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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  July 2, 2015 12:00am-1:01am PDT

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www.vitac.com -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com the back and forth over greece's financial future. the remains of britons killed in a tunisia attack arrive home. and in vienna officials are trying to hammer out a nuclear deal with iran. and heart-break for anyone a gut-wrenching finish to the women's world cup semifinals. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. you're watching "cnn newsroom."
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i'm natalie allen. it's now 10:00 a.m. in greece where pensioners have been lining up again today outside banks hoping to get their hands on some money. there's a great deal of confusion and uncertainty about what is going to happen over the next few days. the government has implemented strict withdrawal limits to try to stop the banks from running out of money, bringing the financial sector to a grinding halt. prime minister alexis tsipras is urging people to vote no on sunday's referendum on whether to move forward with the terms of a european bailout plan. that is a 180 degree change from earlier tuesday when he told creditors greece would agree to nearly all of their bailout conditions. the greek finance minister says he hopes a new deal will happen by monday. >> translator: we are prepared to accept even strict measures
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as long as the framework in which they are contained is sustainable as far as growth. so greece can grow and grexit disappears so we are not in the same situation in a few months. >> vote no vote yes, exactly what are they voting for? cnn's isa soares is following us developments in athens. i hope you can keep up. i can't here in athens. >> reporter: good morning to you. a lot of people are confused as to what they will be voting for. alexis tsipras calling for people to vote no. many expecting to get rid of the referendum given the fact he will accept the creditors demands similar to what was on the table last week anyhow but now his argument he believes by voting no he can have a stronger hand when it comes to negotiations.
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but still, there's no -- not any clear in terms of greeks here in terms of what they are voting for. many are taking it as are we voting to stay in the euro or out of it or for the drachma. let me give you a taste of what the newspapers are saying this morning. this one shows, terror machine, pushing to vote yes and it shows euro group christine lagarde and the members of the troikas. that is pushing to vote yes and another one that -- it is windy. bear with me here. another newspaper, this is the main newspaper, it says playing games with creditors and euros. that's how many people are seeing it here. it's been a roller coaster day. let's take a look back at how we got here. not budging.
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and still pushing for a no. the greek prime minister is standing defiant, addressing a nation in crisis alexis tsipras sought to dispel rumors he was backing down to pressure from international creditors, announcing the referendum will go ahead as planned on sunday he urged people to vote against the euro group's austerity measures. >> translator: on the other side no is a decisive move for the better agreement. >> reporter: tsipras' show of defiance comes 24 hours after he wrote a letter of concession to the euro group where he agreed to almost all of the conditions for a bailout with a few exceptions. but tuesday's deadline for a deal came and went. and its current bailout program abruptly ended. german chancellor angela merkel
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dismissed the last-minute proposals saying that they needed to wait for the referendum. >> translator: before the referendum no further talks can take place. >> reporter: speaking wednesday, tsipras stressed a no vote would not mean greece leaving europe. >> translator: some insist that a vote of no is that we try to get the country out of the euro. those are the ones who are lying. >> reporter: alexis tsipras is once again trying to calm nerves telling the greek people that the crisis is temporary and urging them to vote no but people are confused exactly what they are voting for come sunday. this person says i don't understand the question of the referendum. there is no meaning to it. there is no proposal to agree or disagree with he says. >> to vote no we know we are not going to continue the same
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way. >> reporter: the existing bailout program expired and no proposals for a new one on the table it's unclear what sunday's referendum question will be. as greek banks remain closed and pensioners take to the streets in protest, tsipras insists he wants to stay in the euro club but play by his own rules. and natalie, the latest polls puts 47 saying yes, 43 saying no. that is the latest poll conducted here. >> pretty close. thank you so much. we appreciate it. isa soares for us in athens. now let's take a look at how the world financial markets reacting to the latest news from degrees. nina dos santos is there for us. >> the mixed messages that the heads of the euro group meeting of finance ministers got and was
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swiftly rebuffed the greek proposals yesterday have the market struggling for direction. the one figure we are waiting for on our chart is the ibex in spain. that is yesterday's figure. it shows how much optimism there was on european markets that alexis tsipras may well have capitulated to a number of the demands but he saw him on television at closing time for some of these markets and that's was when he started to make it obvious that he was despite the fact that he made a u-turn campaigning for a no gotze austerity in the referendum. the arrows are green and this is crucial. and if you look at the latest set of polls there is a marginal swing toward 47% of the greek people who have been asked saying they would vote yes in favor of austerity. but a lot of economists have
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said this morning that that doesn't necessarily mean that a grexit won't happen. even if we do see, for instance the voting yes in the referendum and then a new government coming in it's by no means certain that the greek crisis will be over but it's the markets holding on to dying embers of optimism at this point but it will get more tense over the course of the weekend. we now know that the euro group shut down the negotiations and said we will not discuss this until your vote. and then we'll get back to the bargaining table. >> we appreciate you sorting out the diagnose embers of optimism. that is well said. nina dos santos in london this morning. tunisian authorities investigating whether the gunman who opened fire on tourists in the
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meantime the bodies of the british victims are returning home. here's cnn's max foster from england. on this plane, eight coffins. there will be at least 21 more to follow. a grim moment of reality for the families and the country. the number of confirmed british victims of this beach massacre is still climbing. it was an attack on this country on foreign soil. military honors then for evidence holiday makers and the highest level of investigation. >> this is looking as i said previously at everything from the protective security in hotels and resorts all the way through to intelligence cooperation at the highest levels between britain and tunisia. >> reporter: there will be a joint inquest in london into all
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the british deaths starting with these eight. joel richards his uncle and his father three generations of one family, gone. carly lovet a beauty blogger. a social worker on holiday with his wife and son. dennis and elaine, a married couple. so hard has the country been hit a national commemoration service is being organized to remember those innocent lives cut short. max foster, cnn, england. investigators in taiwan have released their findings in february's crash of transasia flight 235.
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there was complete confusion after one of the plane's engines lost power then the pilot shut off the only working engine by mistake. the transcript indicate the crew discovered the error far too late to get the engine working again. 48 people died in that crash, 15 survived. after the horror at the tunisians beach resort stories of courage are emerging. you'll hear from a person who chased the gunman as we continue. and the head of a nuclear watchdog group is in tehran to meet with iran's president. we'll have the details coming up for you. and heart break on the pitch at the women's world cup semifinal after an england defender scores an own goal.
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every day people fall, from a simple misstep, to tripping over a rug, to just losing their balance. and not being able to get up from a fall can have serious lifetime consequences. being prepared is important. philips lifeline with autoalert is more than just a medical alert button. it's an advanced fall-detection system, designed to get you help quickly. if you fall and you're unable to push your button, the fall detection technology within autoalert can trigger the button to automatically place a call for help. philip's lifeline has saved more lives than any other medical alert service. this is philips lifeline we received a fall detected signal. do you need help?
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call now about philips lifeline with autoalert, the only button with philips advanced fall-detection technology. we'll send you this free brochure with information about the importance of getting help quickly should you happen to fall. when i fell, i couldn't press the button. i blacked out, and so having lifeline with auto alert really saved me. if they don't push the button, they're not able to push the button, it takes over and gets them the help they need. multiple sensors inside autoalert can recognize the differences between your everyday movements and a fall. so if a fall does happen and you're unable to push your button, autoalert can detect it and automatically place a call for help. in a fall or medical emergency, every second counts. with lifeline you're connected 24 hours a day 365 days a year, so you have quick access to help when you need it most. over 7 million people have benefitted from the lifeline service. no wonder it has been recommended by over 200,000 health care professionals nationwide. a personal emergency could happen at any time.
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be prepared. make sure you have auto alert. if you or someone you love would like information about philips lifeline with autoalert call now and we'll send you this free brochure and ask about free activation when you order. call this number. call now.
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welcome back. we have breaking news out of switzerland, reuters news agency is reporting on an american request for switzerland to extradite seven fifa officials
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wanted with the corruption scandal. the swiss officials says they will allow them a hearing and a chance to respond. swiss officials will take several weeks to make a final rule on the u.s. request. japan heads to the women's world cup final on sunday after a shocking and heart-breaking defeat for england on wednesday's semifinal. the 2-1 victory came with the england defender accidentally launching the ball into her own team's net. kate riley has more from edmonton, canada. >> reporter: no one but no one expected either of these sides to lose in the manner in which england did. fans here at the stadium were silenced and supporters in england were stunned. >> it was a horrible moment obviously for laura. she is hurting now. but tomorrow morning she will wake up and have 22 teammates
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and the staff give her a hug, tell her how proud we are of her. >> devastated. but we are immensely proud of everyone in this squad. it's a team game it's not about picking out individuals. we'll get around fast. it's up to us to pick up laura and the group. >> it will sink in soon what they achieved and how proud everyone is of their teammates and what they've done to put women's football and our country in a place they have never been before. >> england face germany next. the prize, third place at this tournament. preparations are ongoing in vancouver. japan and the usa face each other in the final. it's a rematch of the 2011 final. japan won it and the usa will be going for their third world cup crown. kate riley at the women's world
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cup in edmonton. we'll all keep thinking of laura. hope she is doing all right. the united states and cuba have exchanged letters to end their 54-year diplomatic rupture. cuba's embassy in washington is expected to reopen on july 20th. john kerry will travel to havana this summer to formally open the american embassy. >> i will travel to cuba to take part in the opening of the united states embassy in that value that. this will mark the resumption of embassy operations after a period of 54 years. it will also be the first visit by a secretary of state to cuba since 1945. >> but critics of the new agreement say the u.s. should not support a country that gives
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such little political and economic freedom to its people. the head of a nuclear watchdog group is in tehran to meet with the iranian president as negotiations continue over the future of iran's nuclear program. cnn's senior international correspondent nic robertson joins me from vienna where the talks are in overtime. they were tight lipped about any issues yesterday. i would say sum that isassume is it the same today? >> reporter: we are expecting philip hammond to be here today. john kerry met with the foreign minister yet. the french foreign minister will be here today. and the eu foreign policy chief for the european union. so this is still ongoing talks. but very few details have being
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released. perhaps it is significant today that the head of the iaea is in tehran having talks. it will be the iaea that has to enforce any agreement and inspect any agreement that is made with iran. he is in tehran having technical discussions with senior level officials there. perhaps one of those will include a discussion about military dimension which is something that iran has not ever explained and opened up to the iaea in the past. and of course this is a big issue for state department officials in these negotiations. if iran is going to make a good deal it's going to open up about possible military dimensions which is the sort of official language and terminology for has iran put any nuclear technology to use trying to make weapons and that is the central question here. so potentially the head of the
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iaea mae get more insights in that tehran. >> we'll wait to hear from you again nic robertson. a ferry has capsized off a port in the philippines. the boat was heading to sebu with 173 passengers on board. that is all the information we have as we are just learning about this story. as we hear more we will bring it to you. now to the u.s. where authorities want to know if airlines are unlawfully keeping ticket prices high. several carriers were served subpoenas on tuesday. investigators are look into whether airlines colluded to limit the number of passenger seats. at least three airlines are cooperating. united and american airlines say
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they have received subpoenas. british prime minister david cameron says the world has lost a great man. he is talking about sir nicholas winton. he died wednesday at the age of 106. he saved hundreds of children most of them jewish from the holocaust. winton began to organize the evacuation of the children to the uk in 1939. he saved 669 of them. but six million other jews did not survive and for hundreds of throws of those deaths a former nazi is standing trial. jonathan mann has more on this. >> reporter: another plea for forgiveness for the man dubbed the accountant of auschwitz. now old and frail, a former ss guard made a statement through
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his attorney saying of his alleged crimes i can only ask god for forgiveness. >> translator: for him the scale of the crimes in auschwitz were such that he did not ask the relatives to think about forgiveness. >> reporter: he is charged as an accessory to murder in the deaths of 300,000 jews at the world war ii death catch. he says his main job was to collect and sort the money taken from prisoners. he admits he shares moral guilt but claims he never killed anyone. dozens of survivors have attended the trial. many are joint plaintiffs or witnesses in the case. this is one of them. she told the court on wednesday how she lost most of her family in the death camp and she says she cannot forgive the former nazi guard. >> this was not meaningful to me in terms of hearing from him of
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making some real confessions. and real you know feeling that he is sorry. >> reporter: he already apologized early in the trial but it's unclear what that will have on a verdict in the case. he faces up to 15 years in jail if convicted. jonathan mann, cnn. losing patience with greece. one year pianoeuropean leader says that the greeks need to start acting like adults. some of those living in north korea defend their country to cnn. we'll have that.
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hello and welcome back to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world. this is "cnn newsroom." i'm natalie allen. let's check the headlines for you. greek pensioners are lining up outside banks hoping to get hands on their money. there is confusion and uncertainty ahead on sunday's referendum on the country's financial future. prime minister alexis tsipras urging voters to reject a european bailout deal. the u.s. is asking switzerland to hand over seven fifa officials wanted in connection with a $100 million corruption scandal. the swiss officials will give the fifa officials a hearing before handing them over. investigators in taiwan released their findings in this
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crash back in february of transasia flight 235. they say the plane's pilot shut off the only working engine after the other one lost power. that was an accident by the pilot. 43 people were killed in that crash, that harrowing video always is hard to watch. and a boat carrying 173 passengers capsized in the philippines. local media are reporting the boat was heading to sebu. there is no word on casualties. we'll bring you any more information as we get it. european leaders are clearly losing patience with greece over the doubt crisis. donald tusk says it wants to help greece but can't help anyone against its own will. and imf chief christine lagarde
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says that a bit more adulthood is needed. >> once a country is in arrears with the fund it cannot receive funding. so the imf cannot finance greece for as long as it is in arrears, vis-a-vis the fund. so we will continue a dialogue. i think it's important. i think it matters that we stay engaged. i'm particularly concerned about the development of the situation. i care. i am concerned about the people who are taking the suffering of this whole situation. so we will stay engaged. this is the mission of the fund. >> christine lagarde there, carefully choosing her words. let's bring in our emerging markets editor, john defterios from abu dhabi. we did hear her say we want more
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adulthood. are the creditors growing tired of alexis tsipras? >> there are three creditors that have been there for six years, the imf, the european central bank and the european union. and they have grown tired of the flip-flops. this has been going on since alexis tsipras came to power in january of 2015. no one can move if you don't know where the government wants to do. imf cannot help out if they owe them $1.7 billion. the european union says the political context is not right for us to move forward. that was the head of the euro group last night. the european central bank decided not to raise the liquidity fund. they are providing money but not raising it. alexis tsipras made a u-turn saying we will go along with most of the austerity measures. that came very late. asking for another $32 billion,
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basically, a third bailout. but at the same time asking for patience from the pensioners. he wakes up and watches the pensioners trying to get their payments. they are suffering badly. they are seeing their payments cut 30% in the last three years alone. and he is saying you won't lose your money. let's take a listen. >> translator: i would like to assure you, this situation won't carry on too long. and you won't lose your wages and your pensions. your savings won't go away. personally and i take on full responsibility for an instant solution after the referendum. >> so he's saying come monday morning i'll start working with the lenders. but the lenders are saying something different. candidly it's difficult for him to make a pledge saying you won't suffer more austerity. right now the lenders are saying there's no easy way out if you
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keep turning down the proposals and asking for a no vote at the same time. >> absolutely. it will be interesting to see if more start losing faith in his bulldog tactics. unless he stays solid on something this effort to wait for the referendum john is coming from europe's biggest economy, that's germany. chancellor angela merkel says nothing will happen until after the vote on sunday. >> she has been leading the chorus insisting we wait. the european creditors and germany feel blind sided. they put an offer on the table. and let's put it to the greek people on more austerity and whether we would like to stay in the euro. she made her comments before the german parliament before they went on their summer recess. and at the same time she said
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europe has never been as strong or united as ever. that would raise eyebrows in greece. the greeks have watched every comment coming out of greece because of the austerity situation. this may embolden the no vote. and this is the reason why. let's look at the unemployment rate in greece and southern europe. this is where austerity has not worked. the bottom half of europe. unemployment in greece 25%. the german unemployment rate is below 5%. spain at 22%. en and italy at 12%. what does this mean austerity for the last five years? the average family in greece has seen their per capita income go down $10,000 a year. it's incredible the pain. this is why we are in a difficult position today. europe doesn't want to ease the austerity but they want them to
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stay in the euro. that's why we have the referendum taking place on sunday. it may mean the future of alexis tsipras. it may be a vote against him or for him. >> and speaking of the unemployment level. we have seen a greek exit so many people leaving the country to find a way to get their lives back on track. john defterios, as always, we thank you. north korea is fighting back against years of criticism over its human rights record. de defectors have told horror stories about prison camps. but a cnn crew in pyongyang, the capital, was introduced to a group of citizens who say it's not true. the interview, like most everything else in that country was tightly controlled. our will ripley reports now from north korea. >> the north koreans want to tell their story of the human
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rights story but reporting here continues to be tightly controlled. in a flashback to our visit in may we were led through our hotel lobby to this room not knowing who would be rating. >> reporter: we find them waiting patiently in a hotel conference room. eight north koreans. each asked to be here. each asked to defend their country and supreme leader kim jong-un. this defector says they were treated like state-sponsored slaves working grueling hours in the middle east with most or all of their compensation going back to the north korean government. he knows nothing about the reality on the ground says this former colleague. he stayed in kuwait just a few months. he was a bad worker. he was lazy says this man, claims the defector denies.
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these men say they are happy to work overseas hit hard by sanctions over its military and nuclear programs which remain heavily funded. government income comes from state owned restaurants like this one in cambodia. now closed. i met her parents. they say it was the south korean government that kidnapped their daughter. north korea tells its citizens many defectors are actually abduction victims taken by the enemy, forced to betray their homeland. in this case the claim is backed up by a manager and former waitress who escaped a similar kidnapping attempt. i know she is eagerly waiting to turn home. i curse the agents who kidnapped my daughter. cnn can't verify the claims.
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but her parents' anguish is undeniable sitting in a north korean conference room making a desperate plea for their daughter to come home. we asked to venture outside the hotel to go to her family's home but we were told that would be impossible. but no question was offlimits during the interview, a sign that things may be opening up. will ripley cnn, north korea. while north korea denies human rights abuses there is evidence to the contrary. a report by the korea institution for unification alleges that north korea publicly executed nearly 1400 people between 2008 and 2014. the report is based on a survey of defectors and just last year a u.n. human rights investigation found systematic widespread and gross human
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rights violations have been and are being committed by the democratic people's republic of korea, it's institutions and officials. in many instances the violations of human rights found by the commission constitute crimes against humanity. that report sparked outrage around the world. here's what u.s. secretary of state john kerry had to say? september. >> what goes on inside north korea, systematic represcription, collective punishment arbitrary execution, penal colonies prison camps. they should have no place in the 21st century. coming up he captured the images of a harrowing day, the man who risked his life to face the gunman in the tunisian
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attack. we'll show you next.
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we have some compelling video to show you about that terror attack in tunisia. a man who chased the gunman recorded haunting images of the attack. he also captured the moment the killer was shot. cnn's nick paton walsh has his story. >> reporter: this cell phone video gave the world an almost too vivid window into the sheer horror of the tunisia beach massacre but also of the bravery of the tunisians here who tried to fight the twisted gunman seif rezgui. and this is the man who filmed it. he tells us why he ran headlong
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against the gunman. >> translator: a lot of people came. he was hiding in the garden and we were saying we can go inside and kill him. i felt so sad. we loved those people. we always talked with them. and also i felt angry. anger is what made me follow this guy, not just to film but i was all the time thinking of defending the people. >> reporter: he got so close, meters away seeing a man walk calmly with no fear. i saw him when he was coming out of the side of the restaurant. he stopped, put the kalashnikov between his legs and put something in his bag maybe a bomb. >> reporter: these pictures were not the limit of the courage. he picks up a bottle of oil
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thinking others would rush in if he attacked rezgui with him. >> reporter: i came so close to him and did not sacrifice myself or volunteer to attack him. i felt so sorry for the people and so many tourists dead. i can't forget the noise of the guns and the bodies on the beach. >> reporter: he joined the chase for the gunman. [ speaking foreign language ]. >> reporter: here he films the flurry of bullets fired fearful there were more gunman or that rezgui was wearing that bomb.
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[ gunshots ]. >> reporter: were it not for these pictures and the courage and love of strangers that led one ordinary tunisians to film them there could have been many more dead indeed. nick paton walsh, cnn, tunisia. >> i agree the sounds of that kalashnikov mowing down innocent people on vacation. a saudi prince is donating his 30 third and-- $32 billion fortune to charity. forbes ranks him the 34th richest person in the world. the prince says his fortune will go to chairties to help improve health care education, disaster
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relief and women's rights and to alleviate poverty. let's hear it for him. officials in europe are issuing warnings about an oppressive heat wave. we'll have that story ahead on "cnn newsroom."
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every day people fall, from a simple misstep, to tripping over a rug, to just losing their balance. and not being able to get up from a fall can have serious lifetime consequences. being prepared is important. philips lifeline with autoalert is more than
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just a medical alert button. it's an advanced fall-detection system, designed to get you help quickly. if you fall and you're unable to push your button, the fall detection technology within autoalert can trigger the button to automatically place a call for help. philip's lifeline has saved more lives than any other medical alert service. this is philips lifeline we received a fall detected signal. do you need help? call now about philips lifeline with autoalert, the only button with philips advanced fall-detection technology. we'll send you this free brochure with information about the importance of getting help quickly should you happen to fall. when i fell, i couldn't press the button. i blacked out, and so having lifeline with auto alert really saved me. if they don't push the button, they're not able to push the button, it takes over and gets them the help they need. multiple sensors inside autoalert can recognize the differences between your everyday movements and a fall. so if a fall does happen and you're unable to push your button, autoalert can detect it and automatically place a call for help.
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in a fall or medical emergency, every second counts. with lifeline you're connected 24 hours a day 365 days a year, so you have quick access to help when you need it most. over 7 million people have benefitted from the lifeline service. no wonder it has been recommended by over 200,000 health care professionals nationwide. a personal emergency could happen at any time. be prepared. make sure you have auto alert. if you or someone you love would like information about philips lifeline with autoalert call now and we'll send you this free brochure and ask about free activation when you order. call this number. call now.
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all right, parts of europe are scorching through the record books, even the mountains and sea are not providing much relief. pedram javaheri is following this story for us. you were saying a ball boy at wimbledon fainted. that tells you how bad it is. but we have been talking about this in many pockets. >> for parts of the uk to get their hottest day in july ever on the first of july tells you how serious it is. usually the hotter temperatures are at the end of the month. this is unusual in that sense. and you think about it 35 36 celsius is about 100 degrees. but it's the aclimatetizing to it is one thing. >> this is not arizona.
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>> no this is in the uk. you look at the story and showing you what occurred here in recent days. it's happening again, this time a searing heat wave in western europe. the record-breaking temperatures in britain and spain with european countries having issued warnings as the mercury hits 40 degrees celsius. that is 104 degrees fahrenheit. >> we have been saying for two months that this summer in germany will be warmer than the last 30 years. >> reporter: people are look for ways to cool off. water activities among the most popular not only for residents but tour "i"s as well. in germany surfers riding waves of the river along with swimmers and sun bathers. >> for me it can't be hot enough. i find this pleasant. summer has to feel like summer. up until now it has been miserable. >> i'm happy about the beautiful
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weather. i find it fantastic that summer has finally arrived. if it rains it's bad, if it's nice it's also bad i want to enjoy the nice weather. >> reporter: in france where 15 people died years ago many people apparently heeding the warnings to stay inside and keep hydrated. the elderly and young children most at risk. >> i give him a lot of water and liquid like yogurts and lots of water. >> reporter: relief from the sweltering heat is expected in northwestern europe but in central europe temperatures well above average for another several days. >> toasty starting off the morning in the uk this morning. but look at the observations at heathrow at 36.7 celsius.
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the hottest was in 2003 during that heat wave. paris, the hottest temperature since july of 1947. they kept records since the 1870s and second hottest all time. all occurring on wednesday afternoon. the colors show you the temperatures. in the uk it cools off into the green and warms up for saturday. it's a long-term effect. and some people in the world can take this heat. but your body your physiological conditions change dramatically. if you are used to this you sweat more and in parts of the uk that is not the case. >> we appreciate it. thank you. we want to continue to follow a breaking news story of a capsized ferry in the philippines. cnn's affiliate there say it overturned off a port in l.
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eyte. it was headed to sebu with 73 on board. the coast guard is conducting rescue operations at this moment. there is no confirmation of fatalities. a red cross official has said that at least 34 people died in this incident. we'll continue to bring you the latest as we get it. thank you for watching "cnn newsroom." i'm natalie allen "early start" is next for viewers in the u.s. and "cnn newsroom" continues for the rest of the world after the break.
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:. .
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big changes coming to the new york prison where two killers broke free. the captured convict sharing new details of his escape and how involved a prison seam stress was involved. and new fallout from donald trump. it is costing him business now. he did an interview with cnn overnight. you have to hear this. and boosting security concerns over fourth of july terror threats. good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm christine romans. >> i'm john berman. 4:00 a.m. in the east. >> a rescue operation in the philippines where a ferry has just capsized. coast guard officials tell cnn that this boast was

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