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tv   CNN Newsroom With Carol Costello  CNN  August 27, 2015 6:00am-8:01am PDT

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please! [ nurse ] i'm a nurse. i believe in the power of science and medicine. but i'm also human. and i believe in stacking the deck. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. and good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining me. they were murdered on live television and the killer celebrating his heartless sav e savagery on social media. they each had their own special love story. chris cuomo is in roanoke,
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virginia this morning. he talked with alison's boyfriend and her father earlier. tell us more, chris. >> carol in these situations the big question is always why. and maybe the best way to have something positive come out of this is to remind us of what is lost and the value of human life involved, that maybe it moved an unsettled soul to think before they commit violence. and we have beautiful opportunities to get to know who was lost and understand the value that these people held, even at this young age. 24-year-old alison parker, 27-year-old adam ward. the father wanted even in his pain to let people know what was missing now in his life and what the situation means to him. here's some of what he had to say. >> it's sense less that her life and adam's life were taken by a
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crazy person with a gun. and if i have to be the john walsh of gun control and -- look, i'm for the second amendment, but there has to be a way to force politicians that are cowards and in the pockets of the nra to come to grips and have sensible laws so that crazy people can't get guns. it can't be that hard. and yet politicians from the local level to the state level to the national level, they sidestep the issue, they kick the can down the road. this can't happen anymore because -- alison was one of you guys. this has got to hit home for journalists. she would be texting me right now, saying, dad, what did you think of my story. what did you think of it? i'm never going to hear that
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again. she was so loved by all. and my heart is broken. but i want to try and do something that will change that and make her life -- will do something meaningful for her life so this doesn't happen to someone else again. she was a special young lady and i think people across the country and certainly around here realize that. we at least take solace in the fact that she lived -- she was only 24. she just turned 24 last week. and she packed in a great life in 24 years. she did a lot of things. and she was -- most of all, she was happy with what she was doing. she loved what she was doing. she loved her family. she loved chris very much.
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at least we know from the law enforcement officials she didn't suffer. and you know she led a happy life. but i just wish i could touch her soul right now. because -- i'm sorry. i -- it's tough for me right now. >> of course it's tough for him right now, carol. and you know, as you well know -- and you handle these situations very delicately. you don't want to make something more difficult for a man, a parent in andy's position. he believes things need to change. and he deserves that opportunity, especially now. and her boyfriend, chris hurst, is an anchor here at wdbj, what the community is calling their news family. and he wants people to know that alison was only 24, but she was so much more than her age.
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she had lived so much. and she had given him a love for nine months that most people never have in their lives. >> our love story is just like, i think, adam and melissa's. and real quick, adam was the best boyfriend and fiance. way better than me. going the extra mile to prove his love to melissa was something that i have never seen before. and the way he proposed to her was elaborate and well executed. they were going to be a wonderful married couple. >> what did he do? >> he said it up so that she was exactly where he wanted to be, got down on one knee. and always made melissa feel special. these were two people like myself who maybe never thought they could get that kind of love and they got it. it was at the christmas station party last year, the way she
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looked. you've seen her. >> beautiful, stunning. and the energy that came out of her also. >> inside and out. i saw her at the christmas party wearing this gold sequinned dress. and everybody said she looked a little bit like taylor swift. and she had this beautiful red lipstick on. i stood in the corner and said, chris, you've got to do something or you're a fool. and something came over me. and i went up and made my move and asked her out a couple of days later. and we had our first date on january 1st. >> you said you felt tremendously lucky. you couldn't believe she returned the affection. >> yes. i'm not one to really put myself out there for dating. it's a tough job that we have. and we don't get a lot of free time. people in the business tend to know each other and get each other and we got each other. something came over me and i decided to go for it.
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we were both so lucky that that occurred because she told me and her parents told me last night that she was the love of my life and i was the love of her life. >> these situations, we see them so often and every one has its own special qualities and all of them share the same horrible questions. for all the unknowns that remain, carol, we hope for a better discussion than what we've had in the past. but you never know. what is known is that this young women and this young man were very special people to those in their lives and those in this community that they touched. >> you know, we remember victims like this in each and other incident that happens where gun violence is to blame. and nothing is ever done and nothing ever changes because people hide behind their old tired arguments. and i'll just say it. it makes me angry. it just makes me angry. >> i think that's understandable. i think it's an emotion that's
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shared here on the ground and in the community. and you know, yet this woman came up to me yesterday -- and she's been here her whole life. what she spoke about was the anger, that there's too much of it and not the righteous one that you're discussing, but how people treat one another and how they voice their own problems and how they deal with what's going on inside of them and how we treat each other. and yes, guns, yes, mental illness. when you tell a story about what is lost and how beautiful these people were and how much they had to offer, you hope that if nothing else that may move an unsettled soul to think before they decide to hurt others. >> i wish i could believe you, but i don't think so, because the answer to rage in this country has become, hey, you disrespected me, i'm just going to pull a gun and i'll cull my rage that way. we have to get rid of that. we don't have respect for guns
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anymore. >> look, i hear you. y you're making smart points. know what the status of the debate is, we know what the questions are. this country for all the talk about money and politics and corruption has always ultimately been what the people want to make it. and these situation raise the same questions every time. where it leads often winds up making the hope for change just that, only hope. and you just hope that it gets better and the conversation is had. more than anything else, we want the people who remember who was lost here and remember what it means to their loved ones. >> thanks. we'll get back to you. i appreciate it. to the tabloids here in new york the daily news and the post are facing outrage today for their shocking front pages. i'm not going to show you the front pages. i have them right here.
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but on the pages of both are freeze frames of the camera. angry tweets. just went to get coffee and saw the covers. can't believe their front covers. and then in all caps disrespectful. another tweet, the entire daily news editorial team should be fired. and this,almost tweeted out the appalling deal daily news cover before realizing that's exactly what they're trying to get you to do. with me now roanoke mayor david bowers and marly e ly o'toole. i want to get your reaction to these covers. >> i haven't seen them. but they remind me of matthew bra brady, the civil war
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photographer who took pictures of the battle scenes of the civil war. they were appalling and provocative at the time but they helped the american people begin to understand the horrors of war. i mean, at some point when are we going to understand the horrors of gun violence in our country. how many massacres do we have to have at virginia tech or church shootings in charleston or movie theater shootings in lafayette, louisiana, or shooting of journalists here in roanoke before the public cries out and says what it is that they want us to do. we just haven't reached a consensus on this in america in my opinion. >> it is interesting what you say about these tabloid covers though, mr. mayor. you say in some way maybe they can show the horror of gun violence and maybe something will be done? >> i guess, again, i would say that was the effect that matthew
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brady had 150 years ago on the american public. they're horrible pictures, i would guess. i've not seen them. the shooting itself was live on television here in roanoke. i didn't see it. i saw the film afterwards. it's horrible and sickening and maybe it will cause us to think about the horror of gun violence in our country and how it seems to be more and more prevalent. and innocent people are dying. i knew alison parker. i knew of adam ward. i didn't deal with them as closely. she was bright and intelligent and she just had a great energy in the mornings here at wdbj. i think everybody did love her and the community is mourning the loss that these two roanokers today. >> this killer, he was never deemed mentally i'll, so he was easily able to buy a gun, right?
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>> i don't know the circumstances of that. >> he bought a gun. these are the circumstances that cnn uncovered. so he was easily able to buy this gun. mr. mayor, what is the answer in your mind to stemming gun violence? do we need gun control laws? >> i think people ought to go back to church. i think in america people ought to go back to church. i have a saying on a plaque in my house. when life gets to be too much for you,just kneel. that's what i believe. i think people ought to pray more. we are praying for these poor souls now. we're praying for these families. we're praying for these wdbj employees family. we're worried in communities about these things happening. one thing is to pray, go to church, do positive things
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instead of all the crazy things in our society we seem to be doing with drugs and domestic violence and drinking and all the other things that seem to be awful in our society now. >> i also believe in the power of prayer, mr. mayor. i also believe in the power of pr pr prayor and i believe deeply in god. but i believe praying would be the solviolence in our country. >> there has to be a lot of thought, a lot of prayer, a lot of consensus building. to my way of thinking, that's the very first thing we've got to do. >> thank you so much for joining me. i so appreciate it. now i'd like to focus on you mary ellen. thanks for standing by and waiting. i appreciate it. i really want to find some answer to this, if possible. there were many signs in this man's past that he exhibited
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volatile behavior, that there was something unbalanced about him. but as far as we know, he never got help. >> right. that's a problem. but as i am listening to all of this information come out about him, there are other people clearly in the united states who are evolving down the same road that he did yesterday. and the one thing that law enforcement really needs to do in working with companies, in working with schools and universities is this. our mental health system is broken. got that. the gun control argument is at a stalemate. got that. but when you do have someone that you're firing or expelling from school and they manifest these kinds of behaviors, you cannot just boot them out the door and hope your problem is gone. there really has to be some way to monitor them, which maeeans
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that you may have to pay an off duty officer or a private investigator for the next five years to go by and check on them. >> for five years? he was fired from that television station two years ago. >> i understand that. when you have someone as volatile as this, it's very extreme. most people you fire, they're upset and they leave. when you have someone as volatile as this one, they have to be monitored. until we can fix the mental health system, those are the recommendations we made in the fbi to employers, to schools, you have to monitor this person. and that just means going by and checking on them. >> i'm just saying, so you were putting the onus on employers and to monitor someone for five years can be an expensive
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proposition. how is that even possible? >> well, people do it, though. it's not a full-time job. but clearly you're very sensitive to this. we don't have a mental health system where you can take somebody and put them away. and that will probably never happen anyway. so what we've found works the best is to just stay in touch with the person, see if they're getting worse, if their hatred, if their attitudes are deteriorating and if they're talking about buying guns and in fact they are buying guns, because from the information right now he was legal in purchasing that gun. so short of everything thaeelse that's not working, i'm just saying we would make that recommendation in the fbi, not all the time and not really frequently. but every now and then if somebody was that concerning to us, we would tell that company you have to do something to monitor them. >> mary ellen o'toole, thank for your insight.
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i appreciate it. >> you're welcome. >> just moments ago the morning team held a moment of silence for their fallen colleagues and we will too. >> it was yesterday around this time that we went live to alison parker and photo journalist adam ward. they were at bridgewater plaza near smith mountain lake to report on a happy event, the 50th anniversary of the lake, just a feature. the peacefulness of our community was shattered. as we approach that moment, we want to pause and reflect what made these two so special, not just to us, but to all of our hometowns that wdbj7 serves. please join us now in a moment of silence. (woman) you want to eat...
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the family of the man who shot and killed two virginia journalists is offering their sympathies, enlisting a family friend to read a statement on their behalf. >> it is with heavy hearts and deep sadness we express our deepest con doll edolences to t families of alison parker and adam ward. we are also praying for the recovery of vicki gardener. our thoughts and prayers are with the families and with wdbj station family. >> in the meantime we're learning new details about what motivated the killer, including the plan for yesterday's attack that seemingly began weeks ago. >> reporter: the day he was fired from wdbj tv february 1st,
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2013, the shooter told his bosses i'm not leaving, you're going to have to call the efing police. colleagues say he threw a tantrum. police did indeed escort him out of the newsroom. internal mem rows obtained by cnn show his brief one year employment was racked with aggressive behavior, poor journalistic performance. at one point the station referred him to mandatory counselling. after his firing form eer colleagues tell cnn they were concerned for days he would come back. jeff marks is the station's general manager. >> it was i guess a little bothersome he was still in town and would be seen by our employe employees. again, what do you do? >> he sued the station for
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discrimination, the suit dismissed last summer. record show he worked at tv stations in greenville, north carolina, savannah georgia. and he was fire from a station in tallahassee, florida for what the news director described as odd behavior. a lawsuit filed alleging racial discrimination. the suit dismissed. hours after the shooting he writes alison made racist comments meaning alison parker the reporter he killed but never worked with. it's unclear if he ever seeceve met. he writes eeoc report filed. at tweet, adam went to hr with
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me after working with me one time. he meant the station's human resources department. adam was adam ward, the photographer killed. the station says no one saw this coming. >> he did make some accusations against people some time ago. you can never imagine that somebody's going to come back and act on those issues that were so old. >> about a week ago the shooter started posting pictures, an apparent life history, highlighted from his childhood, high school and beyond. and in the rambling 23-page fax to abc news he said his plan was to kill after the charleston shootings earlier this summer. later he writes, administration for the south korean national mass killer responsible for the
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shootings at virginia tech and the columbine high school killers. his final tweet, i filmed the shooting. see facebook. drew griffin, cnn washington. >> with me now cornell west. he's a professor, author and activist with black lives matter. did race play a factor in this killer's rampage? >> we don't know. the fundamental question is how do you get at this spiritual decay and this moral decadence in this society as a whole? all of us have to deal with rage. how do you filter that rage through love? and this is a larger question. we live in a society that resolved around money and image. so it pushes out wisdom and empathy. and we don't have a push button
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solution. gun control legislation, crucial. but if our souls are still shot through with the callousness and indifference towards others -- >> the fact that he used the charleston church shootings as an excuse, those were the most forgiving people on the planet pi it's a disservice to them. it's disrespectful. >> i think he was a gay brother, i'm told. he's dealing with being margi l marginalized in his other community. it's not an excuse. the killing of any innocent person is wrong. we don't have a language to describe it. at the same time all of us are wrestling with this rage. and how do we express it in such a way -- >> didn't his rage come from an unbalanced place, though? he was a sick person, though, wasn't he? >> i don't think he was mentally ill. i think he snapped.
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i think he reached a point where he snapped. the problem is we live in a society where people don't give or get enough love. they don't give or get enough justice. they don't give or get enough community. when you're isolated and insulated that rage bubbles up. and lo and behold you get a bigger thomas. >> i have his work history right here. it sounds like he used these things as excuses for violent behavior. >> he could have. we just don't know. the important thing is this is not an isolated incident. this says something about us as a nation, as a people. how do we come to terms with contempt? we see it in regard to our dear brother trump, you see? what did you say about the precious mexican brothers and sisters? no matter how you try to nuance it, it shows a hostility and a contempt. how do we talk in such a way in
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which we show an empathy and a sensitivity? where is the integrity? >> let's talk about the gun issue. chris cuomo talked to donald trump earlier and on the gun issue he said some things that some politicians say. this was a mentally ill person. guns don't kill, people do. >> we know that. i mean, it's true there's not a push button solution to this. we're in a spiritual crisis. it's a moral crisis. what kind of people are we? the only way you get out of it is through love exemplified and enacted. justice is what love looks like in public. when you have a love deficit, you have a justice deficit. and the question becomes how do you make things accountable? i'm very much in favor of tight gun control. different culture. how do we hit it head on?
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brother martin luther king, jr. told us. the disposition solves the conflict by means of violence is something we're going to have toe come to come to terms with. and he's trying to talk about integrity, honesty, dee sevcenc. >> bernie sanders supported a ban on assault weapons. he was against brady bill. >> we can have integrity and have addition agreement on is--n this regard. people can deal with their rage through family, community, be it church, mosque, synagogue that allows us not to have to kill
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one another. >> i'll be right back. care of my heart.
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i won't belabor this because i don't need to. we want to show you the entire interview with andy parker, that would be alison parker's father who was struggle with the fact that his daughter whas killed o live television. mr. parker, thank you for joining us. i know this is an incredibly difficult time for your family i also know that it's important for you to share who your daughter was in her life, not just in her death. how are you this morning? >> well, i could be better. yesterday i really didn't think i would be making the news round circuit. had no intention of doing so. and then as i reflected during the day, i realized that alison
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was a journalist. she did what you guys did. and she would want me to do this. so that's why i'm here. i've gone through the usual emotions of being numb and then, you know, uncontrolled grief and sobbing all day long. and then, you know, anger. but my soul's been crushed. >> in one of your statements yesterday, you said something that i hope you're feeling as well as saying, which is the measure of solace that you get from knowing that while your daughter had such a young life at 24 years of age she made so so much of the time she had and touch sod many people. is that helping? >> it is. the out pouring from the community and i think the nation at large -- obviously this is a big story nationally. you know that has been a comfort. she was.
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she was such a special person. she loved everybody that -- she was loved by everyone and you know it was -- and she touched a lot of lives. obviously it shows in the tributes that have come her way. i've got to tell you. i've not watched any television. i didn't see any of the recounts. i didn't want to. after the fact i'm hearing just, you know, how much she has been loved. and i certainly -- it doesn't surprise me. >> part of how you want your daughter to be remembered is that you want something to come out of the situation. you were very strong last night when you were talking about how we need to be better after a situation like this. what do you want now? >> well, you know her life was cut short.
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she had -- she had so much potential. and it's senseless that her life and adam's life were taken by a crazy person with a gun. if i have to be the john walsh of gun control and -- look, i'm for the second amendment, but there has to be a way to force politicians that are cowards and in the pockets of the nra to come to grips and have sensible laws so that crazy people can't get guns. it can't be that hard. and yet politicians from the local level to the state level to the national level, they sidestep the issue. they kick the can down the road. this can't happen anymore. alison was one of you guys.
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this has got to hit home for journalists. and journalists are targets. and we're not talking about, you know, someone going to syria and being in the cross hairs of isil. we're talking about two young people that were doing a benign story about a marina opening or celebration and someone -- and a crazy person with a gun shoots them. aknno i know the nra are going to say, oh gee, if they were carrying, this never would have happened. i've got news for you. if alison and adam had been carrying an ak47 strapped around their waist, it wouldn't have made any difference. they couldn't have seen this coming. i don't want to hear that from the nra.
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i got a call from the governor yesterday and i told him exactly what my plan was. if i have to be a crusader on this, i'm not going to rest until i see something happen. he said, andy, you go for it. i'm right there with you. we've got to have our legislators and congressmen step up to the plate and stop being cowards about this. >> andy, you know what you're going to hear. obviously you're very emotional right now and it's motivating you and you have to put emotion where you can in this situation. we just had donald trump on. he's leading in the polls. he said these are tough issues and i'm for the second amendment and i don't think that you should take away more guns, that doesn't seem to be the answer and mental illness is tough and we should do more. those things sound great and we hear them from politicians all the time and yet nothing changed. the two sides are very rooted.
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the law is what it is. and change is hard. what do you say to those issues? >> of course. i'm not saying let's take away guns. i'm saying let's make it harder for people with mental issues. like this guy that killed alison and adam, to make it difficult for them to purchase guns. there's got to be a mechanism that gets put in place for that. i don't think that's unreasonable to do. how many newtowns are we going to have? how many sandy hooks? how many alisons is this going to happen to before we stop it? i'm challenging you, the media, because again, this is one of your own. and i know how the business works. you know, it's a great story for a couple of days and then it goes to the back burner and nothing happens. but i can prom you and i can
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promise the american people i'm not going to rest until i see something get done here. >> you're being motivated obviously by the loss of your daughter. you know there's been a great o outpouring of support for her. and the eyes of the country are on this story. what do you want them to know about your daughter? >> that she was -- she was kind and she was sweet and she touched everybody. and that, you know, i'm standing here now. and you know, i got to see her in action and doing stories like this with the cameras set up. she loved us and we loved her. and i talked to her every single day. every single day i talked to her. right now she would be texting me right now saying, dad, what did you think of my story? you know, what did you think of it? and i'm never going to hear that
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again. she was so loved by all. my heart is broken. but, i want to try and do something that will change that and make her life -- will do something meaningful for her life so this doesn't happen to someone else again. she was a special young lady. and i think people across the country and certainly around here realize that. >> often maybe the best thing that comes out of a situation like this, andy, is that people get a respect for the victims who were involved and what is lost when somebody decides to take out their anger the way that this madman did. and your daughter in her own way is becoming the best example of how precious life is. and you got to see it even in her boyfriend chris who you know so well, the love he had for
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your daughter and the love she had for him. that is one way your daughter will live on in the hearts of the people who loved her. >> it is. and you know we can at least take solace in the fact that she lived -- she was only 24. she just turned 24 last week. and she had -- she packed in a great life in 24 years. she did a lot of things. and she was most of all she was happy with what she was doing. she loved her family. she loved chris very much. and what we know from the law enforcement officials, she didn't suffer. and, you know, she led a happy life. i just wish i could up ttouch h soul right now. i'm sorry. >> andy, don't say you're sorry.
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i know this is difficult for you. i know it is. i know you feel you have to come out because you want people to remember her the right way and what you think is important in this. please take care of yourself and your family. you know we will stay on this for the right reason. i appreciate it. our hearts and pray yours -- go out to you and your family. >> thank you. she would have wanted this. thank you. ♪
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we're watching wall street very closely after yesterday's huge surge. will the market continue to make up for a six straight days of losses? okay. well, just minutes now to the trading day. let's check the big board. you can see the dow is up more than -- a little over 200 points. of course, as you know, the dow closed a whopping 619 points up yesterday. that's the biggest one-day gain since 2008, but still not enough to make up for the 1,900-point drop we saw in less than a week. we'll keep you posted. on to politics. a new quinnipiac show shows donald trump continuing his dominance. 28% throwing their support to trump.
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that's a double digit lead over his closest rival ben carson who has just 12%. jeb bush, ted cruz, and marco rubio tying for third. scott walker coming in at 6 t% s while john kasich and carly fiorina are tied for sixth. when quinnipiac asked voters about the first word that pops in their heads when they think of the donald, the responses were not as favorable. topping the list, arrogant followed by blow hard, idiot, businessman and clown. there's also a few we had to blur out to make this image tv-friendly. you can just imagine what those descriptors might be. here to talk about this, mindy fin, republican political consultant and ben ferguson, a political talk show host. >> i love we're blurring out words on a candidate running for president. >> it's just unbelievable, right? >> yeah. >> what do you make of those descriptors? >> well, two things here.
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donald trump, the narrative that it's him against the world has obviously solidified his base. it also could hurt him in the long run, but i don't think he's worried about that. he is sucking up all the oxygen in the room. he's continuing to gain over other candidates, and i think the biggest point about this poll is donald trump has been able to literally dismantle one of the best grass root campaigns we've seen with jeb bush, and jeb bush has been able to raise a lot of money. the establishment very much behind him, and yet he's tied and keeps dropping in these polls, and ben carson is also telling. ben carson and trump may only have one thing in common, they're both not politicians, they have not held office and there seems to be a big appetite for that in the gop. >> okay. so, mindy, i'm curious about something. mitt romney raised a lot of money, too, but he was just a bad candidate. is it possible jeb bush is just a bad candidate? >> i think it's too early to tell. look, donald is beating the
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field by a wide margin so the story here is really donald. it started out as amusing and now it definitely has to be taken seriously. i agree with what carly fiorina said yesterday, donald is a wake-up call the entire country needs to take seriously. i think at this point though actually he's dangerous and anybody who is still kind of looking at it and thinking it will just ride it out and it's kind of amusing, it's time to take a closer look. >> why do you say, mindy, he's dangerous, his candidacy is dangerous? >> he's a bully. carol, this morning i dropped off my 3-year-old for first day of school and i thought about what are my hopes and dreams for him as he goes through his school life? what are the lessons i want to teach him? we all look to our kids and we want them to be a leaders. it's not be a bully, name call, think of bim as bimbos and dogs. you know, it's not -- i actually kind of look at the donald a bit like an abusive boyfriend. there's an allure, he's filling
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kind of a need and a void and people are attracted to him but ultimately he's a bully. he's going to punch you in the eye. >> okay. >> i don't think he's an abusive boyfriend. i think he is the nontraditional candidate, and eats nhe's not go take crap from anybody and i think that's why people are liking him, because he is not going to focus group anything he says. he goes on stage and i don't think he exactly know what is he's going to say. he's real, he's raw, he's in your face. yes, some of the things he said are absolutely offensive to people, but i think his whole point is being pc has gotten us in the mess we're in right now, so i'm not going to run the country the way that others have, and i'm going to make america great and i'm going to fight hard against other countries when they're fighting hard against us. he's talked about that with russia and putin, with isil and people say, you know what? i'd rather have a bully than somebody that's going to be politically correct all the time and get nowhere with it. >> there is a caveat to that because also this quinnipiac
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also shows, mindy, that trump top was quinnipiac calls the no way list. 26% saying they would not support him as a nominee. that's just below the 28% who rank him as their first choice. so it seems to me -- is it possible people are just enjoying the show for now because, i mean, we have, what, more than 500 days still to the election? >> that does explain some of his support. a lot of it is what ben said, is that they're attracted to his outsider image. you know, they see our current president as weak and kind of politicians in general as weak and too poll tested and politically correct, and donald is the opposite of that. he's the answer to that. what i suggest though is that that's an overreaction. i think many people looked at the first debate and they looked at the fact he doesn't have clear positions on policy. i mean, he actually entered the race and many of his previous positions are not conservative, they are actually quite liberal. he was a friend of hillary
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clinton. >> and a good friend. >> a good friend. what i see now is really an overreaction and the fact he continues to rise in the polls is why wi say it's time to get beyond seeing him as amusing and the trend is troubling. >> thanks to both of you. i appreciate it. so what is the first word that pops into your head when you hear hillary clinton? her results in a now poll coming up in the next hour of "newsroom."
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checking some of the top stories for you at 59 minutes past. a louisiana police officer is dead after responding to a call about a stabbing. the suspect harrison lee riley is accused of stabbing three women including his wife before fatally shooting the officer. riley took off in his car, crashed into a convenience store, and then barricaded himself inside. he is arrested after police forced him out with taer gas. a judge has sentenced colorado movie theater gunman
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james holmes to the maximum. 12 life sentences plus more than 3,000 years in prison. he is not eligible for parole. he killed 12 people and wounded 70 others in the 2012 shooting. the next hour of cnn "newsroom" starts now. and good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining me. this morning haunting words from the father of the woman murdered on live television. andy parker vows that his daughter, alison, and her colleague adam ward, will not remain the victims of yet another senseless killing. angry at times and choking back tears at others, he says their deaths must open a new national dialogue on gun violence. cnn's chris cuomo is live in roanoke this morning. he spoke to him just a short time ago. tell us more, chris. >> reporter: well, he says, carol, that he is forcing himself to deal with the media, and as you know it's one of the tough calls for us is whether or
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not you take someone who is in pain and put them on television, but he is aware of his pain, all too aware, and he's also aware of the opportunity and he says he wants people to know who his daughter was and more importantly he does not want her death to go without meaning. not just to his family but to the reasons why he thinks this happened. but listen to him in his own words. >> i could be better. yesterday i really didn't think i would be making the news round circuit and just had no intention of doing so, and then as i reflected during the day, i realized that, you know, alison was a journalist. she does what you guys did -- did what you guys did, and she would want me to do this. so that's why i'm here, but i've gone through, you know, the usual emotions of being numb and then, you know, uncontrolled grief and sobbing all day long,
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and then, you know, anger, but my soul has been crushed. >> reporter: in one of your statements yesterday you said something i hope you're feeling as well as saying which is the measure of solace you get from knowing that while your daughter had such a young life at 24 years of age, she touched so many people and she made so much of the time she had. is that helping? >> it is. the outpouring from the community and, you know, i think the nation at large, obviously this is a big story nationally, and, you know, that has been a comfort, but she was, she was such a special person. you know, she loved everybody that -- you know, she was loved by everyone and, you know, it was -- and she touched a lot of lives, and obviously it shows in the tributes that have come her way, and, you know, i got to tell you, i've not watched
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television. i didn't see any of the recounts, i didn't want to, but after the fact i'm hearing just, you know, how much -- how much she has been loved and, you know, i certainly -- it doesn't surprise me. >> part of how you want your daughter to be remembered is that you want something to come out of this situation. you were very strong last night when you were talking about how you think we need to be better after a situation like this. what do you want now? >> well, you know, her life was cut short. she had -- she had so much potential, and it's senseless that her life and adam's life were taken by a crazy person with a gun, and, you know, if i have to be the john walsh of gun
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control, you know, look, i'm for the second amendment, but there has to be a way to force politicians that are cowards and in the pockets of the nra to come to grips and make sense -- have sensible laws so that crazy people can't get guns. it can't be that hard. and yet politicians from the local level to the state level to the national level, they side step the issue, they kick the can down the road. this can't happen anymore because alison was one of you guys. this has got to hit home for journalists, and if journalists -- you know, if journalists are targets, and we're not talking about, you know, someone going to syria and being in the crosshairs of isil, we're talking about two kids that were two young people that were doing a benign story about a marina opening or celebration
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and someone -- and a crazy person with a gun shoots them. and i know the nra, their position is going to be -- i can hear it now. they are going to say, oh, well, gee, if they were carrying, this never would have happened. i have news for you. if alison and adam had been carrying an ak-47 strapped around their waist it wouldn't have made any difference. they couldn't have seen this thing coming. so i don't want to hear that argument from the nra, and you know that's going to happen, and i'm going to take it on. i got a call from governor mcauliffe yesterday and i told him exactly what i plan was. if i have to be a crusader on this, i'm not going to rest until i see something happen, and he said, andy, he said, you go for it. i'm right there with you. we've got to have our legislators and our congressmen step up to the plate and stop
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being cowards about this. >> reporter: you're being motivated obviously by the loss of your daughter. you know there's been a great outpouring of support for her, and the eyes of the country are on this story. what do you want them to know about your daughter? >> that she was kind and she was sweet and she touched everybody and that, you know, i'm standing here now and, you know, i got to see her in action in doing stories like this with a camera set up. she loved us and we loved her, and i talked to her every single day. every single day i talked to her, and right now she would be texting me right now saying, dad, what did you think of my story? you know, what did you think of it? and i'm never going to hear that again. she was so loved by all, and i know my heart is broken, but i
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want to try and do something that will change that and make her life -- will do something meaningful for her life so that this doesn't happen to someone else again. but she was a special young lady, and i think people across the country and certainly around here realize that. >> reporter: often maybe the best thick that comng that come situation like this, andy, are people get a respect for the victims and who is lost when somebody decides to take out their anger the way this madman did, and your daughter in her own way is becoming the best example of how precious life is, and you got to see it even in her boyfriend chris who you know so well, the love he had for your daughter and the love she had for him. that is one way that your daughter will live on in the hearts of the people who loved
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her. >> it is, and, you know, we can at least take solace in the fact that she lived -- she was only 24. she just turned 24 last week, and she had -- she packed in a great life in 24 years. she did a lot of things, and she was -- most of all, she was happy with what she was doing. she loved what she was doing. she loved her family. she loved chris very much, and at least we know and i know from the law enforcement officials, she didn't suffer. and, you know, she led a happy life, but i just wish i could touch her soul right now because -- i'm sorry. >> reporter: i told andy not to be sorry for sharing his pain. he's trying to give a purpose to his pain. he's trying to take this
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opportunity, as difficult as it is for him to let people know what was lost and in his opinion let them know why things were lost, and the job then becomes for us obviously, carol, in all of these cases, and there are so many, to create an urgency through an intimacy with those who are lost, in this case alison and adam and her boyfriend, chris hurst, is a talented young anchor here at d wdbj and he talked to us about the love of his life. >> our love story i think is just like adam and melissa's, and real quick adam was the best boyfriend and fiance i could ever imagine, way better than me. his spontaneity to show his love. going the extra mile to prove his love to melissa was something i have never seen before and the way he proposed to her was elaborate and well executed and they were going to be a wonderful married couple. >> reporter: what did he do? >> he set it up so that she was exactly where they wanted to be,
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got down on one knee, and just always made melissa feel special and those were two people just like myself who maybe never thought they would get that kind of love, and we got it. and for me, you know, it was at the station christmas party last year. the way she looked. chris, you have seen her on television. >> beautiful, beautiful. >> stunning. >> and the energy that came out of her also. >> that, too. inside and out. so i saw her at the christmas party wearing this gold sequin dress and everyone always said she kind of looked a little bit like taylor swift and she had this beautiful red lipstick on, and i just stood in a corner. i said, chris, you got to do something or you're a fool. and something came over me, and i went up and made my move and asked her out a couple of days later and we had our first date on january 1st. >> and you say you felt tremendously lucky. you couldn't believe that she returned the affection. >> yes, yes, yes. i'm not one to -- i'm not one to
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really put myself out there for dating, and, you know, it's a tough job that we have, and you don't get a lot of free time. people in the business tend to know each other and tend to get each other and we got each other, and -- but something came over me and i decided that i had to go for it, and we were both so lucky that that occurred because she told me and her parents told me last night that i was the love of her life and she's the love of my life. >> so where is the hope? why do these keep happening? carol, you said it makes you angry, and you know what? i have a better answer for you now. of course you're angry. you're angry because you know that there are solutions to this. these are not impossible problems. are they intractable, are they difficult, do they deal with the frustrations and problems of politics? yes, but none of those are reasons for no solution. of course there's a better way to deal with guns in this society than we are. any fool would know that. but what the preferences are for those solutions or will there of
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is where we get caught. could we do better with the mentally ill? of course we can. you ask any clinician or any politician who has taken time to study it, of course we can. there's better monitoring, better treatment. representative tim murphy has a bill right now going nowhere in congress. of course the gun policy doesn't make sense right now. of course it doesn't. and that's why you're angry because there is a necessary frustration when you're faced with situations that are so obvious that don't change over time. i have been in 20 different states covering this since columbine. i have been to far too many. the questions are always the same and the answers don't come and we know they don't come. that's why you're angry. >> the other frustration is we live in a country with unbelievably smart people who can find solutions. yet we all sit back and say, what can you do? there are evil people in the world. well, of course there are, but to say there's nothing we can do about it, thaebs just the coward's way out. that's not the american way.
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i just don't understand that. there are solutions. we just have to sit down and talk about them like reasonable people. >> reporter: well, the question is who are we? and i mean that in two different ways. one is who are our leaders and what are they really interested in and how does that really manifest? and also there's a second we, which is, and this will sound amorphous or pollyanna and people think it's off point, but it's the core of the point. how we treat each other. what you said america is. america has always been about sweet strength. where is that in our society today? what is our culture about violence. how do we treat one another? it may seem nebulous and off the point. it isn't. all these cases come down to that. when people are angry, what do they do? it comes down to respect and how we care about each other. >> that's right. i will just say -- i will just button it up here, chris. you know, when i was a girl, i lived in rural america. i had a gun. i'm not against guns.
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but i don't understand why responsible gun owners don't want to do anything to get the bad gun owners, the irresponsible gun owners, out of the way. to make sure that guns don't land in the wrong hands. because those irresponsible, violent gun owners give everybody a bad name, including responsible gun owners, and they should be leading the fight, and i don't understand why they're not. >> reporter: you understand why they're not. you understand the politics that are involved. the question is what will make the difference? because you'll hear them come out and say the right things right now, but what happens tomorrow, what happens next week, what happens a month from now when you have parents like andy all over this country wanting something to be different for everybody else's kids than what happened to their own. >> chris cuomo, many thanks. i appreciate it. the wdbj news team has shown so much grace in covering this difficult story. their morning team held a moment of silence for their fallen colleagues, and we will, too.
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>> it was yesterday around this time that we went live to alison parker and photojournalist adam ward. they were out in the field. the story was like so many others they did all the time, reporting on our hometowns. they were at bridge water plaza near smith mountain lake to report on a happy event, the 50th anniversary of the lake, just a future. it was during a conversation with vicky gardner about another reason why we love living here when the peacefulness of our community was shattered. as we approach that moment we want to pause and reflect and we want to share with you once again what made these two so special not just to us but to all of our how mametowns that w serves. please join us now in a moment of silence.
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we're learning new details about the man who killed two virginia journalists before taking his own life during a police chase. the shooter called himself, quote, a human powder keg waiting to go boom. he made that statement in a ranting, rambling, and disjointed suicide letter he faxed over to abc. chief media correspondent brian stelter is following that part of the story. tell us more, brian. >> i hate having to go into the mind of a killer like this, carol, but the mind of this man is very evident in the suicide note. it goes on and on and it was faxed to abc about an hour and a half after the shooting yesterday. he then called up the network to make sure they got it apparently and then hung up. we can read you a part of it. i think it's notable he goes into a rambling detail about his life talking about his past employment as a teen model he says and a male escort and then a television news reporter. he talks about being a black man and a gay man and feeling discriminated against and
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harassed. i think one of the most important quotes comes talking about race. he says he's somewhat racist against blacks, whites and latinos. he refers to the charleston church shooting as one of the final elements that triggered him to buy a gun and prepare for this attack. he said if you wanted a race war, you got a race war. there were racial overtones to this and some people have started to call it a hate crime. he also talks about being inspired by past killers, including the killers in columbine many years ago and virginia tech in 2007. he actually refers to them by name and says they inspired him to commit his act of crime. >> just unbelievable. brian stelter, thanks. i appreciate it. the killer's admiration for other mass murderers has reignited the debate over guns in america. not that it matters because you know talk is just talk. but there is a small sign that something more than talk is happening at walmart. the retailer announced it will
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stop selling military-style semiautomatic weapons, including ar-15s. walmart made that announcement on the same day two journalists were gunned down. gun control advocates have been fighting for this, but listen to what walmart's ceo told us recently. >> our focus as it relates to firearms should be hunters and people who shoot sporting clays and things like that, so the types of rifles we sell, the types of ammunition we sell should be curated for those things and we believe in serving those customers. we have for a long time a we believe we should continue to. >> to be clear, gun sales have been strong this summer. the fbi conducted 1.6 million background checks in july alone. that includes all types of guns. and, no, the killer in virginia did not use an ar-15, but he is another example of a troubled, volatile person able to easily purchase a gun. as "the new york times" points out, more americans have died from guns in the united states
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since 1968 than on battlefields of all the wars in american history. yeah, try to wrap your head around that one. with me to talk about all of this, david cullen the author of the book "columbine" and colin godda goddard, a survivor of virginia tech. colin, you still have three bullets in your body. when you hear this virginia killer admire the man who shot you, what goes through your mind? >> it's incredibly disturbing and, frankly, none of us should be thinking about admiring these people or giving really them any notoriety they don't deserve. so my mind on that is pretty short. what i then focus on is how do we stop the next series of shootings that's going to happen in this country because we've done nothing since the last one. that's where i spend most of my focus. >> i want to talk about that, but i want to pause for a moment because this killer in virginia also expressed admiration for the columbine killings, and
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dave, that's your area of expertise. columbine continues to inspire mass murderers. why is that? >> well, it's sort of the template. it kind of kicked off this whole series of these copycats. it wasn't the first one, but it was the one that brought it to a new level and really kind of showed these people the level of notoriety they could get, what it could do for them in terms of fame, infamy, and really how much the media would make a tv movie out of them, would be, you know, all coverage all the time for about a week as we're doing now and make them the center of attention. i'm really glad that in this case more so than other cases we have seen more of an emphasis on the victims this time. you know, in some ways it helps for us as media people, but there's just two of them. when you have 10 or 15 people, you can only do like little vignettes of 30 seconds or something. when there's two, we can really
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focus on them. we need to figure out a better way of doing that because we always say we want to focus on the victims do. >> reporter: let's focus on that for a second, the notoriety that these mentally ill people derive from doing these vial, evil acts. copp colin, "the new york times" features frame by frame shots. the killer wore a go pro to tape what he was doing. did the new york tabloids go too far? i think they did. i wanted to hear it from you. >> i mean, in a basic way i think when you watch the live feed that happened yesterday morning, it shows you a small glimpse of what a shooting is really like. you heard the gun shots. you heard the screams. you could see the blood. you felt how horrible it is and that's just a small part of how truly terrifying these examples are. so when the conversation around guns or gun deaths and look at the bigger statistics can get
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lost in numbers and talking points, those moments bring back the reality of this is the situation that we're trying to avoid. this is what we're actually trying to prevent from happening to other people, and so it's incredibly difficult to watch, particularly people who have experienced it themselves, and i think to a certain extent people should see that, but at the same time we should not be giving it repeated, repeated air time that we are to then give the notoriety to these people. >> and i hear what you're saying and cnn has chosen not to air any of those images anymore and we did so sparingly even yesterday. colin, i want to like -- i want to talk about something you just said because the mayor of roanoke, i interviewed him earlier this morning, and he, too, said these images might bring home the carnage and make people really understand that we need to deal with this problem. is that sort of what you're saying as well? >> yes. you know, 88 other americans dealt with what alison and adam
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and vicky dealt with yesterday on an average american day. 88 of us will deal with that same kind of scenario again today. that is the reality that we are dealing with in this country in 2015. and the disconnect is the american public wants something to be done but we have elected officials who give talking points and then nothing, and we let that be the case repeatedly and we have the same conversation over and over again. so instead of having -- frankly, pointing the cameras at us to talk about this, you should be pointing the cameras at the elected officials who sit on the committees who refuse to hear bills on this subject, who refuse to even have a discussion or a hearing on gun violence in america. those are the people who should be held accountable at this point in time. >> colin, did you hear alison parker's father and what he said to chris cuomo? >> incredibly moving what he said. i couldn't really know why. but what he's trying to this si come to be.
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how is it such that dangerous people continually get their hands o guns easily in this country and so he's on point when he says a background check is something we should require on all sales. we only do that for some sales right now. it's not done for all sales. that ought to be done and the fact that the father at this point in time was willing to say that and champion that is incredible and something that americans should rally behind. >> well, i want to ask you a bit more about that because, you know, after your own tragedy, you vowed to fight for stricter gun control laws, and nothing much has happened. what has that been like for you? >> nothing much has happened here in congress which is just frankly unacceptable and needs to change. however, there is progress happening on the state level. the state of washington passed background checks on all sales by a vote of the people last fall. even just this year oregon became the 18th state to do background checks on all sales. so there is movement happening. we certainly need a hearing in the house of representatives here in congress. like i said, the fact there's
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nothing there repeatedly is unacceptable. and so that's where we are going to focus all of our attention to keep building on the local level and forcing our elected officials to do something here in d.c. >> i can see the anger behind your eyes, colin. >> we've been in this situation before, carol, and when you continually get media requests asking what are your thoughts, how do you feel about what happened, what can be done and you repeat the same things over and over again it can get infuriating when you realize that unless the conversation pivots to those people who are sitting in those chairs in those committees, we're going to have this same conversation again until that happens. so let's go do that. >> all right, colin, thank you so much. and dave, i don't mean to neglect you. so just going back to your point about, you know, how not to inspire these mentally unbalanced people to commit acts of horrible violence. i don't know if there's any one answer because i do believe people have the right to know,
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you know, who shot someone else. i believe they have the right to know everything. >> well, yeah. i think there are some answers. >> so where is the line? >> well, i think it's a matter of scaling back in how we do it. people definitely have a right to know, but in this day and age, i mean, you can google his name. it's going to be out there. you can get his image. that doesn't mean that we need to say it over and over again and show his image repeatedly, especially when we sort of visual wallpaper where it's background. a couple years ago i was talking about this, how the media should stop using the image as the intro to the segment about whether we should do lots of it. it was over and over the perpetrator for no purpose really. i don't think it needs to be wall to wall 24 hours. you know, i'm not in the tv business, but perhaps an hour-long show could devote 20 minutes or something to it. does it really need to be all day for an entire week
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afterwards? anything that sort of like lets the killers know we're not making you this starring role, we're not making you -- playing right into your hands. this guy did it on live television, and then filmed it himself just in case the live tv didn't get it and to put it on television. what more do we need to have tell us that these people are trying to get on television? that they're reaching for this infamy and we're playing into their hands? >> i hear you. i haven't mentioned his name once in my two hours on television so thanks for being here. i appreciate it, dave. and thanks to you, too, colin. >> thanks, colin. >> i appreciate it. still to come in the "newsroom," likely voters were given one word to describe hillary clinton and most of the answers, well, not too flattering.
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i know how hard our crews work for our customers. i want them to know that they do have a safe and reliable system. together, we're building a better california. for hillary clinton the days of joking about or dismissing criticism of her use of personal e-mail while she was secretary of state may be over.
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clinton taking a more serious tone on the issue during a campaign stop in iowa. >> my use of personal e-mail was allowed by the state department. it clearly wasn't the best choice. i should have used two e-mails, one personal, one for work, and i take responsibility for that decision. >> so let's talk about this. cnn political analyst and editor in chief of the daily beast john avlon is here. hi, john. >> hey, carol. >> so why the change in tone? >> well, i think she needed to change her tone. and this was a decidedly different approach. this wasn't joking about wiping servers off with a cloth. this was her saying i understand why people are upset. i get it. i made the wrong decision, and i take sponresponsibility for it. and that's an important step. a new tack in addressing this not only from a communication
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standpoint but also asserting what she did when she did it was permitted under the rules and trying to be as transparent as possible going forward about serving over information and giving any testimony that's necessary, but clearly the previous tack has not been working. the problems have been compounding so this is overdo u but probably welcome. >> voters like a little humility. why didn't she do this sooner, it was just weird. >> yep. >> yep. >> it was weird. >> nothing more said on that. let's take a look at this new quinnipiac poll because it shows mrs. clinton still maintains a double digit lead with voters, but she's lost 10 percentage points in the last month. so will this trend continue or will her new tone make a difference? >> well, clearly it's the hope of the campaign it will make a difference. i think what's significant about this poll, it's the first poll showing a biden hypothetical candidacy could do better against some republicans. that's got to make hillary
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clinton's camp nervous in part because it's sort of a red flag to a bull about getting biden in the race. a bit of a reality check here. she still is doing twice in this poll as well as joe biden or bernie sanders. that's significant, but the downward trend is troubling and those five words you mentioned, that association at the top. those numbers are really troubling when you have five words and three of them is negative and synonyms for liars. >> the quinnipiac poll asked voters about the first word that comes to mind when they thought of hillary clinton. that word was liar followed by dishonest followed by trustworthy, experience, and strong. so that's kind of a weird mixed bag, right? >> it's a weird mixed pag but the first three are basically synonyms for having a truth telling problem. that's no good for the hillary clinton camp. strong is good, experience is good, but clearly the weight is on the negative associations resuscitated by the server
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scandal which is why she's got to change her tone. the campaign needs to change their tack and try to get past this. it's not going to be done in one day but clearly the damage has been done and it's reflected in the downward trend of the polls in the last month. >> thank you for your insight. i appreciate it. still to come, the shooter in the murder of two journalists posted his violence online. why at least one journalist feels social media sites should not be the ones censoring it. hey pal? you ready? can you pick me up at 6:30? ah... (boy) i'm here! i'm here! (cop) too late. i was gone for five minutes! ugh! move it. you're killing me. you know what, dad? i'm good. (dad) it may be quite a while before he's ready, but our subaru legacy will be waiting for him. (vo) the longest-lasting midsize sedan in its class. the twenty-fifteen subaru legacy. it's not just a sedan. it's a subaru. when i went on to ancestry, i just put in the name yes, we are twins.
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big day? ah, the usual. moved some new cars. hauled a bunch of steel. kept the supermarket shelves stocked. made sure everyone got their latest gadgets. what's up for the next shift? ah, nothing much. just keeping the lights on. (laugh) nice. doing the big things that move an economy. see you tomorrow, mac. see you tomorrow, sam. just another day at norfolk southern.
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two new york tabloids are getting slammed by read theers morning for their shocking front pages. they both used freeze frames of
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the journalist's murder taken from the camera the killer wore. here are how some readers reacted. may i suggest this as an alternative cover for the new york daily news and this tweet, that image is exactly what the shooter wanted people to see. michael harrison is the publisher of talkers magazine. >> nice to talk to you. >> thanks so much. what do you make of the covers? they're tabloids, they deal in the sensational and they're very sensational this morning. >> well, i'm certainly an advocate of free speech and freedom of the press so they have the right to do that. however, there is such a thing as taste and there is a reason why even though we're in the digital age let's look at print journalist. there's a reason why they call it the front page. i personally think it's in bad taste to put something that might be disturbing to people on the front page where people could see it against their will if they're walking on the street. it's on the newsstands. it's out there.
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it's in public. i think that if i were the publisher of those tabloids, i certainly would have run pictures, but i would have run them in a more discreet place so as not to inflict them on people who might not want to see them. and that's the way i would do it. >> you know, i spoke with the roanoke mayor earlier this morning and he hadn't seen the pictures but i described them to him, and he had an interesting take. let's listen. >> they remind me of matthew brady, the civil war photographer who took pictures of the battle scenes during the civil war. they were appalling at the time. people were -- they were provocative at the time, but they helped the american people begin to understand the horrors of war. i mean, at some point when are we going to understand the horrors of gun violence in our country? >> okay. so basically what he was saying, michael, is people actually need to see images like these to like bring home the horror, the true
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horror of gun violence. >> well, his position was a partisan and a biased position of his own feeling as to what people need to do for the benefit of any social progress. so i don't necessarily buy into that. i believe in free press. i believe in free speech. the first amendment is very important. and i personally do believe that publishers and editors should not take it on themselves to determine what people need or what people should be protected from seeing. so when i said don't put it on the front page so as to protect the sensibilities of other people that might not want to see that, i think that that's a smart thing to do. but i think it's equally warped to say it's my job to shove this into the consciousness of the people that they have to understand the horrors of war by putting it in their face. so i think there's a middle ground, carol, and i think that most reasonable journalists --
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we're talking about journalism here, we're not talking about entertainment or sensationalism or titillation for the sake of selling newspapers or getting, you know, media ratings. we're talking about the pure principles of journalism we we don't hear that much about anymore. i think that it's important to not edit stuff that people as adults need to know but on the other hand we walk such a fuzzy line with sensationalism and attention getting devices. i think that that should also be taken into consideration when making presentations to the public. >> i hear you. michael harrison, thank you so much for your insight. i appreciate it. still to come in the "newsroom," gop front-runner donald trump is gearing up to take his next stage. protesters have vowed to be there. we'll talk about that next.
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donald trump takes his pledge to make america great again to south carolina today as a new poll shows he has widened his lead in the race for the white house. m.j. lee is in greenville, south carolina, to walk us through the numbers. good morning, m.j. >> reporter: good morning, carol. whatever it is donald trump is doing is clearly working. this morning we have yet another poll showing that trump is the clear leader in the republican pack. his number right now is at 28% which is up from 20% in the previous month, and no one else really comes close to donald trump right now. the person in second place is ben carson who is only at 12% and then we have a few candidates like jeb bush, ted
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cruz, marco rubio and swoke esc walker who is at 6% or 7%. it goes to show even though trump has been in the middle of a number of controversiecontrov people are into him and there is a lot of excitement about his candidacy. i'm here in grenville, south carolina, right now where we're waiting for donald trump to come here and speak. outside are dozens and dozens of people already lining up to hear him spoke. he spoke with chris cuomo on "new day" earlier today and asked about his lead in the polls. listen to what he said. >> i see the response that i get, chris, and, you know, i'm honored by the polls but i'm not that surprised to see it. i also see my competition. i see people like jeb bush who is a nice man, but he's not bringing you to the promised land. i see others and i respect everybody that's running. it takes courage to run. it really does take a lot of
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courage, even if you're a politician it takes kocourage t run but i will say we will get them there. >> reporter: as you can see, carol, never missing an opportunity to take a jab at jeb bush. this open war between trump and bush will be a fascinating story line to follow in the coming weeks. >> absolutely. m.j. lee, thanks so much. what've we got? bp 64/40 sterilize sites. multiple foreign objects in the body. tweezers. (buzz!) (buzz!) if you're the guy from the operation game, you get operated on. it's what you do. (buzz!) if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. it's what you do.
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and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. raise your expectations. ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, control is possible.
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checking some top stories for you at 58 minutes past. a judge sentencing movie theater gunman james holmes to the maximum, 3,000 years in the prison. applause could be heard in the courtroom as he was led out in shackles. the usa network has delayed the season finale of "mr. robot" following yesterday's shooting
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saying the previously filmed finale contains a graphic scene similar in nature to the tragic events in virginia. out of respect, we are postponing tonight's episode. the morning team of wdbj took to the air for their first broadcast after the murder of alison parker and adam ward. >> we have had help from many of our colleagues, including steve grant. thank you so much for being here with us. >> thank you, kim, and i bring with me the best prayers and best wishes of all the folks of southwest missouri and northwest arkansas to wdbj 7 and all of roanoke area. our hearts are broken with yours and certainly we're here to do everything we can to help you get through this. >> yeah, we appreciate it. we need everyone's help and love and support right now. >> yeah, we do. >> awesome. thank you so much for joining me today. i'm carol costello. "at this hour with berman and
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bolduan" starts right now. hello, everyone. i'm kate bbolduan. >> i'm john gberman. today the entire country in mourning over the murder of two young journalists shot and killed while on the air. wdbj's morning show paused for a moment of silence for their colleagues the very minute that alison parker and adam ward's lives were taken yesterday. >> as we approach that moment, we want to pause and reflect and we want to share with you once again what made these two so special not just to us but all of our hometowns that wdbj 7 serves. please join us now in a moment of silence.

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