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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  August 5, 2015 10:00pm-1:01am PDT

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god will save madagascar. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com malaysia says this debris is from the missing flight mh370. but now hear why even more testing will be done on the wing piece. a hatchet and pepper spray. new details on the bizarre attack inside a movie theater in tennessee. and countdown to the big debate. how republican presidential candidates are getting ready for their showdown with donald trump. want to welcome our viewers here in the u.s. and those of you tuned in from all around the world. so glad you could join me. i'm errol barnett and this is "cnn newsroom."
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now, we begin this hour with mixed conclusions surrounding a piece of airplane debris found on reunion island. malaysia's prime minister confirms the part of a wing known as a flaperon is from missing flight mh370. that was sent to france for testing. but a french investigator is much more cautious suggesting the piece is very likely from mh370. he says further analysis will start thursday to prove it conclusively. more now on this developing story from cnn's rene marsh. >> the aircraft debris found on reunion island is indeed from mh370. >> reporter: malaysia's prime minister for the first time uttered words families of the 239 people on board mh370 have waited 515 days to hear. >> we now have physical evidence that as i announced on 24th
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march last year flight mh370 tragically ended in the southern indian ocean. >> reporter: but the french prosecutor working on behalf of families of four french citizens was not ready to say for certain the piece of the wing called the flaperon found on reunion island belonged to mh370. >> translator: there is a very strong supposition that the flaperon actually does belong to the boeing 777 of mh370. >> reporter: there's more investigators hope to learn from the flaperon. we went to an aviation forensics lab in maryland to find out. >> structural member here is -- >> reporter: joe reynolds worked on high-profile aviation crash investigations like valujet and air france 447. >> very helpful for us to know whether things came apart because of a lot of force, impact, or whether they broke up
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because of fatigue in the air. >> reporter: that analysis is not done with the naked eye but heavy-duty microscopes. >> it has a rotating capability to scan the object which we're doing right now. >> reporter: the pattern in this 3-d image will tell a story. >> every time it bends and breaks it forms a little tiny mark and that way they can see whether it was an instantaneous break or something that happened over time. >> reporter: now that investigators may have a piece of the mh370 mystery, they are tasked with answering not only where but how the jetliner went down. it's worth noting boeing put out a statement which made no mention that its representative on the ground has confirmed without a doubt that this is a piece of mh370. now, most will agree this is probably a piece of the missing plane. but the problem is the experts looking at the piece say they don't have that definitive proof
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just yet. we know that tests will continue thursday. rene marsh, cnn, washington. our cnn aviation analyst mary schiavo joins us now from charleston via webcam to talk about this. mary thanks for your time. a short while back deputy prime minister warren truss of australia mentioned a series of letters and numbers that were seen visible on this flaperon. how much potential information will investigators found once they pull all of it apart? >> well it depends how many of the serial and part numbers survived. now, they had a part number on the end of it which identified it as a flaperon for a 777. however, there are part numbers unique to every part manufactured and part of the regulatory plan in the united states where the plane was assembled is that each part is unique so you can track it. so this part would be unique to this aircraft and this aircraft's part numbers would be unique to the one that belonged to malaysia 370. >> and that though only gets
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us so far. the aflap number itself won't tell us why the plane went down or necessarily how but it might shed some light as to what condition this part of the plane was in at the moment of impact and that is key, right? >> that is. they do a lot of different kinds of tests depending on what evidence is available. i mean, this piece of the plane, this flaperon will have sonar analysis cat scans, thermal analysis. there's something called a liquid infusion analysis where they will see if liquids can penetrate certain things. i mean this is going to be like major surgery. they will film it all. they will record it all. and hopefully also inside they might be able to find some additional part numbers. and if the part has had any repairs it will be recorded in the malaysia airlines maintenance books. >> and i imagine we would expect all of those tests to take a matter of weeks, maybe even months. >> oh yes, it will. even just analyzing the paint.
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and the paint can be unique to malaysia airlines as well. and so they will ienltz the paint that's on it. some of them you can do right away. for instance the electron microscope analysis and some of the ultrasound and magnetic resonance, magnetic imaging can be done right away. but other things take analysis. and it's all very important. and that is done in every crash where they're trying to determine the cause. except here of course they can only determine so much. how did it come down? how long has it been in the quarter? does it float? did it float to where it got to? and did it hang around in the water or has it been on the short for some time? >> is there any information that can be used now? there were barnacles and other biological evidence on the flaperon. the search zone remains massive. but might it help narrow the search for debris at all? >> well, it can if there's anything particularly unusual about the species. from the looks of it they look like something called goose
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barnacles. they're over 100 -- or over 1,000 species of barnacles. so unless these are particularly unusual they might not yield too much other than their indian ocean barnacles. but it miebtd interesting if they were all dead or alive on the flaperon because that might tell us how long it's been on the beach. also patterns on which they were on the flaperon any kind of water marks on the inside would tell us how it floated. for example, the chewed-up area what's called the trailing edge might have been because that was the bottom of the part that was in the water and scraped against the shoreline for who knows how long before it finally made it ashore. >> well at least we're one small step closer to answers. our senior aviation analyst mary schiavo, thanks for your time today from charleston. >> thank you. now, most of the 239 people on board mh370 were chinese citizens. cnn's david malko joins us from hong kong with reaction of some
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of the passengers' relatives. and david, we're really in a bit of an awkward moment for these relatives of the victims. you've got confirmation from the malaysian pm the flaperon is from mh370 but caution from french officials saying more testing must be done. what is this moment like for those emotionally exhausted relatives? >> errol, these families have been carrying an enormous burden for 550 days. for that time they have had nothing. this is the first time they have heard anything there's been anything definitive. and it's not even that. in the past week we've heard them say we want 100% proof this is from mh370, 99% isn't good enough. so it's not just feelings of sadness now but also confusion, frustration, anger, and despair. errol, it's a very difficult situation. some of the families yes, they were notified by malaysia airlines via e-mail a few minutes before the prime
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minister spoke that the announcement would be made, that the piece would be linked conclusively to mh370. but many said the words the prime minister chose were premature. >> translator: i am suspicious of malaysia airlines' words because in the past they have a track record of going back and forth in what they say of being true and not true. what i hope right now is for the chinese officials to give me a confirmed answer. >> translator: i don't believe it. i am furious. and i think this announcement is very irresponsible. >> in the last hour or so we have heard from the chinese foreign ministry. they posted a statement on their website saying they are deeply saddened by this announcement also saying "we require the malaysian side to earnestly fulfill their commitments, continuing to investigate the reasons behind the plane's disappearance and making full preparation for the aftermath settlement to effectively
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protect the legitimate rights of the families. errol, there's still a lot of mistrust wen those 239 families and specifically the malaysian authorities. this potentially could have been an opportunity to begin to work past that for whatever reason the announcement did not play out that way. the question families continue to ask is does this announcement get us any closer to finding the plane, the passengers and ultimately errol, the truth? >> it really is -- your heart goes out to all the relatives of the victims. david molko in hong kong with that new information there from the chinese foreign ministry. david, thanks. now to some other big stories we're following for you. in the u.s. state of tennessee authorities say a man who attacked moviegoers had a history of mental illness. he was also reported missing two days before the incident where police shot and killed him. cnn's mary maloney has the details of what was a terrifying situation. >> reporter: sounds of a
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firefight outside a tennessee movie theater. >> i just heard all the police coming out and it was very scary. >> reporter: police say a man wearing a surgical mask and armed with a hatchet, pepper spray, and an airsoft gun went to this movie theater and attacked. investigators say the man doused three people with pepper spray and sliced someone with a hatchet, causing a minor injury. police also say he had two backpacks, a fake bomb in one of them. police killed the man inside the movie theater. no one else was seriously hurt. >> because of the extraordinary work of these officers their bravery, their training the way they reacted, we have no major injuries to any civilian personnel. >> reporter: but a feeling of safety may be shattered. just last month in louisiana a man killed two people and wounded nine others before killing himself. and in 2012 james holmes killed 12 people and wounded 70 others in colorado becoming one of the worst mass shootings in american history. holmes is now waiting to hear
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whether he will be sentenced to life in prison or death for his crimes. back in tennessee there's a sense of relief that something so violent wasn't worse. >> the fact that no one else got injured other than the person who did this, i would ask everyone to pray for his family because he obviously has some mental problems or something else. >> reporter: i'm mary maloney reporting. a los angeles judge is ordering comedian bill cosby to give a sworn deposition over a sex abuse allegation against him. the plaintiff, who was 15 years old at the time of the alleged incidental, says cosby assaulted her at a party at the famed playboy mansion back in 1974. cosby will face questions under oath from the accuser's lawyer in october. she will then answer questions from his attorney the week after. 35 women have publicly accused cosby of drugging and assaulting them over the past four decades. court documents reveal he admitted to getting drugs to give women he wanted to have sex with.
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u.s. president barack obama has sharpened his rhetoric as he makes his case for an iran nuclear deal. the details on his message that some are linking to john f. kennedy is just ahead. and it's been 70 years since the u.s. dropped the first ever nuclear bomb on hiroshima. just ahead, the promise from the japanese prime minister. stay with cnn. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ hp instant ink can save you up to 50% on ink delivered to your door, so print all you want and never run out. plans start at $2.99 a month. right now, buy an eligible printer, and get three months of free ink with hp instant ink. available at participating retailers. the most affordable way to print. hp instant ink. shopping online... ...is as easy as it gets. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers carpenters and even piano tuners...
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looks good though, right? looks great. ladies love a man in a uniform. laughs... first step, credit karma. welcome back. u.s. president barack obama's making a passionate pitch for the iran nuclear deal. his speech wednesday at american university was meant to draw comparisons to john f. kennedy. but as jim acosta reports, the fate of the deal is in the hands of congress. >> the president of the united states. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: raising the stakes in the debate over his nuclear deal with iran president obama warned if congress rejects the agreement the u.s. will begin the march toward military conflict. >> the choice we face is ultimately between diplomacy or some form of war. >> in his toughest language to date on the iran war, the president likened his gop critics to the ruling clerics in tehran. >> it's those hardliners
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chanting "death to america" who've been most opposed to the deal. they're making common cause with the republican caucus. >> reporter: and he blasted skeptics who claim a better deal could be had. >> those making this argument are either ignorant of iranian society or they're just not being straight with the american people. >> reporter: a nuclear armed iran he added would be even more dangerous for israel dismissing complaints from its prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> i do not doubt his sincerity. >> because the deal makes it far easier for iran. >> but i believe he is wrong. >> reporter: the president described the upcoming vote on the nuclear agreement as the most important decision facing congress since lawmakers authorized the iraq war. a move mr. obama said he correctly considered a mistake. diplomacy, he cautioned, deserves a chance. >> resist the conventional wisdom and the drumbeat of war. >> reporter: the president neglected to mention that as vice president, secretary of state and former secretary of state all supported the iraq war
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and that even some of his fellow democrats are now wary of the iran deal. >> madam secretary, this agreement or war? is that the choice? simple yes or no. >> i don't think it's a simple yes or no. >> reporter: the white house chose american university as the backdrop for the speech to invite comparisons to president kennedy's historic address at the school in 1963. kennedy's adversary, a nuclear soviet union. >> where in the final analysis our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. we all breathe the same air. we all cherish our children's futures. and we are all mortal. >> reporter: the president urged the nation to follow kennedy's lead. >> now more than ever we need clear thinking in our foreign policy. >> reporter: with the white house giving up on attracting much gop support the speech was really aimed at nervous democrats. but republicans are outraged that the president compared them to iranian hardliners. senate majority leader mitch
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mcconnell has called on the president to retract that comment. jim acosta cnn, the white house. an online video purportedly from the egyptian branch of isis threatens the death of a croatian hostage in the next two days. now, in the video the hostage reads a statement saying he was captured in cairo last month while working for a french firm. the group says the hostage will be killed until muslim women are freed from egyptian jails in 48 hours. the croatian government says it's making all efforts to resolve the situation. prosecutors in the uk are cracking down on religious leaders who support isis and that includes the country's most high-profile muslim cleric who appeared in court on wednesday. our senior international correspondent fred pleitgen has more. >> reporter: amjem choudary is one of two men in london who have been charged with supporting isis which is of course a banned terrorist organization here in the united kingdom. the second man facing charges is
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32-year-old mohammed mizanur rahman. the men are suspected of having invited support for isis in individual lectures which were also published online. they were initially arrested last september by the metropolitan police's counterterrorism command on suspicion of being members of the proscribed organization and have been on bail since then. the alleged crimes took place between june 2014 and march of this year. choudary is a controversial figure in the uk. a preacher. he is the former uk head of the islamist group al muhajirun, also known as islam for uk which was banned in 2010. both suspects made a preliminary court appearance today and pled not guilty. fred pleitgen, cnn, muslim. rescue crews in the mediterranean are searching for survivors off the coast of libya right now. a fishing boat loaded with migrants capsized on wednesday. according to reports, the u.n.
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refugee agent and the italian coast guard say about 400 people have been rescued so far but more than 600 people were on board. the international organization for migration says more than 2,000 migrants have died attempting to cross this year. elsewhere on the mediterranean, egypt will open an expansion to the suez canal in a few hours from now. this project cost more than $8 billion and is part of the president's plan to boost the country's economy. nick gloss explains the history and significance between the waterway and trade route. >> reporter: unlike the men who built it we can now look down on their extraordinary handiwork from above. from the red sea in the south the suez canal first meanders and then cuts across the desert. channel after channel ever straighter right up to the mediterranean in the north. for almost 150 years now it's been an essential trade route
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between east and west. passing through it is frankly a monotonous journey. 160 kilometers through featureless desert. but the canal earns egypt billions of dollars in toll fees every year and remains the greatest of maritime shortcuts, used by ships of all flags. napoleon bonaparte was the first to seriously consider a permanent canal after he invaded egypt in 1798 but was told it was unfeasible. half a century later, in 1854 a french diplomat and entrepreneur ferdinand de la seps persuaded the ruling egyptian viceroy that it could be done. construction work began in 1859 and took ten years. a workforce of tens of thousands of egyptians in effect slave labor. the europeans eventually brought in steam-driven dredging machines to help. the canal opened with much
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fanfare in 1869. just seven meters deep and at its widest 90 meters across. the operating company had a 99-year lease. investors, mostly french made vast profits, as did the british. >> the suez canal, storm center of controversy for weeks, now becomes a cause of war in a lightning sequence of diplomatic and military moves. >> reporter: in 1956 the canal was nationalized by egypt's president nasser. in this the suez crisis france and britain ultimately lost their controlling influence. >> war in the middle east. >> reporter: the canal featured in the arab-israeli conflict in 1967 the so-called six-day war, and remained closed for eight years. now perhaps more than ever the current egyptian government is promoting it as a symbol of nationhood and in its expanded form as some kind of rebirth. this time only egyptians were
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allowed to invest. >> that was our nick glass reporting. the canal extension will run parallel to the existing route. egypt expects the number of ships traveling through it to double by the year 2023. now, the stage is set in cleveland, ohio. the top ten u.s. republican presidential candidates are getting ready to face off in the first primary debate and all eyes will be on you know who. donald trump. plus jon stewart, the political king. or i should say the king of political satire, let's say. he will host his final show tonight. and in his 16 years at the helm of the "daily show," he's never shied away from controversy. we'll explore that after this.
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you are watching "cnn newsroom." welcome back everyone. i'm errol barnett. thanks for staying with me. here are our top headlines right now. malaysia's leader says a piece of airplane debris found last week on reunion island is from missing flight mh370. this prompted angry relatives of the passengers to storm malaysia airlines' beijing office. they say they don't believe the debris is from the plane and are demanding to know the truth. u.s. authorities say a man who attacked people in a tennessee movie theater had a history of mental illness. he sprayed three people with pepper spray and injured a man with a hatchet. police shot and killed him as he tried to escape. rescue crews in the
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mediterranean are in a desperate search for hundreds of passengers of a fishing boat. it was packed with migrants when it capsized off the coast of libya. about 600 people were on board. doctors without borders says there are many deaths. at least 165 people were pulled out alive. now a batch of u.s. republican presidential candidates will take the stage thursday night for the first primary debate. and not surprisingly front-runner donald trump will be front and center. literally and figuratively. he'll be up against nine other men, including jeb bush a favorite among many establishment republicans. dana bash has more. >> reporter: the biggest event at this cleveland arena these days is when lebron james is playing. but all these satellite trucks are lined up for political sport. the first republican 2016 presidential debate. >> this is not reality television. >> reporter: sources close to the nine gop contenders sharing the stage with the unlikely front-runner donald trump insist he will not be their focus.
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>> all of us owe voters an explanation of who we are, what we plan to do if we're elected. that's what i plan to focus on. >> reporter: as for trump he insists he wants to focus on issues. >> i'm not looking to hurt anybody. i'm not looking to embarrass anybody. if i have to bring up deficiencies i'll bring up deficiencies. but certainly i'm not looking to do that. i'd rather go straight down the middle. you don't know what's going to happen. >> reporter: and tries to lower expectations politician style. >> i've never debated. my sort of -- my whole life has been a debate. but i've never debated before. these politicians, all they do is debate. >> reporter: the question is whether the man who retaliated against an opponent by reading his cell phone number on live tv, can help himself. >> i don't know if it's the right number let's try it. 202 -- >> trump's hard charging lawyer warned maybe not. >> look what happened. lindsey graham. not even in the debate. rick perry not even in the debate. you attack donald trump he's going to come back at you twice as hard. >> reporter: but while trump may be the most entertaining jeb bush may have the most to lose.
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he's still the favorite among many establishment republicans. and this is a critical chance for him to prove he's worth a record $100 million plus he raised. >> my dad's the greatest man alive. if you don't like, it i'll take you outside. >> reporter: that shaky performance at a new hampshire forum this week has some backers worried. not to mention this stumble yesterday when talking about planned parenthood. >> you can take it dollar for dollar although i'm not sure we need half a billion dollars for women's health issues. >> but his campaign is trying to stay on message in a new cheeky way. the jeb bush swag store. selling things like this vintage tank top. >> this was a serious decade. >> reporter: but as for jeb bush's preparation i'm told by sources inside his campaign that he is very much focused on trying to explain to people that he's not just another bush that he has another specific conservative record from when he was governor of florida, even on issues of education, where
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people think maybe he's too moderate in the republican electorate. and also he's going to try to separate himself, maybe not by name but just the dynamic to show that he is different from the guy at the center of the stage, donald trump. dana bash, cnn, cleveland, ohio. now, america's favorite fake news personality will be signing off for the final time on thursday night. say it ain't so jon. but it is. jon stewart has spent 16 years as the host of "the daily show," telling thousands of jokes, mocking hundreds of public figures, and even stirring up some controversy around himself. brian stelter has a look back at some of his most provocative moments. >> reporter: at the helm of "the daily show" for over 15 years, host jon stewart has never shied away from controversy. stewart's first "daily show" after 9/11 has been widely praised as heartfelt and compassionate. >> are you okay? and we pray that you are and that your family is. >> reporter: one of his most
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controversial moments happened not on his show but on cnn's "crossfire" back in 2004. >> it's funny. i made a special effort to come on the show today because i have privately amongst my friends and also in occasional newspapers and television shows mentioned this show as being bad. [ laughter ] i felt that that wasn't fair and i should come here and tell you that i don't -- it's not so much that it's bad as it's hurting america. >> reporter: a few months later cnn canceled "crossfire" and the network's president at the time said he agreed with stewart's overall premise. during the 2008 financial crisis stewart invited cnbc's jim cramer on the show and did not mince words. >> it feels like we are capitalizing your adventure. by our pension and our hard earned -- and that it is a game that you know that you know is going on, but that you go on television as a financial
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network and pretend isn't happening. [ applause ] >> okay. first -- >> reporter: stewart also went head to head with president obama back in 2012. >> do you feel like you have a stronger affirmative case for a second barack obama presidency or a stronger negative case for a mitt romney presidency? what is -- in your mind what is the stronger case to be maid? or do you prefer a melange? >> reporter: and in december stewart weighed in on the controversial eric garner jury decision. >> we are definitely not living in a post-racial society. >> reporter: stewart's fans loved hearing his opinions. whether the next "daily show" host can live up to it remains to be seen but there's little doubt that he or she will stir up controversy much like their predecessor. >> and that's our show. so cha, cha, cha. now, pope francis is stirring up debate again. who would have thought jon stewart in the same sentence as
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the pope? indeed. this time the pope is saying the catholic church should embrace divorced people and their children. listen to this. >> translator: lately we have seen a growth in the awareness of the fact we need to welcome brotherly and tenderly in love and truth, those baptized people who have established a new relationship after the failure of their sacramental marriage. to all effects, these people are not at all excommunicated. they are not excommunicated and they must not be treated as such. they're always part of the church. >> there you go. now, catholics who are divorced and remarried have currently -- are currently banned from receiving communion and the remarried spouse is seen as living in permanent adultery. in october catholic bishops from all around the world will meet to review this and other teachings on the family. now, netflix makes a change in its parental leave policy. and at least one major company follows suit. coming up next a look at what could be a trend.
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visitors gathered at the hiroshima peace park and memorial where the horrors of that event are still raw. hiroshima's mayor and prime minister shinzo abe spoke from what's now called peace park. >> translator: as long as nuclear weapons continue to exist, there is no way to know who and when its next victims will be. and if the bomb is dropped the damage will reach indiscriminately across borders. >> translator: japan plans to renew its efforts to bring about a world without nuclear weapons, with the cooperation of both nuclear powers and the non-nuclear powers. >> now, our own ivan watson spoke to one woman who survived the blast. and we've got to give you a
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warning. there are some images you're about to see which are disturbing. >> reporter: she may look frail, but don't be fooled. 87-year-old chisako takeoka is a survivor who lived to tell the tale of the world's first atomic bomb. she was in hiroshima not far from ground zero when an atomic flash lit up the sky. "i was three kilometers away," she says. the shock wave knocked her out. she says she woke up in time to see the mushroom cloud. on the morning of august 6th, 1945 a u.s. bomber dropped the weapon nicknamed little boy over the city of hiroshima. about 80,000 died immediately. by u.s. estimates the five-year death toll from radiation, poison, and cancer about 200,000. takeoka was only 17 years old and had just finished a night
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shift making torpedoes at a military factory. after the blast she says she saw horrors here by the river. >> translator: i still remember the day very well because this was a river filled with dead bodies. people were burned and they jumped into the river. >> reporter: takeoka survived the ordeal and eventually went on to become an outspoken activist campaigning around the world against war and nuclear proliferation. hiroshima was rebuilt, along with a peace park to honor the victims. the museum here chronicles the devastating effects of the a-bomb, leaving some visitors grappling with very difficult questions. >> in america a lot of the textbooks talk about how necessary it was to see the -- to release the bomb and have all these innocent civilians die. but when you really look at it from a moral standpoint it's like was this really necessary? did we have to do this? >> reporter: scott baker
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traveled here from northern california. he and his fellow boy scouts say they're shocked by what they learned here. >> when i came here i didn't really know what to expect. but then once i saw all the images and stuff i kind of got a little sick. >> i feel it's necessary to walk through and to see what happened and just to go through history, to see that this can be repeated if we make the wrong mistakes. >> reporter: that's an observation a-bomb survivor chisaka takeoka is glad to maerp two years after the bomb her son died from what doctors told her is a-bomb syndrome. today she works with her daughter to pass on her eyewitness account of the bomb's devastation dmin hiroshima to future generations. her message on this grim anniversary -- never again. ivan watson cnn, hiroshima, japan.
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and we keep our focus in asia as a powerful typhoon is headed straight for taiwan. meteorologist ivan cabrera joins us to explain why it carries the potential to be quite dangerous. ivan? >> yeah multiple things going on here, errol. making a beeline for taiwan. high probability of it striking directly at taiwan over the next 72 hours. formidable typhoon here. this was the strongest in 2015. it was a super typhoon. it's weakened somewhat. but the winds still a dangerous 175 kilometers per hour. and in fact intensifying a little bit more over the next few days as we talk about -- well, in about 36 hours right before it makes landfall winds of 215 kilometers per hour. and it just goes right into taiwan over the next couple of days here. you have just about a day to get things prepared as this thing begins to move in. now, the reason for that is we have the winds that are going to be moving in. take a look at that. by the time we get to friday at
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1700 we're already going to be experiencing tropical storm force winds. you do not want to be out with winds in excess of 50 80 kilometers per hour and then of course the storm continues headed off to the west. and look at this. just an incredible shot here. this would be the center of circulation. the eye of the storm right over taiwan. we have to talk about the topography of taiwan. let's go to the floor to do that. because if the island was flat we would be in a lot of trouble. in fact, let's go over to taipei. this is where we have 7 1/2 million people. this is on the northwestern side of the island. but the island is not flat, and that is important. we have a big mountain chain here that kind of buffers taipei and that is important. it's going to do a couple of things disrupt the storm as it moves in. the storm surge on the eastern side of the island not as significant. but what the mountains do enhances the lift and so we get very heavy rainfall on top of what's already coming with the storm itself. so as the storm passes actually
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the storm surge the worst of it i think will be on the western side of the island from the taiwan strait as the winds switch and move over from the west. we'll watch that closely. the winds in excess of 100 kilometers per hour 150 kilometers per hour. that is important because we have taipei 101. this is one of the tallest -- in fact the tallest building in taiwan. we're talking about 500 meters here designed to withstand 260-kilometer per-hour winds. so i think we'll be okay. because of the mountain chain back here. let's go back to the wall and show you real quick here what we're talking about as far as accumulation. anywhere from 500 millimeters to as much as a meter of rainfall errol, in the next 72 hours. that is going to be very dangerous stuff with flash flooding and mudslides likely. >> all right. ivan cabrera the great breakdown there on why the topography of this is such an important aspect to keep in mind. we'll see you next hour. thanks. one day after netflix announced its new parental leave policy microsoft stepped up with
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an additional eight weeks of paid leave for its employees. now, it could be a sign of what's to come for tech workers who are in very high demand these days. lynda kinkade has more on the netflix policy and how it compares to companies around the world. >> reporter: the world's leading internet streaming video network is now leading the corporate world in paid leave for parents. new mumz and dads at netflix will now be able to take unlimited paid leave of up to a year after their child's birth or adoption. >> this is something that i think really speaks to the talent wars that are going on particularly in silicon valley. >> reporter: and that's not all. netflix will offer employees the chance to return full-time or part-time after that year. >> google facebook, apple, these companies are usually on the best place to work list. they offer a lot of perks. so netflix is doing a smart thing to try to keep existing talent and maybe lure other
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people to come to the country. rfrmt 10 to 15 years ago the most competitive tech companies were offering free food ping-pong cables and xbox games. but those companies have grown up and so too their policies and a work-life balance is now more important than a free lunch. google recently raise thrd paid leave from 12 to 18 weeks and claim it's cut in half the number of new mums leaving the company. facebook employees get 16 weeks and new parents are entitled to $4,000 for each child born or adopted. apple gives 14 weeks and partners can take six weeks. apart from a few top companies the u.s. ranks far behind the rest of the world in paid leave. >> if you work for a company with less than 50 people you can lose your job. they can take your job away from you if you go have a bay baby. >> reporter: the international labor organization asesd more than 185 countries and territories, finding that only two countries provided
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absolutely no mandated cash benefit to new mothers. the u.s. and papua-new guinea. compare that to the other superpower china, which offers three months paid leave through social security. while many developed economies throughout europe as well as canada and australia offer around 4 to 12 months with a mix of paid and unpaid leave. lynda kinkade, cnn. now the search is on for the new face of the $10 bill. this moment one of the most iconic first ladies is currently in the lead. a new poll shows 27% of americans want to see eleanor roosevelt on the bill. that would be a good choice. coming in second place is the famous abolitionist harriett tubman. that would be awesome come to think of it. rounding out the top five are sacagawea who helped lead the famous lewis & clark expedition across the western united states. that would be a great pick. legendary aviator amelia earhart. now it's getting hard to choose.
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and susan b. anthony who played a key role in the women's suffrage movement. the redesign the $10 bill is set to debut in 2020. it's almost time for the debate in the 2016 u.s. presidential race, and they always seem to give us some odd and sometimes funny moments. coming up next we'll show you some of the best from years past. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ hp instant ink
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well no one ever said the road to the white house was smooth. as republican candidates prepare for their first debate later today, cnn's jeanne moos looks back at those moments from previous debates that make you say oops. >> reporter: we tend to watch debates, hoping to see a trainwreck. instead we're left with memorable moments. sarah palin winking. >> how long have i been at this? like five weeks? >> reporter: ronald reagan demand k the sound system not being turned off. >> i am paying for this microphone mr. speaker. >> reporter: a line he picked up -- >> don't you shut me off. i'm paying for this broadcast. >> reporter: -- from spencer tracy in the film "state of the union." tv magnifies everything. from the sweat glistening on nixon's chin that he had to wipe
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off to al gore's exaggerated -- >> texas. that's what a governor gets to do. >> reporter: -- exasperated size. >> there's a difference. >> reporter: resuscitated by "snl." >> rome came to life in "gladiator." >> reporter: what was i going to say again? oh yeah there were some unforgettable forgetful moments. >> commerce education, and the -- what's the third one there? let's see. >> reporter: rick perry's oops moment. >> oops. >> reporter: and arizona governor jan brewer's brain freeze. >> that we could possibly do. >> reporter: and this was just her opening statement. you know what a televised debate isn't the time for? checking the time as president george bush did. >> how has the national debt -- >> reporter: debates are a time for memorable zingers. >> senator, you're no jack kennedy. >> reporter: and one-liners. for instance from a relatively unknown candidate for vice president. >> who am i?
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why am i here? >> reporter: and whatever you do candidates don't invade your opponent's personal space. as hillary's senate rival once did. >> right here. right now. >> we'll shake on this -- >> no i want your signature. >> reporter: or when al gore crept up on george bush. >> but can you get things done? and i believe i can. >> reporter: there's nothing like debatable behavior to liven up a debate. >> there's differences. >> you're likeable enough hillary. >> reporter: jeanne moos cnn. >> are we not doing the talent portion? >> reporter: new york. ♪ thanks for watching everyone. i'm errol barnett. who is it that joins me for the next hour of "cnn newsroom"? rosemary church. that's it. stay with us. "ride away" (by roy orbison begins to play) ♪ i ride the highway... ♪ ♪ i'm going my way... ♪ ♪i leave a story untold... ♪
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com it's been nearly 17 months to the day since mh370 vanished and now the malaysian prime minister says this flaperon is part of the plane. a u.s. attack in a movie theater with a hatchet, pepper spray and a pellet gun.
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and cnn is in hiroshima 70 years after the u.s. dropped an atomic bomb on the city. >> i'm errol barnett. thanks for joining us. this is "cnn newsroom." our top story, the most talked about scrap of plane debris in the world. malaysia's prime minister says experts confirmed the wing piece found on reunion island last week is from mh370. >> but a french prosecutor is being much more cautious suggesting the piece is very likely from mh370. he says further analysis will start on thursday to prove it conclusively. malaysia's leader is takesticking to his statement. >> we have physical evidence that as i announced on 24th
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march last year mh370 tragically ended in the southern indian ocean. >> but australia, too, is weighing in saying it will await further details from the french-led investigation team. >> but prime minister tony abbott remains hopeful. >> the search must go on. but what we have found in the western indian ocean does seem to indicate that the plane did come down more or less where we thought it did. and it suggests that for the first time we might be a little bit closer to solving this baffling mystery. >> this news about the debris prompted angry relatives of the passengers to do what you are seeing here. they stormed malaysia airlines beijing office and they say they don't believe this piece is from the plane and they are demanding to know the truth.
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anna coren is joining us from hong kong can hong kong with more on this. you have confirmation from the malaysian prime minister but caution from the french. what are the relatives saying about that? >> reporter: as you can imagine this is a difficult and painful time for the families of the 239 people on board mh370. many just devastated to hear this news because as you say, this is confirmation as far as the malaysians are concerned that this is in fact a piece of the debris from mh370 which proves that it did crash in the indian ocean. now, there are other families -- as you see, there in china, who refuse to take this as gospel. they believe that there have been cover ups throughout the past 17 months. and so they don't see this as the truth. as far as they are concerned they want definitive answers as too what happened why this
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plane crashed. they want the wreckage of the plane. they want the black box and the bodies of their loved ones to be retrieved. this two-meter piece of the wing the flaperon as it is known, that is not enough for many of the families. others i should add are disgusted that they were not contacted officially by authorities and they had to hear through the media about this news. so really this is an indication or reflection really as to how this entire crisis has been handled over the past 17 months. families just feeling like they've been neglected and were the last to find out any piece of information or new developments. for them this is another painful reminder. but at the end of the day, many of these families are back at the very beginning. this is really just extremely
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painful episode as you can imagine. >> yeah it certainly is true anna coren live in hong kong with the perspective from victims' relatives, thanks. after this difficult time for families cnn's richard quest takes a closer look at the clues investigators have been searching for and what the further testing on the debris will focus on. >> reporter: i understand that there are some distinctive parts, there are only distinctive paints and markings within it all of which have led to conclude pretty much conclusively that this is actually from mh370. as for why the prosecutor was more circumspecht they are going to be testing the barnacles and the stresses and seeing exactly what the
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composition is and what the paint that might be unique to malaysia airlines and that's how they have done it. malaysia airlines says they have spotted on this flaperon that is pretty much unique to their planes. >> so let's talk more about this with jules jaffe who is an oceanographer and he joins me now from san diego. thank you, sir for talking with us. as we know malaysia's prime minister is convinced this wing part is from malaysia airlines flight 370. french authorities are more cautious. but if it is indeed from mh370, what do you think we can learn from this debris? and how likely is it that through the study of ocean currents that oceanographers like yourself can pinpoint where the rest of the plane might be? >> yeah that's the question on everyone's mind right now,
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rosemary. thanks for asking. you know there's a lot of history of debris in the ocean and currents and washing up. you probably recall the terrible disaster of fukushima and months later docks and things washed up on the shores of the west coast of the united states. there have been freight cars that have been lost. and the question is how can we figure out where it came from? and we have a general idea i mean i guess i'm glad we found something. as you probably recall we had no idea where the thing was. i mean they never -- the satellite communication was out for a long time. it still had a fair amount of jet fuel. we now know for sure it was in the indian ocean. i think we have to backtrack at least to the first square. now the study of ocean currents is pretty advanced and we as
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scientists understand the general flow of things in the ocean but the analogy i'd like to use is imagine you have a glass of water and you put sprinkles in it and you mix it up and you ask yourself where did the sprinkles start? we'll call that unstirring a thing that was stirred up. and you can imagine that's a pretty hard problem. i think it helps a bit but i don't think it's going to allow us to pinpoint the exact location of the crash to a 100 kilometer diameter on the circumstance of the ocean. and the other thing work against us is the time. the longer that things are out there, the more time they have to meander around and so the length of time the distance it traveled all contribute to uncertainty in figuring out where it might have started.
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i, for one, think we were incredibly lucky that it washed up on la reunion. i would not have imagined it could. >> what you are saying too, is that we can't assume then that other parts of the plane will end up around that same location. they could be in other parts of the ocean, perhaps. >> that's precisely too. again, imagine now, releasing 100 balloons and watching them in the sky go apart and picking the red one and say where did that guy come from? chances are you are not going the figure out the person that launched it and where they are. >> thank you for joining us. we appreciate it. india is dealing with monsoon rain and severe flooding. some locals say this is one extraordinary monsoon season. >> it has destroyed homes and lives and left villages under water as you can see.
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>> are joined live from calcutta where hundreds of thousands have been evacuate to relief camps. can they cope with the huge demand right now? >> reporter: errol, there are still 200,000 at least in these relief camps just in this state of west bengal alone and a lot of the officials were saying they expect the people to stay there for at least the next week or two weeks because the waters are not going to recede any time soon. the main situation right now, the main problem in these parts is the overflowing dams. this part of west bengal it's got some of the biggest rivers in the country, including the ganges which is what you see behind me. every once in a while the dams have to be opened to release the excess water. that's why the areas are
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inundated a couple times a day. that's here outside in the outlying areas of west bengal the situation is much, much more desperate there. kilometers and kilometers of flood water as far as the eyes can see. this district in eastern india is one of the worst affected. the main river is 7 kilometers from here roughly five miles. but you can see how far inland the water has come and people have started their farmland. hundreds dead. hundreds of thousands of homes damaged. roads submerged. wading through the flood water is the only option for many. we hitch a ride with a wedding party. the groom rented a neighbor's boat. what can i do? i can't change the wedding date
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so i had to get married, even in these conditions he says. this is a potato trader. he says the entire supply for the season has been destroyed. i ask how he is going to support his new bride. i don't know, he says. throughout the journey the priest blows on a conch shell. >> the entire area is a mini lake of sorts and quite deep as well. about 10 to 15 feet. those without access to boats are stranded. entire villages cut off from the outside world for almost a week. the homes are unlivable. they found this dry patch of land and they've built this makeshift shelters over here. they moved their livestock as well but it's they have received absolutely no help so far.
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floods are not uncommon here. but this is the worst it's been in years, they say. after a long journey, the two are finally home. a welcoming ritual is performed. the holy water may not be as clean as it should be. the celebrations perhaps not perfect. people making the best of it. even in the worst of times. something has to be said about the resilience of the people here. they deal with so much hardship on a day-to-day basis and the floods are a setback but they persevere. >> a romantic take too that love can conquer all and persevere. we hope that things improve for the hundreds of thousands of
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people suffering now. thank you. we're going to take a short break here. still to come we are learning about the man at the center of a disturbing attack at a u.s. movie theater. what police are saying about his mental state. that is next. (vo) after 50 years of designing cars for crash survival, subaru has developed our most revolutionary feature yet. a car that can see trouble... ...and stop itself to avoid it. when the insurance institute for highway safety tested front crash prevention nobody beat subaru models with eyesight. not honda. not ford or any other brand. subaru eyesight. an extra set of eyes, every time you drive. ♪"once there was a hushpuppy" by dan romer and ben zeitlin ♪ is man kind? are we good? go see. go look through their windows so you can understand their views.
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. in the united states there are new details about a man who police shot and killed after he attacked people in a tennessee movie theater. authorities say this man had a history of mental illness. >> in talking with rutherford county authorities it appears this individual has had significant psychiatric or psychological issues. they are reporting he had been committed four times, twice in 2004 and twice in 2007. >> police say that montano's mother filed a missing person's report two days before this incident. he doused three movie goers with
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pepper spray and injured another man with a hatchet. >> we were the only ones in theater. i walked out to use the restroom and walked into the policemen who were armed and had guns and told me what was happening. >> we heard screams coming from another theater. this is before we thought something was happening. >> we thought it was a scary movie. >> police say he also had a pellet gun that can fire plastic pellets or bbs. >> i'm eternally grateful for the metro police department for their fast response today and the fact that no one else got injured other than the person who did this. i ask people to pray for his family. >> u.s. federal authorities are
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helping police with this investigation. but incidents like this appear to be all-too common in the states. >> a lot of people are considering whether they want to go to the meanies any more. u.s. president barack obama is making a case for the iran nuclear deal. this comes as critics point to evidence of an alleged coverup at an iranian nuclear site. jim sciutto has the details. >> reporter: the president made a impassioned defense of the iran nuclear deal. >> i've had to make a lot of tough calls as president. but whether or not this deal is good for american security is not one of those calls. it's not even close. >> reporter: but the skeptics got new ammunition today. cnn learned that the u.s. intelligence community believes iran is attempting to clean up one of the most sensitive
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suspected nuclear sites. after new commercial satellite imagery showed heavy construction equipment including bulldozers. the president dismissed the fact that iran can hide nuclear material. >> nuclear material is not something you hide in a closet. it can leave a trace for years. the bottom line is if iran cheats we can catch them and we will. >> reporter: a senior intelligence official tells cnn the iae aechld the international agency responsible for inspecting the nuclear sites is familiar with sanization efforts and the international community has confident in the iaea's technical expertise. many lawmakers, republicans and democrats are not convinced. they take issue with the fact that details have not released details and will not confirm if
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the officials read them. >> why not will you give us the documents that exist that are so important. >> we don't have the documents to give to you. i didn't see the final documents. i saw the provisional documents. >> reporter: but for the president, however, the choice is clear. >> let's not mince words. the choice we face is ultimately between diplomacy or some form of war. maybe not tomorrow maybe not three months from now, but soon. >> that was cnn chief u.s. security correspondent jim chute sciutto reporting. the top ten u.s. presidential candidates are getting ready for the first debate on third night.
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>> donald trump will be there along with jeb bush and eight others. dana bash has more. >> reporter: the biggest event at this cleveland arena these days is when lebron james is plague but it's this is political sport, the first republican 2016 presidential debate. >> sources close to the nine contenders sharing the stage with donald trump insist he will not be their focus. >> an explanation about who we are and what we plan to do when we are elected. >> reporter: trump wants to focus on issues. >> i'm not looking to hurt anybody or embarrass anybody. if i have to bring up deficiencies but i'm not looking to the that. i'd rather go down the middle. >> reporter: and tries to lower expectations. politician style. >> i've never debated. my whole life has been a debate but i've never debated before.
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>> reporter: the question is whether the man who retaliated against an opponent by reading his cell phone number on live tv can help himself. >> i don't know if it's the right number. >> reporter: trump's lawyer warned maybe not. >> look what happened to lindsey graham. not even in the debate. you attack donald trump he's going to come back at you twice as hard. >> reporter: while trump might be the most entertaining jeb bush might have the most to lose. he is the favorite among establishment republicans and this is a chance for him to prove he is worth the $100 million plus he raised. >> my dad's the greatest man alive. if you don't like it i'll take you outside. >> reporter: that shaky performance has some backers worried. not to mention this stumble when talking about funding for planned parenthood. >> you can take dollar for dollar although i don't know we
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need half a billion dollar for women's health issues. >> reporter: and the jeb bush swag store. >> this was a serious decade. washington correspondent for the new yorker joins us now with more on the debate. and as the republican candidates prepare, talk to us about what we should be looking for when they all take to the stage. >> as you know donald trump is the leader in the polls and i think he's going to have the center position on that stage. so everyone will be looking for how the other candidates deal with this dominant personality in their midst. and so what you look for how do the candidates attack him? do they engage with him? or do they just sort of present their own agenda?
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that is a strategic calculation they have to make. these debates do matter. in 2012 when we had a big field, if you were the candidate who came out of the debate as the news story, you got a lot of attention and free media and your poll numbers were goosed. so i think what you're trying to do is you're looking for opportunities to be the next day's story but without -- i guess, embarrassing yourself by attacking trump in a way that is sort of debeneath a governor or senator. >> and do you tackle trump and take the risk of them shutting them down and possibly humiliating them or do you try to work with him? this is the other thing isn't it? in american politics eventually
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some of these guys are going to have to work together. >> although i don't -- if donald trump -- i don't mean to dismiss him or be dismissive of him but most people don't see him being the republican nominee. and he's frankly not likely to run for any other position. he's not likely to serve in the cabinet of another administration. you don't have to worry about working too much with him but it's some of the other candidates you could see being the top and bottom of a ticket. there is that dynamic. i think that the question is do you sully yourself by trying to take him down? and it's a question that i think that someone like jeb bush or marco rubio or scott walker the candidates just below trump in the polls, they have to decide is it going to be me that takes this guy on or do i let the lesser candidates do it for me
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and i stay out of the fray? remember, very few of these candidates have ever been engaged in a field of 17 opponents, right? most of these candidates had one, two, three primary opponent when they ran for governor or senator. they are making it up as they go along as well. and never have they run against a person like donald trump. there is no script nor this. there is no debate to look back on and say that's the model here. i would expect the unexpected. we haven't seen this dynamic before. >> it will be interesting too to see if we can work out who the winner is at the end of this g.o.p. debate. ryan thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. and we'll have highlights from the debate this time tomorrow. isis delivers a new threat with a tight deadline for egypt to meet its demand. detail on the terror group's
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my name is mark amann. i'm a gas service rep for pg&e in san jose. as a gas service rep we are basically the ambassador of the company. we make the most contact with the customers on a daily basis. i work hand-in-hand with crews to make sure our gas pipes are safe. my wife and i are both from san jose. my kids and their friends live in this community. every time i go to a customer's house, their children could be friends with my children so it's important to me.
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one of the most rewarding parts of this job is after you help a customer seeing a smile on their face. together, we're building a better california. welcome back to our viewers in the u.s. and those tuned in from around the world. the last half hour with the boast of us i'm errol barnett. >> i'm rosemary church. malaysia's leader says a piece of airplane debris found last week on reunion island is from missing flight mh370. now this prompted angry relatives of the passengers to storm malaysia airlines' beijing office. they don't believe the debris is from the plane and are demanding to know the truth.
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we can report on a tragedy in the mediterranean. rescue crews rushed to save hundreds of people after a boat packed with hundreds of migrants capsized off the coast of libya. the u.n. refugee agency and the italian coast guard say that about 400 people have been rescued. flooding has been battering parts of asia including myanmar. 200,000 people there are in temporary shelters and the death toll has risen to 69. the u.s. has pledged to donate a relief package to help the country deal with the disaster. a dangerous typhoon is headed straight for taiwan. ivan cabrera joins us with the latest on what folks in that part of the world can expect. >> the track is set at this point. it's headed straight for taiwan. will it be a category 3, category 4, splitting hairs at
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this point. it's going to be a major impact storm. winds at 175 kilometers per hour. right at a category 3 and it could intensify a little bit more. that is the official forecast. look at this 215 kilometer-per-hour winds. and that goes right into taiwan. let's show you the winds here. tropical storm force winds impacting taiwan by friday afternoon. you must get preparations finished right now. and the dangerous winds of the core move in friday night into the early part of saturday. let's talk about what the winds are going to do and use the floor to talk about the topography of taiwan. we have taipei on the northern side of the island but on the eastern side of the island we have a mountain.
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on the western side my concern is going to be the storm surge from the strait of taiwan. and it makes a secondary landfall in china. when this does hit the strait of taiwan on the backside of the storm we get the westerly wind and that will produce a storm surge on the western side where we have more people living. and the rains are going to be incredible over the next few days here. because not only are the storm arriving here but because of the topography and the mountainous terrain which is going to lift the air and wring out the moisture. upwards of 500 millimeters. i have seen these typhoons drop a meter of rain on taiwan. look at the forecast. this is just as the storm arrives. we're already at 130 millimeters of rainfall here. about 5 inches. that is not going to be the
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total. we're going to do a lot more than that as the storm continues to move in. something to watch. but preparations need to be finished now. and then it crosses the strait and heads to china by late in the weekend. >> fascinating to see how taiwan's physical form is a part of this story. ivan cabrera breaking that down for us. thanks. the egyptian branch of isis claims to be holding a croatian hostage and threatening to kill him. >> this is the first such threat from the terror group's branch in egypt as ian lee reports the militants are vowing to act quickly. >> reporter: another looming deadline for an isis hostage. croatian -- shown online in the strait mark orange jump suit with a masked man and the isis flag behind him. isis in egypt sinai gaving him
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48 hours starting wednesday. their demand to egypt, release all female muslim prisoners. militants reportedly kidnapped the father of two on a road west of cairo last month. he says he is a topographer. the croatian government says it's making all efforts to resolve the hostage situation. the egyptian government has yet to respond. while isis in iraq syria and libya are known for their kidnappings and brutal executions this is the first time for branch in egypt. since 2013 we've seen isis in sinai grow bolder and deadlier killing hundreds of soldiers policemen and civilians.
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according to egyptian state media, militants killed at least 17 soldiers in time simultaneous attacks in sinai last month including striking an egyptian naval ship in the mediterranean. this comes as egypt tries to focus the world's attention on the suez canal. on thursday egypt's president, abdel fattah el-sisi will lead celebration on the opening of a new section of the canal, a waterway that separates the sinai peninsula from mainland egypt. egypt has dealt with isis kidnappings before. at least 20 christians were executed in libya. egypt responded with air strikes. we don't know where the hostage is being held but we do know the
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clock is ticking. ian lee, cairo. authorities in the uk are widening their inquiry into child sex abuse claims. >> the latest allegations involve the late prime minister sir edwards heath. police are now urging any alleged victims to come forward. >> there are now five british police forces independently investigating claims that include child sexual abuse involving sir edwards heath. kent police are one of the latest to confirm their involvement after receiving a report of a sexual assault committed in the east of the country in the 1960s. the victim named the former prime minister in connection with the case. sir edwards led a conservative government and was an mp in the 1990s. he died in 2005 aged 89. heath is the most senior figure
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to be investigated for child sex abuse claims dating back decades. for years there have been claims about political and establishment circles and attempted coverups. cases that are under investigation. there have been cases in the world of entertainment including jimmy saddle. the government uncovered hundreds of victims he allegedly raped and abused for decades. scotland yard launched an inquiry. we saw rob harris and gary glitter convicted for sexual offenses dating back 40 years. police issued an appeal for anyone claiming to have been a victim of abuse by heath to come forward. the police complaints commission is investigating allegations that police failed to pursue a complaint made against heath in the 1990s.
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at least one former colleague has spoken out against the suggestion that the man who ran the country was also a child sex abuser. >> i'm sure he would have been even more bemused. i just don't for a moment think that there is anything there. >> the sir edward heath charitable foundation says it welcomed the inquiry and wholeheartedly believes it will clear his name. max foster cnn, london. >> we'll have more of the world's biggest stories after this.
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today marks 70 years since an atomic bomb designated hiroshima in japan. >> bells tolled in remembrance of the 80,000 victims that died
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instantly that day. tens of thousands more lost their lives from radiation poisoning in the years following. >> we are joined by ivan watson who is in hiroshima and he spoke with one of the survivors from that day. so talk to us about the important message that survivor wants to share with the world and also how japan is marking this critical but devastating day. >> reporter: i mean it was 8:15 a.m. 70 years ago this day that the world's first atomic bomb targeting a civilian city exploded in the sky over ground zero where i'm standing now. i've spoken with a survivor of that terrible day who, after enduring ordeals and witnessing horrors including the river behind me being choked with the bodies of burned corpses, she
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went on to become an outspoken activist speaking out against the proliferation of nuclear weapons, also speaking out against conflict in general. and that is a theme that is repeated here in hiroshima on this somber 70th anniversary. a theme that was repeated by the japanese prime minister and the mayor of the city when they addressed the commemoration ceremony. >> translator: as long as nuclear weapons continue to exist, there is no way to know and when its next victims will be and if the bomb is dropped the damage will reach indiscriminately beyond borders. >> translator: japan intends to renew its efforts to bring about the world without nuclear weapons with the cooperation of nuclear powers and nonnuclear powers. rosemary throughout the day
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here we've seen many japanese as well as more international visitors who been paying their respects to the hundreds of thousands of people who were killed by the atomic bomb. but also people who have been praying for peace, whether that's singing here by the banks of the river in front of the a-bomb dome one of the only buildings that survived here or dropping flower petals into the water or putting down burning down incense or laying flowers at the monuments in the peace park in hiroshima that japan built in the years after the war. rosemary? >> and ivan just quickly, what that survivor said to you, her message to the world?
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>> reporter: never again. and surprisingly for an american citizen such as myself and other americans that i've talked to here after all it was the u.s. that dropped two atomic bombs on japan, hastening the end of the war but at the expense of hundreds of thousands of civilian lives, perhaps a surprising thing that i think americans observe when they visit here is there seems to be no ill will from the communities here from the japanese population in the museum exhibits here that the message instead that was repeated by that survivor is look at the horrors that were inflicted 70 years ago and do not let them happen again. >> an important message indeed. ivan watson reporting live from hiroshima. thank you so much. we'll be right back. ♪"once there was a hushpuppy" by dan romer and ben zeitlin ♪ is man kind? are we good?
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next month. he faced criticism for online jokes some found to be in poor taste. we have a closer look now at the comedian as he faces a much wider audience. >> welcome to "the daily show." >> welcome daily show. >> big shoes to fill for jon stewart's successor on "the daily show. [ bleep ]. >> reporter: the question can this south african comedian cut in the best of u.s. satire. he is rising to fame in his 20s through standup and as a talk show host but his brand of comedy has evolved from vanilla to something more interesting. >> this is swag right here. >> reporter: this comedian knows noah well. >> because now he knows that
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people listen to him, he pushes the edgy really progressive stuff that a lot of south african comics are scared of. >> reporter: it had been a meteoric rise. the poster child of the comedy scene from at that time an illegal union between a white sisz father and a black south african mother. >> and you have been through difficult times in south africa's history. and he was born -- >> during that time of apartheid. >> reporter: does he talk about it with you? >> what does he know? the mother knows. i had to hide him. when he plays with the kids in the street they are all shout and run away.
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noah a white person! >> reporter: it's a legacy which informed his generation. >> we're not the most romantic. we had other things to worry about. you are picking flowers and dodging tear gas. >> reporter: but his friends say he opened up the realm of what is possible for the youngsters. >> when we wanted to do comedy we didn't have that guy. you looked to america for that guy. now guys are thinking trevor noah's success. >> reporter: and they are confident he will take "the daily show" by storm. >> he would not have taken it on if he could not have been the best at it. three weeks. no pressure. no pressure, dog. a lot of pressure. i wish trevor noah the best but jon stewart. >> huge shoes to fill.
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but he represents a new young talent. folks in south africa love him. we support you. good luck. we've got your back. don't make fun of us. that's all we ask. >> i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. stay with rosemary. she's back after this short break. i'll see you next week. ♪ they lived. ♪ they lived. ♪ they lived. ♪
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www.vitac.com anger and disbelief. relatives of those on board mh370 say they don't believe that a piece of debris is from the missing airliner. the u.s. president lobbies for a deal with tehran. and the first presidential debate in the race for the white house is upon us. and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm rosemary church. and this is "cnn newsroom."
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our top story this hour malaysia's leader says a piece of airline debris found last week on reunion island is from missing flight mh370. this prompted angry relatives of the passengers to storm malaysia airlines beijing office. they say they don't believe the debris is from the plane and are demanding to know the truth. meantime chinese officials are calling on malaysia to continue investigating what happened to mh370 and to communicate with the passengers' families. >> translator: we suggest that malaysia should explain to the next of kin what's going to happen next. i think on this matter we care about their feelings and the struggle that they're going through. >> cnn's asia-pacific editor andrew stevens is following
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developments from kuala lumpur and joins us live. we're seeing this anger from particularly these families in china, storming as we saw, the offices of malaysia airlines. they want some answers. they are very angry and they don't think that this particular piece from the plane is from mh370. >> that's right, rosemary. they just don't believe the malaysian government when it said very very clearly that this is indeed, a part of mh370. and the malaysians were also very clear in seeing that was supported by the other investigators on the ground. the malaysian prime minister actually made that announcement at 1:45 this morning here in kuala lumpur and he gave an indication as to why he wanted to get the news out. listen to what he had to say.
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>> it is my hope that this confirmation however tragic and painful will at least bring certainty to the families and loved ones of the 239 people on board. mh370. they have our deepest sympathy and prayers. >> reporter: so bringing that certainty as mr. najib said there to the families. 515 days after mh370 disappeared, we have that statement. so those families have been living every day of those past 500 days in such difficult conditions rosemary. the people here in malaysia they are not saying that they don't believe the malaysian government. but they are saying that this doesn't necessarily bring them closure.
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the line is that we want to bring our loved ones home and bury them. that's when we get closure. is it going to be very difficult, obviously. just because this has been established, it's still difficult to find where the plane went down. but certainly as you point out in china there has been a very very strong reaction. listen to what the ministry of foreign affairs had to say and another jab, basically at the malaysians. this is what the foreign affairs ministry had to say. we require the malaysian side to earnestly fulfill their commitments to continue to investigate the reasons behind the plane's disappearance and making full preparation for the aftermath settlement to protect the legitimate rights of the family. there you seat. the government is telling the malaysian government they still need to make sure this investigation carries through and make sure the families get what they are entitled too in
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terms of compensation. but compensation is not really something a lot of people are talk about in beijing. listen to some of the family members in beijing, what they have been saying. >> translator: with what does such a tiny piece of debris mean regarding a 230 ton plane? why are they trying to fool us? to take the compensation money? we will not accept it. >> translator: nets step is we are going to ask the malaysian government and airlines to assist us to go to reunion island and france. we will go to the site to check it out by ourselves. we do not believe any of their words, which are all lies. >> so that's the reaction from beijing, whether or not malaysian airlines will fly families to the reunion islands is we'll have to wait and see but it's certainly at this end, the malaysian government could not be clearer, rosemary that
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this piece of debris this flaperon is a part mh370. >> why jump so quickly? why not wait until french investigators and authorities are on board with this confirmation as well. this is such a sensitive topic. the families have been hurt. it has been difficult for them. these more than 500 days since this plane disappeared. would it not have been a wiser move to wait until they were able to confirm this completely with everyone on board with them? >> reporter: that's an interesting point. the malaysian government would say, and they said very very clearly in their press statement that it is linked to 370 and the french investigators and other investigators involved in reunion and in toulouse also support that conclusion. we did hear from french investigators which showed daylight between the malaysian position and the french
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position. the french are saying everything points towards this being mh370 but we can't say 100% that it is the aircraft. why did the malaysians want to release the news? why did they want to say that this is definitively part of the plane? it looks from here that they really do want the help the relatives in this way in telling them saying it is the inevitable there is no other plane missing. this is part of a 777 and roundly sort of agreed now that this is part of a 777 and the only 777 missing is 370. so the malaysians. they did it at 1:45 in the morning. they are confident this is the case it is 370 and they are asking the families now to -- stating to the families this is a fact the plane went down at sea and you can begin hopefully
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to get some sort of closure. whether or not it's the right decision that is for the families to decide. that is for the people so closely involved to decide rosemary. >> and for most of the family members, until they actually find the plane and find their relatives, they're not going to feel that their relatives have been lost to this plane crash. we will watch this story of course very closely. andrew stevens, reporting live from kuala lumpur thanks to you. tony abbott thinks that the debris is consistent with the search pattern that the crews have been using for the past few months. >> the search must go on. but what we have found in the western indian ocean does seem to indicate that the plane did come down more or less where did and
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it suggests that for the first time we might be a little bit closer to solving this baffling mystery. >> prime minister abbott there. experts are said to conduct more tests on that flaperon thursday. cnn's richard quest takes a closer look at the clues investigators have been looking for. >> reporter: if you look at the flaperon i understand that there are some distinctive parts and distinctive paints and markings within it all of which have led to the conclude pretty much conclusively that this is actually from mh370. as for why the prosecutor was more circumspect that i think raises a good interesting question. but what they are going to be doing tests on they are going to be testing the barnacles and testing the stresses and seeing exactly what the composition is and what the paint is that might
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be unique to malaysia airlines and that is how they've done it. malaysia airlines says that they have spotted things on this flaperon that is pretty much unique to their planes. >> cnn's richard quest reporting there. we do want to check other stories now. u.s. authorities say a man attacked movie goers in tennessee suffered from mental illness. he doused people with pepper spray and went after them with a hatchet. he also had a pellet gun. three people were injured from the pepper spray and one man had a minor cut from the hatchet. an irish naval vessel is en route to italy after rescuing people who were rescued from a boat that capsized. about 600 people were on board
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the fishing boat when it capsized. a los angeles judge ordered bill cosby to give a sworn deposition over a sex abuse allegation. a woman says that cosby sexually assaulted her in 1974 at the playboy mansion when she was 15 years old. she is one of 35 women who have accused him. u.s. president barack obama makes his case to congress to accept the iran nuclear deal. he warned that the country's cydibilty is at stake. new evidence surfaced that allegedly shows a coverup at an iranian nuclear site. here's jim sciutto. >> reporter: today the president made an impassioned and defiant defense of the iran nuclear deal attempting to dissuade lawmakers from blocking the agreement. >> i've had to make a lot of
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tough calls as president. but whether or not this deal is good for american security is not one of those calls. it's not even slow. >> reporter: but the skeptics got new ammunition today. cnn has learned that the u.s. intelligence community believes that iran is attempting to clean up one of the most sensitive suspected nuclear sites. after new commercial satellite imagery showed heavy construction equipment including bulldozer. the president dismissed the possibility that iran can hide nuclear activity. >> nuclear material isn't something you hide in the closet. it can leave a trace for years. the bottom line is if iran cheats we can catch them and we will. >> reporter: a senior intelligence official familiar with the imagery in question tells cnn that the iaea is quote, familiar with
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sanitization efforts and the international community has confidence in the iaea's technical expertise. many lawmakers, republicans and democrats, aren't convinced. they take particular issue with the fact that the administration has not released details of agreements between iran and the iaea and won't confirm if u.s. officials read them. >> why now will you not give us the documents that exist that are so important to all of us relative to the integrity of this? why not? >> we don't have the documents in the first instance. we don't have them. so we don't have them to give to you. i didn't see the final documents. i saw the provisional documents. >> reporter: but for the president, however the choice is clear. >> let's not mince words. the choice we face is ultimately between diplomacy or some form of war. maybe not tomorrow maybe not three months from now. but soon.
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cnn's gym shoejim sciutto there. an islamic preacher says he is innocent. and he appeared in court on wednesday. they are accused of supporting the militant group in lectures that were published online. they both said they would plead not guilty. their next court appearance is scheduled for august 28th. the egyptian branch of isis claims it is threatening to kill a croatian hostage if the group's demand is not met. and as ian lee reports they are promising to act quickly. >> reporter: another looming deadline for after isis hostage. a croatian shown online in the trademark orange jump suit with
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a masked man and the isis flag behind him. isis in egypt sinai giving him 48 hours starting wednesday. in the short video he states their demand to egypt, release all female muslim prisoners. militants reportedly kidnapped the father of two on a road west of cairo last month. he is a topographer. the company confirmed the kidnapping saying they took all necessary precautions to safeguard its employees welfare and to collaborate with local authorities in this regard. the croatian government says it is trying to resolve the situation and the egyptin government has yet to respond. while isis in iraq syria, and libya known for their kidnappings and executions this
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is the first time for the branch in egypt. we have seen isis in sinai growing bolder and deadlier. according to egyptian state media, militants killed at least 17 soldiers in simultaneous attacks in sinai last month including one of their most sophisticated to date striking an egyptian naval ship with a missile while sailing in the mediterranean. this latest isis video comes as egypt tries to focus the world's attention on the suez canal. on thursday egypt's president, abdel fattah el-sisi will lead celebrations surrounding the opening of a new section of the canal, a vital waterway that separates the sinai peninsula with mainland egypt. egypt has dealt with isis kidnappings before. in february at least 20 christians from egypt were executed in libya.
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egypt responded with air strikes. we don't know where the hostage is being held. it may not even be in egypt. what we do know is the clock is ticking. ian lee, cnn, cairo. still ahead here on "cnn newsroom." a powerful typhoon is packing damaging winds and rain. and taiwan and china are next in line. what to expect when ten republicans take to the stage in ohio for the first presidential primary debate. we're back in a moment. just about anywhere you use sugar, you can use splenda®... ...no calorie sweetener. splenda® lets you experience... ...the joy of sugar... ...without all the calories. think sugar, say splenda®
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egypt is planning a grand ceremony today for the opening of an extension to the suez canal. the route which runs along the original canal will allow two-way traffic and can accommodate larger ships. it took a year to complete and egypt hopes it will boost the country's economy. the canal links the mediterranean with the red sea and is one of the most important waterways in the world. severe flooding is battering
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several parts of asia in the wake of a cyclone and heavy monsoon rains including myanmar. more than 200,000 people there are in temporary shelters and the death toll has risen to 69. u.s. secretary of state john kerry announced plans for the u.s. to donate a relief package to help myanmar deal with the disaster. india is also suffering. hundreds of thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes to escape the flooding and more than 200 people have been killed. the rains have caused landslides destroyed homes and left entire villages under water. sumnima udas is in the flood zone. >> reporter: the rivers flow down from the himalayas and many are flowing over the danger level. in some areas like this the water level is starting to
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recede. but in the low lying parts of west bengal the situation is still very desperate. kilometers and kilometers of flood water as far as the eyes can see. this district in eastern india is one of the worst effected. the main river is seven kilometers from here roughly five miles but you can see how far inland the water has come and people have started fishing on what used to be their farmland. hundreds dead and hundreds of thousands of homes damaged. roads roads submerged. wading through the flood water is the only option for many. we hitched a ride with a wedding party. he rented a rick -- boat. >> he is a potato trader.
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he says his entire supply for the season has been destroyed. i asked him how he is going to support his new bride. i don't know he says. throughout the journey, the village priest blows his conch shell. >> all of this used to be rice paddy fields and it is planting season right now. but as you can see the entire area has turned into a mini lake of sorts and it's quite deep as well about 10 to 15 feet. those who don't have access to boats are stranded. entire villages cut off from the outside world for almost a week. the homes are unlivable so they found this dry patch of land and have built this makeshift shelters over here. they moved all their livestock as well. but so far they say they've received absolutely no help. floods are not uncommon here. they happen every monsoon season but it's this is the worst it's been in years, they say.
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after a long journey, they are finally home. a welcoming ritual is performed. the holy water may not with as clean as it should be. the celebrations perhaps not perfect. people making the best of it. even in the worst of times. something has to be said about the resilience of the people here. they deal with so much hardship on a day-to-day basis and floods are a huge setback for them but still they persevere. >> sumnima udas there. and flooding rains will be a big threat for taiwan with a powerful typhoon striking this weekend. ivan cabrera joins us with the latest on the storm. and of course the difficulty for taiwan a small, vulnerable island there. >> no question about it. and the topography making it worse for the rainfall there. and unlike the floods in india
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and myanmar. here we have to contend with typhoon force winds. the winds are down a bit now. but the latest satellite imagery indicating to me i think the winds of 175 kilometers per hour are likely to go north. we'll watch that closely and that is the forecast for intensification as the system continues to move to the north and west. the track has never been in question here going right towards taiwan. so that by the time we get into the 36-hour time frame winds of 215 kilometers per hour. that's essentially a category 4 hurricane equivalent moving over taiwan. talk about the winds. hour by hour as far as the wind field. look at this perfect symmetry here with the very powerful winds. this would be friday afternoon. that means that taipei will be
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experiencing tropical storm force winds. but the dangerous winds arrive friday night into saturday morning. that's when the landfall will occur. let's talk about the topography in taiwan. of course the city the capital, where 7.5 million people live that's taipei on the northwestern side of the island. on the eastern side of the island we have a coastal range here. the storm surge you would get on the eastern side of the island is worst on the western side as the storm moves into the taiwan strait. by then the winds shift back to the west. as the wind pushes the water from the strait into the coastal cities we are talking about a storm surge and coastal flooding along with the rainfall. and the topography enhances the rainfall here as we talk about this wall of water that's going to be coming in. take a look at this arm here moving into taiwan.
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we'll get closer here and talk about the numbers. 150 to 250, that's just in the first 12 hours of this storm. and you see the white color here indicating excess of 500 millimeters of rainfall. that will fall on the mountain. that water has to go somewhere and it's going to rush down the mountain and that is the problem we have in taiwan because of the topography landslides and flash flooding over the next few days. and then of course round two as it crosses the strait china gets ready for a second landfall sunday and monday. >> unnerving for those people in taiwan. thanks for pointsing it out for us. the top ten republican u.s. presidential candidates are getting ready to face off in the first primary debate and all eyes will be on donald trump. it has been 70 years since
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the u.s. dropped the first ever nuclear bomb on hiroshima, japan. one survivor shares her story for future generations.
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welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. this is "cnn newsroom." i'm rosemary church. it is of course time to check the headlines for you this hour. malaysia's leader says a piece of airplane debris found last week on reunion island is from missing flight mh370. this prompted angry relatives of the passengers to storm malaysia airlines' beijing office.
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they say they don't believe the debris is from the plane and are demanding to know the truth. u.s. president barack obama is making a strong pitch to congress on the iran nuclear deal. he says rejecting the deal will damage the u.s. credibility. the senate will begin the debate on the deal next month. monsoon rains and flooding have forced hundreds of thousands of people into relief camps in india. government officials say more than 200 people have been killed in the heavy downpours and related accidents. forecasters say it could take two weeks for flood waters to recede in some areas. later tonight, we will hear from ten u.s. republican presidential candidates in the first primary debate. front runners donald trump and june jeb bush.
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things are already heating up. here's dana bash. >> reporter: the biggest event at this cleveland arena these days is when lebron james is plague. but all these trucks are lined up for a political sport, the first republican 2016 presidential debate. sources close to the nine g.o.p. contenders sharing the stage with the unlikely front runner donald trump insist he will not be their focus. >> all of us are running, we owe voters who we are. >> reporter: as for trump he insists he wants to focus on issues. >> i'm not looking to hurt anybody. i'm not looking to embarrass anybody. if i have to bring up deficiencies i'll do that but i'd rather go down the middle. you don't know what's going to happen. >> reporter: and tries to lower expectations politician style. >> i never debated. my whole life has been a debate. but these politicians all they do is debate.
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>> reporter: the question is whether the man who retaliated against a man by reading his cell phone on live tv can help himself. >> look what happened to lindsey graham rick perry, not in the debate. you attack donald trump he is going to come back at you twice as hard. >> reporter: jeb bush may have the most to lose. he is the favorite among establishment republicans and this is a critical chance for him to prove he is worth the $100 million plus he raised. >> my dad's the greatest man alive if you don't like it i'll take you outside. >> reporter: that performance has some backers worried. and this stumble yesterday when talking about funding for planned parenthood. >> you can take dollar for dollar -- i'm not sure we need half a billion dollar for women's health issues. >> reporter: but his campaign is
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staying on message with the jeb bush swag store selling things like this vintage tank top. but as for jeb bush's preparations he is focused on trying to explain to people he is not just another bush but he has a very specific conservative record from when he was governor of florida even on issues of education where people think maybe he is too moderate in the republican electorate and also he is going to try to separate himself maybe not by name but just the dynamic to show he is different from the guy at the center of the stage, donald trump. dana bash cnn, cleveland, ohio. cnn political commentator ryan -- joins me now to talk about the debate. thank you for being with us. and as republican presidential
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candidates prepare for the opening debate talk about what we should be looking for when they all take to the stage. >> reporter: as you know donald trump is the leader in the polls and i think he's going to have the center position on that stage. so everyone will be looking for how the other candidates deal with this dominant personality in their midst. look for how the candidates attack him. do they engage with him or present their own agenda? that's a strategic calculation they'll have to make. the debates really do matter. if you look back in 2012 when we had a big field, if you were the candidate who came out of the debate as the news story you got a lot of attention and free media and your poll numbers were goosed. so i think what you're trying to do is looking for opportunities to be the next day's story but
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without -- i guess, embarrassing yourself by attacking trump in a way that is sort of beneath a governor or a senator. i think that's the knife edge these candidates are on in engaging trump. >> as you mention with the candidates do you tackle trump and take the risk of him shutting them down and possibly humiliating them or do you somehow try to work with him? because this is the other thing in american politics eventually some of these guys are going to have to work together. >> that's right. although i don't think -- if donald trump -- look i don't mean to dismiss him or be dismissive of him. but most people do not for see him being the eventual republican nominee and he's not likely to run for another position. he's not likely to serve in a cabinet. so you don't have to worry about
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working with him. but some of the other candidates you could see being the top of a ticket or bottom of a ticket. there is that dynamic. i think that the question is do you sully yourself by trying to take him down? and it's a question that i think someone like jeb bush or marco rubio or scott walker the candidates that are just below trump in the polls they have to decide is it going to be me that takes this guy on or should i let the lesser candidates do it for me and i stay out of the fray? remember very few of the candidates have ever been engaged in a field of 17 opponents, right? most of these candidates had one, two, three primary opponents when they ran for governor or senator. they are making it up as they go along as well. and none have run against a persona like donald trump.
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there is no script for this or historical debate to look back an and say that is the model here. >> it will be interesting too to see if we can work out who the winner is at the end of this gop debate. ryan lizza thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. we are just a year away from the summer olympics in rio de janeiro. some waterways are so bad even the fish can't survive. >> reporter: diving in head first. olympic hopefuls splash into the waters off rio's beach for a tri
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triathlon qualifier. a recurring event, dead fish on the top of the site of the rowing and canoeing events. you have to stop training and go rest he says. the dead fish block the oars and get in the way. and the garbage bobbing in the olympic sailing events. the worst by far isn't what is on the surface but what is underneath. this is raw sewage pouring into the bay every day and it stinks. a new investigation commissioned by the associated press found olympic water venues so contaminated with human feces, athletes risk becoming violently ill. if i fell into the water right
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now, he says i could contract anything from an intestinal disorder or hepatitis a. the city and state governments admitted they won't meet cleanup targets. but newer water samples show no health risks. >> it's not an issue for the games. it's a lie when people say that. the area where sailing competitions are going to be held it's a good area and a safe area. >> reporter: and it certainly hasn't slowed down the rowers warming up for another olympic test event. a woman who survived the devastating hiroshima bombing wants her survival to mean something. what she's saying on the 70th anniversary of that deadly day. with hyaluronic acid
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[ bell tolling ]. >> thursday marks 70 years since an atomic bomb decimated hiroshima in japan. bells tolled in remembrance of the nearly 80,000 victims that died instantly that day. tens of thousands more lost their lives from radiation poisoning in the years following. prime minister shinzo abe spoke from what is now peace park. he says he will be drafting a resolution for a nuclear-free world and submit it to the united nations. and ivan watson spoke to a woman who survived. there are some pictures from that time that can be very disturbing. >> reporter: he she may look frail but don't be fooled.
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87-year-old cisako lived to tell the tale. she was in hiroshima when an atomic flash lit up the sky. i was three kilometers away she says. the shock wave knocked her out. she says she woke up in time to see the mushroom cloud. on the morning of august 6th 1945 a u.s. bomber dropped the weapon nicknamed little boy of hiroshima. about 80,000 died immediately. the five-year death toll was about 200,000. for takioka was only 17 years old and just finished the night shift making torpedos at a military facility. saw horrors here by the river. >> translator: i still remember the day very well.
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this was a river filled with the dead bodies. people were burned and they jump into the river. >> reporter: takioka survived the ordeal and became an outspoken activist around the world against war and nuclear proliferation. hiroshima was rebuilt along with a peace park to honor the victims. the museum here chronicles the devastating effects of the a-bomb leaving some american visitors grappling with difficult questions. >> in america textbooks talk about how necessary it was to release the bomb and have all the civilians die. but when you look at it it was just really -- was it really necessary to do this? >> reporter: scott baker and his fellow boy scouts are shocked by what they learned here. >> i didn't know what to expect. once i saw all the images and
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stuff i got a little sick. >> i feel it's necessary to walk through and to see what happened and just to go through history and see this can be repeated if we make the wrong mistakes. >> reporter: that's an observation chisako takioka is relieved to here. her first son died 18 days after birth from what doctors told her is a-bomb syndrome. today she works with her daughter to pass on her first-hand account of the devastation in hiroshima to future generations. her message on this grim anniversary? never again. ivan watson, cnn, hiroshima, japan. >> the atomic blast in hiroshima levelled almost everything in its path. but there were some remnants. a tricycle a suitcase, a doll. and you can find the photos and
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the stories behind them on cnn.com. we'll be right back.
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mom has always been one of those people who needs to keep busy. if she's not working in her garden, she's probably on one of her long walks with bailey. she was recently diagnosed with a heart condition. i know she's okay, but it concerned me she's alone so often. so i encouraged her to get a medical alert button. philips lifeline offers the best options to keep her doing the things she loves in the home she loves. if she ever falls, or needs help, i know we can get to her quickly and with her condition that can be critical. and even though she doesn't typically go far from home, the button always goes with her. these days, she's still as busy as ever. just the way she likes it. innovation and you. philips lifeline. lifeline is america's #1 medical alert service. visit philipslifeline.com/caregiver today or call this number for your free
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brochure and ask about free activation. no one ever said the road to
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the white house was a smooth one as republican candidates prepare for their first debate later today. cnn's jeanne moos takes a look back at some of the oops moments from debates past. >> reporter: don't we tend to watch debates, hoping to see a train wreck? instead, we're left with memorable moments, sarah palin winking. ronald reagan demanding the sound system not be turned off. >> i am paying for this microphone. >> reporter: a line he picked up -- >> don't you shut me off i'm paying for this broadcast. >> reporter: -- from spencer tracy. tv magnifies everything from the sweat glistening on nixon cease chin to al gore's exaggerated exasperated sighs. resusz tated by "snl."
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>> commerce education, and what's the third one there? let's see. >> reporter: rick perry's oops moment and jan brewer's brain freeze. >> that we could possibly do. and this was just her opening statement. you know what a televised debate isn't the time for? checking the time as president george bush did. >> how has national debt -- >> reporter: debates are a time for memorable zingers and one-liners. for instance -- >> who am i? why am i here? >> reporter: and whatever you do candidates don't invade your opponents' special space. >> as hillary's senate rival
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once did. >> we'll shake on this. >> reporter: or when al gore crept up on gorge bush. >> and i believe i can. >> reporter: there is nothing like debatable behavior to liven up a debate. >> there's differences. >> you're likable enough. >> thank you. >> are we not doing the talent portion? >> reporter: jeanne moos cnn, new york. and be watching tonight for more possible oops moments. i'm rosemary church. "early strart" is coming up for viewers in the united states and for those elsewhere there is another edition of "cnn newsroom." have a great day.
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in just hours, republicans running for president face-off in the first debate of the primary season. new information about the last-minute preparations and possible surprises on the way. part of missing malaysia airline mh-370 found. officials confirming the jet wing washed ashore in the indian ocean is that. and a man armed with a pellet gun and hat

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