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tv   CNN Newsroom With Fredricka Whitfield  CNN  May 30, 2015 8:00am-11:31am PDT

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maybe people that haven't had an impact on. as you said his polls are low. people around country don't know who he is now his task is to take the message that he just gave in baltimore and try to take that across the nation. to iowa new hampshire, south carolina and other states. i think it's a message that will certainly resonate. he's going to be able to look back at his record when he talks to liberals as governor and point to a lot of concrete wins. but also his opponents are going to be able to point to what has happened in the city where he was mayor, baltimore, and the possible effects of his policies on the community there. so he has a tough road ahead. but with a message like that i think some people might give him a chance at least to hear him out. >> all right. hey, chris, thank you so much and thanks to all of our guests they're going to stick around as we pass it off to randy kay, she's going to continue to walk you through all the politics and the happenings of the day. randy? >> all right. thank you all very much. appreciate that. have a great day. let me bring in our colleague, cnn senior washington correspondent jeff zeleny who
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is in baltimore. jeff tell me first, what stood out to you in this speech? >> >> one of the things that stood out to me was really how governor o'malley tried to build a bridge with between what's happening on main street and what's happening on wall street. he addressed head-on the challenges of baltimore. he said there are economic chalt engs that have caused the violence caused the protest. so he dr. drew a link a correlation between what is happening in this city and what's happening across the country. and then he drew a link and said that ceo of goldman sachs, the big investment firm would be happy with a president bush or a president clinton. he's trying to present himself as a new, progressive leader that stuck out to me how he's trying to compare and draw a correlation between all of these economic problems. >> did you, jeff did you get a sense of confidence from him?
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>> it's very loud at this raly. and things behind me. i didn't hear what you said but a few protesters interrupted the raly. but they were just a couple handful of them. he was able to deliver his speech without much interruption. >> jeff appreciate it thank you very much. let me bring in our political panel now. cnn political correspondent jeff zeleny and national democratic strategist craig viroga he was chief strategist for governor o'malley's 2010 campaign and brian morganstern. o'malley makes the field grow by one, with hillary clinton and bernie sanders already running. what does o'malley's entrance into the race mean for clinton and sanders? that's the big question. so ryan o'malley ron what do you think? >> okay.
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brian, let me ask you what you think about that then? >> well i think that martin o'malley is welcome to the race by a republicans, because frankly, he is the poster boy for failed democratic leadership. baltimore has been in control of democrats for about five decades, what do the residents have to show for it? >> high taxes, high crime, high poverty, extreme racial strife. governor o'malley's speech was complaining about the condition of america under democratic leadership and his persona is an everyday guy who can identify with ordinary americans. is is just a routine reminder that hillary clinton is sort of a, aloof aristocrat who doesn't give access to the press and so as a republican i guess i would say welcome to the race. we feel bad that we didn't get him anything. >> let me bring in cnn senior politics correspondent chris moody who is also with us.
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chris o'malley he couldn't even keep his own state in democratic hands in last year's race for governor. how likely is he to win the democratic nomination? and even more so the presidency if you want to look that far? >> from where we stand right now, not very likely to take the nomination. but that doesn't mean he's going to not have an impact on the race. you know like people run for president for a lot of different reasons. some to raise their name i.d. some to get issues out there. and some is to win. i think with o'malley, what he's going to bring to the table is certainly somebody that can have a record he can point to. we saw in his speech he's not afraid to take on hillary clinton. if you look back at her donation record she has a lot of donations from wall street. in a is something that i think o'malley will be pushing very hard and he's going to have an opportunity on the debate stage to be kind of in between a hillary clinton and let's say a bernie sanders. and i think he's a voice that i think democrats will actually be glad to have in the race.
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especially just in case something happens with hillary clinton's candidacy or she implodes. they'll need to have someone in the wings that can take the reins, there might be someone that can come in very quickly, but for o'malley to start building a campaign right now, i don't think that hurts democrats. and also to have a robust debate in the primaries. hillary doesn't want to go through this unencumbered. >> you worked on o'malley's gubernatorial campaign. what do you expect from him for this presidential run? >> well i think what we're going to see from him is a lot of what we saw in the speech. i think it was a very confident performance. think he articulated very well the progressive side of the democratic party. and his record. and i think the thing that i found interesting toward the end of the speech is that you know he didn't blink about drawing a pretty explicit criticism of secretary clinton and he compared her to the bush family. and i think he's probably going to use that frame and put some issues behind it. in order to make his case to
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voters. it's going to be very difficult and hillary clinton certainly is a very strong front-runner. but i think that's more of what we're going to see from him in the days and weeks ahead. >> and o'malley is aiming to make income inequality a major part of his platform. does this push hillary clinton more to the left of her party? even more so now, after sanders has jumped in? >> i think that there's a lot of unanimity in the democratic party on the issues. i think the challenge for governor o'malley is to find one or two issues where he can disagree with secretary clinton. where he can say this is what i believe, this is what she believes and they're different. and this is why you should vote for me instead of her. that's what we need to see. that's what his campaign needs to do in order to be successful in the short run and get some traction and proof in the polls. >> let me bring in mj lee to talk about womens issues. does hillary clinton get the edge because she's a woman,
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wife mother and now grandmother? >> look it certainly an issue that hillary clinton has been talking about on the road. i think this time around it's been very interesting to see her talk about her family more. talk about her personal life more. talk about the fact that she is a grandmother. it makes her more likable and makes her more personable. but martin o'malley is a charismatic person. he's a good retail politician. we saw a lot of excitement behind us when he was talking to his supporters. i think it's important to keep in mind. i know that jeff talked about this a little bit earlier. the protesters that showed up today, the issue of police brutality and the policing tactics that o'malley used when he was mayor and governor that is going to follow him around. we're going to hear much more about that. >> and brian, what does did say, that in the democratic race the woman candidate is the front-runner and on the gop side you have carly fiorina, may get pushed off the debate stage by the gop debate
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organizers? >> well i think most voters are less concerned with gender or race or identity politic thans they are with the politicians' policies and experience and record. i don't know that that matters a whole lot. another point i want to touch on that we touched on before. i am not normally one to give credit to early polls. but there was one that caught my eye. this was among democrats in maryland. when governor o'malley was still governor. they were asked who would they prefer hillary clinton or martin o'malley. this is in maryland and secretary clinton won 63-3. i've seen closer scores in video games set on easy mode. he has a tough road ahead to distinguish himself. i don't think secretary clinton is ahead in the democratic primary because she's a woman. i think she's ahead you know because she's more of a national name brand. she has more of a record that people are aware of. and so you know i think the identity politics question is
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not necessarily relevant here. but again, governor o'malley has a very duff road ahead. >> and chris, let me get back to you on how much mj touched on this. how much will the baltimore riots following freddie gray's death hurt o'malley given his record there in baltimore with police and use of force? >> well when he was mayor and he was governor he supported the zero tolerance policies that a lot of people say may have led to a lot of this frustration between the police and the people who live there. and that is something concrete that people can see. it's not a number or a data a piece of data. it's people's lives and it's visuals that the people will be reminded of. and remember when he went back to baltimore, at the height of the riots when they were really just starting out. he was shouted down. people recognized him and said this is your fault. now whether that's completely fair or not, the perception is there and it's something he's going to have to try to explain when he's on the campaign trail.
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but also this is i think this is campaign-wide. republicans and democrats, even hillary clinton in the 1990s, in the 2000s, spoke a lot about increasing police and being tough on crime. and you see a lot of candidates moving away from that and trying to find another way forward on criminal justice. so it's not just o'malley that i think is going to have to answer a lot of these questions. >> it's one thing to make a big announcement. the question is where do you go from here. craig, you know o'malley well. what's next? >> i think the first thing he needs to do after explicitly talking about running against secretary clinton is deal with the bernie sanders factor. sanders is ahead of him in the polls, sanders has raised a lot of money. until he gets around bernie sanders, won't get traction against secretary clinton. think we saw the beginning of that. i think we'll see more of that in the next several weeks. but he needs to do that without getting into a protracted battle of the long shots nof toward a
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real chance of winning this nomination. mj lee, jeff zeleny. craig varoga brian morganstern, chris moody. the whole bunch. thank you. the united states released them from gitmo in exchange for bowe bergdahl now the travel ban on the taliban 5 is about to expire. he was once the most powerful man in congress now former house speaker dennis hastert accused of lying by the fbi to cover up a secret. big day? ah, the usual. moved some new cars. hauled a bunch of steel. kept the supermarket shelves stocked. made sure everyone got their latest gadgets. what's up for the next shift? ah, nothing much. just keeping the lights on. (laugh) nice. doing the big things that move an economy. see you tomorrow, mac.
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see you tomorrow, sam. just another day at norfolk southern.
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former house speaker dennis hast srt under indictment for lying to the fbi. federal prosecutors say he withdrew hume sums of cash allegedly used as hush money to cover up sexual abuse with one of his former students. this dates back to his early years as a teacher and wrestling coach, long before his political career ever started. so far he isn't saying anything.
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here's cnn justice correspondent pamela brown. >> well randi, first came the indictment from the justice department with the shocking allegations that dennis hastert had lied to the fbi about withdrawing money for a cover-up. now we're learning from sources that alleged sexual misconduct involving an underage student was the reason behind the hush money. federal sources tell cnn dennis hastert, the longest-serving republican u.s. house speaker, was paying hush money to a student at the illinois high school where he once taught. more than a million dollars for the former student to keep allegations, hastert had sexually abused him quiet. hastert has not commented publicly. but he abruptly resigned from this washington, d.c. lobbying firm as well as from a chicago derivatives firm. the indictment does not discuss sexual abuse. instead, it focuses on how the 73-year-old former wrestling coach moved the money he allegedly was paying the former student. prosecutors saying he agreed to
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pay an unnamed individual quote $3.5 million to cover up his past misconduct. according to court records, the investigation started two years ago when the fbi started investigating mystery transactions made by hastert. bank withdrawals ss of more than $950,000. the fbi alleges they were less than $10,000 apiece so he could evade bank detention. when the fbi asked hastert about the withdrawals, he said he was keeping the cash for himself. we're told by sources federal authorities were looking to bring extortion charges and concluded that was something they didn't want to pursue. hastert has not returned our calls for comment. a friend of his says he perceives himself as the one being wronged here. randi? >> pamela brown. thank you very much. the l.a. times is reporting a top law enforcement officials say investigators spoke to a second man who accused hastert
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of similar allegations, "l.a. times" reporter tim phelps spoke about that second man. >> there were no payments going on between hastert and the second official we're reporting. >> and this occurred when hastert was a teacher and a wrestling coach at that high school? >> well we believe that's the case. we don't have a lot of detail on the second victim. in general, the charges made clear that it goes back before the time that hastert was in office. >> the school where hastert taught during the alleged sexual abuse said it had no knowledge of these accusations. still ahead, a kansas college student being called a hero after isis launch as deadly bombing in saudi arabia we'll tell you what he did.
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♪ ♪ as some of you may or may not know i was born in new york city. but immediately after my birth i was whisked off to what would become my happy home for 17 18 years. that would be new jersey. now as a long-time resident of new york i happen to think that new york is the greatest city in the world. but if you're asking me what is the greatest state in the union?
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the greatest state of all 50 states? it's new jersey. >> i would have to agree with that. anyway check out the stories for you right now. a boat captain in hawaii has died after getting impaled by a swordfish. he jumped into the waters off of hawaiian coast while holding a speargun in an attempt too capture the fish. he got punctured in the torso by the fish and died. the pentagon now confirming the u.s. army sent a suspected shipment of anthrax to australia. the pentagon says the live samples of the potentially dangerous pathogen are believed to have been shipped in 2008 or 2009. a total of 24 laboratories in 11
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states and two foreign countries are believed to have received suspect samples. the defense department is conducting a thorough review of anthrax protocols. the cdc is investigating, but officials say they don't expect any risk to the public. u.s. defense secretary ash carter wants china to quit its territorial expansion into the south china sea. it comes a week after a u.s. surveillance plane carrying a cnn crew swooped over the islands, triggering warnings from the chinese navy to back off. u.s. officials say they're concerned about china's militarization of some islands and are considering flying surveillance missions closer than it has before over these islands. this morning, a wichita state university student is being remembered as a wonderful friend and a true hero. 22-year-old abdul jalil al arbash sacrificed his own life to save hundreds of others when he stopped a suicide bomber from entering a crowded mosque in saudi arabia. he and three others were killed
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outside the mosque when the bomber detonated his explosives. isis has claimed responsibility for that attack. cnn's nick valencia is covering the story. he was back in saudi arabia to be married? >> he was there visiting the country with the intention of getting married. but before he did that he was volunteering as a security guard outside of a shia mosque. there was recently another attack on a separate shia mosque which is why tensions were very high. that 22-year-old abdul jalil al arbash noticed the suspect when he showed up at the mosque dressed as a female. according to reports women were told to stay home because of the heightened security risk. abdul jalil is said to have chased off the attacker who ended up detonating the device killing himself and three others. at a memorial service held yesterday, abdul jalil's family spoke with the character of this young man. >> his move in saudi arabia was bravely. because of the bravery and heroism, he saved a lot of people.
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>> he's like a brother or monday that brother, for everybody. if you can see right now, you're going to see a smile on his face. >> saudi arabia's government has not officially identified abdul jalil as the man who stopped the suicide bomber. but they did release a statement talking about the details of what happened during friday afternoon's incident. saying security men suspected a car and was heading to the car parking adjacent to the mosque. when the security men approached the car, it exploded killing four people one is believed to be the driver. spreading fire to a number of cars. abdul jalil's family says he saved hundreds of moves. >> wichita state university have issued a response as well? >> they're mourning the loss of this young man. they say he had an incredible character, was an incredibly good student as well. saying wichita state university community is saddened by the tragic death of one of our students our condolences go out to abdul jalil's family. >> very sad story. nick valencia thank you very much. they were held in gitmo for
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years. then released in exchange for bowe bergdahl. but soon the taliban five could be allowed to travel freely. next the efforts to stop that from happening. plus two former members of the fbi joint terrorism task force talk about the danger that these men pose. at book club they were asking me what you're doing now, janice. blogging. your blog is just pictures of you in the mirror. it's called a fashion blog todd. well, i've been helping people save money with progressive's discounts. flo, can you get janice a job? [ laughs ] you should've stuck to softball! i was so much better at softball than janice, dad. where's your wife, todd? vacation. discounts like homeowners' multi-policy -- i got a discount on this ham. i've got the meat sweats. this is good ham, diane. paperless discounts -- give it a rest, flo.
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all: yeah, flo, give it a rest.
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good morning, everyone, thanks so much for joining me i'm randi kaye in for fredricka witfield. u.s. and qatari officials are having a final meeting about what to do with the men known as the taliban five. the five terrorist detainees at guantanamo bay exchanged for american bowe bergdahl. after their release they were sent to qatar and banned for traveling for a year. the ban expires on monday. the source says qatar is willing to extend the agreement under the same terms, but the u.s. apparently wants more restrictions on their movements. cnn global affairs correspondent elise labott has a look at what could be done. >> well under the agreement, the five taliban detainees have been monitored by the qatari government for one year and banned from traveling outside the country. now the state department is leading separate negotiations
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with both the governments of qatar and afghanistan about what happens next. u.s. officials say there are a few options in play now the u.s. prefers they stay in qatar where they will be monitored. the five have brought their families there and total about 70 among them. the other options could see the five returning to afghanistan. either be released or monitored by the afghan government. now the qataris say they will not expand the restrictions on the five nor will they send them home to afghanistan, if they don't want to leave qatar. so none of these are great options. these are five pretty high-ranking taliban officials, at least one has tried to communicate with taliban militants back home since arriving in qatar. raising questions about whether the lives of afghans, americans and u.s. soldiers in afghanistan would be at risk. republican lawmakers were upset with the deal in the first place. now they're calling on the obama administration to make sure that the five are not set free.
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elise labott cnn, washington. for more on how we keep track of the taliban, let's bring in former navy s.e.a.l. and former member of the fbi joint terrorism task force, jonathan gilliam and steven rodgers, a former member of the fbi joint terrorism tank force and a retired police detective as well. jonathan let me start with you on this one. is there really a way to track these prisoners, once the travel ban is lifted? >> i would have to say no. i mean there are ways through sources that we can track these individuals. but the reality is these five guys should have never been released. especially for bowe bergdahl. i mean take the politics out of this. i know the reporter there was just talking about the republicans being angry about stuff. there are people that are operators, that are in the intel community that are furious over these individuals. al-baghdadi, the head of isis went through a similar incarceration. over in iraq and then got out and became the head of isis. so that's just one individual and look at what's that caused.
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now we have five high-level guys who could have potentially stayed in jail for the rest of their lives because of the parts this they played in this war. and now they're going back over to the battlefield. >> and also steven very concerning earlier this year the director of national intelligence james clapper released a report saying one prisoner had contacted the taliban since being released from gitmo. is there any way to tell or track if these men are plotting revenge of some sort? >> well jonathan is right. it's going to be near impossible. let me add this randi. in your report you stated that or the reporter stated that they will be a danger to our troops in afghanistan. but you want to know something? they're going to be a very clear and present danger to every citizen of this country. these are operational commanders in my estimation they're going to want to get even with us and they're going to plot to do something catastrophic here. what a national security blunder this was. >> jonathan how concerned are you with all the talk they may go to afghanistan, does it tell
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you they have future plans? >> well you have to realize, randy, these are individuals that are a part of an ideology. they're not just going to give up that ideology. they did time in a prison they're out, they're going to go straight back in that fight. let me say this one thing -- we you know we watched germans that were killed were executed for doing less to jewish detainees than these individuals are have done to people over in afghanistan and iraq. these people are guilty of war crimes not just leading different groups. these are actually war-time criminals. >> and as you said taking the politics out of it still a concern. when it comes to tracking the terrorists here in america, the director of the fbi says that the agency is facing an extraordinarily difficult challenge. keeping up with the growing number of potential terror suspects here in the united states. listen. >> but i can't stand here with any high confidence when i confront a world that's
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increasingly dark to me and tell you that i've got it all covered. >> so the fbi is now asking for help from local police departments in new york. the police department wants to add an additional 450 officers to its counterterrorism unit. the big question here is of course how safe is the u.s. from a terror attack. steven i mean what do you think, you touched on it a moment ago, you think they're going to be targeting us in the u.s. how nervous should we be or do you think we have it under control? >> the fbi has done an extraordinary job so far. i can tell you when i was on the national joint terrorism task force in 2002 there was a complete lack of intelligence-sharing. there is some now. let me add that local law enforcement officers have to be trained in the, in the gathering and analysis of intelligence. there's where we're going to get the information. on the streets of this country. and until the department of homeland security begins to start funding police departments for what is a war -- not a criminal act, a war, we're going to find ourselves in serious trouble. >> and jonathan what do you
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think? what should we take from the fact that the fbi is overwhelmed, which certainly sounds concerning and needs assistance from now local police departments? >> well i think the word overwhelmed. we need to take that word out. the reality is the fbi is not an entity that does policing on the ground. we don't have officers that go on patrol in neighborhoods, that's what police do. i think what you're seeing is not an overwhelming of the fbi. you're seeing a lack of an overall straej strategic plan to fight this war completely. that incorporates domestic defense, as well as offensive movements by local law enforcements and coordinated federal agencies. but also overseas. we don't see an overall strategic plan. and that is where things start to break down. we have a national academy that a lot of police officers come to. in quantico they train side by side with us when we're in the fbi academy a lot of the times. that needs to be utilized further so guys can go back out, men and women that go to this can go back out and have a more
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standardized relationship with the bureau. >> steven it is sort of scary that the fbi says they can't keep up at least with all the possible terror suspects. i mean should we believe that there are that many out there at this point? i've said all along, they're here and it's a matter of setting up operations i'm concerned about the patriot act being tinkered with. i'm concerned about some of the things we've done 0 to at least be very proactive and prevent terrorist attacks. but intelligence information sharing has always been from the top down. now it has to come from the top up. meaning from the streets to the national law enforcement agencies. >> jonathan what about the money? do we have the money for the hiring and the training of these officers to help the fbi? >> well i'll tell you, randy, again, we need to have a shift in this country to stop thinking that we have to spend, spend, spend in order to stop terrorism or to stop this these operatives inside the country. you know look at look at a big retail store. they can put 100 cameras in there.
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they hire one guy that's not that well trained. it's not going to do that good spending the money. you need to start taking the officers already on the ground and training them effectively. not just smoke and mirrors. but effectively, how to look where to look, when to look. and start thinking like somebody who might be doing an attack so they can look in that direction and try to spot these people. and also sources. the more sources we have on the ground here the more relationships we have with mosques which is not a part of this conversation. and should be the muslim community themselves they're going to do far more than the fbi and the local law enforcement if they get their act together and start working in conjunction with all of these entities. >> steven do you have any idea how many people how many body it is takes to watch a suspect 24/7? and do you think that we do have the money and the manpower to do that? >> well i have to agree with jonathan on this. it isn't exactly money and manpower it's training officers. one motor vehicle stop can lead to the prevention of a terrorist attack. you let those officers out there
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on the street know what to look for. how to look for suspects. you know what to do with that information is very important. you'll be able to stop a terrorist attack. so it isn't money, it's manpower and it's training. >> jonathan gilliam, steven rodgers, great discussion thank you both very much. is still ahead, death on hudson. a woman accused of killing her fiancee by sabotaging his kayak. but the defense says this was not murder. their side of the story, coming your way, next. i'm caridee. i've had moderate to severe plaque psoriasis most of my life. but that hasn't stopped me from modeling. my doctor told me about stelara® it helps keep my skin clearer. with only 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses... ...stelara® helps me be in season. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections
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an accidental drowning on the hudson river or a cold-blooded killing? that's the question at the center of a murder case in new york state. the woman accused of murdering her fiance by sabotaging his kayak pled not guilty on friday. the attorney for angelika graswald said results will show her husband died from hypothermia hypothermia and drowning after drinking. >> an evening kayak trip for a couple that appeared very much in love. but before it was over angelika graswald's fiance 46-year-old vincent viafore, had disappeared, presumed dead. >> police say the couple was kayaking here on the hudson river between thumb point and benderman's island. investigators say around 7:30 that evening, graswald called 911 from the river to report that her fiance's kayak had
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capsized in the choppy water. she told police she couldn't find him. it was april after an especially cold winter so the water was only about 40 degrees. rescue crews searched the river for viafore. no luck. graswald who is a u.s. permanent resident but a latvian citizen, described the scene to a reporter. >> i saw him struggling a little bit. he was trying to figure out how to paddle the waves, because they were again, crazy. and then i just saw him flip. >> reporter: but the police don't believe that story. graswald is charged with second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. the indictment alleges that as viafore reached for his paddle to save his own life graswald pulled it away. richard portale is angelika graswald's defense lawyer. did your client try to save her fiance that night on river? >> well i think she did, but
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even if she could have gotten to him, she didn't have the physical ability to save him. >> prosecutors also suggest graswald may have actually set him up to drown by tampering with his kayak's plug so the boat would fill with water. so, your client didn't remove the plug from the victim's kayak? >> she did not. vincent left in his kayak on april 19th without the plug knowingly, as he had done several times in the past. >> in the days following the tragedy, graswald posted this video of herself on facebook doing a cartwheel along with smiling selfies, all of it raising eyebrows. she even showed up on stage at a local pub singing "hotel california." a friend of the couple's described her performance as strange. mike colvin is angelika graswald's ex-boyfriend. does she have a temper? >> a temper would come out on occasion. you know as i've told a lot of people there was no inclination that she was ever capable of anything remotely like this.
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>> reporter: when they broke up in 2010 colvin says graswald made a desperate and dangerous attempt to take the couple's cat. >> she threatened to break into the house if i didn't give her the cat. finally, i relented. i did give her the cat and i literally got an alarm installed in my house the next day. >> reporter: angelika graswald later moved into this townhouse with vincent viafore. why, if she did do this, would she want to harm her fiance? the prosecutor says graswald stood to inherit $250,000 from life insurance policies and talked about what she could do with the money after his death. >> was she aware of those insurance policies? >> i'm not aware that she was. >> reporter: what about her diary? could that hold clues to a motive? graswald told a reporter that she complained in her diary about her fiance wanting a sexual threesome. >> what partner hasn't requested a threesome? this is not craziness, right? this is not anything that is out of the ordinary but it's not a motive for murder. >> reporter: motive or not,
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investigators now have a body. >> cnn legal analyst and criminal defense attorney paul calin joining me now to discuss this. paul there is one witness to what happened here and of course it is the defendant. how does the state prove that she tried to kill her fiance? >> you know randi, it makes for an extremely difficult case because of that point exactly. remember they're claiming that there was something, the boat was tampered with but noticed there's no physical damage to the boat. it's just that the plug was removed. now, the defense will say that probably was an accident or caused by you know the victim himself. so this is a very very difficult case. now, they claim they have a motive of course because of the life insurance policy and inappropriate behavior after the killing, but bear in mind i think it's a very very difficult case. and interestingly, to hedge their bets they have charged it as an intentional murder but they also have charged it as a mentioning
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manslaughter saying that it could be a reckless or accidental action that rose to the level of manslaughter. >> what about her actions though what you touched on there, after her fiance's death? i mean she posted smiling selfies on facebook she posted a video of her doing that cartwheel. we've certainly seen other cases where bizarre behavior has been used against suspects before. i mean how would that play out in court? >> first of all, you'd have to get it into evidence. and that's an uphill battle i think, to get that into evidence because what a lot of people will say is that you know different people react differently, and that doesn't mean she killed somebody. i'm thinking, by the way, of the amanda knox case. you remember that randi. >> absolutely. >> the claim was that she was doing cartwheels while in police custody and that that was inappropriate behavior in italy. and of course americans were appalled when she was convicted in part on that evidence. so i think as a, you know common sense says that's not the way you act when your fiance has been killed or died accidentally
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in a river, but i don't know if a judge will let it into evidence. >> and what about the information from her ex-boyfriend who we talked to there in that piece as well? i mean he said that you know she did have a temper. he never suspected she could do something like can that information, can his testimony be used at trial, if it goes that far? >> probably not. unless the only way that would come in at trial would be if her lawyer called character witnesses, to say she has a peaceful disposition and doesn't have a temper then rebut that with the prior boyfriend. if they don't open that door it won't get into evidence and i'm betting defense attorneys, will play this close to the vest because they know the prosecution's got an uphill battle. they probably won't put her on the witness stand, unless there's other information we don't know about at this point, and i'm betting there is other information we don't know about. >> her statements police say she made a lot of conflicting statements early on to them. would that be allowed to be used in court? >> yes, that will definitely be
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used in court, and if those conflicting statements don't line up with the actual facts of the case that can be very, very damning, then you have a $250,000 life insurance policy conflicting statements and you start to build a case depending on what those statements are. >> all right. paul callan thank you for your insight. appreciate it. >> coming up ten years to the day since natalieee holloway disappeared on the island of aruba. one man telling cnn in an exclusive interview he was last person to see the teen abler alive. martin savidge is in aruba. martin? >> reporter: if this person is to be believed he is going to turn this case right on its ear. we'll have the interview, after this. >>who... is this?! >>hi, i am heinz new mustard. hi na na na na >>she's just jealous because you have better taste. whatever. >>hey. keep your chin up. for years, heinz ketchup has been with the wrong mustard. well, not anymore. introducing heinz new better tasting
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ten years ago today, high school student natalee holloway diz appeared in aruba, on a graduation trip with classmates. cnn's martin savidge joins us aruba. you spoke exclusively to a witness who ten years later claim his saw what happened. >> reporter: right. and what he says could change everything. standing on the very spot where the common belief by investigators is that something
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happened to natalee holloway and her body ended up in the ocean. this new witness says no for ten years, everybody's had it wrong. this man says he's something that natalee holloway case has never had -- an eyewitness. you were the last person to see natalee holloway alive? >> yes. >> reporter: so where have you been because it's been ten years. actually deyoung isn't new, he's been speaking out for years. in 2008 he even called natalee's father and said -- >> she's on land and i know where her body is hidden. and my initial thought was, this is another crazy. >> reporter: he's gone to the police numerous times, even give ain't sworn statement. what happened? >> nothing. >> reporter: his version, on the night natalee holloway vanished deyoung was doing something illegal at a construction site. he won't say what. but around 2:00 a.m. he say he sees a young man who later he identified as joran van der
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sloot, chasing a young woman into the site. >> i thought first in a playful way, like i'm going to get you, you know like -- >> reporter: le says the couple disappeared into a small section of construction. >> after five minutes he came out with her in his arms. >> reporter: it was what he saw the man do that told him the woman was dead. >> he slammed her, like and then you don't start hiding this person in the crawl space. >> reporter: joran van der sloot serving 28 years in prison for the murder of a young woman in peru. he's never been charged in the natalee holloway case. now, deyoung's testimony seems to practically solve the mystery of what happened to natalee, and nearly ten years after she disappeared, the authorities have finally got around to investigating it it. >> i don't know whether he's lying. i can only say that his statement can't be true. >> reporter: that construction site in 2005 is now a 12-story vacation property owned by
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marriott and the prosecutor says marriott informed him at the time natalee vanished there was no construction. >> because when there's no construction natalee holloway can't be buried in the crawl space under the foundation. >> reporter: that certainly seems true. but dave holloway believes marriott may be possibly wrong about those construction dates. holloway led a number of searches for his daughter on aruba and he remembers the place. >> i was there june 1st, there but was definitely construction in that area. june 1, 205. >> reporter: and this google earth view from june 2005 a short time after natalee vanished appears to show a construction site and the fuzzy shapes of structures. we asked marriott for clarification, but in a statement the company made no mention of the building saying only as we have done all along, we cooperate fully with authorities whenever they are
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conducting an official investigation. >> what he's describing in his story matches what's physically there at the time so i'm thinking this could be -- this could be something, it's something that really needs to be looked at closely. >> reporter: holloway wants a search but authorities say, that's not going to happen. >> it's useless to search there with drilling or whatever. one thing will be sure she's not lying there. she can't be lying there. >> reporter: dave holloway says if people have this idea it would require demolishing the hotel or doing major structural damage to investigators he says no that's not true. drill a couple of holes in foundation get a cadaver doug on the island, get it it past those holes and you'd have an answer quickly. as you heard, the prosecutor says not going to happen. >> fascinating case.
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martin savidge for us. thank you. we have much more just ahead in "newsroom" and it all starts right now. happening now in "newsroom" two heartbeats away from the white house. new details on dennis hastert's multimillion dollar secret. >> plus deadly flooding. >> we do not know there's anybody in it or not, so we will need to check it out. >> a terrifying rescue as a police officer is plucked from his car to safety. rising waters threatening more homes and more rain is on the way. and martin o'malley officially jumps into the presidential race. you are live in the "cnn newsroom." good afternoon, everyone. thanks for joining me. i'm randi kaye in for fredricka
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whitfield. we begin with a simmering washington scandal. the story centers phone former house speaker, dennis hastert, now under indictment for lying to the fbi about huge sums of crash he withdrew alglegedly for hush money with one of his former students. this goes back long before his political career ever started. so far, he is not saying anything. let's get to sunlen serfaty in washington for us. isn't he eventually going to have to face reporters? >> reporter: i think it's very likely randi. he hasn't said anything yet. his lawyers still haven't said anything yet, and there are still are so many questions about this. here what's what we know. hastert was paying a former male student to keep quiet over these allegations of sexual abuse. this was, as you note from the time that he was a wrestleing coach in illinois before he even came to washington to start his political career. he was indicted thursday by the
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department of justice for lying to the fbi about $3.5 million he agreed to pay this undisclosed person. but he only ended up paying $1.7 million of that before the indictment came through. now, hastert is known for being squeaky-clean here in washington. a lot of surprise over this indictment. here's the white house press secretary. >> i think i can speak faithfully for everybody here at the white house, that even though speaker hastert served as speaker of the house in the other party, there's nobody here who takes -- who drives any pleasure from reading about the former speaker's legal troubles at this point. >> reporter: cnn spoke to a friend of hastert who has known him since 1970s. he spoke with him the day that the department of justice indictment came through and he tells cnn, quote, he perceives himself as the one being wronged and he made no comment, though randi, about the allegations.
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>> all right. sunlen serfaty, thank you very much for the update from washington. much more to the hastert story. l.a. times reporting an official spoke to a second man who accused hastert of similar allegations. l.a. times reporter tim phelps spoke to cnn's wolf blitzer about the second man. >> there were no payments going on between hastert and the second official reporting. >> this occurred when hastert was a teacher and a wrestling coach at that high school? >> well, we believe that's the case. we don't have a lot of detail on this second victim but in general, the charge is made clear it goes back before the time that hastert was in office. >> and the school where hastert taught during the alleged sexual abuse says it had no knowledge whatsoever of these accusations. let's bring in cnn senior political analyst ron brownstein and cnn legal analyst paul
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callan to talk about more about this. ron, to you first, done this threaten to destroy hastert's legacy? >> sure. i mean this is just an extraordinary story, especially when you consider the way hastert was introduced to the country. i mean he really was for house republicans a return to normalcy. he became speaker after newt gingrich stepped aside following the republican losses in 1998 and the backlash against the impeachment of bill clinton and then when bob livingston was forced to step aside because of his own allegations of sexual misconduct. hastert seemed to be smoothing the waters and for the story to end, for his story to end with these revelations is an extraordinarily revessel of fate. >> let me follow up with you here because hastert was instrumental instrumental in passing the patriot act and it was the provision of that act that actually tightened restrictions on the cash withdrawals which, in the end, helped the feds build the case
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against him. how ironic is that? >> yeah that's just adding more irony. we think of hastert as very much of a low-key speaker. initially thought of as the public face and the real power was tom delay who later ran into legal troubles of his own that were subsequently reversed. hastert turned out to be a forceful voice on the security issues and still a name used all the time in washington because of the hastert rule something informal that became formal under him where he said he would not bring a bill to the floor unless it has majority support bay majority of the majority and that's contributed to polarization in congress. we talk about the hastert rule but i think it's going to have different connotations depending on how this case plays out. >> absolutely. paul let me ask you about the statute of limitations. what do we know about that? >> well we know that the state of illinois changed the statute of limitations in certain kinds of sexual abuse cases in 2005.
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and they extended it and made it longer. presumably what's being alleged in the background stuff here predated 2005 when there was a shorter statute of limitation. my bet is the statute of limitations had run on sexual misconduct of a criminal nature and the only thing, the law enforcement authorities were left with were these sort of you know exotic charges like currency transaction charges which is the first count in the indictment and of course the old standby, lying to the fbi. >> so then paul what kind of punishment could hastert face if he's ultimately convicted if the statute of limitations is out? >> he's facing very serious time on these two charges. both of these charges, each of them call for a five-year or $ $250,000 fine as sentence. underlying fact of the sexual misconduct would come out at the trial because, remember he's being accused of lying to the fbi why he was taking applause of this money out of the bank.
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so presumably the prosecutor would be able to explain the real reason that he was taking it out of the bank was to -- it was hush money. so in a way they're going to use this as a mechanism to try the underlying case, and that will give them leverage of course to get a plea of guilty ultimately in the case which is probably how this case will resolve. and one other thing, he's presumed innocent at this point, and i'm only speculating about how it could play out in the future. >> right. and, ron, are you surprised, i mean this is washington after all, and if true are you surprised that this scandal has been hidden for so long? >> somewhat. you know but, look the greatest book ever in american politics "all of the king's men" and one character says to another, there is always something. you know the reality is that most of people in their lives -- not necessarily this serious -- understand that many people have something they would not want to read on the front page of nupt and this kind of goes with the scent there are a lot of rocks that can be overturned.
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in a strange way, again, i'm not equating this with other behavior if the underlying charges are true, this goes to why americans are anured to scandal and why it does not disqualify polliticians quickly because many people have flaws in their background, again not this serious if underlying charges are true. >> thank you both very much. the democratic field for president got larger. martin o'malley former maryland government and one-time baltimore mayor made it official this morning that he is running for president. >> that is why today, to you and to all who can hear my voice, i declare that i am a candidate for president of the united states and i am running for you! god bless you. may god bless the united states of america! thank you. >> let me bring in jeff,
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o'malley aims to be progressive alternative to hillary clinton. won't he have to battle with vermont senator bernie sanders as well? >> no doubt. he and bernie sanders both competing for anyone but hillary clinton votes, though democrats who are looking for something else. but martin o'malley is a former two-term governor of maryland. he's presenting himself as an experienced, new leader kind of pointing out, you know he has been a governor and a mayor, not just serving time in the senate. but his speech was very interesting today, particularly when he took a not so subtle jab at hillary clinton and jeb bush. >> goldman sachs is one of the biggest repeat investment banks in america. recently the ceo of goldman sachs let his employees know that he'd be just fine with either bush or clinton. i bet he would!
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well i've got news for the bullies of wall street the presidency is not a crown to be passed back and forth by you between two royal families. it is a sacred trust, to be earned from the american people and exercise on behalf of the people of these united states. >> reporter: between two royal families talking about hillary clinton and jeb bush there. so the theme of his speech was built right around that really trying to say that the economy needs to be improved. he's going to be fighting for main street tieing it to wall street. he said that's one of the reasons that baltimore has had all of the problems even though he served as mayor of the city he said that economic regrowth needs to happen across the country. he went head-on into that. but certainly did not shy away from taking at least a subtle shot at hillary clinton. >> and you know you mentioned some of the problems that baltimore's been having. one of them is certainly the
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conflict now between police and the community. and he's being blamed for that because of his zero tolerance policy. how do you think that's going to play out? >> reporter: sure he's being blamed for some of it. in fact a few protesters a handful of protesters tried to interrupt his speech. one was saying black lives matter. of course the anthem of the rallies we've been seeing in baltimore for so long. but look he can't be blamed for all of the problems in baltimore but is it part of his record. he has been campaigning on saying that he reduced crime in baltimore because of his policy. so at some point he'll have to give more of a folsom answer on this. i'm not so sure this presidential campaign is going to be guided by what happened here in baltimore. it certainly is something that is not helpful to him but it is part of his record. he's trying to focus more on his time as governor when he was a progressive and very liberal governor here in maryland north dakota. >> absolutely. jeff zellny thank you very
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much. federal aid will be on its way to texas, hammered by severe weather. the white house made that announcement late yesterday. at least 22 people in texas died this week from either tornadoes or flooding. the same storms have claimed lives in oklahoma and northern mexico. dan simons is in highlands, texas, hit hard again yesterday. are things any better there today? >> reporter: things are looking a little better randi. waters have receded where i am. this is highlands, texas. this is an area called the banana bin. i should tell you that most of the homes in this area are on stilts so they're not going to flood. but you go into some other areas that are under evacuation orders and there is concern, particularly with forecast more rain is expected to come this afternoon, and if that happens you could see a whole other round of flooding in texas. that's certainly not what they need. but you can see that this street this is a residential street entirely flooded.
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so some of these residential areas where i am at highlands the only way to get around is by bode randi. >> dan simons thank you very much. up next -- a man fighting for isis trained on u.s. soil. the surprising claims and government reaction when we come back. when it comes to good nutrition...i'm no expert. that would be my daughter -- hi dad. she's a dietitian. and back when i wasn't eating right, she got me drinking boost. it's got a great taste and it helps give me the nutrition i was missing. helping
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cnn has learned disturbing information about an isis fighter who had extensive training in the u.s. and now making dangerous threats. cnn's brian todd has more on what the former commander may know and how it could be used against americans and our allies on the battlefield. brian? >> reporter: randi, we've got new information abouten an isis fighter, a former colonel with the counterterror police. we have learned this man was trusted enough to be allowed inside the united states for
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extensive counterterror training. >> reporter: donned in isis black he carries a long sniper rifle, ammunition picks off a tomato to show off his skill. this is an isis video, and cnn has just learned this man trained on american soil. the fighter says he's a former commander in a special police counterterror unit a key u.s. ally. >> translator: from 203 to 2008 i received specialized training in america on the military base of black watter. >> a controversial u.s. contracting company which sent private security personnel to iraq and trained other country's fighter as the this compound in north carolina. contacted by cnn academy, the company that purchased blackwater's training facility was unable to confirm that he was there. the state department tells cnn, he participated in five counterterrorism courses in the
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u.s. between 2003 and last year. we spoke with former army sniper paul shari about what he might have learned. what skills he would have learned do you think might hurt allied forces on the battlefield? the types of training he's likely to have received would have been basic tactics and maneuvers, ability to say, move through a building move through urban area in a tactical way, basic marksmanship. >> reporter: u.s. contractors would have trained him to be a killing machine like rambo but if he was a top commander in terror forces there's a worry. >> he knows how to plan counterterrorism operations help knows how people who protect a high-value target will be thinking how people who protect an embassy will be thinking and that gives him a position to red team think, think intelligently how to disrupt plans. that's a dangerous capability. >> reporter: other ominous
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threat what he calls american pigs. >> god willing we will come to your cities and homes and kill you. >> reporter: the state department says all appropriate vetting was done for him before he came to the united states. officials have so far not commented on this man, or the video. he has a skill, a dangerous one, that goes beyond what he can do with a sniper rifle. in the video he speaks russian. analysts say that's a marketing decision by isis to use him as a tool to recruit other fighters from central asia. >> certainly alarming. brian todd thank you. a u.s. passenger jet forced to make a sudden maneuver as it prepares for landing at new york's laguardia airport. why the threat it faced could have ended in disaster.
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check top stories now. a boat captain in hawaii has died after getting impaled by a sword fish. the 47-year-old had jumped into the waters off the hawaiian coast holding a spear gun in an attempt to catch the fish. was during his time in the water that somehow he got punctured by the fish in his torso and died. conservation officers are investigating. the pentagon confirming u.s. army sent a suspected shipment of anthrax to australia. the live samples of the
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potentially dangerous pathogen believed to be shipped in 2008 or 2009. a total of 24 laboratories in 11 states and 2 foreign countries now believed to have received suspect samples. the defense department is conducting a thorough review protocols. u.s. defense secretary ash carter wants china to quit its terrorle expansion into the south china sea, this comes one week after u.s. surveillance plane carrying a cnn crew swooped over these islands, triggering warnings from the chinese navy to back off. u.s. officials say they are concerned about china's militarization of some of the islands and are considering flying surveillance missions closer than it has before over these islands. federal aviation administration is on the hunt for a drone pilot who could have caused a catastrophe. a passenger jet coming in for a landing at laguardia airport had to move quickly to avod a drone
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on friday morning. the jet had to climb 200 feet. the drone was flying about 2700 feet, way too high way too close to an airport. right now the faa is trying to figure out who is responsible. let's bring in analyst from boston a former assistant secretary for the department of homeland security. let me ask you, i mean officials say a drone getting sucked into a jet's engines could have catastrophic consequences. what do you make of that? >> i think that's absolutely right. just the number of drones and people have this image of what a drone is they think it's a missile going off in afghanistan afghanistan, drone means unmanned aerial instrument so anyone can get one of them. a drone in an engine hitting the wrong part of an airplane whether a large commercial plane or small one, would cause significant damage. so it's terrifying incidents because they are so avoidable.
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people who have drones have to abide by the rules that are regulate where and when drones can be utilized. >> also joining our conversation from denver cnn safety analyst, david suzi a former faa inspector. what can an encounter with a drone actually do to pilots? especially during this critical time in a flight? >> well there's a couple of things really if you look at it from a pilot's perspective, just the distraction, you know it wasn't long ago we talked about the distraction to train engineer by having a brick hit the front of the windshield. now a drain that diverts attention, make an evasive maneuver take you off the flight path and into the flight path of another aircraft. the second thing is if it's ingested into an engine we're not talking about a bird strike engines are designed to take bird strikes. talking about mechanical parts that can get in and block specific pass ageways of air
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flow within the engine. it's not only about it hitting the fan blade which is turning 30,000 rpms and hit with it those are titanium blades throws strong but what happens parts get into the parts of the engen engine and cause fuel controls to fail and that catastrophic. >> five passenger jets around new york report being hit by lazers that can temporarily blind pilots. david, anything anything at all to be done to protect aircrafts or pilots from something like that? >> well there's a lot of parallels between the drone and these lasers. the faa needs to realize a regulation does not mitigate risk. it's just the same as a gun law. put a gun law in place, don't use guns in the wrong way, those are regulations and rules that rely on people to adhere rules. this needs to be higher level,
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the congress needs to step in and give them empowerment to control these kind of things there has to be register laser that are cape only of doing this or start taking criminal action against the people that are doing it. it's far beyond just someone with a laser out there. this is now something that needs to be dealt with and dealt with right away. >> juliette is it time for the government to rethink the way that it's protecting the airlines? i mean what do you make of that? >> and i agree with david, whole heartedly. it's registration it's required train, it's licensing, and then it is prosecuting. we need to get some high-profile cases of these guys who are, whether fooling around making accidents, or actually dangerous, that they're purposefully doing this there has to be very strong prosecutions to get the word out to the drone community or whatever community it is that these are dangerous instruments and that there has to be just a
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stronger federal oversight of what's going on because a very small thing can cause catastrophic damage. >> absolutely. nice to see you both. thank you. >> thanks. still ahead -- he was mayor of baltimore, governor of maryland but can martin o'malley capture the white house? he's officially started his journey. our political panel weighs in, next.
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do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. ask your doctor about viagra. hello, everybody, thanks for joining me i'm randi kaye in for fredricka whitfield. martin o'malley former governor of maryland and former mayor of baltimore just announced that he is in the race for 2016. during his kick-off speech he addressed the current divide in baltimore in the weeks of unrest over the death of freddie gray.
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>> last month television sets around the world were filled with the anger and the rage and the flames of some of the humblest and hardest hit neighborhoods in baltimore. for all of us who have given so much of our energies to making our city a safer, fairer and more prosperous place, that was a heartbreaking night for all of us. for us baltimore is our country. for what took place here was not only about race not only about policing in america, it was about everything it is supposed to mean to be an american. >> all right. let's talk about this some more. joining me now, republican strategist brian morgenstern and a columnist at news day who once was a republican but now a democrat. brian, to you first on this. how much does this whole baltimore divide impact o'malley on day one of his campaign?
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>> well it damages his credibility tremendously because, obviously, he's running on his experience as governor of maryland and before that mayor of baltimore. as i mentioned last hour what do the voters have to show for his leadership? high crime, high poverty, racial tension, higher taxes and regulation and poor business climate. he doesn't have a good record to run on. of course it really makes him stumble right out of the gate. i want to touch on his policing policy because that seems to be at the root of this. people are conflating what was happening in baltimore under mayor o'malley with what is happening in new york and other cities with the so-called broken windows and things like than you know this kind of policing the -- it's supposed to be about policing with a scalpel. what was happening under mayor o'malley was policing with a shrimping net, where he'd arrest entire neighborhoods and let people out when they'd sign a waiver to not sue the city. no wonder people are angry and not reacting to his candidacy.
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he's got hey pretty flawed track record. >> ellis, you've written that o'malley is better than hillary clinton. why do you say that? he did endorse her in the 2008 campaign. >> listen he has a tough road. i don't think we can pretend this has been a smooth launch. the fact that he's speaking about police unrest in baltimore is frankly not the theme that he ought to be launching on you've got to say bernie sanders had a much better launch this week. the passion in the democratic party is in the progressive wing it's people to the left clearly to the left of hillary and o'malley's record is more mixed on that front. i don't buy brian's view he's a pretty good governor and mayor, but as a political matter he's nearly begun. let's put it like that. >> brian, weigh if on o'malley in terms of his strength against hillary clinton as a candidate. >> well you know another poll that i mentioned earlier,
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maryland democrats were asked who they would prefer hillary clinton or governor o'malley and it was 63-3 in favor of hillary clinton. there's an article on 538, not a right-wing publication, it's nate silver's website and talked about why would americans like o'malley if marylanders don't even like o'malley. i think, again, he's -- he doesn't have a favorable track record and he's not a real popular governor and that's why his lieutenant governor was trounced in november's election i'm think, as ellis said i agree he's got a tough road ahead. i think it's nearly insurmountable, though. >> ellis, final word? >> hillary clinton. i mean that's the road ahead. it's going to be tough for any of these people to beat her. be honest she's at 50% in the polls, he's at 1. yes, it's a very tough road ahead, guys. >> two words, by the way, for the record hillary clinton. >> i should have just said
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hillary. >> brian, ellis, thank you very much. the deal reached in a high-level taliban prison swap is about to expire. who could happen to the five gitmo detainers traded for army sergeant bowe bergdahl. the network that monitors her health. the secure cloud services that store her genetic data the servers and software on a mission to find the perfect match. and the mom who gets to hear her daughter's heart beat once again. we're helping organizations transform the way they work so they can transform the lives of the people they serve. automotive innovation starts... right here. with a control pad that can read your handwriting, a wide-screen multimedia center, and a head-up display for enhanced driver focus. all inside a redesigned
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veteran and you're endangering our fellow soldiers! >> protesters and counterprotesters faced off at a rally outside phoenix mosque holding a draw muhammad cartoon contest. a similar event in garland, texas, this month ended in gunfire. there, police shot dead two armed isis sympathizers who tried to attack that gathering. a decision expected monday on the fate of the five high-level taliban detainees swapped in a prisoner exchange with u.s. the taliban members were traded for sergeant bowe bergdahl last year. the agreement between u.s. and qatar imposed one-year travel ban which officially ends at the end of the month. global affairs correspondent on what could happen next. >> the five taliban detainees have been monitored by the qatari government for one year and banned from traveling outside the country. now the state department is leading separate negotiations with both the governments of
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qatar and afghanistan about what happens next. u.s. officials say there are few options in play. now the u.s. prefers they stay in qatar, where they will be monitored. the five have brought their families there and total 70 among them. the other options could see the five returning to afghanistan, either be released or monitored by the afghan government. now the qataris say they will not expand their restrictions on the five nor will they send them home to afghanistan if they don't want to leave qatar. none of these are great options. five high-ranking taliban officials, one has tried to communicate with taliban militants since arriving in qatar, raising questions whether the lives of afghans, americans and u.s. soldiers in afghanistan would be at risk. republican lawmakers were upset with the deal in the first place. now calling on the obama administration to make sure that the five are not set free.
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tlc still deciding what to do about the duggars, reruns of the show "19 kids and counting" pulleded after a sex scandal after oldest son josh was revealed last week. he critics are getting more vocal about the brazen hypocrisy. >> we're the duggars. >> reporter: pounding piety in their home duggars reality clan preaching beliefs beyond tlc, powering into the political field. >> hello, this is michelle duggar. >> reporter: matriarch of the
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family recorded the re-breaux call asking residents to protest anti-discrimination ordinance which would protect transgender rights. >> i doubt that fayetteville parent would stand for a law that would endanger they're daughters or allow them to be traumatized by a man joining them in their private space. >> she left out what was happening in her family's own private space. according to this police report o. obtained by "in touch" magazine the family did not take josh duggar to the authorities in 2002 when the family first learned about an alleged sexual assault. four years later, the family's tv fame growing, a tip prompts an official police investigation. >> welcome. >> reporter: the allegations not becoming public until last week. only then josh duggar saying he is extremely sorry and as parents, we are not a perfect family. >> love you, josh. >> reporter: the eldest in a cast of many on tlc's "19 kids
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and counting" josh duggar jockeying to be a political play speaking of christian and family values. >> we had parents that loved each other, loved the lord. >> reporter: a potent symbol to republican presidential candidates courting the evangelical base all silent in the wake of the scandal except for candidate mike huckabee standing by the family on facebook. josh's actions when he was an underaged teen are as he described them himself, inexcusable, but that doesn't mean unforgivable. >> i'm glad they got what was coming to them. i think karma's a bitch. >> reporter: howard bragman says repugnant part of the reality tv tale unravels isn't just the alleged sex crime. >> they had the hut spa or nerve to be judging other people when you know this in your past, it doesn't make any sense. and it really in the end, they
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are responsible for the death of their own brand. >> reporter: a brand and a family waiting to see if tlc decides to bring it back. kyung lah, cnn, los angeles. >> let's discuss this further now. joining me cnn senior media correspondent and host of "reliable sources." brian brian, what is going on behind the scenes now at tlc. >> the least bad option is not do anything. they pulled the episodes from the episode last week but stopping short of canceling. the canceling means never resuming produnks there's no crews following the duggars around so there's nothing to cancel. but it's a huge hit they'd like to resume more seasons. at some point they have to make a decision. but right now by avoiding the issue, by staying silent they're probably doing the least bad thing, because they're letting this hopefully, you know it's not going to blow
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over but letting the intensity and interest die down. we learned in the last hour we'll hear from the family for the first time. the parents, the duggar parents giving an interview to megyn kelly that will air next week. in the statement the parents say they're going to be speaking from the heart, sharing our hearts with you about the pain that we walk through as a family 12 years ago, tears we all shed and forgiveness that was given. the subtext of the statement, randi, they're preparing to tell their side of the story. their side of this awful story for the tirs time what about -- that is surprising. i'm sure folks are anxious to hear about what they are say about. hulu dropped the episodes after consulting with tlc. which side initiated that. >> another example how this family crisis has deepened for the duggars and that's i think the point we were hearing howard bragman make in the story just now. hulu took the shows off the website a few days ago. the ceo did it in consultation
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with tlc. it wasn't about advertiser pressure it was refreshinglecting what tlc was doing. but it's been wiped away off the internet and television. again, making it harder to bring it back in the future. one of most logical outcomes here is a spin-off. maybe that's why the parents think they need to do a television interview, they need to tell their side of the story and make it more possible 30 have a spin-off in the future. >> what about the brand? depending what the parents say of course what will happen to the duggar brand? >> you know this might be the rare sort of reality tv scandal that doesn't actually help a show. you know we've seen with "duck dynasty" it results in higher ratings and more interest in the subjects of the show. this might be one of the rare stories where that's not the case because we're talking molestation including of family members. that's why the questions for parents are going to be so crucial here. we have to hear from them what
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they did and didn't do when they learned about josh duggar's offenses here. we have to also hear about the victims in the story, we've heard from almost nothing from them or about them. the word by the way about the interview we will not be hearing from the children only from the parents. obviously them coming forward and speaking will be a first step where they hope to repair some of the damage publicity wise that's been done to their family. >> brian stelter, thank you. sentenced to life in an egyptian president but a jailed american is coming home. the story, next.
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u.s. citizen who had been sentenced to life in an egyptian prison will be reunited with his family in the u.s. the u.s. embassy confirms he has left egypt. he had been jailed since 2013 for his role in demonstrations in support of ousted former president morsi. he had been on a hunger strike for 14 months and state department call for his release on humanitarian grounds. u.s. lawmakers return to the senate floor in a rare session sunday in a looming stalemate over provisions of the patriot act, unless congress moves the measures expire midnight tomorrow. one of the main provisions the nsa's metadata collection program which allows to collect millions of americans' phone data. an extraordinarily difficult challenge, keeping up with possible terror suspects in the u.s. the agency is asking for help from local police departments. the nypd wants to add 450 officers to its counterterrorism unit partly to counter the
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threat from isis sympathizers. we have much more just ahead in "newsroom" and it all starts right now. happening now in "newsroom" he was two heartbeats away from the white house. new details on dennis hastert's $1.7 million secret. plus -- >> you were the last person to see natalee holloway alive? >> yes. >> ten years after the disappearance of natalee holloway an eyewitness says he knows where to find her. martin o'malley officially jumps into the presidential race. you are live in the "cnn newsroom." hello, everyone. thanks for joining me. i'm randi kaye in for fredricka whitfield. the democratic field for president just got larger.
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martin o'malley former maryland governor and one-time baltimore mayor made it official this morning. >> that is why today to you and to all who can hear my voice, i declare that i am a candidate for president of the united states and i am running for you! may god bless you. >> let's bring in our political team on the ground in baltimore, cnn's jeff zeleny and m.j. lee. jeff you first, o'malley is known in maryland but nationally he done have the name recognition of say, hillary clinton or even vermont senator bernie sanders. it seems like he has a little bit of work to do get his campaign off the ground. >> randi, no question he has a bit of work to do and that's exactly why he is flying to iowa right now, you know just an hour or so after he finished his speech. the home of the first conit test in this white house 2016 campaign. but, in any other year martin o'malley would have a gold-plated resume two-term
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mayor of a big city a two-term governor of the state of maryland plays guitar in a rock band. of course that is overshadowed by hillary clinton. he's running as an alternative to her, plan b. he said it's time for a new generation of leadership a new face to be put forward for the democratic party. but of course we all know so well that baltimore's been in the spotlight for the last several weeks and months because of protests. he did not shy away from that. he addressed it in his speech. let's take a listen. >> and there is something to be learned from that night. there is something to be offered to our country from those flames. for what took place here was not only about race not only about policing in america, it was about everything it is supposed to mean to be an american. >> reporter: by addressing that
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he of course is raising one of his biggest vulnerabilities, policing policies as mayor of baltimore. but he's going to talk about his progressive agenda going forward. he's going to talk about how as governor he signed into law a bunch of progressive issues like gay marriage and other things. no question it's an uphill battle ahead of him but that's what campaigns are all about. >> absolutely. m.j. the questions about his baltimore record as mayor, that jeff was touching on coupled with the current crime and violence there, i mean is this a short-lived story, do you think, or it could it become a real campaign problem for o'malley? >> randi, this is a problem and an issue that is going to follow martin o'malley on the campaign trail. i spent some time yesterday here in baltimore talking to some of the residents here and asking them what did you think about his legacy as mayor of baltimore and governor of maryland, and while there are people who are very excited about this campaign there are also residents, particularly in the
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african-american community, who are angry and frustrated about the policing tactics that jeff talked about that they thought were discriminatory. we saw here earlier today protesters coming out to try to interrupt his rally. they didn'tend up being disruptive but it brings a potential challenge. we are in a state where the national dialogue is really focused on issues like police brutality, issues about race relations and tension, and this is an issue that is going to follow him on the road and asked that over and over again. >> all right. we will continue to follow him, as well. thank you both very much. meanwhile in his speech martin o'malley addressed the divide in baltimore between the bliss and the community following the death of freddie gray you but that divide made be getting worse. some officers told the police commissioner they're afraid to make risky arrests because they don't want to end up being
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accused of misconduct but other reports claiming that the police are intentionally responding to calls slowly to make a point because they've lost confidence in the chain of command. either way, the numbers show that the month of may is the deadliest month in baltimore since 1996 with 39 murders now. arrests were the month were down under 2,000, compared to almost 4,000 arrests this time last year. so let's talk about this a little bit more with los angeles police sergeant cheryl dorsey she's retired now. the first question what is the fang that arrests are down and homicides up tell you about what's going on with policing in baltimore? >> well you know police officers are a crafty sort and so they have a way of making their discontent known, if you will. but i think the bigger problem here is that you have reportedly officers saying that they're afraid to do their job. and so i'd like to challenge commissioner batts to identify and locate every officer who
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says he's afraid to do his job and remove him from that position because you don't get to not do your job if you're doing the right thing, you have nothing to fear. if you're not mistreating people and servering the spine of someone who made eye contact with you, then you have nothing to fear. >> what about disciplinary action? we talked about the slowdown. can there be disciplinary action taken against officers who might be participating in the slowdown? >> my guess it would be very difficult to prove, much like an officer's perception of fear. how do you prove that the officer wasn't involved in traffic, because we're required to obey all traffic laws as we respond to calls for service. and if it's not a high priority call you drive the speed limit and you don't run any red lights or stop signs, it might take longer. >> what would help? i mean if you think about the idea that many officers don't live where they work would it help at all if they did live in
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that city? >> i don't believe that you have to live in the city where you work in. and there's reasons why you wouldn't want to live in a city where you work in. i wouldn't want to encounter someone who may not be happy with the service i provided to them because i had to take them to jail. all you really need to do is just care. all you really need to do is have empathy and compassion for the people that you serve. >> and then you have this meeting between prosecutors and the top police officials taking place. they met yesterday to try to mend relations, maybe bring both sides together. what is it going take? would a meeting like that help or what's the answer. >> i believe the benevolent officer's association is circle the wagon around wrong doers and convince us they did the right thing and we didn't see what we saw in the freddie gray matter. so i think what needs to happen is i think probably commissioner batts needs to go. the officers have voted a no confidence in his leadership ability, and understand this is his third time as the head of a police department.
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i don't know why he's struggling with the issues that he's having problems with. >> does it concern you, i guess i should say how much does it concern you, about the number of arrests this time compared to last year? >> well again, it would appear that the officers are playing games. but how do you prove it? right? if they're not responding to anything except for where that radio sends them they're not being proactive in police work how do you prove it's not coincidental or it's contrived? >> either way, not good for the city if the crime rate's going to go up. appreciate it. thank you very much. >> thank you. protesters and counterprotesters faced off at a rally outside a phoenix mosque holding a draw muhammad cartoon contest. >> our soldiers overseas. >> thank you. >> i respect your organizers service but i'm a veteran and you're endangering our fellow
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soldiers. >> they separated the groups afraid of violence. a similar event ended in gunfire this month. police shot dead two armed isis sympathizers there who tried it attack the gathering. once the most powerful man in congress. now dennis hastert accused to lying to the fbi after pay morgue than $1 million to cover up a sex secret. thanks for the ride around norfolk! and i just wanted to say geico is proud to have served the military for over 75 years! roger that. captain's waiting to give you a tour of the wisconsin now. could've parked a little bit closer... it's gonna be dark by the time i get there. geico. proudly serving the military for over 75 years. here at friskies, cats are in charge of approving every new recipe. because it's cats who know best what cats like to eat. up today, new friskies 7.
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former house speaker dennis hastert is under indictment for lying to the fbi. prosecutors say he withdrew huge sums of cash allegedly used his hush money to cover up section ooul sexual abuse with a former student, this dates back to before his political career started. here's cnn justice correspondent pamela brown. >> reporter: randi, first came the indictment from the justice department with the shocking allegations that dennis hastert had lied to the fbi about withdrawing money for a coverup. and now, we are learning from sources alleged sexual misconduct involving an underage student was the reason behind the hush money. federal sources tell cnn dennis hastert, the longest serving republican u.s. house speaker, was paying hush money to a student at illinois high school where he once taught. more than a million dollars for the former student to keep allegations hastert had sexually abused him quiet.
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hastert has not commented publicly but he abruptly resigned from his washington, d.c. lobbying firm as well as a chicago derivatives firm. the indictment does not discuss sexual abuse. instead, it focuses on how the 73-year-old former wrestling coach moved the money he allegedly was paying the former student. prosecutors saying he agreed to pay an unnamed individual quote, $3.5 million to cover up his past misconduct. according to court records the investigation started two years ago, when the fbi started investigating mystery transactions made by hastert. bank withdrawals of more than $950,000. the fbi allegations several of the withdrawals were less than $10,000, so he could evade irs detection. prosecutors say when the fbi asked hastert about the pattern of large withdrawals he said he wud was keeping cash for himself. we are told by sources federal authorities were looking at whether to bring extortion charges and concluded, that was something that they didn't want
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to pursue. hastert, meantime has no returned our calls for comment. a friend of his, though said that he perceives himself as the one being wronged here. randi? >> pamela brown, thank you. "the l.a. times" reporting a top law enforcement official says investigators also spoke to a second man who accused hastert of similar allegations. l.a. times reporter tim phelps spoke to cnn about that second man. take a listen. there were no payments go on between hastert and the second official we're reporting. >> this occurred when hastert was a teach somewhere a wrestling coach at that high school? >> well we believe that's the case. we don't have a lot of detail on the second victim but in general, the charges made clear that it goes back before the time that hastert was in office. >> the school where hastert taught during the alleged sexual abuse says it had no knowledge of these accusations.
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still ahead -- a kansas college student called a hero after isis launches a deadly bombing in saudi arabia. we'll tell you what he did. he says she's an undisciplined overwaterer. she claims he's a cruel underwaterer. with miracle-gro moisture control potting mix, plants only get water when they need it. fight ended. or shifted? miracle-gro. life starts here.
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i am totally blind. i lost my sight in afghanistan but it doesn't hold me back. i go through periods where it's hard to sleep at night and stay awake during the day. non-24 is a circadian rhythm disorder that affects up to 70% of people who are totally blind. talk to your doctor about your symptoms and learn more by calling 844-844-2424. or visit my24info.com.
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with xfinity from comcast you can manage your account anytime, anywhere on any device. just sign into my account to pay bills manage service appointments and find answers to your questions. you can even check your connection status on your phone. now it's easier than ever to manage your account. get started at xfinity.com/myaccount a great friend and a true hero that's how university of wichita student is being remembered today. the 22-year-old gave up his life
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to save hundreds of others when he stopped a suicide bomber from entering a crowded mosque in saudi arabia. he and three others were killed outside the mosque when the bomber detonated. isis has claimed responsibility for that attack. cnn correspondent nick valencia is covering the story for us. tell me he was about to get married, correct? >> that's right. that adds to the sadness and the grief, of course of the familiar in saudi arabia according to his family to get married. before that he volunteered as security guard. another mosque in the region had also been attacked according to reports, the suicide bomber showed up dressed as a woman and that heightened suspicions because women were told to stay home during friday prayers because of this heightened security risk. it is said by his family that abdul jahleel stopped the suicide bomber along with his cousin. the bomber ended up detonating the device and killing three others. last night at a memorial service
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for the 22-year-old, who was also a student at wichita state university his family spoke about his character at a memorial service. >> his role in saudi arabia was bravery. because of the bravery, heroism he saved a lot of people. >> he is like a brother or more on that a brother for everybody. if you can see right now, you're going to see a smile on his face. >> he was not officially named by the government of saudi arabia but did release a statement about the details of friday's attack saying quote, security men suspected a car heading to the car parking adjacent to the mosque. when the security man approached the car, it exploded, killing four where one is believed to be the driver. spreading fire to a number of cars. abdul jahleel was expected to return to wichita state university this fall. >> the university is issuing a response? >> they are. they did confirm he died. they didn't list circumstances or details about the circumstances he died but did release a statement offering
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condolences saying wichita state university community is saddened by the tragic death of one of our students. our condolences goes out to family friends and colleagues especially his bride-to-be. never a chance to get married. >> incredible bravery, saving hundreds of lives potentially. thank you. up next the clock is ticking, less than 24 hours until key provisions of the patriot act run out. live to washington as leaders attempt to get a deal done. life begins with a howl, we scream shout, shriek with joy. until, inhibition creeps in our world gets smaller quieter, but life should be loud. sing loud, play loud, love loud. dentures shouldn't keep you quiet, life should be ringing in your ears. live loud, polident.
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hello, everyone. thanks for joining me. i'm randi kaye in for fredricka whitfield. senator and gop presidential hopeful rand paul say his will force the nsa data collection program to expire. the controversial law is set to expire tomorrow unless lawmakers renew it. now congress will hold a rare sunday session with the hopes of coming up with a compromise. the white house is warning of potentially serious consequences if ideal is not reached. cnn's sunlen serfaty is at the white house with the latest for us. what is really the core issue here preventing an agreement? >> reporter: well randi, it taps into the balance between national security and the privacy of americans. the white house has said that they believe this house bill that passed the compromised bill helps to pinpoint and make
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the changes necessary to address the concern over privacy. that bill extends some of the provisions within the patriot act. about changes that controversial bulk phone records data collection and it basically takes it from the hands of government into the hand of the phone companies. for that reason the white house says that this house bill should be passed by the senate and, as you said they ratcheted up their language calling it irresponsible and reckless by the senate. if they don't pass this into law tomorrow. here's president obama yesterday in the oval office. >> i don't want us to be in a situation in which, for a certain period of time those authorities go away and suddenly we're dark and, heaven forbid we've got a problem where we could have prevented a terrorist attack or apprehended someone who was engaged in dangerous activity but we didn't do so simply because of inaction in the senate.
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>> reporter: republican senator rand paul he says that he believes the programs are illegal and unconstitutional and says he's ready to block this from happening again tomorrow. he's both against the extension of the patriot act but also this house passed bill unless he says significant changes are made to weaken the government's surveillance powers. he tweeted out just moments ago, there has to be another way. we must find it it together. so tomorrow i will force the expiration of the nsa illegal spy program. at this time randi, clearly, there is no firm way forward. >> in terms of the timetable, parts of it are going to start shutting down before the senate even meets, right? >> reporter: that's absolutely right. something the white house has been warning about, one minute before the senate convenes tomorrow 4:00 p.m. these programs will start shutting down at 3:59 p.m. in the afternoon. they say the nsa will have to start winding down aspects of the surveillance programs.
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they said they'll have to reach out to inform phone companies, also shut down servers and tweak software on their end, clearly making it the case that there's a small window of the time for the senate to act. they say unless the senate acts and passes this into law and president obama signs that legislation into law by 8:00 p.m. tomorrow night, then these measures can be reversed of that winding down but after 8:00 p.m. then little chance that this can be wrapped up and reversed in any fair amount of time. randi? >> sounds like a messy day in washington for sure. cnn's sunlen serfaty at the white house, thank you. the trial of the colorado theater shooter has already seen some dramatic evidence presented. what role james holmes' diary and interviews with psychiatrists could play in his verdict. but when i started having back pain my sister had to come help. i don't like asking for help.
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was james holmes mentally ill when he opened fired and killed 12 people in a colorado movie theater? prosecutors say that holmes knew what he was doing, and in a new video of the 27-year-old speaking with a psychiatrist reveals new insights into his state of mind. cnn's anna cabrera. >> reporter: appearing calm and speaking in a steady monotoned voice the words of james holmes have a chilling effect. >> do you remember the day you were arrested?
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>> yes. >> what day was that? >> july 20 2012. >> reporter: for the jury the video's a brief look inside the mind of the alleged killer taken during a mental evaluation to determine whether holmes was legally insane when he opened fire in a colorado movie theater. >> do you take into consideration the fact that when you're talking to him he knows that he's facing the death penalty? >> yes. >> reporter: ordered by the court, dr. william reid interviewed holmes nine times for 22 hours. >> did you drink quite a bit in college. >> no i wasn't a huge drinker. >> after breaking up with his girlfriend months before the shooting in 2012. >> did you think about hurting yourself or kill yourself? >> no. >> killing other people? >> yeah. i kind of transferred it to kind of homicidal thoughts.
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>> reporter: dr. reid concluded holmes knew right from wrong, he was sane when he killed 12 and injured 70 others. prosecutors say he planned and detailed his actions in his journal. >> did he discuss having a desire to kill people? >> yes, he does. >> reporter: holmes sent the notebook to a psychiatrist at university of colorado before the shooting. but it was discovered too late. in it holmes writes the obsession to kill since i was a kid with age became more and more realistic. and he details different ways to carry out an attack from bombs to biological warfare to serial murder. he settles on mass murder at the movies writing, maximum casualties, easily performed with firearms caught 99% certain. holmes pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. >> insights into the mind of madness. >> reporter: the defense points out the notebook contains ramblings that don't make any sense, and holmes also writes about his mental illness.
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so anyways, that's my mind it's broken he writes. whether the jury believes that could determine the fate of a self-described shy, but once promising, ph.d. student. >> what brings tears to your eyes sometimes? >> regrets. >> regrets about? >> about the shooting. >> reporter: anna cabrera, cnn, denver. >> talk about what to expect next in the case and the trial. joining me mary ellen o'toole, a former fbi profile somewhere special agent. by skype, gail saltz, author of "the psychology of living a lie" and hln legal analyst, joey jackson. mary ellen, let me start with you on this one. looking at that diary, what does it show about holmes' frame of mind ahead of the killings would you say? >> what it shows to me is that
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there's areally significant leakage in terms of his homicidal i'dation and it goes back into time according to what he's writing, and he talks in parts in a logical way, as he lays out what's a good venue, what's not a good venue. this is leakage, though. and what's important is that this writing is not dynamic. so the next step the most logical step you have to sit down and talk to the person and determine, do you know the difference between right and wrong? did you understand the consequences of your behavior? so his journal is a tremendous jumping off point, but you have to go further than that. >> and, just talking about some of the things in the journal, a desire to kill violent thoughts obsession with killing, do the contents of that notebook notebook tell you whether or not holmes could meet the legal standard of insanity in this case?
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>> they don't tell you one way or the other, because the question as was mentioned already is really did he have psychiatric illness that at the moment he committed the crime and in the planning of the crime was basically impacted by psychotic thinking. so for instance if he had written that you know he didn't think that killing someone was wrong, that he was doing it because, you know of some delusion that he had and, therefore, felt that it was right or he had to do it was forced to do it because of his psychotic thoughts that would meet the criteria. but you can have serious psychiatric illness, which he may have and still not be legally insane because it doesn't impact the reason that you did the crime, it doesn't impact your ability to know that what you're doing is wrong. it doesn't, therefore, meet legal criteria of insanity. >> joey i mean this notebook is really a window into what
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this guy was thinking before this all happened. i mean what impact could something so valuable like that and the interviews likely have on the trial? >> sure randi. good afternoon. always good to be with you. what's going to happen here is that it will be a battle of the experts. we know from a prosecution perspective, their experts are going to say they've evaluated him, looked at the notebook and certainly he was sane lucid, rational knew right from wrong and that's the standard. however, you're going to hear defense experts, who are equally as capable, equally as competent, say, their evaluation shows something significantly different. so you can look at the notebook and of course the prosecution will cherry pick items that show that rationality, where should i engage in the attacks? should i do it at an airport? no, too much security. defense will look at aspects of the note box that have rambling equations, why, why, why, scrambled everywhere and each side will cherry pick the side
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that supports their view. it comes down to what he knew at the tame he was engaging in the action and the prosecution, randi, will hasten to add the plotting the planning the premeditation and everything that goes into it and finally the defense will say he was delusional in a deep psychosis, he didn't know what he was doing you cannot hold him accountable and that's the battle before the jury. >> mary ellen, one of the things to be blunt here, the jury could he be faking it? have you seen this before? >> absolutely. we've seen it in other cases where there's malingering on the part of the defendant, and that behavior can be seen in how they present in the courtroom. it can be presented in how they behave in the jail cell. so i think the jury will probably have to consider that very strongly in terms of this case. and it can make an impact. >> and, gail how will his demeanor in the courtroom and the photos of him and his behavior in the court, how will
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that play with the jury? >> i think when someone appears ill, of course it has to affect the jury's mind. appearing ill can be because you're actively ill at the moment or because you're heavily medicated, and have -- so there's something called flat after fech you have kind of the stone n. nonemotional looking face and you can have flat affect because you've had ongoing schizophrenia, you can also have flat appearing after fech because you're on a lot of antipsychotic to control the illness, and those an unfortunate side effect. either way a jury who sees someone, who done seem to be having normal emotion response to things and therefore looks odor eccentric in some way that certainly could affect the way the jury sees and hears information that's being presented to them they may say, he really does seem ill. what the jury will have to be
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continually reminded of is that it's possible and it sounds like he is really ill, he has been ill but that doesn't mean he's healy not responsibler insane of committing the crime. you can have both things be true. >> joey how much personal information would the jury know about him? would they know if he's on medication? what else would they know about him? how would that weigh into how they go with this. >> the defense attorneys will cross-examine the expert sir, you interviewed him but that was two years after the event, is that not right? certainly he was medicated at that time would that be true? he was medicated for a period of time when you interviews him and this would not reflect his state of moond during the interview and that his state of mind at the event. so certainly both sides are attempting to use who he is and what he is for their own purposes. the prosecution, to say, listen
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this is a normal person you know who turned into having some type of mental illness, that mental illness does not equate with legal insanity. from the defense perspective, a person who's certainly amiss and at that time was under medication that does not reflect what he was at the time he is insane he is delusional you cannot hold him accountable. and that's the battle. in any courtroom, you always have two professors. both of them sound like they know what they're talking about. the prosecution certainly espousing a point of view that is he is sane ladies and gentlemen, and look to the evidence that establishes that. and the defense professor saying you know what he's delusional he cannot be held accountable, he had no idea what he was doing, look at the past history of who hoe is and what he is that should answer the question and that's what the jury will have to sift through. >> thank you all. appreciate it. >> have a great day. >> thank you. we'll be right back.
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could a man who claims to be an eyewitness hold the key to what happened to natalie holloway the alabama teenager disappeared ten years ago today while on a high school graduation trip to aruba. she was never found. but a man has come forward now saying he knows where to find her body. cnn's martin savidge has been investigating his claims and joins us live from palm beach, aruba. martin what have you found? >> reporter: where we're standing right now is the spot ten years ago that authorities maintain and even the holloway family believes was the last place that natalie holloway was, this spot here with joran van der sloot. the new witness that's come forward says, you know what
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that's wrong, and it's been wrong for ten years. he says he's something the natalie holloway case has never had, an eyewitness. >> you were the last person to see natalie holloway alive? >> yes. >> so where have you been? because it's been ten years. >> reporter: actually de young isn't new. he's been speaking out for years. in 2008 he even called natalie's father and said -- >> she's on land and i know where her body is hidden. and my initial thought was, oh, this is another crazy. >> reporter: he's gone to the police numerous times, even given a sworn statement. >> what happened? >> nothing. >> reporter: here's his version. on the night natalie holloway vanished de young says he was doing something illegal at a construction site. he won't say what. but around 2:00 a.m. he says he sees a young man, who later he identifies as joran van der sloot, chasing a young woman into the site. >> i thought in a playful way.
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>> reporter: he said the couple disappeared into a small section of construction. >> at five minutes he came out with her in his arms. >> reporter: and it was what he saw the man do. >> he really slammed her. and then you don't start hiding this person in the crawl space. >> reporter: joran van der sloot is serving 28 years in prison for the murder of a young woman in peru. he's never been charged in the natalie holloway case. now de young's testimony seems to practically solve the mystery of what happened to natalie and now ten years after she disappeared, authorities have finally gotten around to investigating it. >> i don't know if he's lying. i can only say that his statement can't be true. >> reporter: that construction site in 2005 is now a 12-story vacation property owned by marriott. and the prosecutor says marriott informed him at the time natalie vanished there was no construction. >> because when there's no
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construction natalie holloway can't be buried in the crawl space under the foundation. >> reporter: that certainly seems true. but dave holloway believes marriott may be possibly wrong about those construction dates. holloway led a number of searches for his daughter on aruba and he remembers the place. >> i was there on june 1st and there was definitely construction in that area. june 1st 2005. >> reporter: and this google earth view from june 2005 a short time after natalie vanished appears to show a construction site and the fuzzy shapes of structures. we asked marriott for clarification, but in a statement the company made no mention of the building saying only as we have done all along, we cooperate fully with authorities whenever they are conducting an official investigation. >> what he's describing in his story matches what's physically
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there at the time so i'm thinking man, this could be -- this could be something that really needs to be looked at closely. >> reporter: holloway wants a search but authorities say that's not going to happen. >> it's useless to search there with a cadaver dog or drilling or whatever. one thing will be sure she's not lying there. she can't be lying there. >> reporter: dave holloway and i have had a number of conversations about this witness. you can sense that dave holloway does not want to build up his hopes too much but unfortunately it looks like he already has. he really would like to see an investigation of that site and he's been told by the prosecutor's office that won't happen. as he put it that is causing him a great deal of anxiety. >> and martin though it's hard to understand why the prosecutor would say it's useless. why not check it out? why are they so sure it's
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useless? >> reporter: right. he says that he's gone through the entire tascase file, which is thousands of pages. he only got on the case in october. he said from the statements witnesses have given, the information marriott has provided maybe some other things they won't mention, they are just certain that one, this man is mistaken and, two, that she can't possibly be where she is. i said well look why don't you just check and put it all to rest? and he said they won't do that it will build false hope. i said well then people will always doubt you. he said yes, i know. >> wow, i guess you lose either way. martin savidge, i appreciate your reporting, thank you. let's talk more about this case now. joining us is senior fbi profiler and special agent mary ellen o'toole. mary ellen, you actually worked on the holloway disappearance. natalie holloway has been missing now ten years today.
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in this man appear to have any credibility do you think? did authorities make a mistake in continuing to ignore him? >> well the case was assigned to me as the fbi agent profiler. i did go to aruba and listening to the story and i've been following it i've never met the witness, but, you know i'm very there's not enough reason or justification not to check this out. i mean this is an older man at the time that natalee went missing, our information was coming through joran or his friends and this man does not have any association with him, he's older. he's really made multiple efforts to contact people. he was fearful of getting in trouble. for all we know he could still get in trouble because of his illegal activities at the time. but there's just such a concerted effort. apparently he even went there himself and tried to drill into
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the foundation. so i'm just extremely concerned that there's not the slightest bit of effort to say, yes, maybe he forgot maybe he got his information wrong. but we're going to check it out anyway. i would never rely on a hotel saying it's not -- it's not correct or on my saying i just don't believe this man because he's probably lying to me. >> but as you well know at the time authorities, they practically tore that island of aruba apart searching for natalee holloway. do you think that it's really possible that she has been there all along? >> well you have to remember being down there i know that this is true. much of the search was focused on her body being put in the ocean and currents taking her away. that was really the focus, because the information that was given to law enforcement at the time was that was -- you know that's what happened. and so this is a completely different new lead and it's one that maybe you're not 100% or maybe not even 50% comfortable
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with the witness. with a case like this, and because of the way it was handled initially, the fbi -- we went down there as advisers we had no jurisdiction. we would not have handled the investigation that way. i think you owe it to the victim and the family and to all the investigators to do as much as you can to check out this lead. >> yeah absolutely. appreciate your insight, mary ellen o'toole, thank you so much. >> you're welcome. and we have much more just ahead in the newsroom. it starts after a very short break.
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hello. thanks for joining me. i'm randi kaye in for fredricka whitfield. diplomatic officials say qatari and u.s. officials are having one final meeting about what to do with the five detainees at guantanamo bay that were exchanged from the freedom of former american p.o.w. bowe bergdahl. after their release they were sent to qatar and banned for fravling for one year but that ban ends on monday. qatar is willing to extend the agreement under the same terms but the u.s. apparently wants more restrictions on their movements. cnn's global affairs correspondent has a look at what
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could be done. >> reporter: under the agreement, the five detainees have been monitored by the qatari government one year and banned from traveling outside the country. now the state department is having separate negotiations with the governments of qatar and afghanistan about what happens next. u.s. officials say there are a few options in play. the u.s. prefers they stay in qatar where they have been monitored. the five have brought their families there, now total about 70 among them. the others could see them returning to afghanistan, being released or monitored by the afghan government. the qataris say they will not expand the restrictions on the five nor will they send them home to afghanistan if they don't want to leave qatar. so none of these are great options. these are five pretty high-ranking taliban officials. at least one has tried to communicate with taliban militants back home raising questions about whether the lives of afghans, americans and
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u.s. soldiers in afghanistan would be at risk. republican lawmakers were upset with the deal in the first place. now they're calling on the obama administration to make sure that the five are not set free. let's talk more about bowe bergdahl who was exchanged for the taliban five. he faces a military hearing july 8th in texas. he's been charged with one count of desertion with intent to avoid important or hazardous duty and one count of endangering the safety of a command or unit. this follows an extensive army investigation. he's now assigned to a desk job. bergdahl disappeared from his unit in afghanistan back on june 30th 2009. he spent nearly five years in captivity before he was freed in that trade deal. now, in saudi arabia a young man back in his homeland to be married. instead he is now being morningurned. the 22-year-old wichita state student gave up his life to save
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hundreds of others when you stopped a suicide bomber from entering a mosque filled with worshippers. he and three others were killed outside that mosque. isis has claimed responsibility for this attack. nick valencia is covering this for us. nick what is the latest now? >> reporter: according to his family it's a remarkable story of heroism. hundreds more could have died if not for this 22-year-old. the saudi arabia minister of interior released a statement saying security men suspected a car when it was headed to the car parking. when they approached the car, it exploded killing four people where one is believed to be the driver and spreading fire to a number of reports. the suicide bomber showed up dressed as a female which raised suspicions because women were told to stay home from friday prayers. another shia mosque in the region had also been targeted. this is the second attack isis has claimed responsibility for on a shia mosque.
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the 22-year-old was the victim -- one of the victims in this attack. the suicide bomber killed himself as well as three others. the young 22-year-old a student at wichita state university. >> and what do we know about him? >> he was always smiling, good character, good student. an engineering student at wichita state university. the local university has released a statement addressing the instance department on friday saying the wichita state university community is saddened by the tragic death of one of our students. our condolences go out to the family friends and colleagues in this time of loss. he was in saudi arabia expected to get married. that's what he was doing there. his family grieving not only over that but this young man had a bright future a bride-to-be and that cut short. >> thank you, appreciate it. u.s. central command wants americans to look at the big picture when it comes to the fight against isis. the agency continues to give an upbeat assessment in iraq despite the fall of ramadi and several suicide attacks this
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past week in baghdad. a centcom spokesman says isis at large appears to be on the defensive and losing territory. the spokesman cited successful air drops to iraqi units fighting isis in the very contested oil refinely city of baji. security forces are mobilizing to retake ramadi. hillary clinton and bernie sanders now have more competition. martin o'malley the former maryland governor and one-time baltimore mayor made it official this morning that he is running for president. o'malley took on clinton and wall street in his announcement in baltimore. >> recently the ceo of goldman sachs, let his employees know that he'd be just fine with either bush or clinton. i bet he would. well i've got news for the bullies of wall street. the presidency is not a crown to be passed back and forth by you
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between two royal families. it is a sacred trust to be earned from the american people an exercise on behalf of the people of these united states. >> hillary clinton tweeted her response to o'malley joining the field. she writes welcome to the race governor o'malley. looking forward to discussing strong families and communities. coming up he was too heartbeats away from the white house. today new details on dennis hastert's multimillion dollar secret.
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to create a more advanced vehicle, you use the most innovative technology available. to craft a more luxurious vehicle, you use the most skilled hands on earth. like ones that spend 38 days creating a lexus ls steering wheel. or 2,000 hours calibrating an available mark levinson audio system. the high-tech, handcrafted lexus ls. luxury, uncompromised. this is the pursuit of perfection. in 1997 i had a brawn tumor and that knocked out about 85% of hearing in my left ear.
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i got a hearing aid that opened up sound to that side. over the years i've lost hearing in my right ear. >> tell me what it was like when you first got the technology that connected your hearing aid to your phone? >> it was amazing. it's night and day. to be able to answer the phone without taking the hearing aid out and putting the phone up to your ear. >> so were you counting down for the apple watch? >> i didn't realize what i heard about the apple watch everything you were going to be able to do on it. i thought an apple watch really you know kind of a cool toy. once i saw what i'm able to do with the hearing aids it's another great feature. to be able to use the music when i'm running and have that bluetoothed through the hearing aid, it's amazing. otherwise i would have to wear head sets. if i wore headsets i wouldn't have the hearing aid. i could hear music but won't hear traffic as well. >> there are four settings. what's the four different options. >> there's an all-around setting, i can adjust the bass and treble. there's a restaurant setting,
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there's a music setting and then there's an outdoor where it can -- i can actually block out some of the wind noise. >> one of the big concerns that a lot of people have about the watch is the battery. what happens if the battery on these die? >> the hearing aid still works. the hearing aid batteries are separate from the phone and the watch. >> can you adjust them then? >> i can still cycle through the programs. >> do you ever feel like you have too much technology between the hearing aid, the watch and the phone or are you just grateful that you have them? >> i'm so grateful. god has blessed me with so many different forms of technology. if it means i'm tied to these gadgets to improve the way that i'm hearing things, then so be it. a simmering washington scandal has the capital buzzing. the story centers on dennis hastert hastert, now under indictment
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about huge sums of crash that he withdrew to cover up sexual abuse with one of his former students. this dates back to his early years as a teacher and wrestling coach long before his political career started. so far he is not saying a word about this. isn't hastert eventually going to have to face reporters and say something? >> reporter: i would think it's likely. as you know he still hasn't said anything yet. his lawyers also haven't said a word yet so they will face all these questions that are unanswered. according to sources, hastert was paying a former male student to keep quiet about allegations of sexual abuse. that was from the time that he was a teacher and a wrestling coach in illinois before he came to washington and got involved in politics. he was indicted thursday by the department of justice for lying to the fbi for about $3.5 million he agreed to pay to this undisclosed person but he only
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ended up paying about $1.7 million before this indictment came through. here in washington hastert is well known for being squeaky clean, so there's been a lot of response a lot of shock in response to this. here's the white house press secretary. >> i think i can speak pretty faithfully for everybody here at the white house that even though speaker hastert served as the speaker of the house in the other party, that there's nobody here who takes -- who derives any pleasure from reading about the former speaker's legal troubles at this point. >> and a friend of hastert who has been a friend of his since the 1970s, he told cnn that he spoke with hastert on friday as these indictments -- this indictment was coming through and he says quote, he perceives himself as the one being wronged, but this friend would not comment about these allegations. >> sunlan what is your understanding of why hastert has not been arrested?
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>> reporter: that's right. according to the department of justice they say he wasn't arrested because, one, he was not a flight risk and they didn't believe he was a danger in any way to the community. you know hastert, former speaker of the house, he's a well-known national figure so they believe that -- they had no reason to believe that he would flee. we do know he will appear in front of a federal judge at some point soon but no date has been set. >> all right, thank you very much. still ahead, residents in texas are still on edge after a week of flooding there. dan simon is live near houston with the story. >> reporter: well high randi, texas may have turned a corner with the devastating floods. the water levels are receding. the question is how much rain may be on the way. we'll have that coming up. w recipe. e it's cats who know best what cats like to eat. up today, new friskies 7. we're trying seven cat-favorite flavors all in one dish. now for the moment of truth.
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yep, looks like it's time to share what our cats love with your cats. new friskies 7. for cats. by cats.
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female announcer: sleep train challenged its manufacturers to offer even lower prices. but the mattress price wars ends sunday. now it's posturepedic vs. beautyrest with big savings of up to $400 off. serta icomfort and tempur-pedic go head-to-head with three years interest-free financing. plus, free same day delivery set-up and removal of your old set. when brands compete, you save! mattress price wars ends sunday at sleep train. ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ federal aid will now be on its way to texas, which has been hammered by severe weather. the white house made that announcement late yesterday. at least 22 people in texas died this week from either tornados or flooding. the same storms have claimed lives in oklahoma and northern mexico. our dan simon is in highlands,
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texas, which was hit pretty hard again yesterday. dan, are we expecting more rain in those flood areas now? >> reporter: well that's the real question randi, but i have to tell you the sun is actually making an appearance today. i can tell you in the time that we've been here in highland texas, the water has receded by about a foot and that's telling the larger story as things have stayed dry really over the past 24 hours. so there is rain expected in the forecast. the question is how much. we've seen estimates anywhere from 1 to 5 inches. 1 or 2 inches they can handle. if you get 5 inches then some of those areas that are still saturated, there's where you can see problems. there are two problem areas that authorities are keeping an eye on. one in the town of wharton, texas, and rosenberg, just a short distance away from houston as well. some of those communities are under mandatory evacuation orders. we understand that about 35
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homes in the rosenberg area for instance still under that evacuation order. really it's more of a precautionary thing because, again, it's really going to come down to what mother nature does. >> is there anything they can do to short of move that water along? how are folks getting around there? >> there's really nothing you can do. it's just going to take time. according to our weather folks, it's really going to be thursday until the water levels go down completely in terms of when it's actually normal when cars can go down streets like this where there's no water. it's just something that takes time. of course not having rain is going to help. >> certainly so. dan simon, appreciate it. thank you. up next a very emotional reunion. we'll take you to south america where a mother and son meet for the first time in 41 years.
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with xfinity from comcast you can manage your account anytime, anywhere on any device. just sign into my account to pay bills manage service appointments and find answers to your questions. you can even check your connection status on your phone. now it's easier than ever to manage your account. get started at xfinity.com/myaccount checking top stories now, a u.s. citizen who had been sentenced to life in an egyptian prison will soon be reunited with his family in the u.s. the u.s. embassy confirms that
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he has left egypt. he had been jailed since 2013 for his role in demonstrations in support of ousted former president mohamed morsi. sultan had been on a hunger strike for at least 14 months. the democratic field for president just got larger. martin o'malley the former maryland governor and one-time baltimore mayor made it official this morning. >> that is why today, to you and to all who can hear my voice, i declare that i am a candidate for president of the united states and i am running for you. >> o'malley did talk about the recent protests in baltimore and a small group of protesters tried to interrupt his speech. the pentagon is now confirming the u.s. army sent a suspected shipment of anthrax to australia. the pentagon says live samples of the potentially dangerous pathogen are believed to have been shipped back in 2008 or 2009. a total of 24 laboratories in 11 states and two foreign countries are now believed to have
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received suspect samples. the defense department is conducting a thorough review of its anthrax protocols. the cdc is also investigating, but officials say they do not suspect any risk to the public. the fbi is facing what it calls an extraordinarily difficult challenge, keeping up with possible terror suspects in the u.s. the agency is asking for help from local police departments. the nypd wants to add 450 officers to the counterterrorism unit partly to counter the threat from isis sympathizers. for many adults who were adopted as babies finding their biological parents can sometimes be challenging, but the search for one man's roots took an almost unbelievable turn when he discovered that he was stolen as a newborn in south america. rafael romo was there when mother and son met for the very first time. >> reporter: a hug kept on hold for more than 41 years.
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this mother and son are seeing each other for the first time. he has tears of joy. >> how do you feel? >> i don't know. it's crazy. i never thought this would happen. >> reporter: she can barely talk. i'm going to hug him every day, she says. i love him so much. travis tolliver says he always knew he was adopted. what the 41-year-old didn't know he says was that he was stolen as a baby in his native chile chile. only hours after he was born in the south american country. >> i was wanted. i wasn't given up willingly, like i thought for all these years. so that makes my heart feel wonderful. >> reporter: nellie reyes says she had a normal pregnancy with no medical issues. the 61-year-old said she gave birth to a healthy baby boy on november 15th 1973. but her joy quickly turned to
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sadness when she was later told the baby was born with a heart condition and wasn't likely to survive. hours later they told me he had died she says but was never shown a body and was never given a death certificate. travis tolliver says he tried to find his biological parents when he was in his 20s but didn't have the resources or the connections to make it happen. it was not until last year that he determined he needed to find the truth about his past not only for himself but also for his two children. tolliver says his american adoptive parents never knew he had been stolen. they were told he was an abandoned baby. since reuniting with his biological mother tolliver has been busy meeting four brothers and one sister and seeing the sights of the country. >> now i'm back here in my homeland i guess. >> why was it important for you to meet the person who gave you birth? >> to become whole.
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i've always felt incomplete always kind of the outsider. >> reporter: his biological mother has been cooking for him daily, but more than anything she's been giving her son the hugs and kisses that she was unable to give him as a baby all those years ago. >> rafael romo reporting for us. what an incredible story. thanks for spending part of your saturday with us. "vital signs" with dr. sanjay gupta begins right now. have a great day, everyone.
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ever known about disease, muscle and bone health and eyesight. a lab with the unique environment that affects the human body in ways we've never seen before. in fact there's no place like it in the entire world. that's because this lab doesn't exist on earth. this is "vital signs." i'm dr. sanjay gupta. the lab we're talking about is the international space station. when we say this is a mobile lab, we really mean it. the iss is orbiting around the earth at a speed of 32,000 kilometers an hour. that's more than 30 times faster than a commercial jet. with near zero gravity conditions special diet and modified exercise it's the perfect place for experimenting on the human body. space was once called the final frontier and now for medicine, it's a new beginning.

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