but there were some surprises along the way. deeply personal revelations about past marriages, struggles with thoughts of suicide. and then the answers to why now. at the age of 65. jenner says this is his life's
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new purpose. >> are you sorry you did that show? all this time you had something -- >> i had the story. we have done 425 episodes i think. over almost eight years now. and the entire run, i kept thinking to myself -- oh my god. this whole thing, the one real true story. was the one i was hiding and nobody knew about it. the one thing that could really make a difference in people's lives was right here in my soul. and i could not tell that story. >> we'll be talking so much more about jenner's comments.
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and we'll speak with shane ortega is the first openly transgender person to serve in the u.s. military. we'll ask him about jenner's interview and what it means for him and the transgender community. we're also following the breaking news out of nepal. where hundreds are dead following a major earthquake. we'll have more on that in a moment. also ahead -- the nervous waiting in chile. as everyone keeps a close watch on this erupting volcano. cnn's shasta darlington is there live for us following it all. shasta? >> that's right. fred calbuco is still smoking, here in ensenada people are trying to pick up literally buckets of ash. i want you to look at this -- ash is not the fluffy stuff you think it is. it's like gravel. more details after this. nervous whitening will damage your teeth? introducing listerine® healthy white™. it not only safely whitens teeth... ...but also restores enamel. lose the nerves and get a healthier whiter smile that you'll love.
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after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake shook the country. the epicenter was less than 50 piles from the capital of kathmandu. and hours later the area was shaken again with a series of at least 15 aftershocks. the earthquake triggered landslides on nearby mount everest and there is a frantic search going on now for survivors among the crumbled buildings. the united nations is reporting 40% of the country has been affected by this earthquake. we're also monitoring the volcano erupting in southern chile. plumes of smoke and ash can be seen for miles. thousands have fled their homes. the calbuco volcano is near a tourist destination. cnn's shasta darlington is in chile a few miles from the volcano. yet are you surrounded by the ash. >> that's right. i'm here in ensenada this is one of the first towns that was evacuated. they've let families and
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emergency workers back in. they're scrambling to pick up the piles of ash. at the same time that they're waiting for a possible third eruption. really keeping people here on edge. these days all eyes in southern chile on the calbuco volcano, watching and waiting. none of the airline was fly in for at least 24 hours. the volcano erupted for the first time in more than 40 years on wednesday. a second eruption just a few hours later. now we work our way closer to the still-smoldering crater. past one -- two -- three check points to get into the exclusion zone. we're finally in ensenada. this town is blanketed in ash, it's hard to breathe when you roll down the windows. the sheep and cattle that have
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been left behind they're trying to get them out now. there's clouds of ash wherever we go. this was one of the first towns evacuated. residents now allowed back for a short time to clean the ash off their houses, and save what they can. the first thing we did was to grab the dogs and run, he says. now we're cleaning up because it's going to rain soon and it will make the ash very heavy. friends and family scrambling to clean off roofs before they collapse under the weight. literally buckets of ash fell on the town of ensenada. when we're talking about ash, it's not soft and fluffy it's like gravel. it fell so fast and so heavy that people just dropped what they were doing. right here at this restaurant they were preparing a meal. they left the pots the pans the food is still sitting out. now bracing for a possible third eruption that experts warn could
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be on its way. ash covers the landscape here like a blanket of snow. and always in the background calbuco, once again sending up smoke. now what people are doing here fred is not only cleaning up the ash, but also coming back in to get the animals. this sal rural area. we were just with one family they were herding the cattle down the mountain. we've seen trucks going by filled with salmon. they take the water trucks over to the fisheries, put the salmon in and try to get them out so they don't die along with so much of the landscape here. and again, at the same time that there is still a high alert. we could have a third eruption at calbuco and another volcano about 200 miles away via rica is starting to heat up. >> a double threat there, that's serious, thank you so much shasta darlington appreciate it. we'll keep you abreast of things you keep us abreast as
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well. by now you probably heard about it bruce jenner's stunning interview. >> my brain is much more female than it is mail. it's hard for people to understand that. >> still ahead, we take a closer look at his interview and the message that he is sharing with others who are struggling. you forgot the milk! that's lactaid®. right. 100% real milk just without the lactose. so, no discomfort? exactly. try some... mmm, it is real milk. lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort.
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the white house has launched review of a drone strike that killed two al qaeda hostages one of them an american. the two were being held at a location along the pakistan/afghanistan border. president obama has apologized to the family of warren weinstein, the american who was killed. i want to bring in david rode in new york he's a cnn global affairs analyst and a "reuters" investigative journalist who spent almost a year himself as a prisoner of the taliban. good to see you, david, as a former hostage, you eventually escaped in afghanistan. how much though along the way did you think about the possibility of being killed not just by your captors, but possibly during any rescue attempt? >> there was an issue about rescue attempts and the drone strikes were being carried out when i was a captive as well. and there was a drone strike right outside a house where i was being held captive. there was a car driving by with some militants in it and the drone hit the car and killed
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seven people inside of it. they were militants. it was so close that the force of the missile strike blew out the plastic covering a window in the room where i was standing. so you know it was a threat in my case and it's the threateneded tragically the life of warren weinstein. >> what were your thoughts when you heard this week that in january, this was the fate of warren weinstein and the the lan who was also being held hostage? what were your thoughts about what they endured and did you draw any parallels to what your experience was? >> i'm amazed that warren weinstein survived for three afteryears he was 73 years old and a civilian aid workers, i blame his captors most of all. there's a pron problem with the drone strike that caused his death. it's called a signature strike. it's based solely on what the operators of the drone see as the movements on the ground. that's separate kind of strike called a personality strike where there's specific information about a specific militant commander in that house.
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the administration and the president promised to reduce the use of these signature strikes, which are less accurate two years ago. they clearly haven't done that. and i think there needs to be a look at maybe ending the use of these signature strikes. they've killed civilians in other cases and now they've killed warren weinstein and this italian captive. >> at the same time do you agree with some military analysts who will say you know sadly an outcome like this is always a possible outcome. because when you talk about counterterrorism efforts and when you talk about the volatility of it all, and it's difficult to trust all the intel that comes on the ground that there's always a pretty good possibility that this kind of outcome could happen? >> i think there is a possibility. i think that drone strikes are generally accurate. i think they should continue. but the statistics no one really knows, the government can also be more open about the drone strikes when they occur
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and how many victims they think are militants versus civilians. it looks like 10% of the victims are civilians. this simple change and the signature strikes, you can't really tell who is on the ground based on the way they walk around or the way they're moving as groups. i just think it's not reliable. and you continue the strikes, but do the personality strikes where you have specific information about an individual. there's a way to go forward, think that's more prudent. >> david rohde, joining us from new york thank you so much. appreciate it. up next the interview that so many had been waiting to hear. >> my brain is much more female than it is male. it's hard for people to understand that. >> bruce jenner revealing he is transitions to a woman. more of his gripping conversation with diane sawyer, straight ahead. motrin helps you be an unstoppable, let's-rock-this-concert- like-it's-1999 kind of mom. back pain? motrin helps you be the side-planking keeping-up-with-
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hello, thanks so much for joining me i'm fredricka witfield. we're following this breaking news out of nepal. more than 800 people have died after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake shook the country. that the epicenter was less than 50 miles from the capital of kathmandu. hours later the area was shaken again with a series of at least 15 aftershocks.
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the earthquake also triggered landslides on nearby mount everest and there's a frantic search going on right now for survivors among the crumbled buildings. and we've learned in the last few minutes, the united states is sending a disaster response team to the area. to another big story that everyone is talking about today. olympic gold medalist and television reality star bruce jenner is confirming that he is indeed transitioning into a woman. jenner came out publicly as transjend anywhere a lengthy interview with abc's diane sawyer that interaired last night. cnn's dan simon has more. >> my brain sch more female than it is male. it's hard for people to understand that. but that's what my soul is. >> bruce jenner the olympic gold medalist turned reality star confirming the tabloid speculation that he's transitioning from a man po ato a
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woman, speaking to diane sawyer in an abc special. >> are you a woman? >> yes. for all intents and purposes i am a woman. people look at me differently. they see you as this macho male but my heart and my soul and everything that i do in life it is part of me. that female side is part of me. that's who i am. >> jenner firmly dismissing skeptics that this is some sort of stunt to promote another reality show documenting his change. he said he knew he was different at eight years old when he began trying on his mother's dresses. >> are you telling me i'm going to go through a complete gender change and go through everything you need to do that for the show? sorry, diane. it ain't happening. okay? yeah we're doing this for publicity. yeah right. >> the 65-year-old who has been married three times, says his former spouses knew about his issues. sawyer asking the obvious
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question. >> are you gay? >> no i'm not gay. i'm not gay, as far as i know heterosexual. >> you don't know if. >> as far as i know. i've never been with a guy. i've always been married, you know raising kids. >> and you can desire a woman every bit as much. >> yeah yeah. >> wheaties is the breakfast of champions. >> for children of the '70s and '80s, bruce jenner was the guy on the wheaties box. the greatest athlete on the planet. for millennials, he's been more reality star as the steady male presence on "keeping up with the carkardashian kardashians." he joked that his secret was the one story that really mattered. >> the entire run i kept thinking to myself -- oh my god, this whole thing, the one real true story in the family was the one i was hiding and nobody knew about it. the one thing that could really
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make a difference in people's lives was right here in my soul. and i could not tell that story. >> he says he hasn't decided whether to do a sex change. for now, it's been cosmetic surgery combined with female hormones. jenner says his children 10 of them between his biological and step children have largely been supportive. several appearing by his side. >> i held his hand and cried with him and told him how proud of him i was and how inspired i was. >> as for why go through the change now, when most his age are looking forward to a less stressful, less dramatic life -- >> i couldn't take the walls constantly closing in on me. if i die, which i could be diagnosed next week with cancer and boom you're gone. i would be so mad at myself. that i didn't explore that side of me. you know and i don't want that to happen. >> with this revelation jenner
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is now certainly the most famous transgendered person on the planet. he says he wants to be an inspiration for others going through similar identity issues and he says he wants to change the world by speaking openly about his transformation. dan simon, cnn, san francisco. >> and still to come -- the first transgender person to serve in the u.s. military weighs in on bruce jenner's comments and recounts his own very unique journey. new neutrogena hydro boost water gel. with hyaluronic acid it plumps skin cells with intense hydration and locks it in. for supple, hydrated skin. hydro boost. from neutrogena.
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more on the interview that has so many people talking this morning. olympian and television star bruce jenner revealing to abc's diane sawyer that he is transitioning from male to female. jenner is not alone. a recent study estimates that nearly one million americans are transgender. meaning they identify as a gender other than the one they were born. some alter their bodies through hormones and surgery. but many do not. joining me now via skype from hawaii sergeant shane ortega he is the first out transgendered soldier in the u.s. military. born a female. transitioned to a man. so sergeant good to see you. you watched the bruce jenner interview, right. how much of what you heard mirrors your experience or at least resonates with you? >> i'm inventory i, could you repeat that one more time?
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i was vig a little difficulty hearing the back side of that. >> you watched the interview with bruce jenner how much of that was something you could identify with? did it mirror your own experience? >> i thought the interview definitely hit home. it was very truthful. it was not sensationalized and it definitely cut to the straight facts, i definitely felt that it represented the community honestly. and i definitely could identify with the struggle and the fears that jenner was experiencing while contemplating that transition. >> so and you said you can identify with those struggles and fears, but for you, did you make that discovery as bruce jenner said he really made that discovery at age eight. but it wasn't until very much into his adult years that he came to grips with he felt in his soul he is a woman. and then began hormone therapy. how did you make that discovery? and at what point did you make
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that effort? >> i had the good fortune of being exposed to the lgbt community pretty young off. so i had already read about transgendered people in the dsmv iv and i had interactions with family members in that profession and psychological profession to know what being transgendered meant. i personally decided not to transition until later in life because there were goals that i had, one of those goals was to join the united states military and also to i at that time i didn't feel it was a necessary step for me personally. >> but when you entered the u.s. military you entered as a woman. and then you transitioned while in the military. and it meant not only did you have to transition but everyone around you had to transition. what was that experience like and what kind of acceptance or what kind of experiences did you have along the way? >> all right. so when i made the transition
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which was back in 2011 i think that everyone around me was definitely understanding. you know united states military whether you think it or not, is actually a pretty progressive place, people are understanding, they just want to have good unit cohesion and good team work. so as that transition took place there was no negativity or any derogatory remarks of any kind actually even being made. it was more people were wanting to support someone who they thought was a vital member of their team. >> but then at the same time u.s. military doesn't completely i guess respect that that's the right word your gender transition because is it not true that the military in some circles considers the transgender experience to be a mental illness? and that is in large part why they're still asking you or maybe even demanding if that's the right word that you wear the dress uniform, the uniform dress as opposed to wearing
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pants. particularly on special occasions, as u.s. military uniform. >> well to clarify, females in the military don't have to wear skirts. you can elect to wear pants. which i personally like to do. but as far as adhering to good order and discipline as a soldier that's my upmost important mission with while serving is to have good order and discipline. so until we are instructed to do otherwise, i'm going to uphold the standard of good order and discipline no matter what. so my loyalties lie with serving this country and serving my nation in foremost serving the mission of the united states military. i'm not going to ask them for any special favors because i didn't come in to be special. i came in to serve. >> but the "washington post" article on you says that the military does ask or demand that you wear the dress on special occasions. is that true? >> we do have a tradition in the military that every payday we
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wear our dress uniforms. and so i wear the dress uniform that i am i came into the gender as. and i follow out and carry that good order and discipline just like any other soldier would. >> okay. well does that bring any kind of conflict or even frustration on your part that not everyone wants to fully recognize that you are a man? >> it is definitely socially awkward. there's, it's definitely socially awkward, no good way to put that out there. you have to be patient with people around you. our society is changing. the military has been in an avenue of change for several years now. we have desegregation, we have equal pay for both men and women. we have women going into combat. we have gay marriage equality. so the military is changing as our society changes. and we are being a great avenue to show that change. >> some of the resonating messages from bruce jenner's interview, he says that i'm transgender. i'm transitions does not mean that i am gay. at the same time he says you
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know he got tired of living a lie. and that he has felt in his soul that he is a woman. what is the message that you want to convey to people by way of your experience? >> the message i want to convey to people from my experience is one, transgendered people are not mentally ill and they're not unfit for any sort of avenue of profession or unfit to be loved as human beings. we are all human beings we all deserve dignity and respect. with my transition i just want to be a beacon of hope and help move forward the human rights within our country. because the human rights and how we treat people is highly important you know. if we aren't taking care of that what are we doing as a nation? we are a nation built on change and if we can't change for the better for our future what are we doing as a society? >> sergeant shane ortega thanks so much for being with us from
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oahu thank you so much for your service. >> thank you for allowing me this opportunity. it was very humbling. >> we'll be right back with more. motrin helps you be an unstoppable, let's-rock-this-concert- like-it's-1999 kind of mom. when pain tries to stop you, there's motrin. motrin works fast to stop pain where it starts. make it happen with new motrin liquid gels. now? can i at least put my shoes on? if your bladder is calling the shots ... you may have a medical condition called
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all right. checking top stories the last three men accused in the hazing death i florida a&m drum major have been convicted, guilty of manslaughter and hayesing with
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the result of death. they will be sentenced in june. robert champion died in november 2011 after beaten on a school bus in a hazing ritual after a football game. the number of new hiv infects in rural indiana has grown to 142. the cdc is calling a severe outbreak and says problem stems from uptick of people sharing needles and prescription drugs. 30 miles north of louisville kentucky. starbucks computer glitch now, it's fixed friday the company's cash registers malfunctioned at 7,000 stores but many stayed open and customers, they didn't leave disappointed. guess why? because their drink orders were filled for free. we continue to follow breaking news out of nepal. hundreds are dead after a deb stating earthquake hit near the country's capital. we'll have the very latest for you at the top of the hour.
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it's time. lower your blood sugar with invokana®. imagine loving your numbers. there's only one invokana®. ask your doctor about it by name. newsroom hundreds dead as a massive earthquake slams nepal. rescuers now desperately searching for those trapped or injured. plus, bruce jenner's stunning interview. >> have to lie this whole life about who he is and -- >> the secret he's carried all of his life. now exposed to the entire world and how his message may help others with the same struggles.
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and baltimore bracing for what could be its biggest day of demonstrations yet, busloads of out of town protesters joining organized rallies vowing to shut the city down. and new surveillance video of what happened when police arrested freddie gray. you're live in the "cnn newsroom." hello again, everyone. thanks for joining me. i'm fredricka whitfield. following breaking news from nepal. a devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake has hit that country. more than 800 people. the earthquake hit around midday local time. the epicenter was less than 50 miles from the capital of cath man due. and hours later the area was shaken with a series of at least 15 aftershocks. the tremors also triggered landslides on nearby mountain everybody rest. rescuers are going through the crumbled buildings looking for survivors. the united states is now sending
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a disaster response team to the area. let's get more on this devastating earthquake. earlier i spoke with cnn's ravi agrawal from india, not far from nepal, and asked about the rescue and recovery operations. >> as i speak, rescue operations are under way in kathmandu and other parts of nepal. an extremely difficult operation because, on the one hand you have in kathmandu, which is a very sort of cramped, densely populated city, of many buildings collapsed, people are still trapped under the rubble. it is nightfall now. it is also raining. it is extremely difficult to reach people who may still be trapped. on the other hand you have situations where in rural nepal, mountainous, very heavy, people you know a lot of damage there as well. so authorities are really struggling to reach people on both ends here. major crisis for nepal.
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>> okay. ravi on a good day, it's difficult to get to that region, now talking about the kind of assistance on a very huge scale that will be needed. can you give us an idea of what kind of obstacles are in the way for rescue teams to get into this region and by what means would they be able to get there? >> well this is incredibly hard to begin with on a good day, if you point out. so again, in kathmandu itself you know just to put this in context for our viewers, i mean this part of the world, infrastructure tends to be very very weak you know. roads aren't as wide. there isn't a robust emergency response system. the police system ambulance system health care system none of these systems are, you know what you would imagine them to be in the west while it's very different here in this part of the world.
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>> all right. right now, i want to go to new delhi. what do you know about what kind of recovery or rescue efforts will be launched? >> the latest fredricka, relief planes from india have land in kathmandu, relief planes with mobile clinics inside food water, that's what the nepali government requested to the prime minister of india. it's route it's unclear what the scale of this is really because the numbers that we're getting are mainly coming from kathmandu, kathmandu valley and the area around it. but the epicenter, which is quite a distance from kathmandu, we still haven't heard from that area in terms of how many people could have died what the situation is. it's near on the range which is
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the himalaya's second most popular trekking destination for a lot of tourists and also for nepale nepalese as well. we don't know how big this is going to be. in kathmandu, major, historical sites have collapsed. these are, you know equivalent of the eiffel tower in pair rishgs paris, for instance a tower from the 18th century, pith panoramic views, an iconic building for nepal, that's collapsed. historical palaces. these are sites millions would visit in nepal and those are completely down. terms of death toll it's expected to rise unfortunately, quite a bit. the death toll that we're getting is from all over nepal, but again, the information that the authorities are getting is -- they're saying it's very difficult to get a good sense of exactly what's going on on the ground right now. >> right. it's going to be a painstaking
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process, thank you so much coming from new delhi. back here on u.s. soil now, new video just released by the baltimore police department giving us another look at the moments before during and after freddie gray's arrest. the video comes from some of the city's surveillance cameras. police say it will help as they try to piece together a time line of exactly what happened. they now admit that officers made inexcusable mistakes in the arrest of gray who died days after he was taken into custody. all this as protesters are still demanding answers. they're vowing to shut down the city in a massive rally. cnn's joe johns is in baltimore for us. >> reporter: hi fred. we are in the park that is very close to city hall here where this demonstration, as expected to end up later today probably around 5:00 eastern time if the schedule holds, we're already seeing pretty sizable police
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presence. i wanted to point out, we see police officers gathered around this park and up and down the streets. it looks look a very secure place at this hour here in the baltimore area. meanwhile, as you said the concern here in the city right now is about those surveillance tapes that were released last night by the police. there are hundreds of cameras around this city and now starting to get an idea of what some of the cameras picked up the day freddie gray was taken into custody. new video from baltimore police showing different angles on the arrest and transportation of freddie gray. the camera views, released on the police department's youtube page. >> the video footage of krefr camera that may have caught a single moment of the incident is under review. >> reporter: one clip shows gray interacting with police. minutes later, the same camera shows the arrest scene with the
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police transport van. from another camera a police van is seen stopped, and another prisoner loaded. the footage is from hundreds of surveillance cameras in the area as police try to piece together the video time line. >> we're refining our investigation, we're getting closer and the picture's getting sharper and sharper as we move forward. >> reporter: but the surveillance video released is not as sharp as the video shot by eyewitnesses on april 12th, showing gray's arrest. less than an hour after he was detained officers transporting him called for a medic. gray subsequently slipped into a coma dying a week after his initial arrest. the surveillance video comes as police admit mistakes were made. >> we know he was not buckled in the transportation wagon, as he should have been no excuses for that period. we know our police employees failed to get him medical attention in a timely manner multiple times. >> reporter: and, in the
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strongest language yet, baltimore police talking about possible charges against officers for the death of the 25-year-old. >> if someone harmed freddie gray we're going to have to prosecute them. so giving too much information out to you on front here now may jeopardize that prosecution. >> reporter: so the investigation continues. and there are concerns here in the city about the size of the crowd for the demonstration this afternoon, whether it will be peaceful whether the traffic will be blocked or whether protesters will try to shut down the city. i have to say that on balance, throughout the week, there have been a few sporadic incidents. for the most part it's been peaceful and hope that it will stay that way. >> all right. thank you so much joe johns. we'll check back with you. meantime more on our breaking news. that volcano in nepal, cnn has learned now, that the death toll stands at 1,457. but, of course the efforts are
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under way to try to rescue the hundreds that have been impacted by this earthquake. right now, joined on the phone by american freelance journalist thomas niebo on the ground in kathmandu. tell me about the rescue efforts that you have witnessed there. er. >> it's remarkable. i was in a coffee shop when the earthquake hit, and there was very little structural damage where i was. a lot of fallen power lines but as i made my way back to the hotel a half mile away a seven-story hotel/restaurant that had collapsed, and i went in and approached it and asked a few of the local women if they were okay. one of the women mentioned two of her children were trapped inside. we checked it out, went inside not a chance they survived. in the historic area where local women gather to get water and do their family's laundry,
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seven-story hotel collapsed into this pit, and there was a cement wall and under that wall were three people trapped and a group of remarkable tourists there, one from italy, one from ireland, another from the united states and they were kind of panicked. we don't know what to do. there was no emergency response for a couple of hours where we were. and so joining some of the locals they got anything they could, some old pickaxes hacksaws metal rods from buildings that had fallen and they started hammering a hole above the man, one man who survived hammering a hole in the concrete and broke it wide enough maybe 2 1/2, 3 feet across toafter cutting it through with rebar. at that time the nepalexe army showed up they climbed into the hole and after a lot of
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maneuvering and removal of ruble, were able to pull him out alive. the others didn't make it. >> you're kidding. my gosh. unbelievable. so now you and just anybody who is eyewitness to this has been jumping in to try to help and rescue people. in your view as rescue teams make their way there, what are they going to need? paint a picture, you did a brilliant job just now of painting a picture of that particular rescue give us an idea of what these rescue teams, emergency teams, are going to see and encounter once they get there. >> reporter: it's really important that people understand that this particular area of kathmandu, it's the tourist's center and it's the busy season right now, it's the trekking season. there are literally tens of thousands of tourists staying in these hotels. not only that the streets are quite narrow many of the buildings and the hotels are quite tall. so there isn't much room to
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navigate. what you have gathered outside the hotels restaurants, in the middle of the streets are tens of thousands of people terrified to return to their hotels. power's out in most areas, there's no internet. phone service is quite spotty. the stores have all shuttered their doors and windows, so it's tough to get basic supplies. throw on on top of that collapse buildings, collapsed walls. in many areas the streets, huge crevasses opened up making it impossible for emergency vehicles to pass. so from a purely lodgegistical standpoint to properly evaluate the extent of the damage is almost impossible. >> my gosh. and, so thomas you're a freelance journalist but have you been living working there or what brought you to this area? >> reporter: i'm currently working with unicef their
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regional office for south asia is based in kathmandu, i'm in the office right now, one of the few places with electricity and internet. and i spend a lot of time working in the region, afghanistan, nepal, bangladesh india, and i was here in the region producing a short film on child brides in bangladesh and that's what i was doing in kathmandu. >> now where are you? you're in that office right now, sounds like a safe spot for you. but where are you going to go? what are you going to do? because i imagine you have some of the same worries as anybody else there, worried about the buildings that are still standing. whether they will collapse whether there is a safe place. >> there's no way i'm going to be able to sleep tonight, and i'm doing a lot of photography for "the new york times." i got a lot of shots of this man as he emerged from the hole and i haven't been out on the streets for a couple of hours. i was sending "the new york
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times" photos. i'm going to go out right now, it's 10:00 at night, and see what the situation is bring my camera. >> it's 10:00 at night, you mentioned there are people who are afraid to go into hotels into buildings, what are you seeing? if you emerge right now or look out a window, walk outside the door what are you seeing in terms of people activity how people are trying to you know locate or rescue others or looking for food themselves? what are they doing? what will you see? >> going to the most popular hotels because there are generators in the hotels they're congating in established areas and safe areas, and you really have kind of a bipolar situation in the sense it's entirely calm until there's a tremor. there have been more than a dozen aftershocks. one of them was, i believe, 6.6 magnitude. and that sends people into a panic, rightfully so. so it's really fraught with tension.
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>> you're still feeling those aftershocks occasionally? >> reporter: it's about an hour and 15 minutes ago was last one that i felt. but they have been fairly regular. in fact i was at the site of the rescue and there are about three, four nepalese soldiers in the hole and there was a serious aftershock and they were scrambling out to reach safety. even these guys soldiers were terrified and aafraid to go back in the hole rightly so. >> you're doing a beautiful job describing that happened after that initial, big quake. you have brilliantly painted a picture for us. if i could ask you, where were you at the time of the big quake? what did you experience and feel? >> reporter: i was in one of my favorite local coffee shops, a popular hangout, on the third or fourth floor, somewhere where you can go and get a delicious cup of coffee. it's saturday afternoon, relaxing i was doing editing on
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this film i shot in bangladesh, and it it was interesting because i think most viewers have experienced tremors at least once time in their life and that's whether i thought it was when it started. it was pretty calm nobody freaked out. but the intensity just went through the roof. walls were shaking, televisions were crashing on to the floor, and the walls were shaking so much you couldn't even run out to the street. so it lasted an entire minute and by the time i got out to the street, it was filled with tens of thousands of people who had come from surrounding businesses. >> my gosh. and at that moment were you worried what part of the ground might open up or how much were you worried about your personal safety? >> reporter: i felt pretty safe at that point i'm was in the middle of the street but i wanted to see what the situation was up near my hotel.
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so i quickly set off on foot and i mean the adrenaline hasn't really gone down much since then. that was about, i guess, about ten hours ago, little more than that. so you just kind of go with the flow. once i arrived at hotel, the situation was much worse. there was the collapse at the other hotel which collapsed there were the two children who died in the rubble and then this man who was trapped. and i should say, within ten, 20 feet of this guy there were three or four women who also died. they must have been there before doing the laundry for the family gathering water. it was a really tragic situation. >> it is tragic. thomas i know you said you're not likely to sleep tonight, understandably. but where will you at least go as a safe place tonight? will you return to your hotel? will you stay right there in the office? >> reporter: i'm told the hotel is not a possibility i'm stay up on the roof on the fifth floor.
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they've shuttered the gate. so i'm going to go out with my camera. i have a deep connection to kathmandu. i visited a dozen times. it's kind of my base in south asia. and i'm just going to go wander the streets tonight with my camera. >> well be careful. be safe. we'll check in with you from time to time because your account es extraordinary. we've put us right there we're hoping the best for your safety and of course the safety of others whose lives are certainly in peril this evening, your time. thomas nybo thank you so much. be safe. >> reporter: thanks, fred. >> we appreciate it. we'll have much more right after this. these days you may be hearing more about data breaches in the news. it's possible your personal information may be at risk. research shows that if your information is compromised due to a data breach you are 6 times more likely to become a victim of identity theft. now is the time to get protection. sign up today and lifelock will begin monitoring your personal information,
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it's nightfall in nepal but the desperate efforts are intensifying trying to find survivors from a huge earthquake. cnn has learned thus far, 1,457
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people have died. but of course through all of the ruble, collapsed buildings a desperate search now a worldwide effort teams coming from all on the world, descending on nepal, to try do get in there with the airports closed and roads impassable, to try to get in to find survivors. the u.s. is sending a rescue team. meantime on to baltimore now, we've been talking today about new video just released by the baltimore police department which gives another look at the moments before and during freddie gray's arrest. the video coming from some of the city's surveillance cameras. police say it will help as they try to piece together a time line of what happened. they now admit, officers made inexcusable mistakes in the arrest of gray who died days after he was taken in to custody. for more perspective on this case, i want to bring in cheryl dorsey she served on the force
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20 years and hln legal analyst, joey jackson, in new york city. good to see both of you. >> hello, fred. good afternoon. >> we are learning a little bit more by way of the city mayor and the city police commissioner and one conclusion there were admitted mistakes, both saying the commissioner and the mayor, that mistakes were made by the officers in the arrest that gray should have been buckled in that police van, for one, and that he was not given medical care especially when requested. cheryl from what you heard, the commissioner outlying now saying 600 cctv cameras that also will help fill in some of the blanks. what is most concerning to you about the information that you've heard so far, or maybe even the lack of information? >> well hello, fredricka and joey. good to be back with you again. i'm troubled by a couple of
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things and i'm glad there are admitting problems after mr. gray was detained but i have a problem with why he was detained to begin with. there was no probable cause, there was no reasonable suspicion. i'm told earlier in the week by the president of the police benevolent officers association, that mr. gray was suspicious in a high crime area. i guess that would mean any black man who is out could be stopped, chased and have their spines severed. so i'm glad they're admitting there's wrong doing after the stop. but also what's troubling is there was a lieutenant and sergeant of police on the scene, among those six officers and neither of the lieutenant or the sergeant had the wherewithal to step in and say, that's enough no more let's get help. >> so cheryl to your point about being able to arrest detain pursue freddie gray, because he was suspicious there is this federal allowance that in certain high crime areas
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throughout the country that police are able to pursue someone based on their suspicious but there doesn't have to be probable cause. as an lapd officer yourself los angeles has plenty of high crime areas. was that a condition that was ever used as far as you know to lead to someone's arrest? there may not have been probable cause but because in a high crime area the message being sent by police officers they were still able to pursue someone? >> well you know we hear that all the time. but officers need to be able to articulate what that suspicious activity is because just being in a high crime area and being a black man does not therefore make you suspicious because if that were the case then you should never leave the house. so unless there's some type of criminal activity that you can articulate that this individual is directly involved in or is reasonably believed to be involved in you don't get to chase them down and just running
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is not reasonable. >> so joey a lot is being revealed in this case alone. there's more than a race problem, a relationship problem between police and community. there's a policy problem. there are law problems there's a lot that is being magnified here. but what can be addressed, if anything first in some of the questions that the police commissioner maybe even mayor, any number of these six officers they must address first? >> well fredricka, first of all, you have to address the growing distrust between the police department and the community. that's where it stems. it has to be a relationship that's predicated upon mutual trust, mutual respect. when you look back and evaluate and find out that one in six people in baltimore were being arrested under mayor o'malley certainly in anybody's engaging in criminality, nobody deserves a free pass. when that many members of the community are arrested you have
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to wonder what's go on there, and does it lead to other problems such as distrust et cetera? in working with the clergy the community, whether it's the faith leadership of the clergy whether it's the schools whether it's you know, community organizations there has to be some coming together because the reality is is that you know the community depends upon the police the police in turn depend upon the community to solve crime. so unless that relationship is cooperative, it becomes problematic moving forward. >> okay. and some of these things can be explored simultaneous to this investigation, others are long term something to work on. cheryl if i can get a last comment from you before we wrap up. the family now about to conduct its own kind of forensic pathology autopsy after the city or county has already done so how much do you worry this body has been compromised in order to
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get an accurate assessment of exactly how and what point was he killed? >> well you know i would certainly hope that the body's not been compromised. of course we need an independent reviewer someone other than the police department to come to some kind of conclusion in terms of how mr. gray died. i'm going to trust and pray that the families representative will be able to do that quickly and have some answers for them something that will bring them some comfort and peace. >> cheryl joey thanks to both of you. appreciate it. >> we'll have much more after this.
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he first put on a dress when he was 8 years old. this was just one of the many many big reveals from bruce jenner's interview with abc's diane sawyer last night. the olympian and reality star announced he will be transitioning from male to female. >> i'm me. i'm me. i'm a person, this who is i am. i'm not stuck in anybody's body. it's just who i am as a human being. my brain is much more female than it is male. it's hard for people to understand that but that's what my soul is. i look at it this way, bruce,
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always telling a lie. he's lived a lie his whole life about who he is. and i can do that any longer. so can i take my ponytail out? yeah why not. we're talking about all of this stuff. yeah, let's take the damn ponytail out. >> you understand people are baffled, confounded. people just -- >> oh my god, that -- is he gay? >> yes. are you gay? >> no i'm not gay. i'm not gay. i'm as far as i know hetero heterosexual. >> what do you mean as far as you know. >> as far as i know i've never been with a guy, married, raising kids. >> you can desire a woman every bit as much? >> yeah. >> if you were a male and become female but you like women, are you a lesbian? are you a heterosexual who --
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>> you're going back to the sex thing and apples and oranges. there's two different things here. sexuality is who you are personally attracted to who you, you know turns you on male or female. but gender identity is how to do it with who you are as a person and your soul and who you identify with inside. >> if you marry again, do you see it with a woman? is that what you visualize. >> i'm so far down the road it's the last thing in the world -- >> you can't, you can't -- >> i can't figure that side of it out. i just want to have a free soul and have a lot of great friends. i'm 65 it's not like you want to go out and get it on all the time. i just want to enjoy life. >> all right. joining me now to talk more about this cnn media correspondent, host of reliable sources, brian stelter. it was riveting just simply
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and revealing and people learned a lot. so how many people indeed were tuned in last night? >> it was educational. it wasn't exploit eightative as soon feared 17 million watched one of the highest-rated news programs in the united states all year number two. one episodes of "60 minutes" that was higher. this is the biggest interview of the year many more viewers than ever watching on a friday night. of course it is dominating conversations today. what's really striking it's a ground breaking moment for the transgender community and transgender acceptance. there is negatively on line no doubt but the dominant reaction is love love and affection for bruce jenner. >> he was frank and candid. when you talk about love not just for him, but to see four of his biological kids sit down and talk you know really in concert about how much they
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admired him as an olympian and how they felt like this was the biggest, most courageous thing he's ever done but at the same time there was the omission of the kardashian side of the family that they were not part of that. i wonder if that resonated just as much if not more so than the family members who were willing to reveal themselves and express themselves firsthand. >> well i do think we're trained to be cynical about reality tv. my cynical eye would say that we will hear more from the kardashian stepdaughters and daughters in the days weeks and months to come. we now know that bruce jenner will be startingen e! reality show this july about his new life as he 4 transtitions and we'll start using the word "she" to describe bruce jenner. i have a feeling we'll see daughters, stepdaughters more there. we did see them tweet on facebook last night, expressing
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support, pride in their father. as we know kim kardashian doing a big interview on nbc on monday we will hear more from kim kardashian at that point. >> i know their name kind of steals headlines a lot. i think it was very resonating and it was very impactful when bruce jenner said all of this time all of these episodes 400-something episodes and i was the one with the real story. >> with the real story. and also to hear from the family, hear the support, not every transgender person especially young people who feel these -- that they want to transition that they want to make this change they don't always feel that support. that's what we're hearing from the community today, from advocates today, that is hopefully this is going to save lives. it's a dramatic thing to say, but i think that's very true actually. >> now let's talk about another very real story and we're talking about brian williams and how "the stories" and some alleging they weren't completely real but now something very
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real a reality check, your own reporting has discovered an internal nbc investigation has turned up at least ten instances 0 so far in which brian williams embellished details of reporting, not going away. the investigation followed williams february apology for claiming a helicopter he was in during the iraq war was hit by rocket fire nbc suspended him for six months without pay, and now there's an investigation about all of the other stories and whether he's deserving of being put back on the air, in the seat of "nightly news "s what more are you hearing? >> it's quiet for a long time about brian williams people wondering when nbc's going to make an announcement because he's under the six-month suspension it goes on another three months but it's increasingly untenable for nbc not to be commenting. reported last night was, as you said there's a number of examples of embellishments that haven't been made publicly known but found by nbc.
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my sources are telling me the same thing, at least ten instances of exaggerations found. the most important detail head of all nbc universal had a meeting thursday where he learned about this he heard about these findings that suggests to me that nbc might be nearing a decision about what to do in this very difficult case. it's in some ways a no-win situation for nbc but this is something that does seem to be coming to a head as these newspaper reports indicate. >> brian, it's been difficult, but even more so now, the chairman of nbc -- >> brand-new boss. >> he was the one who kind of anointed brian williams he's the one who said this is going to be the heir apparent for tom brokaw and now it's happened but now he's not in that chair and it's andy lack who will make that decision about whether to bring him back. it's very complicated in many ways. >> talk about professional dramas but they're personal
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dramas, personal relationships. brian williams has fans at nbc, a close relationship with andy lack but people want to see lester holt filling in capably keeping that job. they don't think brian williams' credibility can be restored and think he has to step aside. it seems to me nbc is coming to a decision soon and maybe this is leaking out in the new york times and "the washington post" because of that. that's just my guess. i've seen it happen before in the tv news business. >> yeah it's very complicated. thanks so much. we'll have more after this. people ship all kinds of things. but what if that thing is a few hundred thousand doses of flu vaccine. that need to be kept at 41 degrees. while being shipped to a country where it's 90 degrees. in the shade. sound hard? yeah. does that mean people in laos shouldn't get their vaccine? we didn't think so. from figuring it out to getting it done, we're here to help.
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if you take multiple medications, a dry mouth can be a common side effect. that's why there's biotene. it comes in oral rinse spray or gel so there's moisturizing relief for everyone. biotene, for people who suffer from a dry mouth. continuing coverage of breaking news out of nepal, more than 1400 people killed after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake rock the country the united nations says 40% of the country has been impacted and that a major relief effort is required and there are call for international assistance of course. the u.s. deploying a team as well. cnn military analyst retired
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army lieutenant general mark hurdling joins us from new york and former navy s.e.a.l. joining us by skype from orlando. good to see both of you. general, you first, you were part of a rescue effort in the pakistan earthquake in 2005 at least 86,000 people killed. in cases like this soman massive, difficult to rein to traverse how do you get to the inure jd whend when to such infrastructure airports in the case of nepal, are closed? >> interesting, fred because in 2005 i just returned from combat in iraq and we had became the operations officer for europe when pakistani earthquake in that year happened. as you said tens of thousands of people died. you have to send a team in into conduct analysis of what is needed. that case we realized most of the damage was at high altitudes, couldn't reach them by normal helicopters, we lad to
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not only send in a surgical team of a couple of thousand soldiers from our 12th combat surgical hospital but another team of ch-47 helicopters that could reach the high altitudes. i think you're going to see some of the same things occurring in nepal. you know it's a landlocked country. they have the himalayas to the north, the forest to the south, the roads connecting kathmandu with smaller cities are all difficult to transverse. this is the worst kind of environment to conduct a relief operation in and we've already seen casualty figures jump from a few hundred, now i guess it's over 1,500 now and i think that's going to continue to grow fred. >> wow. jonathan we heard from a u.n. representative earlier who said helicopters are probably going to be used in this case. but there are no assurances there. what are life-saving tactics that you're familiar with that might be employed while people are waiting for the help of big, you know earth movers that
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could eventually come to the area? >> well fred as a general will tell you, the biggest life-saving thing that you can have in an environment like this is actually throttling back and planning as you go forward, because if you just throw all of your resources in there and you exhaust your people it's going to only take about a day and the recovery is going to break down. so the greatest thing that they can do right now is actually pause for a moment try as much as they can to organize, make sure they stay hydrated while they search and do a systemic search. you have to have grids. you have to know where you search so you don't waste time and search again until you've cleared certain areas. >> talking about a place that's hard to get do on a good day. but type is of the essence, people who are trap under debris and rubble. i mean, is this a case where a lot of the rescuers are just
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hoping that they you know there are blessings because the obstacles are abundant? >> well exactly. and what you're going to see, first of all, the construction techniques in a country like this are not very good fred. you know you're talking about ten huts and bricks that are just laid without any kind of reinforcement to them. you've seen photos where all of the walls are tumbling down ceilings crashing down trapping people underneath. one of the things we found -- and i'll agree the key issue is to step back because this is probably going to take much longer than we anticipate. when we did the pakistani relief we thought our soldiers would there be a month. thended they ended up being in nine months. our son is a soldier, in kathmandu, stayed in the city while he took cadets from west point on an engagement visit there they had a conversation with the ambassador at the time.
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one of the cadets asked a question about the pivot to the pacific, the answer by the ambassador we're interested in that but the most important thing in nepal the next humanitarian relief effort we're going to have to conduct and we've got to build relationships. this shows all of that on hispart. >> thank you so much. we're all hoping and wishing the best for all of those involved in trying to find survivors. coming up in the newsroom the man accused of going on a shooting spree in a colorado movie theater is about to go on trial. our legal guys tell us what they expect, next.
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this monday james holmes goes on trial for shooting rampage that killed 12 people and wounded 70 more in an aurora colorado movie theater. he attacked the place in july of 2012 you'll remember during a midnight premier of "the dark knight rises." holmes pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. his attorneys say he was quote in the throes of a psychotic episode at the time of the shooting. prosecutors argue that he was sane and they're pushing for the death penalty in this case. let's bring in avery freeman. >> hi. >> and richard herman law professor joining us from ft. lauderdale today, good to see you. >> hi fred. >> big part of this case will be
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decided by what james holmes' mental state was. we don't have a lot of details about what experts have found, so will this become a case of, you know who's export is more believable richard? >> yeah fred it'll absolutely be a battle of the experts. we have to put aside our anger and our disgust in what happened here understand in the legal system we punish people based on their state of mind. what were they thinking at the time they committed the crime. could they form the extent to kill, for instance in a murder case such as this one. it'll surround whether or not he was having such an episode that he could not form the requisite intent to commit murder and or did he not nose that what he was doing was wrong? that's what the defense is going to try to do. it's up you talk about mt. everest, you talk about a hurdle here. you look at deliberation and
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intent, and the amount of planning that went into this and the actual execution, very very bad -- >> we're talking about examining, avery, all the things that led up to his actions before the shooting. you know he began stockpiling weapons in may, apparently. he took photos of the movie theater the month before the shooting and he -- >> he cased the joint. >> and bought tickets weeks in advance. at the same time he's pleading not guilty by reason of insanity and attorneys say there was an psychotic episode. when you look at all of the planning leading up to does it not sound like he had the wherewithal about his abilities, intent all of those things. might it be difficult for his defense? >> well i mean it drips in premeditation premeditation, not only you have the purchases you say of the arms ammunition casing the joint, he actually booby trapped his apartment knowing the police would go there and killed or
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injured after the incident. the argument here on the insanity plea is it's essentially a psychotic moment. you can piece together over three months of psychotic episodes. i can't understand how the defense could possibly achieve that result. now remember there are going to be five experts, fredricka, two for the prosecution, one for the defense, and two independent experts, psychiatrists, testifying engaged by the core. and studies show that ordinarily injuries will look to the independent studies, but you said earlier, we have no idea what they're going to say. and that's where this case turns. >> all right. all starts monday avery, richard, thank you so much. of course, you know i think some people may have forgotten about the painstaking process of the booby trapping of the apartment. that plays a significant role in all of this. appreciate you guys.
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see you next weekend. this programming note hollywood is hot for the white house correspondent's dinner and that would be tonight. cnn will be there from the red carpet at that main event. jokes from snl's sicily strong and president barack obama. cnn's live coverage starting here tonight, 7:00 p.m. eastern time. we'll be right back. why do we do it? why do we spend every waking moment, thinking about people? why are we so committed to keeping you connected? why combine performance with a conscience? why innovate for a future without accidents? why do any of it? why do all of it? because if it matters to you it's everything to us. the xc60 crossover. from volvo. lease the well equiped volvo xc60 today. visit your local volvo showroom for details.
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all right, we're covering two natural disasters today. devastating earthquake in nepal just moments away, first, let's head to southern chile. the volcano near the tourist destination has erupted twice already, spewing ash for miles, thousands have had to flee their homes. we are in chile where you are surrounded by that ash. >> reporter: that's right, fred. this is one of the first towns that was evacuated. more than 4,400 people were evacuated total. but some people had been let back in so that they can prepare, not only for the possibility of a third eruption but also for rain if you look right over here, we have bulldozers cleaning away the ash. emergency workers, and the idea
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is to get it the off the roofs, to get it off the streets, and that's because this ash is incredibly heavy. you'll see this huge truck passing by right now. this is like gravel or cement. before we have the possibility of another eruption. i should mention also they're coming in to get out their animals. this is a very rural area and so they've been coming back in to get, to get out their cows, their horses their sheep. they've even been bringing in trucks to get the salmon out of the rivers. three trucks passed by right now. these people want to the make sure they have something to come back once the volcano calms down. so they're getting out their animals, cleaning out their houses and preparing for the worst, fred. >> thank you so much. appreciate that. we have so much more straight ahead in the newsroom and it all starts right now. this is cnn breaking news. >> hello again everyone thanks for joining us we continue to follow breaking news from nepal.
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devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake has hit that country. more than 1400 people have died. the earthquake hit around midday local time the epicenter was less than 50 miles from the capitol of kathmandu. and there have been more than a dozen aftershocks. and we're also getting some new video from a surveillance camera that shows the strength of that earthquake right there. the city has been hit with widespread power failures and the airport remains closed there. the tremors also triggering landslides on mt. everest. rescuers are going through crumbled buildings looking for any survivors. let's get more on this devastating earthquake cnn's reporter is in delhi, india for us what do you know about the rescue attempts. at 10:00 local time there. >> reporter: yeah fredricka, they've declared a state of emergency, it's dark now, but
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about 10,000 police and army personnel are still on the ground trying to rescue as many people as they can from underneath the rubble. that's according to the ministry of home in nepal. night vision helicopters have also been sent to the area which is the epicenter where this earthquake took place about 60 kilometers from kathmandu valley to see if they can find anything to rescue anyone there in the area. and, according to tom locals there, we spoke to a little while ago, entire villages have actually collapsed in that area but very little information is coming in from these parts, a lot of the numbers that we're getting, a lot of information we're getting is from the kathmandu valley and around that area. just the kathmandu valley the capitol alone, 600 people have died. the rest in the neighboring areas. really it's still very difficult to get a sense of how big this tragedy is.
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officials still can't confirm or even estimate what this what, you know the death toll right now beyond the 1,400 number they're giving. they expect it to rise quickly. >> all right, thank you so much. keep us posted. meantime right now, joined on the phone with rob styles who is in kathmandu right now, with his wife. so rob, tell me about exactly where you are and what you have experienced. >> okay. right now we are near we are in kathmandu, we're near the pinal area, which is sort of like the big, tourist area. and it's been quite a day so far. currently, we're in we're in some sort of field that some sort of government building. we're here with a lot of travelers and locals. everybody just sort of waiting out the night here in an open space, kind of away from all the buildings here in kathmandu. they're like all brick, very old
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and very sort of brittle. >> so when the earthquake hit, exactly where were you and how, how, you know, worried were you about your safety? how did you try to keep yourself safe? >> well my wife and i actually had gotten to our hotel room we had guest houses put our bags in our room we were going to go out and take photographs of kathmandu which is an eye opening city and right as we were literally walking out the door. things shook. we're both from california and we knew immediately that what was happening. we jumped in the doorway and just sort of hung on to each other. and then some other travelers started coming out of the rooms, like what's going on what's going on. we were shouting everyone stay in the door way, stay in the doorway. and i looked down the hallway, there were people running out of the guest house and the ground was tossing these people. and then just literally across
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the alley, there is an eight-foot high brick wall and 60 meter section just toppled over crushing motorcycles and a car and everything. and i mean it felt like it went on forever, but as soon as it settled down we came outside, we looked down the alleyway where this wall had come down. there were several construction workers just racing down the alleyway trying to get away the construction sites. we went outside, and we just sort of everyone sort of gathered together on the main street sort of away from all the buildings. and once we got out to the main street we could see that several powerlines had come down. one had smashed and fallen on top of a car. another one was laying in the street. everyone stayed there, and the first, i don't know 10 15 20 minutes, must have been three or four aftershocks that were sizable. every time one popped up people were screaming and looking
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around. there were people clearly shaken upset, crying. we stayed there for about 45 minutes and we started walking through the city. as we went through the city, every intersection and street we hit, there were large sections of buildings. everything in kathmandu is made of brick it seems like. and large sections had come off the buildings, and people some law enforcement, people were trying to move rubble to get people out of out from underneath these collapsed portions of the building. >> so people are using their bare hands, aren't they to try rescue anyone? are you seeing any signs, and i realize it's 10:30 at night there, any signs of anymore sophisticated equipment that is being used to help move rubble try to rescue people? >> we went to the dahar tower
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excuse me if i'm pronouncing this wrong, that actually collapsed. like fell over. and we went down to that area and they just had basically like one basic earth mover that's being, moving some rubble and stuff, and that was around 6:30 local time. and they were still clearing rubble and just in about 30 minutes that we were there before before authorities cleared the area they pulled two bodies out on stretchers. and they were continuing to do that but for the most part that's the only real area where we've seen any heavy equipment being used. otherwise, it's just, you know people using their hands and doing what they can. >> oh my goodness. and 10:30 at night there, clearly earthquake of this magnitude, there's no power. there isn't running water in places. so with people still trying to help one another, what are they doing for light?
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if many people are standing outside, or still in the main street how are they illuminating what are you seeing? >> i mean i'm standing in darkness i think, for some reason i can't be sure where i'm at. some sort of government building and across the street there's another government building. i can hear generators running in the areas that we were just as it turned into dusk over by the dahar tower, they were authorities were bringing in some generators but not very many. but like onen to get a big flood light going. otherwise the city is pretty much dark. and from all we can tell walking around being on the streets, a lot of people have just been directed to the go to the open fields and national stadium that's i don't know, i would guess, six or 700 yards long of just a wide open field. and i think a lot of people are spending the night there. >> wow. and i realize you just got there. describe how you put your bags in your room and you know you
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and your wife when the tremors start, earthquake started, you were standing in the doorway, you know that instinctively because of your experience as a californian. now what? i know it's just happened. where are you going to stay what are you going to do? >> well we sort of opted to stay here tonight in this open area because we weren't 1700% keen on the -- 100% keen on staying in the area. the buildings are stacked closely together here i don't know. it just wasn't a good idea. so for us i mean you know a million things have run through our heads. we've been traveling for a while now, and we're always trying to make the most of our time but we're not quite sure. we thought maybe we'll go to a different area maybe of nepal that is not so effected. maybe we'll just walk over to the embassy in the morning and see if there's anything we can do to help. try to hook up with the red cross or something. since we're here and able bodied maybe that's the best
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thing to do. >> that's generous. rob styles keep in touch with us if you could. and al the best to you and your wife, continue to be safe and of course we're wishing the best for everyone who is there and having to endure that devastation. thanks so much rob. we'll have much more on this breaking news and other news right after this. people ship all kinds of things. but what if that thing is a few hundred thousand doses of flu vaccine. that need to be kept at 41 degrees. while being shipped to a country where
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it's 90 degrees. in the shade. sound hard? yeah. does that mean people in laos shouldn't get their vaccine? we didn't think so. from figuring it out to getting it done, we're here to help.
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all right. getting under way this hour the first of two expected rallies today in baltimore. protesters are outraged over the death of freddie gray an unarmed black man who died after suffering a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody. the police department now admitting that its officers made inexcusable mistakes during gray's arrest. cnn's miguel marquez is in baltimore where one of the marches is expected to get started. lots of police presence there. barricades but, are there a lot
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of demonstrators? >> reporter: no demonstrators yet, but police are certainly bracing for it. this is the western district police station of baltimore p.d. you can see there's about, about 100 officers out here. and we believe that people are starting to gather in the neighborhood. it is very busy here. the police commissioner speaking yesterday as you said talking about some of the concerns that he already has with this situation. that mr. gray was taken to several different locations, there is one location in particular they are focussing on. he said and all but said some officers they can't say that much about the case because some officers may be charged. >> well we're focussing in. there is i'm not going to give you all our information, there's an incident not incident i'll get you on the right path there's something we have to look at to have further investigation on. >> reporter: and that
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specifically that's the first time that we have heard that specific reference to an incident that happened during mr. gray's transport from about six blocks that way, then he was taken about eight or ten blocks that way. and he was taken back all the way over there to pick up another prisoner then brought here and before he was even processed into western district they had called 911, put him in an ambulance and took him off. suffered three vertebrae that were broken and a crushed throat basically. big, big questions as to how that happened. people here saying they want to get 0,000 out on the street of baltimore starting here to city hall later. they want to take over the city and basically show the police and the mayor who is boss. >> right. okay. miguel marquez, thanks so much. keep us posted. people wanted to know about the gap that the commissioner talk abouted. there was a gap between freddie gray running and his apprehension. so many are wondering exactly
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what took place, if that injury that ultimately led to a coma then death. could have happened somewhere in there. all right. well did you watch last night? bruce jenner telling the world that he will become a woman. but some are saying that was a publicity stunt, or at least the question was asked to him, was this a publicity stunt for the reality tv show? his response -- >> are you telling me i'm going to go through a complete gender change okay and go through everything you need to do that for the show? sorry, diane, it ain't happening. >> okay. we're going to talk more about the impact of his honesty.
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all right. now to the person that everyone is talking about today, olympic gold medallist and reality star bruce jenner. he is now confirming that he is indeed transitioning into a woman. jenner came out publicly as transgender in a lengthy interview with abc's diane sawyer that aired last night. cnn's dan simon has more. >> my brain is much more female than it is male. it's hard for people to understand that. but that's what my soul is. >> reporter: bruce jenner the olympic gold medallist turned reality star confirming the
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tabloid speculation that he's transitioning from a man to a woman. speaking openly to diane sawyer in a highly publicized abc special. >> are you a woman? >> yes, for all intensive purposes i am a woman. people look at me differently. they see you as this macho male, but my heart and my soul and everything i do in life it is part of me. that female side is part of me. that's who i am. >> reporter: jenner firmly dismissing skeptics that this is a stunt to promote a show documenting his change. he knew he was different at eight years old when he began trying on his mother's dresses. >> are you telling me i'm going to go through a complete gender change okay and go through everything you need to do that for the show. sorry, diane, it ain't happening. okay. yeah we're doing this for publicity, yeah right. >> reporter: the 65-year-old
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whose been married three times says his former spouses knew about his issues. sawyer asking the obvious question. >> are you gay? >> no i'm not gay. i am not gay. i am as far as i know heterosexual. >> you don't know? >> it's not -- >> what do you mean as far as you know? >> as far as i know i've never been with a guy. i've always been married, raising kids. >> right. and you can desire a woman every bit as much? >> yeah yeah. >> wheaties is the breakfast of champions. >> reporter: for children of the '70s and '80s, he was the greatest athlete on the planet. >> okay here we go. >> reporter: for millennials, steady male presence on "keeping up with the kardashians." he joked his secret was the one story that truly mattered. >> and the entire run, i kept thinking to myself oh my god, this whole thing, the one real true story, in the family was
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the one i was hiding and nobody new knew about it. the one thing that could really make a difference in people's lives, was right here in my soul and i could not tell that story. >> reporter: he says he hasn't decided whether to do a sex change. for now, its been cosmetic surgery combined with female hormones. jenner says his children ten of them between his biological and stepchildren have been supportive. several appearing by his side. >> i cried with him and i just told him how proud of him i was and how inspired i was. >> first thing i thought was just like oh finally makes sense. >> reporter: as for why go through this change now, when most his age are looking forward to a less stressful, less dramatic life. >> i couldn't take the walls constantly closing in on me. if i die, which i could be diagnosed next week with cancer and boom you're gone. i'd be so mad at myself that i didn't explore that side of me.
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you know i don't want that to happen. >> reporter: with this revelation jenner is certainly the most famous transgender person on the planet. he wants to be an inspiration to others going through similar identity issues. he wants to change the world by speaking openly about his transformation. dan simon, cnn, san francisco. >> all right. let's talk more about this with cnn media correspondent, host of reliable sources, brian settlers brian, you've heard all kinds of words, courageous this was brave, this really was, you know earth shaking. he has done a lot, not just for himself, by helping to kind of fill in a lot of blanks. people have only been seeing tabloids and pictures but he spoke a little bit to the pain and agony that came behind the paparazzi following him, but he also is opening a door for so many people. and he's aware of that. he said that didn't he?
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>> he did. repeatedly actually in the interview. people refer to this as america's transgender moment. we see more transgender characters on television and movies and media, but this was a moment 65 years in the making. bruce jenner described living a lie, keeping a secret his entire life. and even people that have never even thought about this issue of gender identity i think can relate to the idea of keeping a secret holding something back and finally being able to come out and share it with people. you know diane sawyer said this is going to be the last tv interview that bruce jenner does as bruce. that implies to me that in his e reality show this summer we will start to hear about a new bruce jenner different first name and he'll identify as a woman to the point where he'll ask the media to start using the word she. the reason why we are saying he -- >> he refers -- >> that's his preference. journalists want to go with the preference of the transgender individual but it seems like over the next months and perhaps
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year bruce jenner will take the steps to get to the point where he will ask us to say she. >> he said in his soul is a woman and his brain -- >> you know what i thought was most striking? >> yeah. >> he dreams as a woman. that was the most profound thought to me. when we all go to sleep, we have dreams we imagine ourselves dreaming. the idea that he has dreamed as a woman for so long really struck me. >> it was striking. and abc has said its been very impressed with the realtime tweets. more positive than expected. >> yeah -- >> people weren't sure how people would accept this. >> yeah no doubt. it doesn't take a lot of searching to find some intolerance and negativity under the surface, but overall, more positive than abc expected. diane sawyer and the head of the news division were all in her office last night watching this premier and refreshing twitter and facebook to see the reactions, and i would say the reactions have been overwhelmingly positive. like i said no doubt, some negativity out there. some people just don't want to the hear about this and that's
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something that'll be with us for a long time i think unfortunately. but overall, this was a really educational moment and like you said a real ground breaking moment. >> yeah and i think he used such powerful words when he says he's been living a lie all of this time and it was time now to pull back the curtain because he just couldn't see living any longer that way. >> you could see relief and you could also see a person who plans to talk about this for a long time. >> right. relief is a great word because i think you did see that. now let's talk about another very familiar face on television, but never now we're talking about brian williams and the battle that he is now enduring to keep his job. there is an internal investigation that continues to carry on and now apparently reportedly turning up at least ten instances so far in which brian williams embellished details. what are you hearing about what this means for his fate at that network?
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>> this news began to come out overnight and i've been able to confirm this afternoon that there are number of instances of embellishments beyond the ones we heard about back in february. he was suspended for six months back in february unpaid suspension because of an iraq war mission in 2003. it was a shocking down fall the legendary television news anchor. the question now is if they'll bring him back or not. they've been doing an internal investigation. the fact that there are now leaks coming out in the new york times and washington post and elsewhere, that this investigation has found a number of discrepancies number of exaggerations, it suggests that nbc's nearing a decision point. nearing a point where they're going to decide whether to bring him back or not. >> and i can say, the network has to also weigh if they do indeed bring him back what baggage does that bring with it? will the network be forever saddled with this investigation, regardless of the outcome? >> it is a very much lose lose,
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lose scenario. he is holding on to most of the audience brian williams had. if they decide to bring it back that's going to create drama. there are fans of brian williams out there. i'm hearing on facebook and twitter as we're talking here, there are a lot of fans of brian williams that want to the see him given a second chance. my thought for a while is he will get a second chance but maybe not at nbc nightly news anchor chair where he's been for the past ten years. >> really? isn't there the feeling if you're getting a second chance that would be the only place to get a second chance because it would seem difficult for any other network to want to touch him, regardless of the outcome, just simply by the association with a stories not being accurate? >> yeah that's been the speculation in the tv business. where else could he go? where else could brian williams restart his career? my sources say he wants to come back to nbc, he wants to get back in the chair. and he wants to reearn and regain people's trust.
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that makes sense, question is whether for nbc whether that's the right business calculation. the fact that this investigation has gone on for almost three months now, and leaks are coming out of it and suggests to me that every day the investigation goes on is a bad day for brian williams. i mean imagine any of us watching at home, you know if we were being investigated by our boss and it takes months obviously not a good sign. >> right. thank you so much. and tomorrow of course we're going to be watching because you have a guest with new information, more information, on the brian williams saga. we'll be watching that brian. thank you so much. don't miss reliable sources tomorrow, 11:00 a.m. eastern.
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all right. we're following breaking news from nepal, more than 1,400 people have died following a devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake. the epicenter was less than 50 miles from the capital of kathmandu causing widespread power blackouts and closing the city's airport. new video from a surveillance camera showing just how hard that earthquake hit. the tremors also triggered landslides on nearby mt. everest. it is now nighttime there and rescuers continue to comb through crumbled buildings looking for any survivors. let's get more now on the devastating earthquake cnn's reporter is in delhi, india, what more do we know about the rescue attempts now that it is, you know after 11:00 p.m.?
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>> reporter: that's right, it is dark the rescue operations still under way. some 10,000 police and army personnel there on the ground especially around kathmandu, sifting through the rubble trying to pull out as many people as they can. according to the home ministry they've sent night vision helicopters to the area which is the epicenter of where this earthquake happened to see if they can find anyone there to rescue. this is a tourist area presumably there are some climbers in that area but according to local reports, entire villages have collapsed in and around that epicenter and around that area in kathmandu, of course we've seen many historic buildings, heritage sites, completely collapsed. right now, i mean we're getting messages text messages constantly people a lot of people just outside in kathmandu, too scared to go back into their homes right now, according to the government
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they expect these aftershocks to continue until noon tomorrow so a lot of people expected to camp out in whatever open space they can find in kathmandu valley. it's a densely populated capitol, open spaces are difficult to find but from the messages i've been getting from family members, from friends, everyone is outside right now, trying to just too scared to go back in fredricka. >> all right, thank you so much. keep us posted appreciate that from new delhi. jamie, u.n. country coordinator in nepal is heading to u.n.'s humanitarian aid effort earlier he told me about the many challenges. >> we're going to need to have some sort of capacity to actually get there. most importantly get to the spaces that need assistance. and since it's required i will do it by helicopter. so having the heavy equipment
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there and get that done in repairing that may have been damaged ultimately after the fact that it's a response equation. >> and if you're interested in helping the victims of today's earthquake head to cnn.com/impact. all right. coming up another natural disaster we'll go live to chile where thousands anxious await to see if a long dormant volcano will erupt for a third time this week.
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new details coming out of southern chile today where the volcano near the popular tourist destination erupted twice already. spewing ash for miles. cnn's shasta darlington is a few miles from the volcano. they're trying to clean up but where can they put it? >> reporter: well they're trying to get it out of here fred that's the main issue. they've got to get this ash, get it off of the roofs, out of the roads to so this they can get trucks and vehicles back and forth. and they really only have a few
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hours to do it. we're in one of the first towns that was evacuated. almost 2,000 people were evacuated from this town. and so they are only allowed in for a short period of time. you can see right behind me there's some emergency workers, they're busy with bulldozers with the shovels, the hose, the rakes, and that's because it may look like cement or gravel that's the ash. that's how heavy it is. they have to do this at the same time they're worried there could be a third eruption from the volcano. which is also right behind us but covered by clouds right now. so this is a rush job. they've got to do the best they can in the short period of time and at the same time get these trucks in to get livestock out. this is a very rural area. so they've got to get the cattle the horses the sheep, out of here. they've even brought in water trucks so they can get the salmon out of the river, there are a lot of fisheries around here salmon fisheries. getting from here for the echblg yalty that we could have a third eruption and just to make sure there's something to come back to fred even if nothing happens going forward.
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>> wow. what an incredible undertaking, thank you so much shasta darlington. all right. last night cnn's anderson cooper faced off with the lawyer for tulsa reserve deputy robert bates. disputing a 2009 report that found he got special treatment and started training rules. the fire exchange straight ahead. look! this is the new asian inspired broth bowl from panera bread. our hero is the soba noodle. (mmmm) which we pair with fresh spinach (ahhh) mushrooms (yes) and chicken raised without antibiotics. (very nice) then top with a soy-miso broth. that's the ticket! and if you're feeling extra adventurous try our delicious thai chicken salad only at panera bread. shopping online... ...is as easy as it gets. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers carpenters and even piano tuners... were just as simple? thanks to angie's list now it is. start shopping online...
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all right. explosive new details about the tulsa county reserve deputy charged in the deadly shooting of an unarmed fleeing suspect this month. 2009 internal inquiry found that the sheriff's office violated training policies and gave robert bates special treatment with supervisors intimidating officers to disregard officers to favor him. in an interview last night, the attorney talked to anderson cooper about the report. >> the details of this report are pretty stunning. i mean the multiple officers police officers and employees with tulsa county sheriff's office were intimidated into giving your client special treatment, and even falsifying his training records. do you dispute that? >> yes. yeah the report speaks for itself but this was after a few months that he'd been on the job. keep in mind that reserve officers come in different
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varieties of experience. some of them come directly from the police department that have had a number of years of experience, and into retirement become a reserve officer. and some come from public life that have no police experience at all. mr. bates was a former police officer, but 30 years earlier. he was plet certified -- >> from 30 years ago. >> but lacked the training. he was in a different category when he was received into the department there was some some level of concern and some jealousy i think, and that was voiced to the superiors. and it was reviewed. i think the institution responded appropriately, did interviews did an investigation, and corrective action. >> i feel like we haven't read the same report. because i've read now multiple police officers who gave testimony in this report here saying that they were pressured because of your client's
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friendship with the guy who ran the department pressured repeatedly to initial documents that they hadn't even written, but made it seem they had written saying he doesn't need to get the hundreds of hours of training basically pressuring the timeline of the training. you say it was kind of petty jealousies these are seasoned police officers who have given testimony saying and are quoted in this report saying time and time again, we're talking about sergeants and corporals who are saying time and time again, your client didn't have the training. >> that's just a flat out misstatement of the report. i know the individuals involved. and i've spoken to them currently. and the one person -- >> well corporal warren was asked to initial documents that bates didn't he hadn't done enough training. documents he didn't write. >> he was terminated a year later for improper conduct as a result of mr. bates report.
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he's now standing for first-degree murder in another county represented by the lawyer was this family. and what you just quoted is just a misinterpretation and a misquoting of that report. there weren't numerous seasoned officers saying that. there was one officer and one officer that said he felt that mr. bates was getting special treatment. >> all right. so bates maintains it was an accident mistaking his handgun for a taser. joining me now, police sergeant sheryl dorsey and joey jackson. all right. good to see you back. so now, the attorney maintaining that robert bates did indeed have sufficient training had the credentials to be in a position in which he was in. so joey how might this impact the case against him because he is looking at charges as it relates to this man's death, at the same time mr. bates is
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being allowed to vacation in the bahamas while this case continues. he got permission from the judge in which to carry on with a trip to the bahamas while this investigation continues and while he is now facing time in trial. to defend his case. so how is all of this, you know kind of impacting the case? let's address it in four different parts. let's start with the vacation. let's put this in perspective. i've represented a law enforcement officer in new york last year and his father died out of the country. he was not permitted, based upon him facing charges, to leave to go to his father's funeral. so here we're talking about someone who is permitted to go to vacation. should people be outraged? they should be. based upon my experience as a prosecutor and a defense attorney i haven't seen that. for people to have confidence in the system they have to feel that the system applies to everyone. step two regarding inadequate
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training. obviously it's important, it's relevant. what training did he receive. did anybody force, coerce or pressure someone to change anything. if that happened there should be consequences for the people who had that happen. step three, in the event that he had proper training but there apparently are complaints about his performance, that also affects the case because someone who could be properly trained can still be not competent to be out there. so that's relevant. final step. let's say that he's found to have all the training imaginable that he couldn't have had any more training than he had. it still does not address the underlying issue of how you mistake a taser -- or a gun for a taser, one being on your chest and one being at your sidearm. so still if he had all the training in the world, we have to still examine and say you can still be culpably negligent. that is so careless in regard to
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the standards that you use. no reasonable person under your circumstances would exercise that care and still be criminally responsible. even if he did have the training but acted negligently that doesn't bode well for his criminal case and certainly doesn't bode well for the civil case. in conclusion training very important, very relevant very significant. but even if he had the training you still have to be held to a standard of reasonable care when you're dealing with people's lives. >> i wonder sheryl where do you see the importance of training here whether it was 30 years ago because he was an officer or whether it was recent training and to joey's point whether it was inadvertent, a mistake or simply rusty to not be able to discern the location of a taser on the chest and a pistol at the hip. >> let me say this about training because first of all, he was a police officer in 1964 and he left the department in 1965. so i'm wondering if they didn't discover something back then 30
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years ago that let them know that he was not properly to be in law enforcement, and so he leaves. then he comes back 30 years later. and let's understand that the force that was used that was exacerbated by his own training and he uses his personal vehicle for traffic stops, he issues citations, he's using a gun that he's not allowed to use and trained with properly. so understand this. let me put this myth to bet that when a suspect runs as mr. harris did, that the force that was used was excessive because it was not about controlling him. it was not about him resisting arrest. it was about punishment. that's what happened in the case of freddie gray that's what happened in the case of walter scott, and that's what happened here. they wanted to punish these people because they ran from the police. contempt of cop. there's a penalty when you run. and it's been death. >> all right. sheryl dorsey we'll leave it right there. joey jackson, thanks to both of
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you, i appreciate it. again of course we are watching the protests that will unfold later on today in baltimore as it pertains to the death of freddie gray. all right. it is called the nerd prom. you've heard of it. president obama is actually going on the comedy offensive tonight at the white house correspondents ball. apples fall, but the apples of your cheeks don't have to. defy gravity. juvéderm voluma® is the only fda-approved injectable gel to instantly add volume to your cheek area. as you age, cheeks can lose volume. voluma adds volume creating contour and lift for a more youthful profile. for up to two years. temporary side effects include tenderness, swelling, firmness lumps, bumps, bruising, pain redness, discoloration and itching. ask your doctor. juvéderm voluma®. defy gravity.
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financial noise financial noise financial noise financial noise
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we're now just a few hours
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away from the so-called nerd prom also known as the white house correspondents dinner. the president will take to the podium and crack a few jokes and everyone is fair game. steven collinson is joining us from washington. so what do you know about his script tonight? who is he targeting or who is he not targeting? >> right. i think you'll see the president in a very good mood tonight. he feels his presidency is in pretty good shape. i think he did israel therip the journalists for declaring him a lame duck after the midterm elections. i've heard he's been taking a bemused look of some of the 2016 campaign that's already unfolding. you'll remember hillary clinton's trip to chipotle so he's fairly scathing of the media at the best of times in d.c. he thinks we concentrate too much on trivialities so i would
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expect some pretty scathing media critiques from the president tonight. the other thing is he's been sitting for three or four weeks as the republican campaign has started to unfold watching these republican candidates take shots at his legacy. i think it will be too much for him to sort of resist the temptation tonight to have a bit of a crack at the republican field as well. >> all right, yeah. in the past we've seen him really take kind of direct jabs at donald trump and even john boehner, and so something tells me we may see a little bit more of that too in the spirit of things? >> definitely. this dinner is not just a night out for the press and the president, it's a real political opportunity. the president can make cracks here. he's made some jokes that were pretty close to the edge against people like john boehner and mitch mcconnell in the past so he can make the kind of jokes that if he made them at the podium at the white house may seem inappropriate. but if everyone is out having a good time there's a certain way that he can tell these jokes and
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not pay much of a political price himself but really get across a political point. >> all right. steven collinson, thanks so much. it will be a fun night. we'll be watching. don't forget everybody at home to check out the white house correspondents dinner tonight. live coverage right here on cnn. it all becomes at 7:00 p.m. eastern time. so much more ahead in the newsroom, and it all begins right now. happening right now in the newsroom breaking news. an earthquake rocking nepal and the death toll continues to soar as rescuers continue the desperate search for survivors buried in the rubble. and baltimore bracing for what could be its bagestiggest day of demonstrations yet, this as new surveillance video released showing what happened when police arrested freddie gray. plus -- >> being bruce isn't easy. >> that's the hard part? >> it's much harder.
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>> do you dream? >> the secret bruce jenner has carried his whole life and now sharing with the rest of the world. how his message may help others who are struggling. you're live in the newsroom. hello again, everyone thanks for joining us. i'm frederica when iten it -- whit field. a devastating earthquake hitting nepal nepal, more than 1400 people have died. there have been more than a dozen aftershocks. we're also getting some new video from a surveillance camera that shows the strength of the earthquake. the city has been hit with widespread power failures and the airport remains closed. the tremors also triggered landslides on the nearby mt. everest. it is now late night at katmandu
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and rescuers continue to go through crumbled buildings looking for any survivors. ravi what do you know about the rescue efforts nearing midnight there? how are they going to continue in the search? >> reporter: well they are going to continue through the night. the death toll has been rising every single hour that we've been monitoring this since the quake first struck. certainly it's going to keep rising because we just don't know how many people are buried under the rubble in kathmandu. entire villages have just been leveled, so there's so much more on this story that we just don't know that is going to begin to emerge in the coming hours and days. and the true extent of the
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devastation across nepal, once it becomes clear, only then will nepal only begin to be able to rescue people and try and come to terms with the depth of this crisis. >> we talked to an american tourist not long ago who had just arrived earlier in the day and then experienced the earthquake. he said the kinds of tools that he has witnessed being used bare hands of course and then he saw one earth mover that was used but in large part people are just digging through the rubble with anything they can find to help, you know move these pieces to find survivors. what do you know about what kind of support might be making its way in? >> reporter: well nepal is certainly asking for help from its neighbors. here in india, i'm in calcutta india, which is not too far away from nepal, but the capital in new delhi has dispatched planes to nepal.
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they have rescued some indians from nepal and they are trying to find relief planes to help. what we've been hearing from the streets from people who are there is that people are sleeping on the streets. they're frustrated and scared. they don't know if they can go back in yet because the tremors are still being felt every now and then. they're just absolutely terrified. and, you know overall in a place like nepal, the infrastructure is just not great. for our viewers in the united states i mean we get used to great emergency response systems. we get used to you know great health systems that are equipped to deal with situations when you have a massive natural disaster. nepal is not one of those places. so the crisis that we're seeing there as it unfolds sadly -- this is going to be worse before it gets better. >> all right, ravi thank you so
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much. i'm joined now on the phone also by mark south, a spokesman for the international red cross based in kathmandu, nepal. mark what are you seeing experiencing there, how do you offer aid to people? >> well they moment it's midnight it's very dark. as was just mentioned there are thousands of people sleeping out on the street tonight and any open places they can find in temples, in schools, they're all being used for people who are too scared to go back home. aftershocks are continuing. we haven't felt any for a little while now, but i mean more will be expected overnight. the red cross is a community-based organization. we've actually spent the last several years training thousands of people in first aid and light search and rescue for exactly this kind of event as well as big awareness raising efforts so people are aware of the
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earthquake threat and hopefully know what to do when the earthquake strikes. but obviously there are -- there are areas of the city which are very hard to access still and areas of the country more widely which it will be time before we even know what's happening there. >> and is it your feeling that it could be days before you have any other support to come into that area given it is so difficult to get there? >> certainly some areas of the country it will take a significant amount of time probably days for help to be able to reach. but these are areas that it would take days to reach even if there hadn't been an earthquake. >> all right, mark south, thank you so much. all the best in your efforts to render as much aid and support as you can. >> thank you very much. happening right now, the first of two rallies today in baltimore. protesters are demanding answers over the death of freddie gray days after he was taken into police custody. meanwhile new video just
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released by the baltimore police department giving another look at the moments and during gray's arrest. the video coming from some of the city's surveillance cameras. police say it will help as they try to piece together a timeline of what happened. they now admit, officers do the police commissioner in fact saying the officers made inexcusable mistakes in the arrest of gray who died days after he was taken into custody. cnn's joe johns is in baltimore with more. >> reporter: new video from baltimore police showing different angles on the arrest and transportation of freddie gray. the camera views released on the police department's youtube page. >> the video footage of a tv camera that may have caught the incident is under review. >> reporter: one clip shows gray interacting with police. minutes later the same camera shows the arrest scene with the police transport van. from another camera, a police van is seen stopped and another
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prisoner loaded. the footage is from hundreds of surveillance cameras in the area as police try to piece together the video timeline. >> we're refining our investigation, the picture is getting sharper and sharper as we move forward. >> reporter: but the surveillance video released is not as sharp as the video shot by eyewitnesss on april 12th showing gray's arrest. less than an hour after he was detained officers transporting him called for a medic. gray subsequently slipped into a coma dying a week after his initial arrest. the surveillance video comes as police admit mistakes were made. >> we know he was not buckled in the transportation wagon as he should have been no excuses for that period. we know our police employees failed to get him medical attention in a timely manner multiple times. >> reporter: and in the strongest language yet, baltimore police talking about possible charges against
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officers for the death of the 25-year-old. >> if someone harmed freddie gray we're going to have to prosecute them. and so giving too much information out to you on the front here now may jeopardize that prosecution. >> reporter: the challenges ahead now for baltimore police to deal with whatever crowds may develop from the marches and rallies on saturday again, they also have to deal with the funeral of freddie gray on monday as well as trying to wrap up their investigation, as they have said by next friday. fred. >> all right, thank you so much joe johns, appreciate that. joining me right now, jason downs, attorney for the family of freddie gray and reverend jamal bryant president of the empowerment movement and organizer of the trayvon martin rally in 2012. just to let our audience know the rally is to get under way pretty soon and that's why you hear the music in the background and gathering of people. jason downs, when you hear the police commissioner say that mistakes were made freddie gray
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should have been buckled in that paddy wagon, rendered medical care and then you hear the commissioner say we don't want to reveal too much information because we don't want to jeopardize any kind of potential prosecution, what do you make of that kind of statement coming from the commissioner? does that say to you that it's likely or imminent that there will be prosecution of some of those officers if not at least one? >> well at this point it's not clear whether there will be ray prosecution of any of the officers involved but what it does indicate is that statements were made that at least a few of the officers involved in this case made statements in this case and we would still like to know what the substance of those statements are. there's a lingering question as to exactly what happened to mr. gray and how did his spine become severed, and we still don't know the answer to that question. >> and is it true, mr. downs, that there is an independent autopsy that will be conducted on freddie gray outside of what
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the -- you know the municipality's coreoner may have already conducted? >> at this point we don't exactly know what the result of the autopsy that was conducted by the state is. we don't know those results, so any independent autopsy would necessarily rely on the original results of the original autopsy because we are not in a position to know the condition of mr. gray's body when it was received by the state. so at this point we need that information before proceeding with any independent autopsy. >> and how strange is this that the family would not have that report would not have some real specificity of the cause of death and the condition of the body? >> what the state of maryland could release right now is the underlying information, the stuff that won't change. the exact condition of the body when it was received that could
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be released right now. there is information that is going to take time and that can't be completed right now, but the raw data the information as it relates to how mr. gray's body was received that could be released today and it has not been released. >> all right, reverend jamal bryant the rallies that are expected today, what is your expectation, what is the message, how will this rally be -- there are two rallies, right? how will they be conducted there in baltimore? >> very peaceably. it's really an opportunity for the community to express their frustration, their grief and agony with a broken and corrupt police system. this is not an isolated incident with mr. gray it's become a culture of a lapse of integrity. i'm appreciative that the commissioner is even speaking the word "prosecution" because that's what the citizens of this city want to see, that somebody has got to be held accountable and responsible for the death of
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an innocent man, and so that's a step for us in the right direction. >> and, reverend i wonder you know do you wonder about police being able to investigate itself? while the mayor said she welcomes any independent investigations we know the justice department will be looking into this as well but what's your sense of the satisfaction of the community there as to whether they too can trust that an investigation by any entity will be thorough? >> i think because we have three investigations going on right now, the city of baltimore, the state's attorney and the department of justice, we're praying one of the three is going to get it right. it brings us closer in our odds rather than just doing it internally. otherwise i would have absolutely no confidence. but with the three of them doing it separately i think it will bring us closer to getting some answers, not just on the timeline but why it is that 80%
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of his spine was severed, didn't come from asthma. and i really don't know if it came from not having on a seat belt. >> reverend jamal bryant jason downs, thanks to both of you, appreciate it. of course we'll be watching the demonstrations that take place later on today. they're just in the beginning stages of the music and a severaling -- assembling of a few people behind you. coming up talking about this man right here. >> my brain is much more female than it is male. it's hard for people to understand that but that's what my soul is. >> olympian and reality tv star bruce jenner announcing that he will transition from male to female. we're going to talk about what this means for the transgender community.
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aired last night. it of course confirmed the speculation that he will soon transition from male to female. cnn's dan simon has more. >> my brain is much more female than it is male. it's hard for people to understand that but that's what my soul is. >> reporter: bruce jenner the olympic gold medalist turned reality star confirming the tabloid speculation that he's transitioning from a man to a woman. speaking openly to diane sawyer in a highly publicized abc special. >> are you a woman? >> yes, for all intents and purposes i am a woman. people look at me differently. they see you as this macho male but my heart and my soul and everything that i do in life it is part of me that female side is part of me. that's who i am. >> reporter: jenner firmly dismissing skeptics that this is some sort of stungtt to promote
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another reality show documenting his change. he said he knew he was different at 8 years old when he started trying on his mother's dresses. >> are you telling me that i'm going to go through a complete gender change and everything with that for the show. sorry, diane, it ain't happening. we're doing this publicity. yeah right. >> reporter: the 65-year-old who has been married three times says his former spouses knew about his issues. sawyer asking the obvious question. >> are you gay? >> no i am not gay. i am not gay. i am as far as i know heterosexual. >> as far as you know? >> i've never been with a guy. i've always been married, raising kids. >> and you can desire a woman every bit as much? >> yeah yeah. >> reporter: for children of the '70s and '80s, bruce jernnner was the guy on the wheaties box, the greatest athletes on the planet.
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for millennials he was on "keeping up with the kardashians kardashians." he joked that his story was the one that truly mattered. >> the entire run i kept thinking to myself oh my god, this whole thing, the one real true story in the family was the one i was hiding and nobody knew about it. the one thing that could really make a difference in people's lives was right here in my soul and i could not tell that story. >> reporter: he says he hasn't decided whether to do a sex change. for now it's been cosmetic surgery combined with female hormones. jenner says his children ten of them between his biological and step children have largely been supportive. several appearing by his side. >> i just held his hand and i cried with him. i told him how proud of him i was and how inexpired i was. >> the first thing i thought
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was, oh it finally makes sense. >> as to why go through this change now -- >> i couldn't take the walls constantly closing in on me. if i die, which i could be diagnosed next week with cancer and, boom you're gone i'd be so mad at myself that i didn't explore that side of me you know. and i don't want that to happen. >> reporter: with this revelation jenner is the most famous transgender person on the planet and he says he wants to be an inspiration to others going through similar identity issues and he wants to change the world by speaking openly about his transformation. dan simon, cnn, san francisco. and we'll be right back.
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they wake up if there's a pause in breathing, if they're unusually warm or cool. then we can show you a timeline and deeper insights into what the baby's sleep is looking like and how it's develop and evolving over time. >> why would i possibly want to know all of that? >> our goal is to figure out how to help households sleep more and sleep more. >> households? >> if a baby is sleeping usually parents are sleeping. >> when i told people about this story, the first reaction everybody has is my god, where is it going to stop? wearables and putting technology on children. so why in the world would you be slapping technology on your kid? >> i think that's a great question. actually when i first heard about it i thought the same thing but then i had a kid. as a first-time parent you come home from the hospital and the fear and the paranoia set in and you say oh, my gosh, i have no idea what i'm doing. so having the memo to give you
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some feedback on critical pieces of data is if nothing else reassuring you that you're keeping your kid happy and alive and healthy. >> it sounds like it may be better for parents than it is for babies. >> i think it's just as good for parents as it is for babies. >> here's another look at our top stories. the attorney for a tulsa volunteer reserve deputy who shot to death an unarmed man is responding to a new report that the reserve deputy got special treatment. according to a 2009 internal review by the tulsa county sheriff's office robert bates was given special treatment. the report also says his role in the agency violated training policies. bates' attorneys dispute the findings and insist that their client had the proper training. bates is charged with second-degree manslaughter for the death of eric harris. and a group of drunk fraternity members from the university of florida and emory university are accused of spitting urinating and pouring beer on wounded veterans at a
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resort in panama city beach, florida. the fraternity members were there for their spring formal. the veterans were attending the warrior beach retreat. according to reports the zeta beta tau fraternity has expelled three members while they investigate the ugly situation. and three pit crew members are being treated for burns after a massive require at the richmond international raceway in virginia. a race car burst into flames while in a pit stop right night during the xfinity series race. still no word on what caused that fire. we're continuing to follow breaking news out of nepal where a devastating earthquake has left hundreds dead. we'll get the latest on rescue efforts in just a moment. t. that would be my daughter -- hi dad. she's a dietitian. and back when i wasn't eating right, she got me drinking boost. it's got a great taste and it helps give me the nutrition i was missing. helping me stay more
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we're continuing to follow this breaking news from nepal. more than 1400 people have died following a devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake. the epicenter was near the capital of kathmandu causing widespread power blackouts and closing the city's airport. new video from a surveillance camera shows just how hard the earthquake hit. the earthquake also triggered landslides on nearby mt. everest killing at least 13 people there. most of them were foreign
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mountaineers preparing to go to the summit. it is now late at night there and rescuers continue to comb through crumbled buildings looking for any survivors. it could be days before help arrives in many parts of nepal. some rowemote regions are hard to access in the best of times. sanjay is the director for nepal. give me an idea of what the focus will be for your organization. >> well mercy corps is a humanitarian agency working to find the most need. we will know more tomorrow in the daytime of what the extent of damages are. mercy corps currently has a large supply of house holder items in stock and we are ready
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to distribute as soon as it is safe and we know more on the damages. we are also coordinating with other humanitarian agencies in the area along with government agencies and other organizations here in the capital to distribute items and also know the extent of damages and respond accordingly. >> right now it's midnight too difficult to see, very limited lighting because there is no real power, people are having to really make do. what in your view might be the greatest need right now, since people are scared to go to sleep tonight? >> yes, because, you know since like noon we've been experiencing a lot of tremors, small, big tremors and we've counted around 65 66 you know tremors that have come since noon. so the situation right now is
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like people don't want to go inside and even like the damages, what has been there because when you drive through the cities -- city you see a lot of broken buildingbuildings, damaged infrastructures, even like roads. so people are terrified. the sense of fear especially you can see like, you know, women and children crying. so that's the situation. so i was in a meeting this afternoon around 3:00 p.m. and the estimate was according to government around 1200 dead alone in the kathmandu valley which has three cities here in the valley. so that number is i'm sure going to increase because a lot of casualties are still to be accounted for. >> all right. >> so you can see that sense of fear still in the capital now.
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and the extent of damage outside of kathmandu in the remote areas are unaccounted for and still coming in. >> sanjay of mercy corps, we're wishing you the best. we know the work to be done is colossal. thank you so much. so how is the u.s. going to be responding to the disaster in nepal? we know that already a rescue team is on the way. to what extent will this rescue team be able to assist? >> reporter: fred this is one of the elite rescue teams of the country. it's the fairfax county urban search and rescue squad. they have been activated. they're standing by and expect to be deployed at some point later today to go on the ground in nepal and help with the search and rescue there. this is a 54-member team called virginia task force one. they have been deployed in earthquakes past most recently to japan's earthquake in 2011 and they'll operate under usaid.
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we know that president obama has been briefed on the situation earlier this morning here at the white house, and we're told the state department will take the lead coordinating the u.s. aid effort within the administration. we know from a tweet just sent out by the state department that they have already announced $1 million in initial humanitarian assistance and they have deployed usaid's dark teams, the disaster assistance response teams, and they are en route to nepal now. fred. >> thank you so much for that update appreciate that. coming up we go live to baltimore where people are taking to the streets for what could be one of the largest protests that city has seen.
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happening this hour shall the first of two expected rallies in baltimore under way. protesters are outraged over the death of freddie gray an unarmed black man who died after suffering a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody. they have found -- shut down the city the demonstrators have. miguel marquez is at one of the rallies. miguel quite a few people have turned out. explain to me what's happening. >> reporter: it looks like all of these rallies have morphed into one. certainly the phrase of the day is "shut it down." they're also talking about
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fighting for freddie gray's rights. there are several hundred people here at the corner of mount and pressbury street. this is the location from freddie gray was arrested just down the block from where we are. he was pulled out of the van and taken to two other locations before taken to the police station, which is right down the way and that's when they called emergency services. he suffered three broken vertebrae and a crushed throat at the hands of police. police now launching a huge investigation to try to figure out how this happened. these people have been marching around the neighborhood trying to pick up steam here. they're going to go shortly, in about 20 minutes or so up to north avenue and then downtown promising to shut this city down to show them who is in control. >> all right, miguel marquez, keep us posted. thank you so much. there in baltimore. all right, bruce jenner sharing his secret with the world.
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>> being bruce isn't easy. >> that's the hard part? >> it's much harder. >> do you dream? >> we'll ask our panel how his message is being received. people ship all kinds of things. but what if that thing is a few hundred thousand doses of flu vaccine. that need to be kept at 41 degrees. while being shipped to a country where it's 90 degrees. in the shade. sound hard? yeah. does that mean people in laos shouldn't get their vaccine? we didn't think so. from figuring it out to getting it done, we're here to help.
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i think i chose extremely well. call or go to cancercenter.com. cancer treatment centers of america. care that never quits. appointments available now. see memphis grizz lows star jeff green in action it's clear he's a player with heart. but in 2011 his game was interrupted. >> i was in complete shock. >> a routine team physical revealed an aortic aneurysm. >> it was nerve racking. i couldn't run. i couldn't touch a basketball. i couldn't get stressed out. it was tough. >> reporter: and rebounding from
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open heart surgery wasn't easy either. jeff didn't touch a basketball for nearly six months. he lost muscle and the mechanics of his game. >> it was a slow progression. my body was different. the timing was off. i was fatigued. i wasn't concerned about getting hit. the biggest thing for me was being in shape and being able to function out on the floor. >> reporter: the experience did give jeff a greater appreciation for basketball. >> now i attack every game as if this could be my last. >> reporter: it also gave him a greater appreciation for life. he often visits young heart patients providing encourage maenlt ment and they compare saurs. >> to see me come back from heart surgery, they love it so i'm going to continue to do it. >> reporter: dr. sanjay gupta, cnn, reporting. breaking his silence, olympic gold medalist and reality star bruce jenner is now confirming what many have speculated for months that he
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is transitioning into a woman. he revealed his new transgender identity in a lengthy interview with abc's diane sawyer last night. >> we see -- you see what? >> a confused person running away from my life, from who i was. >> with fear? >> big-time fear yeah. scared to death. didn't know what my future held at that time. >> help. everybody is struggling with what this is. >> that is me. that is her. >> jenner is not alone. a recent study estimates that nearly 1 million americans are transgender. but jenner is without question the most public and high profile figure so far to come out as transgender. joining me from new york our senior media correspondent and host of "reliable sources" and
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jeff gardier, professor of behavioral medicine. brian, let me begin with you because this wasn't a total surprise. you look at the tabloids all the time pictures you knew that jenner was experiencing something, but now he says it. you know for all to hear and understand. if his objective was for people to better understand what he was going through. was that successful? >> i think it absolutely was. you know jenner was the last person to finally speak about bruce jenner's transition. like you said it had been speculated about for months. it was very clear he had thought exactly about what he wanted to say and how he wanted to say it. obviously he picked his interviewer as well diane sawyer. abc handled this expertly. they had 17 million viewers last night. that is by far the biggest rating for this show "20/20" in years. it's even higher than abc was expecting. it just goes to show what a landmark moment this is. >> and it really is an
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incredible journey because, jeff the interview also spent some time talking about the alarming correlation between transgender people and suicide. jenner sharing a story where the tabloids leaked that he was having an adam's apple reduction procedure and how humiliating that was, how desperate he felt. let's listen to what he had to say and how he put it. >> okay. >> that night i thought, oh it's like over. i was in this -- walking up and down this hall right here back and forth, back and forth, all night long heart's pounding. i thought wouldn't the easiest thing to be right now, and i could see where people get to that just go in the room, get a gun, boom. you know the pain's over it's done. go to a better place. and i thought i can't do something like that. i mean i want to know how this
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story ends. >> and he wants to be in control of that story, jeff. but you know what he was talking about and you didn't see in that clip he talked about how humiliating it was that there was paparazzi outside and the pictures and the jeering after the procedure. so he wasn't conflicted about the procedure, but it was the humiliation that came with the paparazzi, people who don't understand his journey. help people understand how powerful a moment that was for him to share, and how his message and his journey may really be saving a lot of lives. >> well i think bruce jenner is going to become and i know he is a role model for a lot of transgender people out there. people who are in the shadows, because they do not have the support that they should be getting from family many of them and certainly our society doesn't understand transgender individuals and accept them as
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being equals and accept the journey that they must take which can be very difficult without that support. so in many ways i think he's opened the hearts and opened the doors of our minds to the fact that there are a lot of people out there suffering. lgbt youth, for example, are three times more at risk for suicide than perhaps heterosexual youth. and just think about all the individuals who don't have the money and the power of a bruce jenner and who can't have an adam adam's apple reduction. they're much more at risk for cutting, for self mutilation for suicide. so this was a landmark moment. and i hope that the show that he does with this continues to be very positive in helping transgender individuals to be accepted as equals and to help them through their journey. >> and, brian, let's talk more about that upcoming show and the
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series which will chronicle his experience. what do we know about what will be revealed how much he you know expects to share. does this mean he'll also sever the ties with the "keeping up with the kardashians" now? >> it's a little up clear what that cross pollenation will be. you don't think of the most careful story telling on e! channel. but they have several experts on board who are experts in transgender issues. they say they want to do this the right way and really show average viewers, who aren't used to seeing these stories on television to show viewers the experience of this transition. now, we haven't heard the name of the show yet and haven't heard if bruce jenner will choose to be referred to as she instead of he. right now the guidance is he wants to be referred to as a man but we know that this transition
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to a woman will be happening in the months and in the year to come. presumably at some point there might be a new first name a new appearance and all that could play out on the reality show. >> and jeff one of the final questions that was asked -- bruce jenner was asked to even ask himself was am i going to be all right. you know what in your view is that next chapter? heeded awfully relieved. he looks happy. around the corner for him is there more of that relief or will there be some challenges? >> well i think there will be challenges as there are for transgender individuals. certainly having family support is the best thing that i didn't individual especially a transgender individual can have as they go through the transition. so certainly there will be issues that he'll have to go through in dealing with members of the public and family. but as long as he gets that social support as long as transgender individuals get that
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social support, it makes that very difficult road a little bit easier. >> all right, thanks so much jeff brian, good to see both of you. brian, we'll watch you tomorrow morning, 11:00 eastern time. we'll be right back with much more.
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checking other stories we're following right now, the last three men accused in the hazing death of a florida a&m
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university drum major have been convicted. a jury found them guilty of manslaughter and hazing with the result of death. they will be accepte sentenced in june. robert champion died after he was beaten on a school bus after a hazing ritual after a football game. starbucks says it has fixed the computer glitch and its stores in the u.s. and canada are back in action. the company's cash registers malfunctioned last night. customers didn't leave disappointed because they got free drinks until the system was fixed. all right, thanks for being with me this afternoon. much more straight ahead with amara walker and that begins right now. hello, everyone. you are in the cnn newsroom. i'm amaramara walker.
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an earthquake in nepal and the death toll has been rising all day. we'll have that story in just a moment. >> we will pray for freddie gray. >> the first at this hour in baltimore. more and more people are joining hundreds of protesters marching from the police station downtown. they're demanding the arrest of any police officer who might be responsible for the death of freddie gray. he is the man who suffered a severe spinal cord injury following his arrest on april 12th. his family said his voice box was crushed and his neck snapped before he slipped into a coma. gray died one week later. with us now is neil franklin a former maryland straight trooper. he also headed up training at the baltimore police department from 2000 to 2004. neil great to have you on. i want to first get your thoughts on this news conference yesterday. we heard from the baltimore

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