Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  August 10, 2015 9:00pm-1:01am PDT

9:00 pm
because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. a day of civil disyoe beadance in ferguson, missouri. plus, the overcrowded earth, how the exploding global population is taking its toll and what it means for the rest of us. thank you so much for joining us. glad to be with you for the next two hours. i'm zain asher. >> good to be by your side.
9:01 pm
i'm errol barnett, this is "cnn newsroom". now protesters are gathered in ferguson, missouri after a local official there declared a state of emergency. demonstrators have been marking the one-year anniversary of the shooting death of michael brown, an unarmed african-american teenager shot by a white police officer. police say protesters are throwing frozen water bottles at them and warned the crowd of possible arrests. >> it's been one year since michael brown was killed. the situation there is clearly still tense. earlier about 200 protesters marched from a church to the federal courthouse in st. louis. police arrested 56 protesters there. now the anniversary of brown's death began very peacefully. but then chaotic later on into the night when shots were fired. listen. [ shots fired ]
9:02 pm
>> frightening moment for so many people. you see some folks ducking down. police say a 18-year-old was critically wounded. we're joined from ferguson, missouri. there was a long way to go in healing the racial divide, but how are things going? >> reporter: that's a tough question right there. because obviously there's a lot going on just under the surface. we saw that bubble up. a lot of people are saying that the violence that happened had nothing to do with the protest. that was a few men who had another beef started shooting at each other. but you can feel people's anger. tonight we haven't seen a lot of protesters hitting the streets. tonight there's less than six people behind me.
9:03 pm
some have signs. but this is a lot different than what we saw sunday night. rapid gunfire followed by running and fear. you can see the panic rise in the crowd. the peaceful protest for michael brown turned to violence sunday night. the interim police chief was in the middle of an interview when the anger across the street boiled over. >> we want to be as peaceful as possible. [ gunfire ] >> reporter: detectives rushed to surround tyrone harris. they say thouey were fired upon. police say he was carrying a stolen gun. >> back up! >> there were four officers who were in that van. all four fired at the suspect. and the suspect fell there.
9:04 pm
>> reporter: harris' aunt told cnn he wasn't carrying a gun and was running from the gunfire. the crowd's anger turned toward police. >> we're ready for war! >> we're ready for war! >> reporter: the shooting pushed police and protesters into a standoff. three officers were injured, one hit in the face by a brick. monday afternoon, the city of ferguson released a statement about the shooting. we are deeply disappointed with the violence that took place last night. this kind of behavior from those who want to cause disruption and destroy the progress 3r this past year will not be tolerated. >> do your job! >> reporter: but a year after michael brown was shot and killed by officer darren wilson, the tensions remain high. some were arrested in st. louis. they were calling for the dismantling of the police
9:05 pm
department. there was frustration with the all-too-familiar scenes. >> i think this is just another tragic reminder that weapons in an already wounded community is a recipe for disaster. >> and as you say in your report, there, these scenes of shootings and protester clashes, in the wake of the shooting of michael brown, the department of justice did find that they exhibited this of patented action against african-americans of. >> reporter: we have had an election here. we've seen a changeover from an all-white elected officials to having some african-americans part of the electoral process. we're also seeing the court system change. but there are people who say enough's enough. they want to see the police
9:06 pm
department go away. we did see protesters take to the highway just this afternoon and block the road. there were drivers who were no longer going to sit in their car and let people block the road. some started driving through the crowd and you could see protesters kicking their car as they went through. so a lot of tension remains in this community. >> ryan young joins us from ferguson. thanks. and we do want to show you recent images from ferguson, missouri where even though some of the clashes have ended, you do see a large presence of people outside. and in the wake of michael brown from last year, i think people really feel the importance of having their cameras out, recording interactions with police, because what's underlying all of that is the distrust between police behavior and how communities of color feel like they are being treated. >> and it has renewed the conversation about police officers wearing the body cameras, but safety is a top priority in that community.
9:07 pm
you remember a few months ago we saw buildings and offices burned down, obviously, a lot of people do not want a repeat of that. but the protesters started up very peaceful after michael brown was honored at 12:02 in the afternoon, marking the time he died, august 9, 2014, and all of a sudden last night turned violen violent. we heard gunshots. and we are working to get one of our reporters who is on the ground there in ferguson, and we will bring him up as soon as we have him. okay, on to another story. u.s. presidential candidate donald trump is defiant about not apologizing to tv host megyn kelly. he says she should apologize to him. this comes after a controversial remark he made. >> many who heard the comment think that trump implied that
9:08 pm
she was tough on him because she was men straightening. trump denies that. and on monday night kelly gave what may be the last word on this controversy on her program. here's a clip of what she said. >> apparently, mr. trump thought the question i asked was unfair and felt i was attacking him. i felt he was asked a tough, but fair, question. we agree to disagree. mr. trump did interviews over the weekend that attacked me personally. i've decided not to respond. mr. trump is an interesting man who has captured the attention of the electorate. that's why he's leading in the polls. trump, who is the front runner will not apologize. and i will not apologize. >> firestorms and controversy are now the norm for donald
9:09 pm
trump's candidacy. >> hillary clinton, the u.s. democratic presidential contender is condemning trump's comments and calling out other republican candidates on women's rights. jeff zeleny has more. >> what donald trump said about megyn kelly is outrageous. >> reporter: donald trump now spilling out into the democratic primary. >> megyn kelly is a strong woman and more than capable of defending herself against donald trump. i'm worried about what republican policies would do to the rest of america's women and i will continue to speak out about that. >> reporter: today in new hampshire, clinton weighed in for the first time on trump's remarks. >> if you focus on the biggest showman, you lose the thread. the thread here is that the republicans are putting forth some very radical and offensive positions when it comes to
9:10 pm
women's lives. >> reporter: she blasted the full republican field saying all women should be on alert over the opposition's position on abortion rights, even in the face of incest and rape. >> i think they should be going after him, the republican party's going to have to deal with him. i don't want that forgotten, so yes, i know it makes great tv. i think the guy went way overboard, offensive, outrageous, but what marco rubio said has as much of an impact on where the republican party is today. >> reporter: she has known trump for years. she tried to distance herself from trump today. >> i didn't know him that well. i mean, i knew him. and i happened to be planning to be in florida, and i thought it would be fun to go to his wedding, because it's always entertaining. now that he's running for
9:11 pm
president, it's a little more troubling. >> reporter: she came to new hampshire to unveil a plan to rein in student lonee loans. >> we need to make it affordable to everyone without saddling them with decades of debt. >> reporter: what's also troubling, trump's surging populari popularity. jeff zeleny, cnn, exeter, new hampshire. all right, we want to update you on the situation in ferguson. one of our reporters, jason carroll is on the scene. we saw gunshots in ferguson last night. there have been arrests there tonight as far as i understand. set the scene for us now. >> reporter: several arrests, zain, that happened about 45 minutes ago right where we are. we are on a street called west
9:12 pm
florissant. what we are experiencing right now, on one sieftd street we have a number of protesters out here, on the other side of the street you can see still a significant number of mens of st. louis county police as well as state troopers trying to keep the peace. and for most of the night that's what happened out here actually. they were able to do that until at a certain point a small number of protesters went into the middle of the street. they repeatedly received warnings to get out of the street. when that didn't happen, that's when law enforcement moved in and made several arrests. again, and there were some tense moments at that point. some rocks and bottles were thrown. you can see from some of the tape that we're able to feed in to you, you can see exactly what happened as officers moved in and made those arrests, and shortly thereafter the protesters went about doing what they set out to do, talking about their anger. they feel that in the year since
9:13 pm
michael brown's death they have not seen enough change and they are venting some frustration. some are out here to cause problems, but what we're seeing out here is even a year after michael brown's death, there's still so much work that needs to be done in this community. >> and you just mentioned that people think that not enough change has happened. that they still don't like the way black men are treated by police officers in that community. but i'm just curious. from the people you've spoken to, what do people make of the small changes, the small sort of progress that's been made, especially when it comes to the hiring of more african-americans in the ferguson police department? >> reporter: i think for some people it's too little too late, not enough. they're still looking for more. i think they're looking for more representation in the police department, not just in the police department but on the school board, throughout city government. and i think we saw, what i think a lot of people would like to
9:14 pm
see is more interaction. they want police to listen to them. and we did see some of that out here tonight. there was one community activist out here engaging with a member of the state police, talking to them, trying to sort out who might be in the crowd causing problems. so we did see some of that interaction. i think there are a fnumber of people in this community who would like to sigh moee more of. if you're going to be realistic about the situation here, you can't expect decades of ill feelings between this community and the police to be solved in one year. it's just simply going to take time, zain? >> of course a few months ago, we saw a lot of violence, a lot of looting, a lot of burning. that community still hasn't been rebuilt from that point, so hopefully we don't see more unrest, especially violent unrest. jason carroll, live for us in
9:15 pm
ferguson, we appreciate that, thank you. >> and we will, of course, update our viewers if there's more news out of ferguson tonight. when we come back, a disaster in the u.s. state of colorado, we'll have more on huge concerns raised over contaminates that turned this river yellow. stay with us. watch as these magnificent creatures take flight, soaring away from home towards the promise of a better existence. but these birds are suffering. because this better place turned out to have a less reliable cell phone network, and the videos on their little bird phones kept buffering. birds hate that. so they came back home. because they get $300 from switching back to verizon, and so can you! verizon. come home to a better network.
9:16 pm
can save you up to 50% on ink, so print all you want and never run out. right now, buy an eligible printer, and get three months of free ink with hp instant ink. available at participating retailers. the most affordable way to print. hp instant ink. i'm why? because it's red lobster's crabfest. and there's so much crab, so many ways. and with dishes like this luscious crab lover's dream or savory snow crab bake. i'm just getting started so hurry in and get crackin' ♪"once there was a hushpuppy" by dan romis man kind?eitlin ♪ are we good? go see.
9:17 pm
go look through their windows so you can understand their views. go find out just how kind the hes and shes of this mankind are. hiking brought us togetherdom hikers. but that's not the only thing that keeps us coming back. here's to friends who reach for better. fewer carbs, fewer calories, superior taste. michelob ultra. the superior light beer. wi noticed benny right away. , i just had to adopt him. he's older so he needs my help all day. when my back pain flared up we both felt it i took tylenol at first but i had to take 6 pills to get through the day. then my friend said "try aleve". just two pills, all day. and now, i'm back for my best bud! aleve. all day strong
9:18 pm
and try aleve pm, now with an easy open cap. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ in the nation, what's precious to you is precious to us. ♪ love is strange so when coverage really counts, you can count on nationwide.
9:19 pm
we put members first. join the nation. welcome back. let's get you some new information out of turkey. a wave of violence has swept through istanbul. >> police responded by firing back. three people including two attackers were killed. [ speaking in foreign language ] [ gunfire ] >> that chaotic scene, that gunfire was the scene outside the u.s. consulate in istanbul. we know that two women opened fire on the building. one of the women were captured. the other fled, but no one was killed. >> now the far left revolutionary people's liberation party claimed responsibility for this. and it all comes after six u.s.
9:20 pm
fighter planes deployed to turkey as a part of the ongoing war on isis. meantime in neighboring syria, the civil war is wearing the country down. president bashar al assad's army is fighting rebels and isis. >> they're fighting two wars on both fronts, and for civilians caught in the middle, there are no signs of relief. >> reporter: the syrian military continues to be increasingly strained. and even president bashar al assad has admitted that they may have to retreat from areas to shore up other places. it is causing a strain here in the capital of damascus. what we're seeing are severe shortages of fuel. it takes an hour to two hours to actually get gasoline at gas station. also, there are power cuts throughout the city various times during the day. one of the other things that's
9:21 pm
also happened is with the pace that isis has been going and the gains that isis has been making against the syrian military, there are a lot of internally displaced people coming to the population centers, some of them near the mediterranean coast but also to the capital of damascus. you're seeing people, especially minorities coming from places like palmyra, also from towns recently taken by isis and putting a big strain on the syrian government to make sure that these people find a place to stay and that they have enough food, water and medication. and also on the many aid groups working here in the syrian capital and in other parts of the country. nevertheless, you don't get the sense that people believe that the regime is on the verge of chancing. while there have been setbacks, most people here in damascus believe that bashar al assad is not going to go away anytime soon. >> and over the next few days,
9:22 pm
fred plight ken will be on the ground in syria and will bring us reports. do look out for that this week. now in the united states, a judge has ruled that two girls accused of brutally stabbing a classmate to please an online horror character, they will be tried as adults. they are charged with attempted murder. the victim was stabbed 19 times but was able to survive. >> absolutely horrifying. that attack happened 15 months ago when the girls were just 12 years old. a local reporter spoke to guise's father. >> what's your biggest concern? >> she's a little girl. >> a wisconsin judge ruled monday that the pair now 13 should remain in adult court.
9:23 pm
a decision means they could face decades in jail if convicted. >> after they were found, the two girls told police they did it out of dedication to the fictional online character "slender man." a thin. mythical man in a black suit. we go now to mexico. it has been one the month since el chapo the escaped from a prison. and the notorious drug lord is still on the run as we speak. police say that el chapo got away using the shower in his cell. you can see the video right here. he goes to the shower. that hole where he disappears into led to a lighted and vent lated tunnel. >> a mexican journalist says that documents show that the mexican government had clues of a possible escape attempt by el
9:24 pm
chapo. >> reporter: the first thing is that the federal government sees last march, they have information that people of el chapo was looking for the blueprints of the prison. so of course that information should create an alert for the government to think what, what el chapo wants with these blueprints. >> now according to the documents, the surveillance camera inside guzman's cell had audio where construction noises could be heard and what makes this suspicious is that this is el chapo's second escape. >> how could they not have heard him drilling away there or heard his people, rather, drilling away. the u.s. coast guard has seized more than 29,000,29,000 kilograms or for our american viewers, 66,000 pounds of cocaine, one of the largest
9:25 pm
hauls in u.s. history. the draugs are valued at $22 billion. >> officials say every single brick was headed for the states. part of the u.s. state of colorado is under a state of emergency several days after a mishap that's stained a river yellow. it used to be clear. >> now it is yellow. the federal agency that is supposed to prevent things such as this accidently released millions of gallons of pollutants into the aknee muss river. authorities are still working to determine just how polluted the river is, but it used to be clear. now it is that color. >> let's get more on how dangerous this spill may become.
9:26 pm
pedram javaheri joins us. imagine if you are a resident, if you are used to seeing this beautiful river, it turns to this. i've seen images of people still boating and kayaking down it. >> what officials here are saying potentially for some contaminates, arsenic, lead, zinc. we know down the line maybe arizona and california could be impacted. we want to show you the state of colorado. a gem of a state if you've been here, but 15,000 mines dot this area. the gold king mine, that's area
9:27 pm
of interest, this mine was abandoned back in the 1920s. and officials knew there was a minor leak here. but what the epa had been doing in the last couple of days, trying to find a way to stop the minor leak that's occurring. one of the officials potentially pushed the backhoe and moved sediment. that pushed farther downstream. rio of the los animus. that was silverton, colorado tremendous area for tourist activity. here we have anything as far as kayaking, fishing, water for irrigation, all of that has been suspended as the state of emergency is issued. and guess what happens beyond
9:28 pm
that? you work your way into the san juan river. eventually feeds into lake powell. even folks in los angeles and san diego get water from areas around lake powell. so the concern is at that wide-reaching impact. and you take a look at the area where the spill occurred and how it impacts further downstream, it could impact five states before it's all said and done with all the heavy metals, as far as arsenic, lead, copper and potentially zinc. >> we will see you next hour. bombs and blame, after a wave of blasts, the afghan president has sharp words for his neighbor. what ya doing?
9:29 pm
checking my free credit score at creditkarma.
9:30 pm
i have great credit when was the last time you checked? so righteous. rad. i want it. it is rad, but we're gonna have to like check your credit score, so... oh my god, it's like totally yours. you know credit scores change, right? aren't you curious to see what it is right now? ah! still rad. credit karma, get your free score now
9:31 pm
everyone is looking for ways while to cut expenses.s unique, and that's where pg&e's online business energy checkup tool can really help. you can use it to track your actual energy use. find rebates that make equipment upgrades more affordable. even develop a customized energy plan for your company. think of it as a way to take more control over your operating costs.
9:32 pm
and yet another energy saving opportunity from pg&e. find new ways to save energy and money with pg&e's business energy check-up. a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the u.s. and those of you tuned in from around the world. their this is "cnn newsroom." >> these are your headlines. police in ferguson, missouri say protesters threw rocks and frozen bottles of water at them during demonstrations monday night. there have been at least nine arrests so far. a local official declared a state of emergency early on. it comes as demonstrators mark one year since the shooting death of an unarmed african-american teenager by a
9:33 pm
white police officer. two people have been stabbed at an ikea store in sweden. this happened about an hour from stockholm. the reason for the attack is unclear. also a bomb exploded near a police station in istanbul, turkey on monday. hours later, police and gunmen exchanged fire at the same scene. three people were killed, including two attackers. later two women opened fire on the u.s. consulate in istanbul. one woman was captured, the other fled. no one was killed. now afghanistan's president has harsh words for pakistan, saying its neighbor must do more to curb the taliban. this after a wave of violence, including a suicide attack monday nur the kabul airpts. >> meanwhile, the u.s. is revealing new details about how an attack was carried out.
9:34 pm
>> reporter: we're learning new details about the attack on the operations base on friday. they got inside the lines, blew up a car bomb at the gate and gunmen followed them inside. four of the gunmen killed, we're told, but still, a major breach of security at a u.s. base. a wave of terror across the afghan capital. today a suicide car bomber sfruk a checkpoint outside kabul airport, killing at least five people, wounding 16. the taliban immediately claimed responsibility, saying it targeted, quote, occupying foreign forces. the bloody attack followed a series of suicide blasts on friday, on a market. a police academy, and a coalition military base, killing more than 50 people, including a u.s. soldier and wounding
9:35 pm
others. pakistan was blamed, ending months of diplomatic outreach to afghanistan's neighbor. >> translator: we want them to take action against those circles who are committing acts against afghanistan. >> reporter: but the violence reflects turmoil within the taliban as well. announcement of the death of mull la omar. >> these attacks underscore two things that afghanistan remains a dangerous place and that the taliban has not renounced the use of violence as a tactic and a terror device. >> reporter: the renewed violence comes as the u.s. continues to draw down its military presence in afghanistan. leading to renewed fears among many u.s. lawmakers that afghan
9:36 pm
security forces are not yet ready to protect the country. >> the taliban and other terrorist groups are testing the new afghan army. so president obama's withdrawal plan is too much, too fast. we take you to the middle east now. benjamin netanyahu is urging a large group of u.s. lawmakers to reject the iran nuclear deal. >> he met with 22 house democrats visiting israel, trying to convince them to oppose the agreement in the vote set for next month. listen here as one leading democrat described the meeting. >> you met with netanyahu. what did he say? >> he believes it ought to be rejected and that a better deal ought to be pursued. i think the concerns are pretty universal. and the president would say,
9:37 pm
yes, i've had those concerns myself, and this is not a perfect answer but is the best answer at this time. >> meantime, democratic presidential front runner, hillary clinton supported the deal on the campaign trail. she says if congress fails to approve the agreement, quote, all bets are off. in the u.s., the federal investigation is under way into what exactly happened aboard a delta passenger plane forced to make an emergency landing. we have some stunning pictures for you. take a look here. a severe hailstorm tore off the plane's nose, and if you look closely, look at the windows of the cockpit. those windows are completely shattered. that forced the plane to make an emergency landing. >> a picture like that makes you not want to fly this again. >> i've never known this about flying. >> and this flight was packed. it was near the nebraska/colorado border when it flew straight into a path of dangerous storms.
9:38 pm
seconds later, the pilot said they were essentially flying blind. >> we have the weather radar. >> our windshield is pretty severely damaged. >> i thought i was lucky to be alive. i couldn't believe that we had flown through that and we made it. especially the damage to the wind screens. if was amazing that the pilot was able to fly and land the plane and keep us all safe. >> now thankplely. the plane was able to land safely in denver. but i'm sure when passengers looked back at those pictures and saw the kchb the plane. >> the windshield completely shattered. big changes for google after they announce a major restructuring plan. >> it will involve creating an umbrella plan, called alphabet. cnn's richard quest explains how this new plan will work.
9:39 pm
>> reporter: the announcement came in a blog called g is for google, from larry paige, the chief executive. in it, he said our company is operating well today, but we think we can make it cleaner and more accountable. and so the idea is to create a holding company, with a similar share structure to google, and enter it all the various components, including a newer, slimmed-down google. out of google will go the life sigh inches, the health care and all of the newer bits. they will all trade as individual companies within the overarching alphabet corporation. larry paige becomes the chief executive of alphabet --
9:40 pm
underneath the men will be a variety of chief execs, inclusion sun da. it will be supervised by bren and paige. will it work? well, no one should ever underestimate google, either in the corporate, the technological or the financial world. they've had tremendous success with google itself, with youtube, google maps, with corporations, you only remain successful if you make yourself uncomfortable. richard quest, cnn, new york. now, if you've been out and about, have you felt that there's just too many people around? too crowded on public transportation?
9:41 pm
>> especially in new york. >> additional 3.9 billion people will eventually be added to the world's population. we will explain. >> more the merrier. a woman who wechbts from running a world famous modeling agency to fighting human trafficking. hi my name is tom. i'm raph. my name is anne. i'm one of the real live attorneys you can talk to through legalzoom. don't let unanswered legal questions hold you up, because we're here, we're here, and we've got your back.
9:42 pm
legalzoom. legal help is here. look at us...ert a nation of checkers. missing this moment... to check all of the other moments. really, mom? just one look. they'll never notice. checkers, you can keep failing at trying to sneak a peek. or, you can change the way you check your phone. it's 3-0 in the first. how'd you do that? magic. acutally, it's the samsung galaxy s6 edge,
9:43 pm
with discreet edge notifications.
9:44 pm
cnn's freedom project is dedicated to shining a light on human trafficking, and we're focussing on how corporations are fighting against the multi-billion enterprise. >> now the former ceo of ford models runs a global foundation that fights modern-day slavery.
9:45 pm
claire sebastian has more. >> reporter: model manager, ceo, anti-slavery activist. tell me how you started in your work against trafficking. >> the u.n. asked me as a business leader to speak at a conference on human trafficking. and when i heard how people are trafficked, it was parallel to how we scout models around the world. >> she's from yugoslavia. and she'll have her second season here in march. >> reporter: katie ford was ceo of ford models for ten years, a company her parents founded in 1946. >> it was a very serious business. it had over $100 million in revenue. >> reporter: today her business is no less serious. >> the hope and dream a model has for a better leave is the same thing as a field worker who
9:46 pm
comes here from mexico or somebody who works in construction. >> reporter: traveling all over the world, she runs her foundation freedom for all, working to slop modern-day slavery at its source. she also supports victims of forced labor. this woman runs one of the partner organizations, a survivor, she came to the u.s., looking for work, and found herself forced into prostitution. this cooking class helps provide survivors skills needed to move on. some did not want to be filmed. those who have moved on were now willing to tell us their stories. >> when i arrived, this hungarian man picked me up at the airport and demanded all my money. >> before long, i realized this guy was a pimp. and it was him, and then it was
9:47 pm
others, and then it was others. and before i knew it, i was involved in trafficking. >> it's just so shocking. it is out of our consciousness. i think when people hear survivor stories that they will be more motivated. >> reporter: katie ford said she watched as her parents changed the fashion industry. it made her believe she can do the same here. you're going to keep going with this indefinitely? >> until it ends. which i hope is in my lifetime. >> reporter: claire sebastian, cnn, new york. >> those survivor stories, incredibly moving, and all this week, the cnn freedom project will focus on what the business world is doing to combat human traffickin trafficking. we will have more and hear from a former child slave. now some of the world's poorest nations will eventually
9:48 pm
see huge increases in their populations. coming up, we'll explain why that's good and bad news for those nations, after the break. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ so you're a small business expert from at&t? yeah, give me a problem and i've got the solution. well, we have 30 years of customer records. our cloud can keep them safe and accessible anywhere. my drivers don't have time to fill out forms. tablets. keep it all digital. we're looking to double our deliveries. our fleet apps will find the fastest route. oh, and your boysenberry apple scones smell about done. ahh, you're good. i like to bake. add new business services with at&t and get up to $500 in total savings. pwhat've we got? 5. bp 64/40
9:49 pm
sterilize sites. multiple foreign objects in the body. tweezers. (buzz!) (buzz!) if you're the guy from the operation game, you get operated on. it's what you do. (buzz!) if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. it's what you do. whei just put in the namey, of my parents and my grandparents.
9:50 pm
and as soon as i did that, literally it was like you're getting 7, 9, 10, 15 leaves that are just popping up all over the place. yeah, it was amazing. just with a little bit of information, you can take leaps and bounds. it's an awesome experience. ♪ hp instant ink can save you up to 50% on ink delivered to your door, so print all you want and never run out. plans start at $2.99 a month. right now, buy an eligible printer, and get three months of free ink with hp instant ink. available at participating retailers. the most affordable way to print. hp instant ink. so you think this chip is nothing to worry about? well at safelite we know sooner or later, every chip will crack. these friends were on a trip when their windshield got chipped. so they scheduled at safelite.com... they didn't have to change their plans, or worry about a thing. and i fixed it right away... ...with a strong repair they can trust.
9:51 pm
plus, with most insurance a safelite repair is no cost to you. really?! being there whenever you need us... that's another safelite advantage. safelite repair, safelite replace. ♪"once there was a hushpuppy" by dan romis man kind?eitlin ♪ are we good? go see. go look through their windows so you can understand their views. go find out just how kind the hes and shes of this mankind are.
9:52 pm
welcome back. a new u.n. report predicts the earth's population is about to experience its biggest growth spurt ever. currently, the u.n. estimates there are 7.3 billion of us here on the planet, and ha number is expected to rise to 8.5 billion by the year 2030. by the end of the century, the projection on this tiny planet earth is 11.2 billion people. where will we find a place to park? this report predicts most of the population increases will come from high-fertility nations, mainly on the african continent or those who already have large populations. and the growth will pose huge challenge challenges. robert walker joins us to talk about this. there is some positive news in the u.n. report. it say the the african
9:53 pm
population growth is due in part to advancements made in health care. it's allowing people po live much longer lives than spekted earlier. but that's happening in very poor nations. that's a problem. >> that is a problem. we are seeing growing longevity. the aids epidemic is waning. but population is expected to grow from 1.2 billion today to upwards of 4 billion by the end of the century. so we're going to see a tremendous amount of population growth in africa, particularly in sub-saharan africa. >> this will put a huge strain on resources and already developing nations, the study also show the that the population of india is set to surpass that of china. they both already have 1 billion people. what kind of challenges will this pose for the international community as we all discuss and
9:54 pm
figure out ways to share the limited resources we have? >> there are two real population concerns. one is a global concern about resources. and that includes fossil fuels, but also water and includes metals and minerals and other materials that are a worldwide concern. but when you talk about india and sub-saharan africa and population growth in those countries, the great other concern is what that means to alleviate hunger, to manage water scarcity, to address issues like deforestation, but political instability and conflict. >> what would be your recommendation, i'm wondering, to address these very serious issues. china's one-child policy, very controversial. and human rights groups have said that for a long time, that it's not helpful, it has all
9:55 pm
these societal fefkts. >> the good news is that coercion is not necessary to see a very substantial reduction in fertility. we've seen in many countries throughout east asia i have substantial reductions of fertility that do not have any element in coercion whatsoever. the challenge in many countries, particularly the poorest today, is that child marriage is oftentimes very prevalent. and if a girl gets married at the age of 8 or 9 or 12 or 13, and a male dominated society, she will have little say about how many children she will have. and that's becoming a very substantial obstacle to reduction fertility in those countries. we also need to increase the supply of contraception in developing countries, but we lass have to address these gender issues which are keeping fertility rates high and keeping them unsustainably high. >> the world is getting more
9:56 pm
crowded. we need to figure out more ways of working together and helping. great to chat with you. joining us from d.c. >> thank you very much. >> it's an important question. you've got limited resources and juste su such a massive growth spurt. >> it's a huge challenge for this generation and the upcoming ones as well. >> i'm zain asher. >> and i'm errol barnett. we're staying comfortable. we hope are you too. we will be back with more of the world's biggest stories. ...become especially important. from the makers of one a day fifty-plus. new one a day proactive sixty-five plus. with high potency vitamin b12... ...and more vitamin d.
9:57 pm
recently signed a 30-year mmortgage on this home.n they must be confident about the future. are you? buy in.
9:58 pm
quickenloans/home buy. refi. power. hiking brought us togetherdom hikers. but that's not the only thing that keeps us coming back. here's to friends who reach for better. fewer carbs, fewer calories, superior taste. michelob ultra. the superior light beer. you aren't treated like a priority. we do things differently. we'll take care of it.
9:59 pm
we put members first. join the nation. thank you.
10:00 pm
ferguson on edge, one year after the police killing of an unarmed black teenager and the birth of a nationwide movement. plus, how donald trump is reacting from the firestorm from his latest controversial comments. and something rotten in the state of theater etiquette. of. and a very warm welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world, we're your anchor team for the next hour. i'm zain asher. >> and i'm errol barnett.
10:01 pm
this is "cnn newsroom." protesters confront of police in ferguson, missouri for a second night. police say demonstrators threw frozen water bottles and rocks at them. it's one year after the death of michael brown. >> the mood there is still very tense. about 200 people marched from a church to the federal courthouse in st. louis. police arrested 56 protesters there, a demonstration began peacefully sunday, but then turned chaotic when shots were fired. listen to this. [ gunshots ] >> our jason carroll is in ferguson, missouri right now. last hour, he described the
10:02 pm
scene there. >> reporter: we on a street called west florissant. if i can show you what we are experiencing, on one side of street we still have a number of protesters out here. on the other side of street you can see still a significant number of police and troopers trying to keep the peace. they were able to do that until at a certain point, a small number of protesters went into the middle of the street. they repeatedly received warnings to get out of the street. when that didn't happen, that's when law enforcement moved in and made several arrests. there were some tense moments at that point, some rocks and bottles were thrown. you can see from some of the tape that we were able to feed into to you, you can see exactly what happened. and then shortly after, the protesters went about doing what they set out to do, which is talking about their anger. they feel that in the year since
10:03 pm
michael brown's death, not enough has been done. they're looking for more change. they're not seeing that. and they're venting some of their frustration. >> that's our jason carroll reporting on some of the small possibilities of violence. we'll ask sara sidner now, she reports on sunday evening's violence and how it echoed a year ago with key differences. [ gunshots ] >> reporter: a barrage of bullets sent dozens scattering to safety, both protesteres and police. and that included the new interim police chief, forced to take cover as we were recording him. >> we just want to be as patient as possible. [ gunshots ] >> gunfire. >> reporter: the standoff between police and protesters suddenly dissipated after police say a shooting happened.
10:04 pm
this video from at search for swag from twitter made a debut and showed tyrone harris after allegedly returning fire with police. >> almost right at the grill of the car, strikes the hood. three or four times, strikes the windshield four or five times. the plain clothes detectives returned fire from the inside of the van. >> reporter: the chaos was a jarring reminder of what happened along the same street, west florissant, exactly one year ago after the police shooting of michael brown, the police officer later cleared of wrongdoing by a grand jury and the department of justice. but this time, protesters acted differently, and so did police, saying it was criminals, not protesters creating the mayhem. police say the suspect shot a plain clothes officer with a stolen .9 millimeter, as word circulated along with the video
10:05 pm
that the person shot was another black man, many left the scene, but some reacted in anger. bottles and bricks were being hurled at officers on the anniversary of brown's death. >> it is truly a tragedy. there is a small group of people out there that are intent on making sure that we don't have peace that prevails. >> reporter: sara sidner, cnn, ferguson, missouri. >> now we want to show you these live pictures coming in to us out of ferguson, missouri. keep in mind, it's just past midnight thayer. we've been watching during sara's report, and we've seen a similar scene to what she described from yesterday and the day before. obtds were thrown. one woman appeared to be struck in the face with some sort of canister. >> she's lying on the ground briefly. >> we do see a number of people that have been detained and cuffed. so there's potentially more arrests happening, but it speaks to the tensions that still exist
10:06 pm
and remain a full year from the deadly incident, and despite all of the government recommendations for change. >> protesters saying they want more significant changes. they've seen superficial changes. more african-americans have been hired in the police department in ferguson, missouri, but they want deeper changes. they want actual, real change between the relationship between young black men in that community and the police officers that deal with them on a daily basis. of course we're going to continue to monitor the situation near ferguson. we will bring you news as and when it happens. we do want to go now to some other stories that we are polle. want to turn to donald trump. many supporters say what they like best about him is that he speaks his mind. he's very direct and honest about what he thinks >> however --
10:07 pm
>> go requewith the but. >> but some think that the latest mess up could cost him the women's vote. >> i don't have time for total political correctness. >> reporter: donald trump remaining defiant, now demanding an apology from fox news megyn kelly. >> she should really be apologizing to me. >> reporter: an apology for a question during the first republican debate that he thought was unfair, so unfair that he described kelly this way. >> you could see there was blood coming out of her eyes. blood coming out of her wherever. >> reporter: clearly the blunt gop front runner is showing no sign of moderating his tone, despite his push to court women and hispanic voters, votes crucial to winning the white house in twibts. according to the pugh research
10:08 pm
center, democrats won more of the hispanic vote. the front runner is already undermining the effort. >> if i was a young woman or hispanic watching this debate, i think i'd have been pretty turned off by mr. trump. and the question is, does it bleed over to all of us. >> reporter: more of trump's opponents piling on. >> for a lot of us, it's like watching a car accident instead of focussing on the direction we should be headed. >> reporter: carly fiorina, the lone female gop candidate said there was no misinterpreting his comments. >> women understood and yes, it is offensive. >> reporter: he took to twitter to respond. i just realize that if you listen to carl eyeeye fiorina,
10:09 pm
get a headache. he's trying to defend against jeb bush. >> my dad did this wrong, my brother did this wrong. >> now, as for the woman at the center of trump's latest dust up, megyn kelly, she addressed the controversy on her show on monday night. take a listen to what she said. >> apparently, mr. trump thought the question i asked was unfair and felt i was attacking him. i felt he was asked a tough, but fair question. i certainly will not apologize for doing good journalism. so i will continue doing my job without fear or favor. >> neither party is apologizing. clinton says his remarks on women are no laughing matter,
10:10 pm
calling him out on his comments and keeping the focus on republican track record. >> what a lot of the men said on that stage was offensive. and i want people to understand, if you focus on maybe the biggest showman on the stage you lose the thread here, the thread is that the republicans are putting forth some very radical and offensive positions when it comes to womens lives, womens' reproductive health. we'll let the republicans, you know, go back and forth with each other, but i want to point out, there's really not that much difference in the policies that they are proposing when it comes to american women. >> david gergen joins us now from harvard. he's our cnn political analyst. it is true trump has dominated
10:11 pm
all of the oxygen, all of the headlines for the past few weeks, but meanwhile there have been interesting movements el where, and i want to address that. hillary clinton did address details on making college more affordable. a $450 billion plan she says will be paid for by taxing the wealthy. what do you think is her strategy there? >> i think her strategy is two-fold. there is concern about the cost of university and the debt students are taking with them when they leave. it's bigger than the credit card debt in the united states. so it's a serious problem, and she's trying to present an answer that she hopes will get bipartisan support. there is, of course in the middle of a campaign, there's a heavy political element, what she's doing.
10:12 pm
the coalition that has won two elections for president obama is heavily dependent on getting the votes of the young. and barack obama was exceptionally successful in doing that. but a number of them haven't been able to get jobs, and hillary clinton is trying to rally the millennials as part of her coalition going forward. >> and maybe we'll see hillary clinton getting specific. because in a way, this presumptive nominee is being challenged by bernie sanders. and he is doing what barack obama did years ago, he is gathering huge crowds in stadiums, 28,000 for example in this past weekend, and he's much more progressive than hillary. he's also providing details on platforms to address racial inequality. i just wonder if you think he is quietly inching ahead of hillary while we all pay attention to
10:13 pm
donald trump. >> i don't think he's inching ahead of hillary. if you look at the national polls, she's still 40, 50 points ahead of him. what he is doing is gaining on her in critical early states. he lives in vermont, but if he were to beat her in new hampshire, it's worth remembering history again. this happened to lyndon johnson. and someone well to his left, eugene mccarthy didn't beat him but came close enough that it put a torpedo below the waterline in a lyndon johnson ship. and johnson pulled out. didn't run, and that's what brought in bobby kennedy. and if he does well enough in these early stages, is that going to bring in joe biden? that would be a much more serious threat to hillary clinton and would be divisive for the democratic party. she profoundly hopes he stays at the sidelines.
10:14 pm
but the more he pecks away at her the chances go up. >> many republicans are upset that donald trump is able it to dominate the headlines. he has said his policies are coming, but we are more than a year away from the general election. how specific do, does he need to be here in the next few weeks and months in order to maintain or at least gain legitimacy. >> he is going to need to drill down and begin to answer questions about what would he do no iraq, what's he going to do with israel and egypt and so far and so on. and what's he going to do to grow the economy. it's interesting, errol that after all the hoop-de-do in the last few days in the debate and afterwards which was all about the antics, the behavior of the
10:15 pm
abortionists and narcissism. he said his campaign has now said we're going to issue position papers. they weren't saying that two weeks ago. they're looking at moving toward a little more conventionality, he is thinking of saying he would not run as a third-party d that would be a serious signal. if he said i'm taking that off the board, because that's really what has made republicans very fearful. the kind of support that he's been able to generate, it would be able to wipe out republican chances to win the white house. so they want to keep him off thifd-party ticket. if he pledges not to go third party, that would signal he's much more serious about winning this nomination, and it's going to be an all-out fight. he's not going to go away quickly. >> either way, i think we will remember this as the summer of
10:16 pm
donald trump. david gergen of. tha thanks for your time. >> donald trump has changed the dynamics of this election. donald trump is going to be a guest on "new day" at 7:00 ir eastern, right here on cnn. when's the last time you've googled something? >> every day. >> they have introduced alphabet. it will be co-founded by sergey brin and larry page. >> sundar pichai will be overseeing it. they will be free to take risks
10:17 pm
and develop their own brands. still to come, a violent day in turkey. next, we'll show you the attacks that rocked parts of istanbul. and later, a disaster emergency in the u.s. state of colorado, the latest on the pollutants that turned this once-clear river yellow. that's coming up. ack, a powerful new dell 2-in-1 laptop, and durable new stellar notebooks, so you're walking the halls with varsity level swagger. that's what we call that new gear feeling. you left this on the bus... get it at the place with the experts to get you the right gear. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great.
10:18 pm
plaque psoriasis. moderate to severe isn't it time to let the real you shine through? introducing otezla, apremilast. otezla is not an injection, or a cream. it's a pill that treats plaque psoriasis differently. some people who took otezla saw 75% clearer skin after 4 months. and otezla's prescribing information has no requirement for routine lab monitoring. don't take otezla if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. otezla may increase the risk of depression. tell your doctor if you have a history of depression or suicidal thoughts, or if these feelings develop. some people taking otezla reported weight loss. your doctor should monitor your weight and may stop treatment. side effects may include diarrhea, nausea, upper respiratory tract infection, and headache. tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, and if you're pregnant or planning to be. ask your doctor about otezla today.
10:19 pm
otezla. show more of you. ♪usic: "thunder clatter" by wild cub ♪ ♪ most weekends only last a couple of days. some last a lifetime. hampton. we go together. always get the lowest price,
10:20 pm
only when you book direct at hampton.com pwho thrives on the unexpected. andha-ha! box shall we dine? [ chuckle ] you wouldn't expect an insurance company to show you their rates and their competitors' rates, but that's precisely what we do. going up! nope, coming down. and if you switch to progressive today, you could save an average of over 500 bucks. stop it. so call me today at the number below. or is it above? dismount! oh, and he sticks the landing! another day shackled by wires. how long do we have to keep untangling for just a little taste of power? who knew charging could be so... draining? you can keep plugging away... or, you can change the way you charge. the samsung galaxy s6
10:21 pm
and s6 edge, with built-in wireless charging capabilities. for the first time since the fukushima disaster in japan, japan is rebooting its nuclear power energy. >> sendai number one was restarted a few hours ago. now all japan's nuclear plants were taken offline after a series of meltdowns in fukushima in 2011, triggered by a massive earthquake and tsunami. >> now we want to get you new information on two terror attacks in istanbul turkey. a bomb explode near a police station. then police shot back. in the end, two attackers and one other person were killed. >> later on in the day there was another attack. this one at the u.s. consulate in istanbul. >> and cnn's barbara starr
10:22 pm
reports, the attack may have been a response to the heightened u.s. military presence there in turkey. [ gunshots ] >> reporter: gunshots rang out near the u.s. consulate in istanbul as police quickly blocked off the area after two women staged an armed attack. turkish authorities said the women were part of a left-wing mitt militant group. >> translator: the policeman said drop your bag. and the woman said she would not drop her bag. >> reporter: an emergency message was warning people to stay away. it all happened at the first
10:23 pm
f-16 fight otheers arrived. air strikes in northern syria will be aimed at killing isis. but they will also support kurds, known at ypg, something turkey opposes. >> the only effective force against isis in syria has been the ypg. it is unlikely that the united states will stop fighting with the ypg and stop its alliance with them. >> reporter: u.s. authorities tell cnn they will send additional helicopters into turkey very soon to be on stand by if any u.s. pilots go down. but until those arrive, the u.s. is willing to take the risk with the rescue helicopters they already have in the region. >> that was our barbara starr reporting there. meanwhile, inside syria, the al nusra front says it's pulled out
10:24 pm
of some front-line positions. >> they are unhappy with turkey's plans to set up a buffer zone in the area. sur key turkey's aim is to protect itself. >> for years now, the war in syria has been brutalizing the population. >> fred pleitgen is live with the fear and heartaches. >> reporter: the syrian military appears to be increasingly strained after four years of this ongoing civil war, and even bashar assad has admitted that at times the military will have to retreat from areas to shore up more important places. the developments on the battlefield are also causing a strain here in the capital of
10:25 pm
damascus. what we're seeing is severe shortages of fuel. it takes an hour to two hours to get gasoline. also there are power cuts throughout the city various times during the day. one of the other things that's also happened is with the pace that isis has been going and the gains isis has been making against the syrian military there are also a lot of internally displaced people coming to the population centers, some of them near the mediterranean coast but also to the capital of damascus. you're seeing minorities coming from places like palmyra, also from other towns recently taken by isis and putting a big strain on the syrian government to try to make sure that these people find a place to stay, that they have enough food, water and medication. but also on the many aid groups that are working here in the syrian capital and in other parts of the country as well. nevertheless, we don't get the sense that the people here
10:26 pm
believe that the regime is in the verge of collapsing. it appears while there have been setbacks most people here in damascus believe that bashar al assad is not going away anytime soon. still to come, details of a police shooting at a texas car dealership that left this unarmed 19 year old football player dead. also ahead, another first in space. this one involves what's on the menu. we'll have details just ahead. v, so print all you want and never run out. right now, buy an eligible printer, and get three months of free ink with hp instant ink. available at participating retailers. the most affordable way to print. hp instant ink. we value sticking with things.
10:27 pm
when something works, people stick with it. more people stick with humana medicare advantage. because we stick with them. humana medicare advantage. the plan people stick with.
10:28 pm
i'm sorta marge... you're not marge? we both drive a stick, we both like saving money on car insurance, and we both feel integrity, such as, that of healthcare in the america of the us and therefore. yes. thank you. no. no. please, stop! sorta you, isn't you. start with a quote from esurance and get a set of discounts personalized to you, not someone sorta like you. esurance. backed by allstate. click or call. the drought is affecting at pg&e we've definitely put a focus on helping our agricultural customers through the drought. when they do an energy efficiency project and save that money they feel it right in their pocket book. it's exciting to help a customer with an energy efficiency project because not only are they saving energy but they are saving water. we have a lot of projects at pg&e
10:29 pm
that can help them with that and that's extremely important while we're in a drought. it's a win for the customer and it's a win for california. together, we're building a better california. s. you are watching "cnn newsroom." thanks so much for staying with
10:30 pm
us. i'm errol barnett. >> and i'm zain asher. at least nine protesters are under arrest in ferguson, missouri. police say demonstrators threw rocks and frozen bottles of water at them during protests on monday night. a local official declared a say the of emergency earlier on. the latest tension comes one year after the shooting death of an unarmed african-american teenager, shot by a police officer. japan is rebooting its nuclear power industry for the first time in four and a half years. the sendai number one reactor in southern japan was restarted about four hours ago now. all of japan's nuclear power plants were taken offline after a series of meltdowns at fukushima in 2011. that was triggered by a massive earthquake and tsunami. attackers set off a bomb and later opened fire at a police station in istanbul, turkey. three people were killed,
10:31 pm
including two attackers, later two women attacked the u.s. consulate in istanbul. one was arrested, the other is still being sought. want to go now to arlington, texas where police are asking the fbi to aid in the investigation of the shooting of an unarmed african-american by a white officer. >> christian taylor was shot by officer brad miller after police got calls of a possible burglary. >> reporter: erratic behavior with a fatal outcome. security cameras captured christian taylor as he drives his car up to a car deep alersh. he stumbles around, then tries to damage property. jumping on the hood of a car, breaking the windshield.
10:32 pm
over a loudspeaker system in the parking lot, the security company tells taylor he's being watched. and after he starts destroying the car window, taylor's been told that police have been called to the scene. in the edited video, taylor hides back to his vehicle. he then breaks through the gate. drives his jeep through the grass on the showroom floor. >> i just saw a guy in the building who has a hat on. >> reporter: arlington police are called to the scene and an altercation ensues. he is tased by one officer, the other officer draw his gun and fires four times. >> we got shots fired. >> reporter: that officer, 49-year-old rookie brad miller was still under supervised field training, having just received his badge in march. miller shot at taylor four times, landing shots in the chest and abdomen. the fbi is assisting in the
10:33 pm
police are not required to wear body cameras, and cnn has learned that there are no cameras inside the car dealership showroom. >> i can guarantee you that we will have a thorough investigation. if this was not justified or authorized under the law, there will be consequences. >> reporter: meanwhile, taylor's family struggles for answers, questioning why the unarmed teen was killed. >> shoot an unarmed man? and you trained to take down. as a police officer, you're trained to take down men with your hands. you have your tasers and your clubs, whatever there is. an unarmed 19 year old, and you shoot to kill. >> i don't want it to be a race thing. it can happen to anybody. i want everybody to be presented by law enforcement. >> reporter: ed lavandera, cnn, arlington, texas. >> reaction from the boy's parents. we're going to take a break.
10:34 pm
when we come back, migrants desperate, cross the mediterranean. you'll learn about one refugee who traveled through ten countries in hopes of finding a better life for his family. milk has 8 grams of high-quality protein. which could be the difference between just living life. and milking it. start every day with the power of protein and milk life.
10:35 pm
okay! fun's over. aw. aw. ♪ thirsty? they said it would make me cool. they don't sound cool to me. guess not. you got to stick up for yourself, like with the name your price tool. people tell us their budget, not the other way around. aren't you lactose intolerant? this isn't lactose. it's milk. ♪ ♪usic: "another sunny day"ctose. by belle and sebastianmilk. ♪ ♪ such a shame it's labeled a "getaway." life should always feel like this. hampton. we go together. always get the lowest price, only when you book direct at hampton.com
10:36 pm
10:37 pm
welcome back, everybody. so we talk about the migrant crisis in europe a lot, but it is crucial to remember the human aspect of that crisis. on monday, the italian coast guard said it helped rescue more than 1500 migrants off the libyan coast. the italian navy released this video of one of the rescues where 775 migrants were picked up. that includes women and children. >> we don't have details on precisely where these migrants are from. typically you find them coming from north african nations. the organization for migration says more than 2,000 migrants
10:38 pm
and refugees have died trying to reach europe by boat so far this year. >> and even though we don't know where a lot of these migrants are from, it's important to remember that many are fleeing violence and poverty in their home country. cnn spoke to one refugee who had hopes of reaching england. >> he got only as far as france after traveling through ten nations. our kellie morgan has more. >> reporter: a syrian father of two shows us where he sleeps in calais's so-called jungle. this is his only belongings. so different from what he had. >> translator: i owned my house, also in damascus. i had a happy life. >> reporter: now, abu hoe h abu lives in fear of isis. >> translator: our home is
10:39 pm
destroyed. we spent a year with daesh. we escaped from them. there were too many restrictions. even in religion. for them it's just a cover. >> reporter: raqqah remains the capital for the islamic state and is a target for coalition air strikes. >> translator: today our children have lost their smile. they only know fear, the sounds of bombs, explosions. today they live in terror. >> reporter: abu mohammed fled damascus on july 1st. he crossed into lebanon and a day later arrived in turkey where he stayed for two weeks before boarding a boat bound for greece. after four days in athens, abu mohammed crossed into macedonia where he took a train to serbia
10:40 pm
before walking to hungary. he then boarded a train to france, arriving in calais 28 day the after he left home. >> translator: we got lost at sea. we nearly drown. we encountered gangs, bandits. >> reporter: after traveling more than 5,600 kilometers, this is not the destination abu mohammed envisioned. >> translator: here at the camp, we sleep on the ground. there's nothing else. they offer us only one meal a day. some charities offer us some help, nothing else. we have to queue up for the bathroom. we have to be there between 12:00 and 3:00 or you miss out. >> reporter: he hopes to get to the u.k., just 33 kilometers across the english channel.
10:41 pm
so close but very far. >> translator: i'm not worried about my own life, but the future of the young children who needed cation. education is important, especially for muslims. it is the path to paradise. >> reporter: a path that for now remains closed. cnn, kellie morgan. >> the things that people are willing to risk and sacrifice for that chance at a better life. it touches me. chg on to another story. the governor of colorado has declared a state of emergency. it comes after an accident last wednesday that led to what's being called a devastating release of contaminates that turned this river basically from clear to yellow. >> a crew from the u.s. environmental protection agency mistakenly spilled an estimated 3 million-gallons of pollutants from a suspended mine into the
10:42 pm
anmass river. authorities are still working to deliver just how polluted the river is. our pedram javaheri joins us. we talked about this last hour. there are people still taking part in recreational activities on that river. how safe or unsafe is it? >> the epa has been pretty quiet about it. but the understanding so far is that they were out there trying to fictionx a leak. a worker pushed a backhoe and loosened sediment and uncorked this mine that had been abandoned since the 1920s. it came all the way down the animas river. >> types of contaminates. >> we've had evidence that arsenic is in it, some lead,
10:43 pm
copper, zinc in it. and ayou're talking about a prominent part of colorado. we know rafting, kayaking, fly-fishing, one of our viewers, tom bartels sharing a photo looking out his back yard, and this is called "the river of souls." it was one of the favorite things for people to go fishing down around this river. but you see the after perspective. here is the before perspective of what occurred here in recent days. we know new mexico areas have issued a state of emergency there as far as new mexico's water, parts of it being contaminated. it flows down. the san juan river will be contaminated. in the four corners area, that pushes in the southeastern portion of utah. now we're talking about lake powell being impacted. a lot of water from lake powell
10:44 pm
is given to arizona but water from lake powell goes into areas around las vegas, san diego, los angeles. so now we introduce nevada and california into the mix. unless there is some kind of a stop here. >> and freshwater's becoming more and more valuable. >> especially in those states. >> when you think about where the contaminates in that river are going to spread to, so many other states, beyond colorado. >> we'll see you next hour. now new zealand is in the process of picking out a new flag for the nation. their current banner looks too much like australia's if you think about it. both feature the union jack. which is which here? >> a panel tasked with picking the new design received more than 10,000 suggestions. they've narrowed it down to 40. many share some very familiar themes with more than half
10:45 pm
featuring the silver fir. >> you see some examples there. the finalists will be announced next month. what we didn't see there was a stick figure riding a horse. didn't make the cut. >> you can't be too creative with the flag. now an interesting request from benedict cumberbatch. he no longer wants to be filmed. >> he told his cumber babes that. but you're armed with a y new jansport backpack, a powerful new dell 2-in-1 laptop, and durable new stellar notebooks, so you're walking the halls with varsity level swagger. that's what we call that new gear feeling. you left this on the bus... get it at the place with the experts
10:46 pm
to get you the right gear. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. plaque psoriasis. moderate to severe isn't it time to let the real you shine through? introducing otezla, apremilast. otezla is not an injection, or a cream. it's a pill that treats plaque psoriasis differently. some people who took otezla saw 75% clearer skin after 4 months. and otezla's prescribing information has no requirement for routine lab monitoring. don't take otezla if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. otezla may increase the risk of depression. tell your doctor if you have a history of depression or suicidal thoughts, or if these feelings develop. some people taking otezla reported weight loss. your doctor should monitor your weight and may stop treatment. side effects may include diarrhea, nausea, upper respiratory tract infection, and headache. tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, and if you're pregnant or planning to be. ask your doctor about otezla today.
10:47 pm
otezla. show more of you. esurwhich means fewer costs, which saves money. their customer experience is virtually paperless, which saves paper, which saves money. they have smart online tools, so you only pay for what's right for you, which saves money. they settle claims quickly, which saves time, which saves money. they drive an all-hybrid claims fleet, which saves gas, which saves money. they were born online, and built to save money, which means when they save, you save.
10:48 pm
because that's how it should work in the modern world. esurance. backed by allstate. click or call. yup, we're constantly making thinkorswim better. here at td ameritrade, they're always working. like a custom screener on your desktop, that updates to all your devices. and you can share it with one click. wow. how do you find the time to do all this? easy. we combined every birthday and holiday into one celebration. (different holidays being shouted) back to work, guys! i love this times of year.
10:49 pm
for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this. some breaking news for you. this just in to cnn. reuters is reporting that greece is very close to reaching a deal with international creditors on a multi-billion dollar bailout. >> this is a very important development because this accord will basically keep greece inside the euro zone. we are watching vegetables in space. it is a first for the astronauts on board the international
10:50 pm
spacetation. one of the goals is to figure out how to grow food on spacecrafts for future long-term missions. the first crop is red romaine lettuce. i'll have some of that, please. >> tested here on earth, the plants were checked for safety. half of this harvest will be sent back to earth for testing. they will clean it with citrus acid food wipes before eating. do you want some? >> maybe later. scott kelly announced tomorrow we will eat the harvest. but for now, let us take a selfie. lettuce, let us, get it? >> yes. a very plight plea from benedict cumberbatch, please stop filming him during his performances. he is in hamlet.
10:51 pm
>> the actor addressed people saying how distracting the red lights are on cell phones during the performance and asking fans to please stop recording. >> it's not fine. and there's nothing that's supportive for that. and i can't give you what you want to get, which is a live performance. please don't, it will get strict. they will have devices to detect people. >> when you think about it from his perspective, i think the most valuable thing for an actor is concentration. if you can't concentrate, your performance may end up suffering. i spoke with bill hershman. and he said that his request is
10:52 pm
very reasonable. >> as texting has become very popular, the barriers have dropped, and i think there are a lot of people who feel like they are entitled to do whatever they want. i should also point out that in the hamlet situation it's a little different in the fact that there are many, many, many people coming to see this show with no interest to hamlet. it they' are' coming to see the star. they are coming without the history or the etiquette. you are getting people new to the theater, people who think they're at a movie or at a concert. where much of this is perfectly all right or considered okay. but no, i don't think it's reasonable for audiences to feel that they can impose themselves on the situation. and i think it's very reasonable
10:53 pm
of actors to ask them to stop. as you may know, here in the united states recently, the actress, patti lupone saw someone texting all through the first act of the show. when the person started up in the second act she went to the audience, picked up the phone and took it offstage. >> i think cumber batch's request is reasonable. bush versus clinton. we're still months away from figuring out if they will face off at the ballot box. >> they went head to head on twitder. >> it all began innocently enough. hillary's campaign tweeting a link to her college plan. clinton gave bush a failing
10:54 pm
grade on college affordability during his time as florida's governor. some zings back and forth. >> bush retaliated with this, rearranging clinton's campaign logo, implying that her presidency would lead to higher taxes. >> meantime, while they were having a twitter spat, donald trump is leading in the polls and never signs content. >> jeanne moos takes a look at why he never looks happy. >> reporter: he is trump zilla, crushing the competition in the shadow as the media shine will lights on him. so why is he looking like trump the fwrumen. what struck you about mr. trump? >> the guy hardly smiles. he may be the unhappiest rich man in america. >> reporter: even when he talked about fun. >> it's fun. it's kidding. we have a good time. >> reporter: he didn't look like
10:55 pm
he was having a good time. did he smile at all, dan? does he ever smile? >> he only smiles when he's making a sarcastic comment. >> only rosie o'donnell. >> reporter: facial coding expert dan hill expected trump to show anger, glinting eyes and pressed lips. and in that sense, the unsmiling donald is totally on message. >> you can argue that not being content is his whole message. >> reporter: of course trump's defenders like these sisters, say everyone's picking on him. >> leave donald trump alone! leave donald trump, leave him alone! period! >> bye! >> reporter: tell that to cartoonists who can't get enough of his hair and pursed lips. >> what i really was surprised by is the guy pouts. he is someone who has an upper chin rising and the corners of the mouth go down drooping in sadness. he's a cross between peter finch
10:56 pm
on network saying i'm as mad as hell. >> i'm as mad as hell, and i'm not going to take this anymore. >> and leslie gore saying it's my party and i'll cry if i want to. >> reporter: it's the republican party crying. ♪ you would cry too if it happened to you ♪ >> reporter: jeanne moos, cnn. >> because our leaders are stupid! >> and i'm not going to take it anymore! >> you hear that? leave donald trump aloin. >> i heard the message. >> it was fun being with you. i'm zain asher. >> zain, you have a good day. rose mary church joins me next for "cnn newsroom." have a great day. to 50% on ink, so print all you want and never run out. right now, buy an eligible printer, and get three months of free ink with hp instant ink. available at participating retailers. the most affordable way to print. hp instant ink.
10:57 pm
10:58 pm
sure! i offer multi-car, safe driver, and so many other discounts that people think i'm a big deal. and boy, are they right. ladies, i can share hundreds in savings with all of you! just visit progressive.com today. but right now, it's choosing time. ooh! we have a winner. all: what? [chuckles] he's supposed to pick one of us. this is a joke, right? that was the whole point of us being here. ♪usic: "thunder clatter" by wild cub ♪
10:59 pm
♪ most weekends only last a couple of days. some last a lifetime. hampton. we go together. always get the lowest price, only when you book direct at hampton.com
11:00 pm
-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com reports coming in that greece is very close to gnaw multibillion dollar deal to keep in the eurozone. protests have broken out in ferguson, missouri. in japan, a nuclear power plant is back on for the first time since 2013. and later this hour, a salad
11:01 pm
from outer space, astronauts tasting lettuce grown in space for the first time. >> i'm rosemary church. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. >> good to be with you, i'm still errol barnett. thanks for joining us. this is "cnn newsroom." >> and we start in the united states and ferguson, missouri, where at least, nine people are under arrest after another night of confrontation between protesters and police. police say demonstrators threw bottles of frozen water and rocks at them. the night's arrest came after a day of civil disobedience. >> protesters are marking one year since a white officer shot and killed an unarmed african-american teen. the police response is under
11:02 pm
close scrutiny this time around. >> reporter: chaos ensues. muzzle flashes. two groups start battling on the street, unleashing a remarkable amount of gunfire. it sends protesters and police scurrying for cover. the eruption triggered a standoff between police and local crowds. >> we ready for what? >> reporter: bottles and bricks thrown at police. it marred what had been a peaceful day of protests marking the one-year anniversary of michael brown's death. as protests and arrests continued monday, the violence frustrated advocates who want to keep the focus on reducing police shootings. >> many of the people who have their own agendas and wish to escalate violence they mix in with the peaceful protesters. it is difficult particularly for
11:03 pm
law enforcement who has no idea, oftentimes, who is who. >> reporter: police say the wounded suspect is 18-year-old tyrone harris jr. from st. louis who was charged with ten criminal counts. harris' aunt denies he shot at police, says he wasn't carrying a gun. st. louis county police chief jon belmar is appealing for the community to rein in troublemakers. >> we can't sustain this as a community as we move forward. we have other individuals out there who are armed right now that a part of this group. >> reporter: all eyes will be on how the ferguson and st. louis county police respond during these tense days and nights. >> the police in ferguson and the surrounding area are under tremendous pressure. >> do they not have to use force during moments where they normally would? >> i think when you start asking police officers to alter the way that they've been trained to
11:04 pm
react, alter the way that they have to act to protect themselves and to protect others, you run into more problems. >> reporter: wesley bell tells us since last year he noticed that ferguson police have engaged the community more and doing more community policing. they are likely going to need every ounce of that goodwill in the tense days ahead surrounding this anniversary. one police union official says officers' tactics are not the only thing that need to change in dealing with ferguson's issues. >> jeff royter is with the st. louis police office association and he is the author of a book on the ferguson war on police and spoke with don lemon. >> it's a powder keg and we've blown 365 days of missed opportunities talking about faux
11:05 pm
police reforms when we ought to talk about how to make life better for these kids in an inner city setting that are so hopeless that they turn to violence and turn it more and more frequently against cops. sometimes the kid dies, sometimes the cop dies. >> you say faux police reform. i mean, no agency, no one is perfect. police could use a little reforming and i'm sure some of the kids can use some help themselves. so you know, it's not just on the community. don't you think the police could use some reforming? >> this is a profession that is in constant evolution, constantly evolving. and you know, we assimilate to the surroundings we're in. just as they did last night. they tried different tactics again last night. the police reformed their tactics last night and we had terrible outcomes. we have to talk about the root
11:06 pm
issues here and not distracting everybody with this big lie which started with this hands up don't shoot myth. >> we will continue to watch what is happening in ferguson. we move on for now. donald trump is leading in the polls thanks to his take no prisoners attitude on just about everything. >> however, a recent comment about fox news host megyn kelly has sparked backlash from democrats and republicans alike. we want you to hear what prompted the backlash. listen. >> she gets out and she starts asking me all sorts of ridiculous questions and you could see there was blood coming out of her eyes. blood coming out of her -- wherever. >> and that pause and wherever was interpreted to mean a specific point. but trump says he was misunderstood and he has been
11:07 pm
everywhere defending the remark he made. on monday night, megyn kelly addressed it on her show. here's part of what she had to say. >> mr. trump thought the question was unfair. i felt he was asked a tough but fair question. i will not apologize for doing good journalism. so i'll continue doing my job without fear or favor. >> megyn kelly there, democratic presidential candidate hillary clinton wasted no time blasting donald trump for his comment and went after his republican challenges over their comments about women's issues. >> what donald trump said about megyn kelly is outrageous. >> reporter: donald trump spilling into the democratic primary. >> megyn kelly is a strong woman and more than capable of defending herself against donald trump. i'm worried about what republican policies would do to
11:08 pm
the rest of america's women and i will continue to speak out and speak up about that. >> reporter: today in new hampshire, hillary clinton weighed in for the first time on trump's remarks. >> if you focus on the biggest showman on the stage you lose the thread here. the thread is that the republicans are putting forth some very radical and offensive positions when it comes to women's lives. >> reporter: she blasted the republican field saying all women should be on alert over the opposition to abortion rights even in the case of rape. >> i think more people should say the same. they should be going after him. the republican party is going to have to deal with him. i don't want that forgotten. i know it makes great tv. i think he went overboard. offensive, outrageous. but what marco rubio said has as
11:09 pm
much as an impact. >> reporter: bill and hillary clinton have known trump for years. he contributed to his senate campaigns and they attended his weddings. >> i didn't know him that well. i knew him. i knew him and i happen to be planning to be in florida and thought it would be fun to go to his wedding. it's always entertaining. now that he's running for president, it's more troubling. >> reporter: she came to new hampshire to unveil plans to make college affordable. >> we need to make a quality education affordable and available to everyone willing to work for it without saddling them with decades of debt. >> reporter: what else could be troubling, trump's surge in popularity and attention. showman or not, hillary clinton is eager to seize the moment and link the republican field to trump. and just a reminder for you
11:10 pm
all, don trump will be a guest on "new day" in just a few hours from now. for those of you in the states that at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. for those watching internationally we will bring you what he says if it's possibly controversial once again. stay tuned for that. we are following breaking news this hour. we're getting reports that greece at this moment is close to reaching a deal with its international creditors. >> the bailout deal would keep degrees inside the eurozone and avert bankruptcy. a reuters source says some minor details are being hammered out right now and we'll have more on that as more information comes into us. it has been four and a half years since japan has run on nuclear power. but that's about to change.
11:11 pm
kyushu electric power restarted its number one reactor in sendai, japan several hours ago. >> all of japan's nuclear plants have been shut down since the fukushima meltdowns back in 2011 after an earthquake and tsunami. >> it comes after the reactor passed new more stringent safety standards put in place in the wake of the disaster. anna coren joins us with more. anna, despite the new safety regulations there there is a lot of concern, isn't there? talk to us about what people are saying across japan about the restarting of the sendai nuclear power plant. >> reporter: as we know, there is a great deal of opposition in japan about restarting these nuclear reactors. across the country, the reason being is that they fear what
11:12 pm
nuclear power could bring considering the disaster in 2011 with the fukushima daiichi power plant, the meltdown that triggered radiation leaks. and still today there is leaking water that is radioactive that they are obviously working furiously to contain. but it's believed that people who lived in that area will never be able to return because of the high radiation levels. now a recent poll, rosemary, found that more than a half of those who were questioned oppose the restart of nuclear reactors across the country. as you say, this one in sendai has been restarted as of this morning. there are 43 across the country. there is a second nuclear reactor on that sendai site in southwestern japan which the government is hoping to reopen by october. but as we saw scenes at sendai today, huge protests, people
11:13 pm
furious that the government is taking this action and very disappointed about what this could mean. let's listen to one of the protesters at the site. >> translator: firstly these new standards that the abe government has the nuclear register tour agency to agree on has slightly raised the bar but it is full of holes. >> he says it is slightly raising the bar but the government says it has the toughest regulations in place in regards to nuclear power. and it is hoping to restart other reactors across the country in the coming months and years. >> but given the extent of the concerns, why was japan's government or why has it decided to restart the sendai nuclear power plant this particular time? >> reporter: as we know, rosemary, japan has very limited
11:14 pm
energy resources which is why it was so reliant on nuclear power pre-2011, the earthquake and then subsequent tsunami that followed really took out the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant leading to that meltdown and the radiation leak. so its reliance on nuclear power means that it just doesn't have the resources in place to keep japan running. so therefore it needs to import energy, fossil fuels, coal, lpg gas. there is a great deal of reliance on. that as a result, too, of the shutdown of the reactors over the past four years, energy prices amongst households has
11:15 pm
risen. but that doesn't bother the people. they just want to be safe. >> next hour we will get reaction from greenpeace on this particular issue. very interesting. >> a very big deal there. we want to get you to northern syria at this point. the front has pulled out of front-line positions against isis. >> the al qaeda linked group is ceding the front to other areas. >> the group says that turkey's aim is to serve its own national security rather than fight against syria's assad regime. >> for four years the war has been brutalizing the population. >> we are in the capital for "w" a look at life with the growing fear, shortages and heart aches. >> reporter: the military is strained after four years of
11:16 pm
this ongoing civil war and bashar al assad has acknowledged that at times the military will have to retreat from certain areas to make sure they can shore up more important places. now the developments here on the battlefield are also causing a strain here in the capital of damascus. we are seeing severe shortages of fuel. it takes an hour to two hours to get gasoline at gas stations. and there are power cuts throughout the city at various times throughout the day. and with the pace that isis has been going and with the gains that isis has been making there are also a lot of internally displaced people coming to the population centers. some of them near the mediterranean coast, which is a stronghold of assad regime. but also to damascus. you are seeing minorities coming from palmyra and other towns
11:17 pm
taken by isis and it is putting a strain on the syrian government to make sure that they have enough food, water, medication and a place to stay. and on the many aid groups in the capital and other parts of the country as well. we don't get the sense that the people here believe that the regime is on the verge of collapsing. while there have been setbacks, most people here in damascus believe that bashar al assad is not going to go away any time soon. just ahead here on "cnn newsroom" you will hear from a refugee who ends up in france after traveling through ten countries from syria but life is not how he had envisioned it. when i started at the shelter, i noticed benny right away. i just had to adopt him. he's older so he needs my help all day.
11:18 pm
when my back pain flared up we both felt it i took tylenol at first but i had to take 6 pills to get through the day. then my friend said "try aleve". just two pills, all day. and now, i'm back for my best bud! aleve. all day strong and try aleve pm, now with an easy open cap. ♪"once there was a hushpuppy" by dan romis man kind?eitlin ♪ are we good? go see. go look through their windows so you can understand their views. go find out just how kind the hes and shes of this mankind are.
11:19 pm
11:20 pm
toenail fungus? seriously? smash it with jublia! jublia is a prescription medicine proven to treat toenail fungus. use jublia as instructed by your doctor. look at the footwork! most common side effects include ingrown toenail, application site redness, itching, swelling, burning or stinging, blisters, and pain. smash it!
11:21 pm
make the call and ask your doctor if jublia is right for you. new larger size now available. look aon tripadvisor.l hotel wait. why leave the site? don't you know the tripadvisor you've always trusted for reviews, book! now checks over 200 websites to find the best price? book...book...book! over 200 sites checked to find the best price. so don't just visit tripadvisor... book at tripadvisor. . on monday, the italian coast guard says it helped rescue 1500 migrants off the libyan coast in seven operations. the italian navy released this video of one of the rescues where 775 migrants were picked
11:22 pm
up including women and children. >> the international organization for migration says more than 2,000 migrants and refugees have died trying to reach europe by boat so far this year. >> and cnn spoke to one syrian refugee who says he hopes to reach england. he only got as far as france after traveling through ten countries. >> reporter: a syrian father of two shows us where he sleeps in calais's so-called jungle. these are his only belongings. so different to what he had. >> translator: i owned my house . >> reporter: now he says he lives in fear of the syrian government and isis. >> translator: our home is destroyed. we spent a year with daesh.
11:23 pm
we escaped from them. there were too many restrictions, even religion. they have harmed religion. for them it's just a cover. >> reporter: raqqah is the de facto capital for the islamic state in syria and a regular target of coalition airstrikes. >> translator: today our children have lost their smile, they only know fear. the sounds of bombs, explosions. today they live in terror. >> reporter: he fled damascus on july 1st in the hope of finding sanctuary for his family who remain in syria. he arrived in turkey where he stayed for two weeks before boarding a boat bound for degrees. after seven days he crossed to
11:24 pm
macedonia. he boarded a train to france arriving in calais 28 days after he left home. >> when we left turkey we got lost at sea for around seven hours. we nearly drowned several times. on the road from hungary, we encountered gangs, bandits. >> reporter: after traveling more than 5,600 kilometers, this is not the destination he envisioned. >> translator: here at the camp, we sleep on the ground. there is nothing else. they offer us only one meal a day. some charities offer us some help. nothing else. we have to queue up for the bathroom. you have to be there on time between 12:00 to 3:00 p.m. or you miss out. >> reporter: like hundreds of other migrants he still hopes to get to the uk just 33 kilometers across the english channel. so close yet still so very far. >> translator: i'm not worried
11:25 pm
about my own life but i'm worried about the future of the young children who need education. education is important. especially for muslims. it is the path to paradise. >> reporter: a path that for now remains closed. kellie morgan, cnn, calais, france. the afghan president is calling on pakistan to crack down on the taliban. >> as lynda kinkade reports that attack comes after a series of explosions rocked the country over the weekend. >> reporter: afghan authorities say the suicide car bomb detonated near the entrance to the kabul airport leaving behind a mess of twisted metal taken bodies. the taliban claimed responsibility for the latest deadly attack the fourth in the afghan capital in as many days. over the weekend, 29 people were killed in a suicide bombing in northern afghanistan.
11:26 pm
many of the victims were members of an antitaliban militia. and on friday in kabul more than 50 people were killed in three separate bombings targeting an army complex, a police academy and special forces base. 300 people were wounded. hundreds of mourners gathered in kabul to pray and light candles in honor of the bombing victims. some chanted "death to the taliban" and burned pakistani currency accusing pakistan of sport supporting militants. ashraf ghani also spoke out. >> they are as active as before in pakistan. >> reporter: these are the first
11:27 pm
attacks since the taliban named a new chief. and experts say they are an attempt to distract from tensions between the groups. but the violence highlights growing insecurity in kabul and concern over whether afghan forces can battle the taliban on their own. lynda kinkade, cnn. still to come here on "cnn newsroom," days ago this woman had access to the white house and now she's accused of firing a gun at a capitol police officer she was dating. details on that after this. ♪ the staff at this beautiful resort . . . will stay with you forever. ♪ especially if you don't leave.
11:28 pm
♪ you got it booking right. booking.com booking.yeah every time you take advil you're taking the medicine doctors recommend most for joint pain. more than the medicine in aleve or tylenol. the medicine in advil is the number one doctor recommendation for joint pain. relief doesn't get any better than this. advil (ee-e-e-oh-mum-oh-weh) (hush my darling...) (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) (hush my darling...) man snoring (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) woman snoring
11:29 pm
take the roar out of snore. yet another innovation only at a sleep number store.
11:30 pm
and i am a certified arborist for pg&e.ughes i oversee the patrolling of trees near power lines and roots near pipes and underground infrastructure. at pg&e wherever we work, we work hard to protect the environment. getting the job done safely so we can keep the lights on for everybody. because i live here i have a deeper connection to the community. and i want to see the community grow and thrive. every year we work with cities and schools to plant trees in our communities. the environment is there for my kids and future generations. together, we're building a better california.
11:31 pm
welcome back to our viewers here in the states and those tuned in around the world. i'm errol barnett. >> i'm rosemary church. we want to update our main stories this hour. at least nine protesters are under arrest in ferguson, missouri. police say demonstrators threw rocks and frozen bottles of water at them during protests monday night. a local official declared a state of emergency earlier. the tension comes one year after the shooting death of an unarmed african-american teenager by a white police officer. google announced plans for a major restructuring. the internet search giant formed a company called alpha bit. the new parent company will oversee google and several spinoff companies. a new jersey man has been arrested and charged with conspiring to support isis. that is according to the u.s.
11:32 pm
attorneys' office in new jersey. the man is accused of attempting to provide material support to the terror group. isis is claiming responsibility for a deadly suicide bombing in iraq that took place in a busy outdoor market monday night. 30 were killed and 40 others wounded. >> officials say a roadside bombi bombing killed four people. it's not clear who carried out the second attack. also in iraq parliament members are expected to vote today on a reform plan by the country's prime minister. >> the -- cnn has details. >> reporter: this is the sound
11:33 pm
of the people who have been simply had enough. iraqis took to the streets in demonstrations calling for change, political reforms, holding corrupt officials accountable and demanding basic services that government after government failed to restore. the protests were prompted by continuing power cuts as the country faced one of the worst heat waves in recent history. on sunday, haider al abadi in what appeared to be a response to the streets and serious call for action announced a series of bold measures the most drastic reforms since 2003. >> it may be the first time that we have a person who is able to change things on the ground rather than just continuing in the same mold as his predecessors. time passes and nothing changes on the ground. >> reporter: and those include eliminating the posts of three
11:34 pm
senior vice presidents and deputy prime ministers. the positions are allocated based on a sectarian and ethnic quota system created by the united states in 2003. but many iraqis feel the system is ineffective and part of the problem. other measures include cutting back on the security allowances allowed to officials and cutt g cutting -- iraqis on tuesday evening took to the streets in support. >> i don't think that the protesters are going to go away even if they hear the words from the prime minister. they want to see action on the ground. that will take some time. it is not something that will happen in a week or two. this is a several month process
11:35 pm
and it will keep the pressure on the government. >> reporter: in a country where fertile ground for terrorist groups thrive, iraq's politicians with not afford to ignore the rising discontent on their streets. a white house staffer has been arrested after a domestic violence incident with a capitol hill police officer. police say that she was in an altercation at her home with the officer with whom she had a relationship. >> and this could all just be based on jealousy. she confronted him about another woman he was dating and she wanted to access his cell phone. when she grabbed the officer's gun, pointed it at him and fired one round. the officer fled her home and called 911. singletary was charged with assault and reckless endangerment. her access to the white house
11:36 pm
has been revoked. volunteers on reunion island are now joining the search. >> the volunteers combed the beach not far from where part of an airplane wing washed ashore. >> reporter: each piece they pick up is a potential clue. a scrap of metal, a bit of plastic, nothing goes unnoticed. what looks like trash may be key to solving a mystery 17 months old. not far from here, beachcombers found a piece of a plane wing now linked to mh370. so these volunteers comb the shoreline hoping for similar success. they are searching along this coastline because this is where the current is strongest and where they are most likely to find debris. this volunteer is leading the charge. for him the search is an act of solidarity. i put myself in the shoes of the
11:37 pm
families who lost loved ones. if that was my family on the plane, i would do the same thing. at the end of the sweep, they examine their haul. and this is some of what they found. you can see here, a bottle of facial wash. flip-flops, plenty of plastic bottles. it's difficult to see how this is going to help. they meet with other teams to hand the items over to local authorities. a volunteer from another part of the coast holds up what he thinks is his most promising find. but it's up to experts to decide what gets sent to paris for tests. they want concrete answers for families. and so they will return to the coastline to do the same sweep. after all, they don't know what tomorrow's tide will bring. erin mclaughlin, la reunion. when we come back a disaster
11:38 pm
emergency in the u.s. state of colorado after contaminants turn a river yellow. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ as we age, certain nutrients... longer than ever. ...become especially important. from the makers of one a day fifty-plus. new one a day proactive sixty-five plus. with high potency vitamin b12... ...and more vitamin d.
11:39 pm
gotta study those tripadvisor reviews carefully. and now, the tripadvisor you have always trusted for reviews now checks over 200 websites to find the best price. book! book! book! book! ♪ over 200 sites checked to find the best price. so don't just visit tripadvisor, book! at tripadvisor.
11:40 pm
11:41 pm
. cnn's freedom project is dedicated to shining a light on human trafficking. this week we're focusing on how corporations are fighting against what is a multi-billion-dollar enterprise. katie ford used to scout models around the world and now runs a global foundation to fight modern-day slavery. >> reporter: model manager, ceo,
11:42 pm
anti-slavery activist. >> tell me how you started in your work against trafficking. >> what happened was the u.n. asked me as a business leader to speak at a conference on human trafficking. and when i heard how people are trafficked, it was parallel to how we scout as models around the world. >> she's from yugoslavia. and she will have her second show season here in march. >> reporter: katie ford was ceo of ford models for ten years, a company her parents founded in 1946. >> it was a very serious business. it had over a hundred million dollars in revenue. the hope and dream a model has for a better life is the same thing for a field worker who comes here from mexico. >> reporter: from her manhattan home and traveling around the world she runs her foundation,
11:43 pm
freedom for all working to stop modern-day slavery at its source. she supports victims of forced labor. a survivor of trafficking, this woman came to the u.s. looking for work and found herself forced into prostitution. her mission with projects like this cooking class is to give survivors of trafficking the life skills they need to move on. the very recent victims did not want to be filmed. >> when i arrived this hungarian man picked me up from the airport, took me to his parent and demanded all my money. >> before long i realized he was a pimp and it was him and others and others and others and i was involved in trafficking. it's just so shocking. it is out of our consciousness.
11:44 pm
i think when people hear stories they will be motivated. >> reporter: katie ford watched as her parents changed the fashion industry. it made her believe she can do the same here. >> you are going to continue with this indefinitely? >> until it ends which i hope is in my lifetime. now we're covering this story in depth all this week. the cnn freedom project will focus on what the business world is doing to combat human trafficking. we'll have more on the hotels and airlines and how they are using tools to fight this battle. you'll hear from a former child slave this week. rosemary? the governor of the u.s. state of colorado declared a state of emergency in parts of state after an accident last wednesday that led to what has
11:45 pm
been called a devastating release of contaminants that turned this river yellow. this is the before and the after there. a crew mistakenly spilled 3 million gallons of pollutants from a suspended mine into the river. waters in colorado and new mexico are affected. >> it is completely irresponsible for the epa not to have informed the state of new mexico immediately because they knew that that was going to flow on into the state. and we could have worked faster and harder to minimize the impact on the state. >> authorities are still working to determine just how polluted that river is. it's just hard to believe that it was an environmental agency that did it.
11:46 pm
>> adds insult to injury there. in myanmar, more than three feet of rainfall in recent days have left parts of that country unrecognizable. our meteorologist, pedram javaheri joins us more with what has been happening there. >> you think about myanmar about 30 million people make their lives from the agricultural industry. we are talking about -- working with the agricultural industry. we know a million acres of rice fields are under water. the landscape is beginning to change in some of these areas and we'll show you what we're dealing with are myanmar being submerged and it is mind boggling, upwards of 50 inches came down in the past seven days. the images looking something like this and the satellite perspective the land mass at the coast, the before perspective and then here comes after.
11:47 pm
notice the colors take away a chunk of land on the immediate coast. we know that 200,000 children have been impacted. 600,000 adults as well. fatalities around 100 people. myanmar is well known for fatalities on the order of 50 to 100,000 in the past. but want to talk about what is happening in the southern united states. a massive area of high pressure has been in place. drought is becoming an issue. but as the heat advisory builds, 13 million people are being impacted. dallas, texas, they saw every day in may with the flooding that took place. they have gone 33 days in a row without any rainfall across portions of dallas, texas. you look at the forecast. improving conditions. 102 fahrenheit improves to 97
11:48 pm
and warms right back up. the heat is continuing across portions of the country. it looks like it will ease a little bit in the coming couple of days but tremendous heat and drought. but interesting to think about that. you might recall. we touched on this for texas in april and may when we had rainfall and storm after storm bringing millions of gallons of water over the region. and now they haven't seen rain for 33 straight days. >> when it rains it pours. >> went it doesn't -- >> hard to predict. >> thanks, see you again soon. coming up, eating food in space got a bit more exciting. >> cheers. >> cheers. that's awesome. good. >> it's good. >> yeah. >> okay. we'll tell you what they're eating and why it's so important, next.
11:49 pm
♪"once there was a hushpuppy" by dan romis man kind?eitlin ♪ are we good? go see. go look through their windows so you can understand their views. go find out just how kind the hes and shes of this mankind are. our eyes, they have a 200 degree which is good for me. hey! and bad for the barkley twins. take care of all your most important parts with centrum. now with our most vitamin d three ever. you can help children all around the world grow up strong, thanks to walgreens partnership with vitamin angels. when you get vitamins here... you change lives everywhere.
11:50 pm
♪ the staff at this beautiful resort . . . will stay with you forever. ♪ especially if you don't leave. ♪ you got it booking right. booking.com booking.yeah happens at the water's edge. here, they must look their best. smooth, beautiful skin is an advantage. the others can only hide in shame. introducing the new dr. scholl's dreamwalk express pedi.
11:51 pm
it'sto venture further.ty to discover the luxury of freedom. to experience more. to make a routine of breaking with routine. come in to the lexus golden opportunity sales event, where you'll find some of the best offers of the year on our most capable models. now through september 8th. this is the pursuit of perfection.
11:52 pm
it's an outer space problem that matt damon tries to solve in his upcoming movie "the
11:53 pm
martian." >> i have to grow food on a planet with nothing grows. >> in this instant, the real life scientists are ahead of the science fiction writers. >> nasa astronauts sampled food that was grown in space. one of the taste testers plains why this lettuce is key to interplanetary travel. >> if we're ever going to go to mars some day and we will, but whenever that is, we're going to sist have to have a spacecraft that is more self sustainable with regards to its food supply. >> woo-hoo. cheers. >> cheers. >> all right. >> that's awesome. >> good. >> it's good. >> yeah. i like that. >> joining me now is leroy chou
11:54 pm
a retired astronaut. so tell me how much trial and error went into this test before they had that first successful taste of lettuce in space. >> researchers have been growing plants in space for a number of decades. and so what you're seeing is like all that hard work starting to pay off a little bit. we're getting better at it. the plants grow more slowly in space. they have gravity dissension organs in their roots. but in space there is no gravity or soil to speak of. so we have to use the roots growing into a mesh and feeding nutrients through the water and the mesh. and the fact that we can grow something we can harvest is interesting. >> and we're seeing the images
11:55 pm
and video from this first successful taste of lettuce in space. because it is space you are getting nutrients and light. there is a pinkish light, what is its role? >> plant needs light to grow and to flourish. in space, although we have sun through the port holes, the orientation of the spacecraft may not allow that to happen. we use artificial light. what you are seeing is that light that has been optimized for that purpose. >> you get excited about this. i'm a space geek and a nerd. i love this stuff but what does this mean practically? we can book our tickets to mars and be able to eat once we get there? >> this is a small step. we shouldn't get too excited about it. it's neat and interesting and exciting. but we are a long ways from
11:56 pm
being able to grow food in space or on a place like mars. it is possible. we don't know the amount of calories in lettuce. it's pretty darn small. you need a lot of lettuce to sustain the crew. but it is an important step the fact that we are able to grow plants more than one or two at a time and you know, it's a step forward but it's not ground-breaking yet. >> and how did the lettuce taste? >> according to all reports they said it tasted great. a lot of times it's the dressing. >> leroy chou joining us discussing lettuce in space. thanks for your time today. >> looks delicious. you have been watching "cnn newsroom." stick around for the next hour. >> i'm errol barnett. i'm off, rosie's back. stay with cnn.
11:57 pm
♪ [whirring drones] ♪ no sudden movements. ♪ [screaming panic] ♪ [whirring drones] google search: bodega beach house. ♪ ♪ [drones crashing] ♪
11:58 pm
(ee-e-e-oh-mum-oh-weh) (hush my darling...) (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) (hush my darling...) man snoring (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) woman snoring take the roar out of snore. yet another innovation only at a sleep number store. look aon tripadvisor.l hotel
11:59 pm
wait. why leave the site? don't you know the tripadvisor you've always trusted for reviews, book! now checks over 200 websites to find the best price? book...book...book! over 200 sites checked to find the best price. so don't just visit tripadvisor... book at tripadvisor.
12:00 am
-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com state of emergency. another night of clashes and arrests in ferguson, missouri. anger and unease as japan restarts its first nuclear power plant since the fukushima
12:01 am
disaster. donald trump defiant. the white house hopeful insisting he is the injured party after his latest controversial comments. hello and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church and this is "cnn newsroom." there's renewed tension in ferguson, missouri as protesters mark a year since an unarmed african-american teenager was shot to death by a white police officer. a state of emergency is in effect for a second night. demonstrators took to the streets. police say protesters threw rocks and bottles of frozen water at them. they arrested at least nine people. demonstrators blocked a major highway for about 20 minutes until police forced them to move to the side of the road. and about 200 people marched
12:02 am
from a church to the federal courthouse in st. louis, demanding the justice department take action. police arrested more than 50 protesters there. the latest violence echoed the unrest from a year ago. but there were key differences in the response. and sara sidner reports. >> reporter: a barrage of bullets sent dozens scattering to safety, protesters and police, and that included ferguson's new interim police chief forced to take cover as we were recording him. >> we want to be as patient as possible -- [ gunshots ]. >> we have gunfire. >> the standoff between police and protesters disappated after a shooting happened. this video on twitter may
12:03 am
disturb you. it appears to show tyrone harris after allegedly exchanging fire with police. >> the suspect engages them with gunfire almost at the grill of the car. strike the hood. three or four times. strike the windshield four or five times. the plain-clothesed detectives returned fire from inside the van. >> reporter: it was a reminder of what happened on west florissant one year ago after the police shooting of michael brown, the police officer cleared of wrong doing by a grand jury and the department of justice. but this time, protesters acted differently and so did police, saying it was criminals, not protesters creating the mayhem. police say the suspect shot a
12:04 am
plain-clothed officer. some reacted with anger. on the other end of the street, bricks and bottles were being hurled at officers. >> it is a tragedy. there is a small group of people out there that are intent on making sure that we don't have peace that prevails. >> reporter: sara sidner, cnn, ferguson, missouri. japan's nuclear power industry has been essentially dormant since the meltdowns at the fukushima power plant in 2011. many people in japan are not happy to see the sendai number one reactor fired back up. cnn's anna coren joins us now with more. so talk to us about how concerned some people are about the restarting of japan's sendai nuclear power plant even though
12:05 am
the safety measures now are in place. what are people saying about that? >> reporter: safety measures which the government are saying are the toughest in the world. but as you say, there is great opposition within japan towards the nuclear reactors restarting the 43 nuclear reactors across the country. you are talking about 50 to 60% of the population that were polled opposing restarting reactors. but today they reopened one of the reactors at sendai in southwestern japan. there are two reactors at that site. the government hoping to reopen the second reactor by october. but as you can see from the pictures, huge protests being staged today as people don't want to see a repeat of what happened in 2011 with the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant disaster. we saw that meltdown and the
12:06 am
radiation leaks which meant that no one can live within the vicinity of that area. we're talking about tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of people that were affected just around fukushima that was the result of the earthquake and tsunami that came in 2011, obviously destroying the plant and causing that meltdown but people in japan, they know that their country is susceptible to earthquakes and very strong earthquakes and they do not want to see a repeat of the disaster in 2011. let's now have a listen to one of the protesters on the site earlier today. >> translator: firstly, these new standards that the abe government have got the snug regulatory agency to agree upon, the standards have just slightly raised the bar. but in fact it's full of holes.
12:07 am
>> reporter: full of holes and that's why they don't want to see the other reactors reopened. but the government is determined. and the reason being, as we've been discussing is japan's limited energy resources. before the earthquake and tsunami in 2011 japan was reliant on nuclear power for one-third of its electricity. really quite extraordinary. it then shut down all nuclear power plants gradually over the years. and it's only now that they are beginning to restart. but the government hoping that by 2030, that perhaps they'll be able to using up to 20% nuclear power for its electricity. over the past four years, electricity prices have shot up by 25% for households. even more so for businesses and factories. so really, the government seeing nuclear power as part of its future in regards to energy for japan, rosemary.
12:08 am
>> all right, cnn's anna coren reporting there from hong kong. we'll have more on this a little later in the program with a guest from greenpeace to explain some of the concerns a little deeper. let's check some other news now. reuters is reporting that after 23 hours of marathon talks, greek negotiators have reached a deal with international credit force. the multibillion dollar bailout keeps greece in the eurozone and avert bankruptcy. greece needs $94 billion to stave off a total financial meltdown. greece's finance minister says there are a few minor issues left to be worked out. swedish police are investigating a stabbing that left two people dead at an ikea store. it happened an hour west of stockholm on monday. a third person who was named as a suspect was also seriously
12:09 am
wounded. police say they have also arrested another suspect. the motive for the attack is unclear at this time. google is restructuring. the internet search giant has formed an umbrella company dubbed alpha bit which will be led by larry page and sergy brynn. it will oversee google and spinoff companies. the new contains will be free to take risks and develop their own brands. u.s. republican presidential candidate donald trump is facing strong backlash from within his own party for a controversial comment about fox news host megyn kelly. some think trump has hurt his chances of winning the women's vote in 2016. cnn's sarah murray explains. >> i evedon't have time for
12:10 am
political correctness. >> reporter: trump demanding an apology from megyn kelly. >> she asked me very inappropriate questions. she should be apologizing to me. >> reporter: an apology for a question during the first republican debate that he thought was unfair. so unfair that he described kelly as this way. >> to see there was blood coming out of her eyes, blood coming out of her -- wherever. >> reporter: clearly he is showing no sign of moderating his tone despite the republican party's huge push to court women and hispanic voters, votes crucial to winning the white house in 2016. according to the pew research center, women have favored the democrats since the 1980s and democrats fared better with hispanic voters. some of trump's rivals worry the
12:11 am
front runner is undermining that effort. >> if i was a young woman or hispanic i would have been turned off by mr. trump and the question is, does it bleed over to all of us. >> reporter: more opponents piling on. >> for a lot of us it's like watching a car accident instead of focusing on the direction we should be headed. >> reporter: carly fiorina told cnn there was no misinterpreting trump's comments. >> women understood that comment and it is offensive. >> reporter: trump took to twitter to respond. i just realized if you listen to carry fiorina for more than ten minutes straight you develop a massive headache. she has zero chance. trump now trying to change the conversation on the attack again this time against his top rival in the gop field, jeb bush.
12:12 am
>> as for the woman at the center of trump's latest dust up, fox news host, megyn kelly she addressed the controversy on her show on monday night. >> apparently mr. trump thought the question i asked was unfair and felt i was attacking him. i felt he was asked a tough but fair question and i will not apologize for doing good journalism. i will continue doing my job without fear or favor. >> megyn kelly there. hillary clinton the democratic front runner in this election is dismissing donald trump has entertainment but says his remarks are no laughing matter. she is calling him out for his comments and keeping the focus on republicans' track record for women's issues. >> what a lot of the men on that stage and that debate said was offensive. and i want people to understand that if you just focus on maybe
12:13 am
the biggest showman on the stage, you lose the thread here. the thread is that the republicans are putting forth some very radical and offensive positions when it comes to women's lives, women's reproductive health, women's employment and opportunities. we'll let the republicans, you know, go back and forth with each other but i want to point out there's not much difference in the policies that they are proposing when it comes to american women. >> and a reminder, donald trump will be a guest on "new day" later today at 7:00 a.m. eastern and 1:00 p.m. central european time right here on state's exhibit. a violent day in istanbul has prompted a warning from the u.s. government. ahead, we will show you the attacks that raised concerns especially for americans in
12:14 am
turkey. thousands of kilometers from home, a syrian refugee keeps searching for peace and security. his story, just ahead. later, the fbi is asked to help investigate a police shooting in texas, where an unarmed african-american teenager was killed. if your purse is starting to look more like a tissue box... you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin®. because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. zyrtec®. muddle no more™ .
12:15 am
12:16 am
12:17 am
12:18 am
a terror attack in istanbul is raising concerns about americans traveling in turkey. two women opened fire on the u.s. consulate there as cnn's barbara starr reports, the attack may have been a response to the heightened u.s. military presence in turkey. >> reporter: gunshots rang out near the u.s. consulate in istanbul as turkish police quickly blocked off the area after two women staged an armed attack. turkish authorities said the women were part of a left-wing militant group. >> the policeman was shouting
12:19 am
drop your bag and the woman was saying i will not surrender. i will avenge the attack. the police warned her again drop your bag or we will have to shoot you and the woman said, shoot. >> reporter: the consulate issued an emergency message warning u.s. citizens to stay away from the area and to exercise caution near large gatherings. it all happened as the first of the heavily armed u.s. f-16 fighters arrived in turkey. the planes now ready to begin airstrikes in syria and iraq. airstrikes in northern syria will be aimed at killing isis. but they will also support kurds known as the ypg, something turkey opposes. >> the only effective force against isis in syria has been the ypg. it's unlikely that the united states will stop fighting with
12:20 am
the ypg. >> reporter: u.s. officials said they will send additional helicopters into southern turkey very soon to be on stand by if any u.s. pilots go down. but the u.s. is willing to take the risk with the helicopters they already have in the region. and what about the u.s. trained and equipped syrian rebels? u.s. officials say they are going to have to figure out what to do with that whole train and equip program. they have a number of additional rebels already in training. where that program is headed is a big question tonight. >> barbara starr reporting there. in neighboring syria, the civil war is wearing the country down. president bashar al assad's army is fighting both rebels and isis. for civilians caught in the middle there are no signs of
12:21 am
relief. fred pleitgen is in the syrian capital with more. >> reporter: the syrian military is strained after four years of this ongoing civil war and president bashar al assad has acknowledged that at times the military will have to retreat from certain areas to make sure that they can shore up more important places. now the developments here on the battlefield are causing a strain here in the capital of damascus. what we're seeing is shortages of fuel. it takes an hour to two hours to get gasoline at gas stations. also there are power cuts throughout the city at various times during the day. and the pace that isis has been going and gains against the syrian military there are a lot of internally displaced people coming to the population centers, some of them near the mediterranean coast which is a stronghold of the assad regime but also to the capital of
12:22 am
damascus. you are seeing people especially minorities from palmyra and other towns and it's putting a strain on the syrian government to make sure that these people find a place to stay and they have food, water and medication. but on the many aid groups that are working here in the syrian capital and in other parts of the country as well. nevertheless, we don't get the sense that the people believe that the regime is on the verge of collapsing. while there have been setbacks, most people here in damascus believe that bashar al assad is not going to go away any time soon. fred pleitgen, cnn, damascus. one soldier was killed when gunmen opened fire on an infantry unit in southeast turkey on tuesday. that is according to a turkish armed forces statement. the statement blames separatist members for the attack.
12:23 am
isis is claiming responsibility for a deadly suicide bombing in iraq. it happened in a busy outdoor market near the city of baquba monday night. 30 were killed and 40 others wounded. officials say a roadside bombing happened in the same area an hour later, killing four people. it's not clear who carried out the second attack. also in iraq, parliament members are expected to vote today on a reform plan that would clear out top government positions. the measures were proposed by the country's prime minister after weeks of demonstrations of iraqis frustrated with corruptions. so, how likely is it that the dramatic reforms announced by iraq's prime minister will be passed and how significant is it
12:24 am
that we are seeing the prime minister propose these bold reforms at this sometime? >> reporter: well, rosemary after years of covering iraqi politics and monitoring the parliament it's difficult to tell how things will go, a lot of predictions that they will have to pass the reforms if the vote does take place today. implementation is a different thing and how that will happen is something that we'll have to wait and see. it's a very significant time. some are describing it as the most historic time in iraq since the 2003 u.s.-led invasion and the changes that came up after that. it's the biggest political shakeup that is being proposed that we are seeing take place now. an iraqi prime minister who is proposing to change a system that has been in place for more than a decade, something that iraqis blame for the current state of affairs in their
12:25 am
country, for a lot of their troubles. and they feel it has failed them. for first time, we're seeing the iraqi politician, a prime minister who has something rare, the backing of the highest religious figure in the country and at the same time, the support of a street movement that is different categories of iraqis not one sect, not one group, many iraqis are supporting him on this. a lot is riding here on haider al abadi's proposed plan hoping it will provide iraqis what his predecessors have failed to provide so far. this is the sound of a people who have simply had enough. iraqis took to the streets in demonstrations, calling for change, political reforms, holding corrupt officials accountable and demanding the basic services that government after government for more than a
12:26 am
decade have failed to restore. the protests were prompted by continuing power cuts as the country faced one of the worst heat waves in recent history. on sunday, haider al abadi in what appeared to be a response to the streets and a call for serious action by iraq's most influential shia cleric announced a series of bold measures. >> it may be the first time that we have a politician who is able to actually change things on the ground rather than just continuing in the same mold as his predecessors. time passes by and nothing changes on the ground. >> reporter: it includes eliminating the senior posts of three vice presidents and three deputy prime ministers. the positions are allocated based on a sectarian and ethnic quota system created by the united states in 2003. but many iraqis feel the system
12:27 am
is ineffective and part of the problem. other measures include cutting back on the costly security allowances provided to officials and more corruption investigations. the proposed steps swiftly approved by the cabinet go to parliament for a vote on tuesday. iraqis on tuesday evening again took to the streets of iraq in support of abadi. >> the protesters are not going to go away even if they hear the words they want to see action on the ground. that will take time to lay out. it's not something that will happen in the next week or two. it will be a several month process and they are likely to keep the pressure on the government. >> reporter: in a country where political instability and grievances have created ferr fe
12:28 am
ground for terrorism to thrive. all eyes are on baghdad and on the parliament that is expected to meet in the coming hours. >> we know you will be watching this closely, as will we. many thanks to you. still to come here on "cnn newsroom," the resumption of nuclear power in japan meets with vocal protests. a representative for greenpeace will make the case for keeping reactors quiet. leaving the terror behind. coming up, how far a syrian father has traveled to try to build a new life. we're back in a moment.
12:29 am
12:30 am
♪ some neighbors are energy saving superstars. how do you become a superstar?
12:31 am
with pg&e's free online home energy checkup. in just under 5 minutes you can see how you use energy and get quick and easy tips on how to keep your monthly bill down and your energy savings up. don't let your neighbor enjoy all the savings. take the free home energy checkup. honey, we need a new refrigerator. visit pge.com/checkup and get started today.
12:32 am
a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. this is "cnn newsroom." i'm rosemary church. we want to bring you up to date on the main stories this hour. at least nine protesters are under arrest in ferguson, missouri. demonstrators threw bottles of frozen water and rocks at them on monday night. this latest tension comes one year after the shooting death of an unarmed african-american teenager by a white police officer. south korea is ready to retaliate as tensions simmer following landmine blasts. they say that north korea planted mines on the south korea patrol route.
12:33 am
they will restart propaganda broadcasts there after a hiatus of ten years. japan is rebooting its nuclear power industry. kyushu's sendai number one reactor in southern japan is the first reactor to restart under tighter safety rules. all plants were taken offline after a series of meltdowns at fukushima in 2011 triggered by a massive earthquake and tsunami. the restart of the plant is immediating with resistance. joining me now from our tokyo bureau is the energy campaigner for greenpeace japan. thank you for talking with us. i want to get an idea from you how concerned should we be about
12:34 am
japan restarting the sendai nuclear reactor? >> yes, thanks for invite us for your program. and the biggest concern for the restart of sendai reactor one is the nuclear regulatory authority in japan and kyushu electric don't apply the robust standard for the safety assessment for restart. so they disregard the seismic risks and volcano risk as well. and furthermore the sendai reactor is aging reactor. they have a lot of issues relating to the aging reactors. >> so what exactly are the safety risks, do you think? and how would you describe the overall state of japan's nuclear industry right now?
12:35 am
>> yes, so as for the sendai reactors, the nra, the nuclear regulatory authority and kyushu electric the seismic risks near the sendai reactors. japan has many earthquake in history. and that kind of risk applies to all the reactors in japan. >> so if there are so many risks involved in restarting the sendai nuclear reactor why do you think japan's government is restarting it at this time and turning back to the country's nuclear industry to provide the nation's energy for now and indeed for the future? >> yes, the japanese government recently announced that their
12:36 am
energy mix in 2030 and in that target, the abe government says that 22% of the japanese electricity will come from nuclear in 2030. on the other hand, a greenpeace analysis found that the 2 to 8% will come from nuclear. so even if one of the nuclear reactor will restart, the japanese nuclear industry is still in crisis. >> all right, i'd like to thank ai kashiwagi from greenpeace. thanks for joining us and explaining some of the details there. we appreciate it. >> thank you for inviting me. the italian coast guard says it helped rescue more than 1500 migrants off the libyan coast in seven different operations on monday. the italian navy released this
12:37 am
video of one of the rescues where 775 migrants were picked up including women and children. we don't have details on where the migrants are from. the international organization for migration says more than 2,000 migrants and refugees have died trying to reach europe by boat so far this year. keep an eye on that story. many of those migrants are fleeing violence and poverty in their home countries. cnn spoke to one syrian refugee who hopes to reach england. he says he only got as far as france as traveling through ten countries. our kellie morgan has the story. >> reporter: a syrian father of two shows us where he sleeps in calais' so-called jungle. these are his only belongings. so different to what he had. >> translator: i owned my house, also one in damascus. i had a happy life.
12:38 am
>> reporter: now, abu mohammed, not his real name lives in fear of syria and isis. >> our home is destroyed. we spent a year with daish. we escaped from them. there were too many restrictions. even religion. they have harmed religion. for them, it's just a cover. >> reporter: raqqah is the defashion to capital for isis in syria and is a target for u.s.-led airstrikes. >> translator: today our children only know fear, the sounds of explosions. today they live in terror. >> reporter: abu mohammed threat on july 1st. he crossed into lebanon and arrived in turkey where he
12:39 am
stayed for two weeks before boarding a boat bound for greece. after four years in athens, he crossed into macedonia where he took a train to serbia before walking to hungary. from there by car through austria and germany and boarded a train to france, arriving in calais 28 days after he left home. >> when we left turkey we got lost at sea for around seven hours. we nearly drowned several times. on the road from hungary, we encountered gangs, bandits. >> reporter: after traveling more than 5,600 kilometers, this is not the destination abu mohammed envisioned. >> reporter: here at the camp, we sleep on the ground. there's nothing else. they offer us only one meal a day. some charities offer us some help, nothing else. we have to queue up for the bathroom. we have to be there on time
12:40 am
between 12:00 to 3:00 p.m. or you miss out. >> reporter: he still hopes to get to the uk, just 33 kilometers across the english channel. so close yet still so very far. >> translator: i'm not worried about my own life. but i'm worried about the future of the young children who need education. education is important. especially for muslims. it's the path to paradise. >> reporter: a path that for now remains closed. kellie morgan, cnn, calais, france. still ahead, details of a police shooting at a texas car dealership that left this unarmed 19-year-old football player dead. just about anywhere you can use splenda®... ...no calorie sweetener. splenda® lets you experience... ...the joy of sugar...
12:41 am
...without all the calories. think sugar, say splenda® ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ geico motorcycle, great rates for great rides.
12:42 am
12:43 am
12:44 am
in the united states, police in arlington, texas are asking the fbi to help investigate a deadly shooting at a car dealership. an unarmed african-american teenager was killed by a white police officer who was in training. >> reporter: erratic behavior with a fatal outcome. security cameras captured 19-year-old christian taylor as he drives up to the gate of a car dealership. the sophomore football player stumbles around and proceeds to damage property on site. first trying to punch through a car window, then jumping on the hood, breaking into the windshield. over a loud speaker system in the parking lot the security company tells taylor he is being watched. after he starts destroying the car window he is told that police have been called to the scene. in the edited video provided by
12:45 am
the dealership he heads to his vehicle, breaks through the gate and drives through the showroom floor. arlington police are called to the scene and an altercation ensued. he is tazed by one officer and the other officer draws his gun and fires four times. that officer, 49-year-old rookie brad miller was under supervised field training. miller shot at taylor four times landing shots in the neck, chest, and abdomen, according to the medical examiner. the fbi is assisting in the investigation and arlington police are not required to wear body cameras and cnn learned there are no cameras inside the car dealership showroom. >> i can guarantee you we will have a thorough investigation. if this was not justified or
12:46 am
authorized under the law there will be consequences. >> reporter: taylor's family questions why the unarmed teen was killed. >> shoot an unarmed man and you are trained to take down -- as a police officer you are trained to take down men with your hands. you have your tasers and clubs. 19-year-old and you shoot to kill? >> i don't want it to be a race thing. i want everybody to be protected by law enforcement. the united states says there is no clear evidence that dirty water sickened more than a dozen rowers in brazil over the weekend. the americans fell ill after competing in the world junior championships, a test event for next summer's olympics. water quality is a growing concern leading up to the games. but members of the u.s. team didn't seem too worried when
12:47 am
asked about it earlier. >> you just have to be cautious with any other place that you visit. you just drink bottled water, wash your hands right after you get off the water. >> you get splashed all the time. so you just have to wash off and you're fine. no big deal. >> u.s. officials point out that coaches also got sick during the trip and never touched the water. the only athlete who fell into the water did not get ill. parts of the u.s. state of colorado are under a state of disaster emergency. the governor made the declaration because of wednesday's accidental release of 3 million gallons of contaminants from a suspended mine. these photos show how the spill by a crew from the federal environmental protection agency turned clear running water yellow. tests are being run to determine
12:48 am
the impact of the pollutants. for more on the dangers of this spill, meteorologist pedram javaheri joins us now. and when you look at that river now, you do wonder how long it's likely to take to clean it up. >> yeah, i think it's going to be a very long operation here as far as being able to stop what has transpired. since last wednesday, officials were trying to stop a leak. this mine had had a small leak for several years. and they were moving some of the sediment and they uncorked what was trapped in this mine and it flowed down into the san juan river and it could be a multistate disaster. but the before and after perspective shows looking down to areas of the san juan river and notice the conditions out there. the before and after. you know something is wrong when you see something like this.
12:49 am
a disastrous scenario for multiple states. you think about colorado, over 15,000 mines across the state of colorado and cold king mine is the one in particular we are watching very carefully. it had not been operatable since the 1920s and the epa was there last wednesday trying to find a solution to the small leak in place. and this creek, cement creek, bone dry and they uncorked an area here and now we have what we believe could be arsenic, lead, zinc, copper flowing downstream. and silverton, colorado a state of emergency there. durango, colorado popular for rafting and kayaking and
12:50 am
fishing. they say stop those activities. let's take a look at this. new mexico tapping into the pollutants and beyond that the san juan feeding into the colorado river. lake powell providing water to arizona and nevada, las vegas in particular and beyond that into los angeles and san diego as well. so this is a concern that this is a very wide-reaching, impactful event that could continue downstream for many, many days ahead of us here. >> major concerns here and ramifications are massive. pedram javaheri thanks to you for pointing that out for us. donald trump isn't afraid to speak his mind. we know that of course. but what are his frowns and smirks saying? we take a look after this short break. stay with us.
12:51 am
12:52 am
12:53 am
12:54 am
welcome back, everyone. let's shift back to u.s. politics and what seems to be a contradiction. donald trump is leading in the
12:55 am
polls so why doesn't he look it. jeanne moos tries to figure it out. >> reporter: he is trumpzilla. so why was the donald looking like trump the grump in his first big debate. listen to dan hill, a man who reads faces. what struck you if anything about mr. trump? >> first of all the guy hardly smiles. >> reporter: even when he talked about fun. >> it's fun. it's kidding. we have a good time. >> reporter: he didn't look like he was having a good time. did he smile at all? >> he only smiles when making a sarcastic comment. >> only rosie o'donnell. >> reporter: dan hill expected trump to show anger, glinting eyes and pressed lips and in that sense, the unsmiling donald is totally on message. >> you can argue that not been content is his message.
12:56 am
>> reporter: trump's defenders like these sisters say that everyone is picking on him. >> leave donald trump alone. >> leave him alone. >> leave him alone, period. >> bye. >> reporter: tell that to cartoonists who can't get enough of his hair and his pursed lips. >> what i was surprised by is the guy pouts. he is someone who has that upper chin rising and the corners of the mouth go down drooping in sadness. it's like a cross of peter finch on "network" and leslie gore saying it's my party and i'll cry if i want to. >> reporter: in this case it's the republican party that's crying. >> ♪ you would cry too if it happened to you ♪ >> reporter: jeanne moos, cnn,
12:57 am
new york. i'm rosemary church. the news continues here on cnn. stick around. . . .
12:58 am
12:59 am
1:00 am
breaking overnight. new arrests in ferguson, missouri. this morning, protesters clashing with police in another night of demonstrations. donald trump back on the campaign trail facing criticism from hillary clinton. state of emergency declared. a toxic spill turns millions of gallons of river water orange three times larger than

122 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on