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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  September 8, 2015 9:00pm-1:01am PDT

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is already here with x1. only from xfinity. despite the smoke and flames, passengers aboard this plane that caught fire in las vegas escaped with only minor injuries. plus, as the world's migrant crisis deepens, another nation offers to shelter more refugees. and county clerk at the center of the same-sex marriage debate in the united states is greeted bay huge crowd after her release from jail. lots to get to today. hello. welcome to our viewers in the states and around the world. we're your anchor team for the next two hours. i'm errol barnett. >> i'm zain asher. glad to be with you. this is "cnn newsroom."
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>> okay. want to begin in the united states with passengers who are leaving las vegas aboard british airways flight 2276 are no doubt feeling especially lucky right now. >> yeah, this was frightening. >> the boeing 777 was about to take off from london when, there you have it, a fire broke out in the left engine. within just minutes, all 170 passengers and crew members had evacuated the burning plane. >> the pilots quickly aborted the takeoff. clark county fire department responders from mccarren international airport station 13 were notified of a potential engine fire at 4:13. at 4:14, firefighters were at the aircraft dousing the fire and evacuating with the passengers. >> so this unfolded very quickly. fire officials say at least 14 people were hurt. most of those injuries are minor.
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our dan simon spoke to one passenger. >> we were just gaining speed to take off and heard a big thud. i opened the cover of my window and saw flames on the engine. we suddenly stopped. we sat still for about a minute, just waiting to hear what to document and then we heard the captain say this is an emergency, evacuate. >> how scary was it? >> pretty scary, yeah. just shocking more than anything. i don't think anyone was too hurt. i don't know. but yeah, it was pretty scary stuff. >> reporter: our dan simon who interviewed that passenger is joining us live on the phone from las vegas. dan, before we begin, i want to pull up on the screen an image of the plane on fire so we can see what we are talking about. this is the plane moments after it caught fire. you can see black smoke billowing in the air. if you look closely you can see the left engine is where the
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flames started. so it is remarkable to me when you see how dra matic this fire was that only 14 people were injured. how is that possible? >> well, this was a quick reaction by the pilot and crew. obviously they knew right away there was something wrong and quickly deployed those chutes, those emergency chutes. we happen to be in las vegas working with on another story. once we with realized this was a potentially serious situation, we raced over to the airport. i have to tell you it was kind of surreal for a while. we were just hanging out in the international terminal and all of a sudden we saw lots of ambulances show up. this is about an hour after this all happened. we figure ed that mostly everyone had been evacuated at that point. no, they were still assessing people and lots of passengers were coming out. thankfully these were minor injuries, but from what we understand when people are going
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down those emergency chutes, some had some friction injuries, basically going down. they may have burned their elbows and such. so the paramedics were with tending to them. everybody seemed to be in relatively good spirits. although we did see one passenger who seemed to be in emotional distress. this is someone who had smoke inhall lag and she looked really torn up. you can imagine, looking at that video, how frightening it must have been. we saw video of other passengers literally running for their lives. going down those chutes and running away from the aircraft. >> absolutely frightening. before we continue, i understand from my producers we have new video. if we could play that for our viewers.
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>> okay. you can actually see in the corner there, that was the plane engulfed if flames there and i believe a fire truck heading towards. there i'm not sure but this could be passengers leading the aircraft, fleeing the aircraft. in terms of the investigation, we know the left engine, that's where the fire started. do we know what caused the fire and what is next in terms of this investigation? >> we know that a go-team from washington, d.c. from the national transportation safety board is on its way to las vegas where they'll start, you know, looking at how this occurred. we don't know how or why this fire started. what we do know, from talking to one of the passengers, is that just as the plane was beginning to pick up speed, that left engine caught fiempl he said it was something like a thud and then he looked out his window
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and saw that engine on fire. so it's really going to be up to the authority s to examine how this happened. of course anytime you have a mishap with an aircraft, they will interview passengers, talk to the crew, look at maintenance records. pretty much anything you can think of. >> a mystery in terms of the investigation and what caused the fire. i know that 14 people were injured. in terms of the passengers who are okay, how soon will they be able to reboard another flight to london? >> well with, from what we understand, british airways put the passengers up in a hotel this evening in las vegas. they did not hop on another plane tonight. from what we understand, arrangements are made to get them on another plane tomorrow. as far as those 14 people are concerned, i don't know precisely when they will be going home. as we know, these are minor injuries. so perhaps they have already
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been released from the hospital. i imagine it was precautionary and a way to take them by ambulance to take them area hospitals to be on the safe side. i would imagine most of those passengers will be heading home tomorrow, zain. >> the good news is the response during this emergency was so rapid. obviously everybody was able to evacuate quickly within minutes and of course 14 injured. only minor injuries. dan simon, thank you so much. we appreciate that in other aviation news, an internal investigation prompted by an ongoing federal investigation has led to the ouster of the ceo and two top executives at united airlines. in a statement on tuesday, this company announced the chairman and ceo has step ed down. >> the u.s. government has been examining united's dealing with form iffer chief of the port of
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new york and new jersey. united said it is cooperating with the government investigations. surely you have heard the name kim davis bouncing around social media. >> who hasn't unless you are living under a rock. >> in you don't know the county clerk in kentucky is a free woman five days after she was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. >> our martin saf ij has more on the woman who finds herself at the cross roads of a very changing society. >> reporter: it was a stage fit for a presidential candidate. but with it was in rowan county clerk kim davis that stole the show. fresh out of jail and welcomed by cheers from hundreds of supporters. >> i want to give god the glory. you are a strong people! >> reporter: davis went to jail for contempt of court after refusing to authorize all marriage licenses following the june supreme court decision on gay marriage.
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she said she was religiously opposed to having her name appear on a document for same-sex couples. she spent five days behind bars, while support from christian conservatives grew. >> the bible trumps man's law. >> reporter: the effort to free her drew two republican candidates to her jail cell, mike huckabee and ted cruz. despite that davis is a democrat. the judge that sent her to jail suddenly freed her on one big condition, that she shall not interfere in any way with the efforts of her deputy clerks who are issuing marriage licenses. >> your glasses. >> some of them to same-sex couples. >> davis' attorney said she hasn't changed her position on same-sex marriage. and hinted another legal showdown could be brewing. >> do her job good. she will serve the people as they want her to serve and she was elected. she will be loyal to god and she's not going to violate her
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conscience. >> reporter: to many, this small town kentucky clerk has become a hero of her faith. >> i feel like she's shown more courage than most any politician i know and most every pastor i know. because she's not only said something but being been willing to put her life at risk. >> reporter: as davis goes home after nearly a week in jail, many of her followers and detractors wonder, how long that freedom will last. cnn political commentator ryan lesser is joining us from d.c. to talk about this. great to have you. kim davis has become an icon the past 24 hours. two evangelicals, who have been opposed to gay marriage. we should explain the supreme court can, the highest court in the fland the united states has settled the issue legally and elected officials have to follow the law. what is it really that mrs. davis represents? >> well, i think the first thing
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to say is maybe it's surprising how little resistance of this kind there's actually been since the supreme court decided this. i think a lot of people predicted there would be more resistance. but there are smach patches in conservative states where people are arguing their their religion makes it impossible to follow this law. now as the judge pointed out in kentucky, that's not legal. she's an elected official. she has to do this. the supreme court has already settled this issue. so, you know, i think you are going to see isolated cases like this until people move on. to a certain segment of religious americans, this does resonate what she's do ing. >> the fact you call it isolated is the key aspect here. you have one of the republican candidates, governor mike
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huckabee, he emceed the event and said, "with i'm not willing to spend the next years in tyranny in under people who think they can take our freedom anden conscience away." the u.s. constitution makes it clear the government isn't to endorse religion. so what is the tyranny they speak of exactly? >> there's a little bit of a sense of victimization among some white evangelicals in the united states that they are now a persecuted minority. which to be frank is not really the case. once you get a campaign going and american politics involved in these issues in the republican party and the early states that matter in our nominating process, evangelical conservatives represent a larger than typical percentage of the electorate. specifically in a state like iowa.
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there is incentive for mike huckabee to go down and associate themselves with this case. that's what you are see ing here. politicians exploiting this issue in kentucky to boost their credentials among iowa religious conservatives. >> because it happened so quickly, kim davis in a way got to make this statement but the fact remains she and others still have to follow the rule of law. >> that's right. >> fwrat to get your incite today. joining us from d.c. staying in the united states, she is saying she's sorry for the first time u.s. presidential candidate hillary clinton is publicly apologizing for using a private e-mail server when she was secretary of state. >> her mea culpa comes as her popularity among voters shrinks. >> reporter: hillary clinton's numbers are taken a dive down ten points nationwide as she tries to turn a corner. tonight for the first time, she
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directly apologized for her use of a private e-mail server while secretary of state. telling abc news -- >> that was a mistake. i'm sorry about that. i take responsibility. >> reporter: according to the "new york times," aides are crafting a strategy for her to show more spontaneity, heart and humor. >> i do kind of know what donald is going through. if anyone wond withers if mine is real, here's the answer. the air is real. the color isn't. >> reporter: president obama's former adviser david axelrod is poking fun at the reboot saying it read like "the onion." her detailed plan to show more authenticity and spontaneity, just do it. clinton tried to shore up her shrinking lead in the polls. >> i have the vision, the policies, skill, ten nasty and determination to get us back on the right track. >> her loss is joe biden's gain.
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new pole numbers show a swell of support for the vice president. he's up ten points since last month and still deciding whether to get in the race. dodging questions about a possible run. >> talk to my wife about that. i've got to talk to my wife about that. >> reporter: nationwide, biden is running neck and neck in the polls with vermont senator bernie sanders who is beating dpln a poll of new hampshire primary voters. >> don't tell anyone. i think they are nervous. >> reporter: while it is all about the summer surge, the biden bump is dominating headlines in to the fall. clinton campaign sources say they are not too worry worried and if biden would enter the race they would see his poll numbers dip under the harsh spotlight of the campaign. coming up next, what he is
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welcome back. australia's prime minister is stepping up his country's commitment to ease the humanitarian crisis in the middle east and help stem europe's mie fwrant crisis. >> tony abbott pledged to expand his military fight against isis. the group is a major cause of the refugee crisis, he says. australia will take in 12,000 refugees from iraq and syria, as well. german chancellor angela merkel is calling for quotas to ensure that each european nation takes in what she described as their fair share of migrants. >> many oppose that and say they don't have the resources. chancellor merkel says all eu countries need to act in the spirit of solidarity. >> translator: i've rarely been
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so convinced inwardly that this is a task that decides on the future of europe and whether we are accepted as a continent of value and freedom. the world is looking at us and we can't say syria is too far away. we won't deal with the problem. this would create huge damage and also for the acceptance of europe. >> leaders and diplomates talk about all of their tempers flared in a migrant holding camp in hungary. >> hundreds of people fed up with skaqualored conditions. they grabbed their possessions and took off running from the camp. our arwa damon was there. >> reporter: a frantic dash after breaking through a police line. stay together, this man shouts, carrying his daughter as they charge in to the corn field. no one knows where they are going, just that they need to
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get far away. they had spent hours, for some days, waiting at a holder area that was supposed to be temporary and just couldn't take it anymore. stumbling over uneven ground, shouting out the names of the war zones they fled. >> syria, iraqi. >> jubilant, breathless, defiant. desperate to move. they are worried the police will come and potentially use violence to try to get them back in the camp. you can hear the sirens right now. those with the kids are the ones really struggling to get away. through thick undergrowth the police close in. forcing the refugees to scatter. split in to two groups.
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families lose each other, but this is no time to stop. drained of what little energy they have, the police eventually catch up. but the refugees keep going. [ chanting ] >> reporter: a sister and brother lose their shoes. rocks digging in to their tiny feet, but they don't complain. their mother carries the youngest, unable to comfort him, she ignores his cries. after hours of walking, the police finally block their path. again they tried to push through. pushing bodies, screams, babies crying. the police convince them to stay. they bring food and much-needed water. negotiations lead to a
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compromise, buses to take them elsewhere for the night and then in the morning they are told a train to the austrian border. a breakout driven by sheer mental and physical exhaustion, having traveled this far, unable to cope and wait any longer. arwa damon, cnn, hungary. >> joining me now to discuss this is professor of political economy. thank you for being with us. i'm sure you have heard the concerns from people within countries like germany, united kingdom, like france, as well. people saying that somehow perhaps terrorists could exploit the migrant crisis to make their way, to gain access in to europe. what do you make of those concerns? do you feel they are valid? >> well, there's always a risk of terrorism or other types of attacks within any type of
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migratory movement. having follow the migration for the past 12, 13 years, when i was doing my book on migration, i traveled with muslim migrants for three years. i lived with them. followed their lives. became part of the landscape of their everyday lives. i have met hundreds of people. not a single one of them had inclinations of causing problems anywhere else in the world. in fact the people i met were running away from conditions in their home countries. lacking economic or political security in their home. they were seeking security they were denied at home. the accusations and the claims that the flow of migrants were destabilize european countries, understand the fear but it is totally false in terms of the reality and the facts on the ground. >> so you think it is overblown.
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>> the obama administration says it is actively considering ways to help, including the idea of allowing more refugees in to the united states. do you think the united states has an obligation to share the migrant burden with europe? >> absolutely. i'm not sure what president obama means by "actively considering." the numbers the united states has accepted, for example from syria, are so small that it is pathetically low. the united states is the largest country in the world with the big est capacity to absorb migrants. it is utterly important for the u.s. to join the bandwagon and become part of the conversation and solve the humanitarian crisis. >> one question i want to ask you, is the u.k. has decided to accept 20,000 migrants but not those traveling through europe. they are going to be accepting migrants in refugee camps in the middle east. what do you make of that? do you think that is fair?
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>> the number is actually the extremely low. right? compared to a half million migrant refugees that germany will accept. in a sense, it's not fair, but i actually propose a similar policy for other european countries as well as the united states. we now have more than 1 million refugees from syria living in turkey. 4 million refugees in neighboring countries. it is possible for the western countries for the wealthy countries in the world to begin the process of -- where the refugees are instead of forcing them to take the sea, risk their lives in order to arrive within the european union and apply for asylum. >> complex problem but one thing i know for sure, the migrant crisis is here to stay for a long time. thank you so much. appreciate that. >> very true. it is heart-breaking to watch so many families trying to find a
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better life and having to go through all of that a. >> when you think of what they are doing, trudging through united kingdom. >> it's a difficult situation. >> very difficult. >> now making matters worse a powerful storm barrelling across the mediterranean and we know it is a deadly trek to cross that body of water. this could make it even more. pedram javaheri is joining us. how bad will it be? it is already a life-threatening journey for so many people. >> this time yesterday it looked like it had the conditions to be a medicane. they are not tropical in nature but produce wind gusts that are hurricane force. potential was there yesterday. it weakened a bit. right now we are seeing powerful winds, easily winds that could capsize boats. major concern when you talk
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about an area with so many people going over precarious situation when it comes to mall boats. the center of the screen, you see a complex of thunderstorms pop up east of sicily. this is an area we are watching closely. in fact we have lotted every one of those tracks. the heaviest of rain in the next 24 hours cruising by the region and pushes in to the balkans. that's where we are watching for the land route to be severely impacted as well with. the laboratory issued a level two on a scale of one to three for probability, strong winds, isolated tornados, large hill. winds 50 to 70 kph. 45 or so miles an hour. the forecast continues in to thursday. any of these routes would be impacted. you know the rescue operations that took place a couple of weeks ago. thousands rescued across the mediterranean when it comes to boats capsizing and taking on water. waves can cap size a boat when
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they are 30% of the boat's length. a lot of these boats ten meter s in length. three meters will push them over. so it is a dangerous situation with storms continuing cruising by. this is an unusual track for this early in the season for a storm system and the strongest one all season. something we are watching with carefully. >> thank you. time for a quick break here on cnn. when we come back, apple is scheduled to make a big announcement. and a full report on what they are expected to say. plus, u.s. presidential candidate jeb bush arrives on a against a. and even fargo, in fargo! binge, while you lose weight!
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newsroom. thank you for joining us. i'm errol barnett. >> i'm zain asher. the headlines at this hour -- australian president says his country will take part in coalition air strikes against isis targets in syria and he says australia will take in 12,000 additional refugees who are fleeing from isis. >> today's commitment by the australian government to take refugees on a permanent basis will be one of the largest commitments made to date anywhere in the world. more than a dozen people suffered minor injuries when a british airways plane caught fire in las vegas, nevada. the fire broke out in the boeing 777 left engine as it was about to take off for london.
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you can see this eyewitness video. all 172 passengers and crew evacuated the plane. the cause of the fire is under investigation. u.s. presidential candidate hillary clinton has acknowledged using a private e-mail server while she was secretary of state was a mistake. many an interview with abc news, she said she was sorry. the issue has pushed clinton's poll numbers down. all right. here's a bit of a fun news update for you. a long-awaited era in late-night television has started in the u.s. stoll stephen colbert has taken over for david letterman on the late show on cbs. a few minutes ago it wrapped up. jeb bush was one of the first guest. >> he has faltered during his campaign and analysts are curious to see, waiting to see how bush handled the one on one with the quick-whitted colbert.
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george clooney was another guest. he is no stranger to talking politics either. >> late-night television has become a rite of passage in many ways in u.s. politics. >> in the presidential election cycle there's no shortage of candidates and potential guest p guests. >> my guests will be george croonny and jeb bush. or the tabloids cloned them. >> the buzz isn't just about george clooney but jeb bush. >> i'm not the only one who's excited. so is jeb, which given his logo is really his only option. >> reporter: late night houses are a place for political q and a increasingly. hillary clinton is doing "the tonight show" with fallen next
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week. >> i was fantastic. the ratings were huge. >> this battle shows the symbiosis between candidates and the late-night comics who make fun of them. >> they will ask questions that aren't so serious and talk about economic policy as much as your favorite midnight snack, your family, things about your childhood. things wouldn't be important to a voter than can show their personality hopefully. >> they can use the guest couch to humanize themselves. like chris christie eating a doughnut on letterman. >> mitt romney did a top ten list. >> isn't it time for a president who looks like a 1970s game show host? late-night is a rite of passage for presidential candidates. one that dates back five decades. jack kennedy went on jack paar's
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show. bill clinton played the sax on arsenio hall. ♪ there's always the risk of an awkward moment or just coming off dull. many thought john kerry bombed on detailly show in 2004. >> are you or have you ever flip flopped? >> i've flip flopped, flap flipped. >> now with trump, clinton, bush, viewers will be watching to see if there are big hits or political misses. cnn, new york the ceo of apple is scheduled to make big announcement on wednesday. likely to unveil the latest in the iphone line of products. >> it could make a major splash in another was way. samuel burke reports. >> iphones are the stars of these big apple events. this time it looks like an updated version of the apple tv
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console might steal the spotlight. that's because no one is expecting an iphone 7 until next year. likely just an iphone 6s and 6s plus with an improved processor and better camera. the biggest change is a screen with force touch. if you press a little harder on the screen it will reveal extra menu settings and a new ipad. sales keep going down for apple's tablets. they are hoping a bigger screen, possibly 13 inches, 33 centimeters will help to turn things around. all eyes will be on the apple tv set top box. it connects your tv to the internet so you can watch video from outlets like netflix and you tube. numbers show that apple tv is the most popular streaming device in the united states beating out google's chromecast. apple tv costs 60 bucks but there are reports the updated model could jump to 150 bucks or more. that would get you an improved
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remote with a touch pad and new gaming options. possibly better integration with siri. the company previously called apple tv just a hobby. now apple appears to be taking the product more seriously, streaming becomes one of the most lucrative areas in entertainment and tech. back to you guys. >> we'll let you know what the big annoyancement or announcements. >> coming up next, queen elizabeth ii surpasses queen victoria as britain's lonk longest reigning monarch. details thaef break
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bag di on a personal level until now. >> cnn international correspondent spent time with a young girl. she said she became a slave of the caliphate hand picked by the isis leader himself. >> reporter: in 2014, kurdish, iraqi and u.s. troops rescued thousands of yazidis caught on cnn cameras. thousands were captured. yazidi children slaves to isis fighters. this young girl says she was enslaved. not just by any isis fighter, this man, isis leader al al baghdadi. she instantly recognizes a young american aide worker killed in isis captivity. they shared a cell together, she
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says, both slaves of the caliphate. we sat down with her at a safe location. she described how she was hand picked among hundreds of yazidi women. >>. >> first time he came, i was sitting and crying. when i stood up he looked at me and told the guard, take this girl away and put her to the side. >> reporter: she says she began as a slave girl at the al baghdadi household, cleaning up and cooking for his three wives and six children. she was just 15. the family was constantly on the move. days after she arrived, she said an air strike destroyed the house next door. she tried to escape with another girl. >> translator: they would lock us in and one night i got the key and unlocked the girl. at this time we were six girls. we run and run, up to three
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kilometers. there was an arab woman. she said she would help us. but then she called al baghdadi. >> they were punished, beaten with a belt, garden hose and plank of wood, dislocating her elbow. the last blows delivered by al baghdadi himself. >> what did he say to you when he hit you? >> translator: he told us we beat you because you ran away from us. we chose you to convert you to our religion. we chose you. you belong to the islamic state. >> where did he hit you? >> left hand. >> this is when she met kayla, she said locked in the same cell. >> translator: first time i entered the room i saw kayla. i asked how did you come here and she said, isis and i told her i'm a yazidi girl and i was
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captured. after that we stayed together and became like sisters. >> reporter: one day, she, kayla and another yazidi girl were moved to the home of a high-ranking fighter. shortly after, she says al baghdadi came to visit. he called for kayla. >> translator: kayla came back to us. we asked her, why are you crying and she told us that al baghdadi said i'm going to marry you by force. you are going to be my wife. if you refuse, i will kill you. she was telling me everything. she wasn't hiding anything from me. al baghdadi raped me. that's what she told me. >> reporter: how many times did this happen? >> four times. >> reporter: did he ever rape you as well? >> translator: he said i did this to kayla.
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what i did to ka lay i will do to you. >> they splotd their escape. >> i took kayla to escape with me. but kayla refused and said if i escape they will behead me. >> reporter: she said she waited until 1:00 a.m. and pushed open a broken window in their room. after a harrowing three hours, they made it to a village. one man agreed to smuggle both girls out. >> translator: at the time i didn't know it was al baghdadi. but when i escaped i saw him on tv and heard his voice. i could not have imagined it would be the leader of isis. i was so frightened. he could have killed me. >> reporter: there's no way for cnn independently confirm her story, but she says she has spoken to u.s. investigators, including details of al baghdadi's daily routine. how he woke up at 10:00 a.m., went to bed at midnight and had no phones for fear of being
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traced, relying on others to relay messages. >> what kind of man was al baghdadi? was he ever, ever kind to you? >> no, he was always evil. there were no kind words. >> reporter: she says she hopes some piece of information, however small, will lead to the down fall of the man who once called her his slave. ick a size. small, medium, large and extra large. if you need less data, pick small. if you need more, go with extra large-- a whopping 12 gigs for $80 a month plus $20 per phone. pick a size. change it up anytime. it's the simple way to get the best network. and now, get $300 when you switch. only at verizon. when your windshield needs for these parents, driving. around was the only way... ...to get their baby to sleep.
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today marks the historic moment for the british royal family. queen elizabeth has officially reigned for 53,226 days. i counted, by the way. just kidding. she is the longest serving monarch in history. >> she has reigned for 63 years, longer than most of us have been alive. surpassing her great great grandmother, queen victoria. ♪ >> so many images, so many waves, so much animation.
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britain's story is unimaginable without elizabeth. just as the 19th century were unimaginable without victoria. that's her urn the parasol. although her image rather severe. the queen has to only step outside of the buckingham palace to be reminded of her great grandmother. it began rosily for both of them. victoria became queen at 18. elizabeth came to the thrown at 25. almost overnight a cover girl of film star glamour. both women married cousins. victoria chose prince albert. elizabeth knows the painting well. it's in the royal collection.
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she of course married prince phillip of greece from denmark. with nine children, victoria presented the royal family as a model of domestic virtue. elizabeth tried to do much of the same with some success until three of her four children married and then divorced. one profound difference between the two reigns is visible. victoria uz with the first british queen ever photographed. she famously retreated for many years from public life. in a magazine from 1900 illustrated some of her rare outings. here she is seen in a wheelchair. she was by then 80 and in the last year of her life. at 89, elizabeth is very much out and about along with phillip, meeting friends and allies, simply doing her job. victoria ended her life as figure head of the largest, wealthiest, most aggressively
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powerful empire in the world. she was revered. she lent her name to the age. elizabeth's realm is obviously diminished, but her reign has given continuity to help make the monarchy a viable institution and is cherished. in her latest portrait she is raiding official government papers, still very much at work. nick glass, cnn, london. >> very much at work. just like us. thank you for watching, every i'm zain asher. >> i'm errol barnett. stay there. we will be back with another hour of the biggest stories after this short break. see you soon and even fargo, in! binge, while you lose weight! and enjoy a good cliffhanger while you hang from a... why am i yelling? the revolution will not only be televised. the revolution will be mobilized.
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because what's precious to you is precious to us. ♪ love is strange just another way we put members first. jo i was going to the library to do my homework. it was a little bit of a walk to get to the bus stop. i had to wait in line to use the computer. took a lot of juggling to keep it all together.
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what's possible when you have high-speed internet at home? the library never closes. it makes it so much better to do homework when you're at home. internet essentials from comcast. helping to bridge the digital divide. terrifying moments on the runway as a plane's engine catches fire as the airline full of passengers was about to take off. desperate refugees make a run for it in hungary. out of jail in to the limelight. the defiant, anti-same-sex marriage clerk speaks out. a warm welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. thank you for being with us for the second hour of cnn newsroom. i'm zain asher. >> i'm errol barnett.
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first up this hour the united states where passengers leaving las vegas got woken only to describe as a heart-stopping experience. look at the footage. british airways flight 2276, carrying 159 passengers and 13 crew members was about to take off from london when this happened. people on the ground watched in horror as the left engine burst in to flames. pilots aborted the takeoff. >> the good news, just a few minutes, everyone on board the 777 had evacuated the plane and firefighters put out the fire. we know that at least 14 people suffered injuries. we're told those injuries were minor. we are also told most of the injuries have been as the the passengers were sliding down the emergency chute. >> now, of course, this happened at a may swror airport.
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people witnessed this spectacle from many vantage points. one passenger aboard another plane described to cnn what he saw. listen to this. >> looked like the emergency systems deployed as they were designed to do. obviously the first thing i thought of is how would you react in that scenario? the people were running fast and looked like a lot came out at once. i imagine everybody was trying to get out a as quickly as possible. we landed from denver and as we pulled on the runway, we pulled to a stop and heard screaming on the plane as far as off to the right side. looking out the right side, it was the left engine that was completely on fire. a lot of black smoke engulfing the plane. >> dan simon spoke to one of the british airways passengers as he was hustled on to an ambulance. listen as he describes what he
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experienced what it was like from inside the burning plane. >> we were getting ready to take off. heard a big thud. i opened up the cover of my win doechlt and saw flames on the engine. we suddenly stopped. we sat still for about a minute, just waiting to hear what to document and then we heard the captain say this is an emergency, evacuate. >> how scary was it? >> pretty scary, yeah. just shocking more than anything. i don't think anyone was too hurt. i don't know. but yeah, it was pretty scary stuff. >> good thing he's okay. don't expect this to happen on a trip to vegas, right. this prompted mccarren airport to shut down one of the runways. the cause is under investigation. . migrants continue to flood in to europe.
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the president of the european commission is set to lay out a plan for dealing with the crisis in a short time from now. >> german chancellor angela merkel is calling for a quota system to make sure eu nations take in their fair share of migrants. >>. >> translator: we need to discuss about a joint and over arching asylum policy and we, as we are in germany are of the view that a binding quota are to be applied so that refugees can be fairly distributed to the european states. unfortunately, we are a long way off of this target. >> the united nations estimates that 850,000 migrants will cross the mediterranean sea in to europe between 2015 and 2016. >> 850,000 is a daunting number, but it's a number that the u.n. says europe should be able to
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handle. >> if europe will be properly organized, it will be a manageable crisis. we are talking about four or five thousand people per day. in a union that has 508 million people, it is one third population refugee. i think we need to recognize that this became a serious crisis in europe. it is a serious crisis largely because europe is not organized to deal with it. >> the debate on how they should handle the crisis, tempered flared in the migrant holding camp. >> it is understandable. hundreds of people low on food and supplies, running out of hope. many picking up their families and belongings and taking off running from the camp.
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our arwa damon was there. >> reporter: a frantic dash after breaking through a police line. stay together, this man shouts, carrying his daughter as they charge in to the corn field. no one knows where they are going, just that they need to get far away. they had spent hours, for some days, waiting at a holder area that was supposed to be temporary and just couldn't take it anymore. stumbling over uneven ground, shouting out the names of the war zones they fled. >> syria, iraqi. >> jubilant, breathless, defiant. desperate to move. they are worried the police will come and potentially use violence to try to get them back in the camp. you can hear the sirens right now. those with the kids are the ones really struggling to get away.
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through thick undergrowth the police close in. forcing the refugees to scatter. split in to two groups. families lose each other, but this is no time to stop. drained of what little energy they have, the police eventually catch up. but the refugees keep going. [ chanting ] >> reporter: a sister and brother lose their shoes. rocks digging in to their tiny feet, but they don't complain. their mother carries the youngest, unable to comfort him, she ignores his cries. after hours of walking, the police finally block their path. again they tried to push through.
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pushing bodies, screams, babies crying. the police convince them to stay. they bring food and much-needed water. negotiations lead to a compromise, buses to take them elsewhere for the night and then in the morning they are told a train to the austrian border. a breakout driven by sheer mental and physical exhaustion, having traveled this far, unable to cope and wait any longer. arwa damon, cnn, hungary. >> there was a shocking moment on camera as the refugees fled. other camera crews recorded an appalling scene. a hungarian camera woman appears to kick and deliberately trip refugees run aring through the field. you see it right there. at one point she even trips a
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man carrying a young child. >> a lot of people were talking about this. the far right television station she works for said she will be fired. in a statement, it echoed what so many are saying on social media. the cam operator was unacceptable. that's what the station is saying. australia's prime minister is stepping up the commitment to ease the humanitarian crisis. >> tony abbott pledged to expand the fight against isis. the group he says sh a major cause of the refugee crisis and australia will take in 12,000 refugees from syria and iraq. >> today's commitment by the australian government to take refugees on a permanent basis will be one of the largest commitments made to date anywhere in the world. but hundreds of thousands of
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people are in camps and they need urgent assistance. so, in addition to the new resettlement in places, the government is announcing we will directly pay for the support of 240,000 displaced people in countries neighboring syria and iraq through the unhcr and other agencies. >> he says the new program will focus on refugees in jordan, lebanon and turkey. >> meantime, in the u.s., the ceo and two other top executives of u.s.-based united airlines are out. that's in the wake of internal investigation triggered by an ongoing federal probe. the company announced the resignation of chairman and crowe in a statement on tuesday. >> the government has been examining united's dealings with the former chief on the port authority of new york and new jersey including adding a flight convenient to a home he owns in
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south carolina. united said it is cooperating with the government investigations. facing a shorp drop in the polls, drop in popularity is former u.s. secretary of state and u.s. presidential candidate hillary clinton. she has admitted for the first time on television that using a private e-mail server to conduct government business was a mistake. >> i could have and should have done a better job answering questions earlier. i really didn't perhaps appreciate the need to do that. what i had done was allowed. it was above board. but in het treu spekt certainly, as i look back at it now, even though it was allowed, i should have used two accounts. one for personal, one for work-related e-mails. that was a mistake. i'm sorry about that. i take responsibility. >> hillary clinton slips in popularity. on the republican side, the u.s.
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presidential race, arrival to front runner donald trump is getting a lot of attention and moving up in the polls. can you guess who i am going to talk about. >> ben carson. >> you are so smart. >> am i right? >> ben carson back on the campaign trail for the first time in 11 days. >> some people hate rats and some people hate snakes, i hated poverty. >> his absence from the public eye didn't seem to hurt him. the op it, his popularity has grown. second in iowa at 22%. third in new hampshire at 11% and third against trump in a national poll. and yet he is not in iowa or new hampshire or any gop contest
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state but the liberal bastion. >> jeb bush is spending big dollars to try to climb up. >> as governor cut taxes. >> reporter: the first bush television ad shows himself as a m politician with a record. i'm offering leadership, ideas and a proven conservative record. >> having trouble sleeping at night? >> as donald trump is out with another instagram video mocking bush as low energy. >> jeb, for all your sleeping needs. >> the bush campaign recycled part of a clip last week raising hillary clinton. >> hillary always surrounded herself with very good people. >> reporter: as for trump, the man that took the top spot despite eyebrow raising comments questioning john mccain's war hero status. he said in a new biography he
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always felt he was in the military because he was sent to military for behavioral problems. despite never serve issing in the military and here he is on the subject a few years sglaeg success is an important thing. it has been important to me and i can tell you one of the great choices i have ever made in terms of success was the choice of going to new york military act. i loved it. it was terrific training. it was tough but good. >> on wednesday, trump will come here to washington and appears with one of his competitors. one he has had a political bromance with, ted cruz. the president has enough senators, 41, supporting him and ploking republican efforts to scuttle the deal. late-night television is a rite of passage in u.s.
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politics. jeb bush was one of the first guest on the new late show starring stephen colbert. >> he has faltered in his campaign and political analysts were curious to see how he handled the one of on one with the quick whitted colbert. the county cler who refused to issue marriage licenses to same sex couples is free from jail. what she told her supporters after the break. a little sibling rivalry at the u.s. open. we will have that story in a couple of minutes.
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a county clerk in the u.s. is now a free woman. five days after she was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. kim davis has been celebrated by some religious conservatives who say the government shouldn't force public servants to issue licenses in violation of their religious beliefs. >> the u.s. supreme court legalized same-sex marriage across the country last june. we have more on davis and what
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is next for her. >> was with it worth it, yes or no? >> reporter: kim davis. >> thank you so much. i love you all so very much. >> reporter: freed from jail, cheered by a crowd of supporters. >> the bible trumps man's law every day. the bible is the word of god and greater than the law. >> reporter: a small kentucky town at the epicenter for discontent with the supreme court's historic ruling making same-sex marriage legal coast to coast. a county clerk, now a cause celeb for the religious far right. >> it seems like the majority rules. >> if somebody needs to go to jail i'm willing to go in her place. >> reporter: two republican presidential candidates visited kim davis before her release. ted cruz and mike huckabee. >> the courage of her convictions was more important than simply even her own
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freedom. she was willing to go to jail for what she believed. >> reporter: davis says she cannot issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples because of her religious beliefs. her repeated refusal led a federal district judge to jail her, ordering her deputy clerks to do the job. they are complying. >> because of that, the same judge ordered davis released from jail, instructing her not to interfere. >> what happens at this point if a same-sex couple goes to that office this week? will davis allow them to pick up a marriage license? >> kim davis has never changed her position. she will do her job. she won't violate her conscience. whatever the consequences of that are, kim davis is not going to violate her conscience. >> reporter: davis is waging with her fight on three fronts, arguing an accommodation should be made for her religious beliefs by the courts, kentucky
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state legislature or the governor. steve brashear who instructed all clerks to issue listens to all cocouples after the ruling. >> i don't see the religious freedom law is trampled on. what you had is a public official who voluntarily ran for election to that office. she decided she could pick up the duties she would perform an not perform others. >> reporter: the clerk says she will go back to work this week but won't do the whole job. is she prepared to go back to jail for this? >> kim davis has thought and prayed a lot about this and is prepared for the consequences of doing her job and not stepping down. at the same time not violating her conscience. >> cnn, grayson, kentucky. >> kim davis is at the cross roads of a country undergoing changes in culture, law and u.s.
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presidential politics it maybe surprising how little resistance of this kind there's been since the supreme court decided this. i think a lot of people predicted there would be more resistance. there are small patches and conservative places in the united states where people are arguing that religion makes it impossible for them to follow this law. as the judge pointed out in kentucky can, that's not legal. she's an elect official. she has to do this. the supreme court has already settled this issue. i think you are going to see isolated cases like this until people move on. to a certain segment of religious americans, this does resonate what she is doing. >> reporter: the fact that you call it isolated is the key
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aspect here. you have one other republican candidates, governor mike huckabee emceed the event and said i'm not willing to spend the next years in tyranny under people who think they can take our freedom and conscience away. the u.s. constitution -- what is this tyranny they speak of? >> there's a little bit of a sense of victimization among some white evangelicals in the united states that they are now a persecuted minority, which to be frank is not really the case. once you get presidential campaign, american politics involved in these issues and in the republican party in the early states that matter in our nominating process, even jell call conservatives represent a larger than typical percentage of the electorate, especially in
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a state like iowa. there is incentive for people like mike huckabee to go down and associate themselves with this case. that's what you are seeing here. you are seeing politicians exploiting this issue in kentucky to boost their credentials among iowa and iowa religious conservatives. >> you see the incentive, but there's also a risk, isn't there? it is hard to see this issue or kim davis has a figure head fade away anytime soon. but won't they have to decide if this is the issue they want to draw attention to. this is a civil rights issue for republicans and democrats, as well. >> this issue -- >> kind of risk at being on the wrong side of it. >> this issue is settled in the united states. it is settled by the court. it is the law of the land and in public opinion. public opinion on gay marriage is approaching 70% in this country. in a decade from now, there will
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be a tiny minority that oppose s it. that's the trend line if you look at it. even on the republican side they are not associating themselves with what kim davis did which of course was illegal. it's really only the candidates who appeal to a very narrow evangelical base of the party that are deciding to keep this fight going. if you look at jeb bush or others, they don't want to be a part of this. they know if they win the nomination in a general election this will not be an issue that benefits them. the country has -- the polling in this country has moved so fast on gay marriage it is really settled but you are seeing some pockets of resistance in very conservative places. >> cnn commentator ron lizza speaking with me. sere reen ya willreena williams
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closer to a grand slam. she beat venus in the quarterfinals at the u.s. open. they described playing each other like playing in the mirror because they are so similar. >> nothing like a good sibling rivalry for good television. >> they played their hearts out. it was intense and very close. neither side gave an inch and serena won two sets to one. but if serena wins the tournament she will be the first player to win all four majors in a calendar year. now refugees from syria aren't just trying to escape a sing isle war. they are actually fleeing from severalful. next, we'll rolook at what is being done to stop these conflicts.
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introducing the one-and-only volkswagen golf sportwagen. the sportier utility vehicle. you are watching cnn newsroom. thank you so much for staying with us. i'm errol barnett. >> i'm zain asher. let's give you the headlines. more than a dozen people suffered minor injuries when a plane caught fire in las vegas, nevada. the fire broke out in the boeing 777's left engine just as it was about to take off for london. all 172 passengers and crew evacuated the plane but the cause of the fire is still under investigation. county clerk in the u.s. is now a free woman five days after she was jailed for refusing to
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six same-sex marriage licenses. davis plans to return to work this week. tony abbott said his country will take in 12,000 additional refugees fleeing the war against isis in syria and iraq. he also said, australia will take part in coalition air strikes against isis targets in syria. as many of you know the air strikes are part of the heavy nighting. there is combat between rebels as well and hundreds of citizens are caught in the middle. >> the refugees from syria now desperate to reach europe are fleeing not just one war but several. there's the war by isis to install and expand what it calls
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an islamic caliphate. and the war between the syrian regime of assad and rebels seeking to overthrow it. wars between rebel groups, as they fight to gain control of key areas. caught in the middle of all of these, millions of civilians, just trying to survive. so what is being done to end these wars? in the fight against isis is, a u.s.-led coalition has launched more than 2300 air strikes in syria. nations that have taken part in the strike include bahrain, canada, jordan, saudi arabia, turkey and the uae. now france is talking about joining in. >> it's our responsibility and my responsibility to urgently respond and to make choices. france is ready to take part and to play its role. >> reporter: on tuesday, france said it had flown its first reconnaissance missions over
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syria. and the u.k. admitted this week it had launched drone strikes at targets in sere ya, despite a 2013 parliamentary vote against military action in the country. >> we were exercising the u.k.'s inherent right to self defense. there's clear evidence of the individuals in question planning and directing armed attacks against the u.k. the syrian civil war is taking a heavy toll. a few weeks ago, more than 100 civilians were killed in air strikes by the syrian regime in the damascus suburb of duma. and activists say 300,000 people have been killed in four years of war. what about pressure on the regime? the united nations envoy to syria says four nations are key. >> in order to conclude the conflict, urge russia, america to continue dialogue and conclude it and put more pressure on those who can make a
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difference. iran and saudi arabia. for god's sake, sit together, do something about otherwise will implode the whole region. >> reporter: what has the u.s. and russia been talking about? the u.s. has been warning russia not to escalate its involvement on the side of the assad regime. russia is denying preparations for a major military deployment. with a tangible solution so far away, so too is the day that civilians won't feel the need to flee this country to survive. hala gorani, cnn. >> the attacks waged by isis against heritage and history such as the destruction of the ancient palmyra. that's according to unesco chief. >> christiane amanpour travelled to the louvre museum in paris, home of some of the richest collections of islamic and preislamic art. >> it is a tragic event.
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you see the beauty of this engravings. i think no other city in the antiquities represented the cultures. >> is this something you see them moving on now? is there another part of this incredible complex in palmyra that is at risk now? >> oh, yes. i think all of it is in taker and the most hidden tragedy of what is happening is all the extra vags that will erupt. there is so much there and we don't know what will be taken out of the ground. >> and what they will blow up next. >> haven't seen anything but systemic destruction. >> it's not an accident that these, you know, the totalitarians who attack art, whether it is the taliban who
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blew up the 1500-year-old sculptures, whether it is the nazis who, you know, plundered the art in europe during world war ii and now it is these. it is dangerous when people start to attack art. it gives a symbol of what they will do to people. >> yes. i think really that i'm convinced that this is part and parcel of the humanitarian crisis is. people, human beings have tendencies, memories, history, pride. they want to delay this. there was no history or culture. i think all of the cheechlt of humanity has to be preserved and that's why i think what we call cultural cleansing -- cultural
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cleansing. >> ethnic cleansing. >> exactly. >> persecute people and minorities. you persecute christians, the syrians, all of these extraordinary diversity of the middle east. you persecute them. you politically want to destroy them. you chase them. displace them and at the same time you want to deprive them of their history and memories. so this is cultural cleansing that we have to stand up against this. >> thank you very much indeed. >> thank you very much. time for a quick break. when we come back, two babies switched at birth. now they are finally back in their birth mothers' arms after three months. more on the emotional reunion coming up.
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a shocking story from central plerk. a man and his wife have been reunited with their infant son
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three months after taking another newborn home from the hospital. >> incredible story. the doctor involved what been arrested. >> reporter: it's every mother 's worst nightmare. you have just given birth and you go to sleep. you wake up and your baby looks different. you later find out, it's not your baby at all. these pictures captured the end of that nightmare. a mother and father reunited with their baby. hours before, a very different scene. a question no mother should have to ask. doctor, doctor, where's my baby, she says? authorities say her baby was switched at birth in el salvador. in may, richard and his wife mercedes were overjoyed. she had given birth to a baby boy named jacob. the couple said it resembled the lighter color of his father.
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the baby the hospital gave them to take homed a darker coloring. the hospital said the color change was natural, nothing to worry about. but the couple was suspicious. dna tests showed the baby belonged to someone else. they found two matches including jacob. the two misplaced babies were returned to their rightful, genetic parents. there are no words to express what a heart feels to have our baby at home. the family said in a statement, thank you for all who squloined our pain and fed our hope. how this happened is the subject of a criminal investigation. police arrested and released the gynecologist responsible for jacob's birth. he is not allowed to leave el salvador and said he is innocent of any wrongdoing. >> keep our focus in asia now. massive fires across indonesia,
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many of which were set creating a dangerous situation for neighboring countries and millions of people. our meteorologist pedram javaheri is joining us with that. >> it is a perennial story where we have farmers cheap way of setting fires to open farming areas an the smoke travels farther downstream. in places like singapore and malaysia you get major problems. you may know singapore is well known for its cleanliness. it is often called the fine city. chewing gum is banned for sale. if you put it down on the ground it is $1,000 fine. not flushing a public toilet if you are caught, $150 fine. >> why why are you looking at me? >> oh, my goodness. this has become a problem for people down the street. these fires are taking place -- i want to show you the thermal signatures of the fire.
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hundreds of them across sumatra. so much the density looks like it has taken over the island. the smoke and wind pad earns going west withly toward easterly direction. you see the satellite imagery. hazy conditions in a city that takes pride for being incredibly clean. unhealthy air quality. officials having to cancel flights. people just stay indoors. way too dangerous to be outside. visibility reduced and look at the firefighters trying to battle the flames here. farmers trying to clear land for the farm iffing ahead of the growing season. the wind has shifted a bit. we have tremendous unhealthy categories of air. quickly leave you with what is happening with regard to the haze, sand and dust as well. massive sand storms sunday in to monday and tuesday. look at the satellite imagery, take over portions of syria,
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lebanon and cyprus, as well. two fatalities occurred because of the severity of the storms and 750 people hospitalized for respiratory illnesses associated with this. >> saw those pictures you understand why. >> we know of course a migrant path is in this area as well. the air quality is not helping the situation. >> wee we will keep an eye on it. appreciate it. time for another break. when we come back an historic break for queen elizabeth who will tell you about her milestone after the break. seems like we've hit a road block. that reminds me... anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea... ...gas, bloating? yes! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against occasional digestive issues. with three types of good bacteria. live the regular life. phillips'.
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today marks an historic moment for the british royal family as queen elizabeth ii becomes the longest-serving monarch in british history. >> what a milestone. she's reigned for 63 years ascending to the thrown at 25 years old. now at age 89, she is passing the record of her great great grandmother queen victoria. earlier, i spoke to cnn royal commentator and we with talked about the queen's milestone and how this historic milestone will not be celebrated as you may expect. >> there's an element of
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celebration going on across london. for the queen it was a solemn occasion. she wants no fuss. she planned to spend the day privately. her reign started on the death of her father. for her she is not interested in competing with ancestors. doesn't want to seem to be celebrating the death of queen victoria and her having the longest reign. she will be opening a railway line in scotland. doing what she does best and going home. >> when you think of how much the world has changed since she took over, since 1952. i'm curious how the queen herself has evolved and adapted in that time. >> you are using the two with best words to describe the queen. she doesn't change but she doesed a math dapt and evolve. as you say she has seen an array of amazing historic moments throughout her rain from the man on the moon, the day of her
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coronation, to the social media age. it is in small ways ve with have seen her adapt and evolve. social media is a prime example. when prince george was born, the news went out on twitter first. the queen is all about looking at society, what is shaping society and adapting to meet those needs. >> this the past six decades, how do you think public opinion of the queen has changed? >> overall i would say it is sort of largely stayed the same. of course there have been dips. diana's death being the prime example when her image in particular took a hit. usually it is members of the family, prince andrew for example in recent years has had a number of sordid stories written about him. the '90s when there were marriage problems, troubles with the children. but the queen remained steady in her popularity. she is at the top of the moral leadership poll, the most
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popular member of the royal family. from stren th to strength. >> i know she doesn't want to compete with her ancestors but it can't be helped. how does she compare with queen victoria? >> i 24i it is the way she is still involved in today's society. queen victoria was married to the love of her life and only married 20 years before he passed away. and she went in to seclusion then. queen elizabeth is the most traveled monarch in history. she's out and about with the people all the time. queen victoria was watching the sun go across the empire. they famously said the sun never set on the british empire. the queen has seen the end of the empire and the success is her credit. i think in many ways she has taken what queen victoria did and built on it and done it better. queen vi victoria reigned for 53
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years at a time when there weren't medical advances we have today. both have reason to celebrate. >> what i find fascinating we don't know the exact minute when queen elizabeth will be the longest serving monarch because it is technically unknown. her father was found by the servants sometime in the morning of 1952. appreciate that. let's look at queen elizabeth's long reign by the numbers. her 63 plus years adds up to 33 million minutes, or 23,226 days, 16 hours and 30 minutes. >> she doesn't have a passport, i guess she doesn't need one. if you are queen you don't need a passport. and to hold any position for six decades is remarkable. >> there are other leaders who ruled longer than queen elizabeth. max foster has detailed.
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>> reporter: more than 63 1/2 years on the thrown is a truly impressive british record. in terms of living monarchs elizabeth is second to one person, that is thailand's longest reigning monarch and he became king in 1946. that is 69 years on the thrown. louis we 14th reign. he ruled france for 72 years. that's the longest reign in european history. this, though, is king and reigned 82 years. there's a chance that this guy beat his record by 12 years. king pepi ii was the last king
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of egypt. hiss tore iccal text said he reigned 94 years. though we can't be sure of that. modern texts put his reign at around 68 years, which is just ahead of elizabeth. max foster, cnn, london. >> thank you so much. >> incredible. i learn sod much there. thank you to our max foster for that. thank you for watching. i'm zain asher. >> i'm errol barnett. rosemary church is joining us now. cnn newsroom continues. please stay with us.
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tuned in from around the world. i'm errol barnett. >> i'm rosemary church. glad to have you back, this is "cnn newsroom." >> we begin with europe's migrant crisis. a short time from now, the president of the european commission will lay out a plan for dealing with the massive flow of people. >> german chancellor angela merkel is calling for a quo that system. she wants all eu countries to take in their fair share of migrants. >> we really need to discuss about a joint and overarching asylum policy and we, sweden and germany are of the view that binding quota are to be applied so that refugees can be fairly distributed to the european member states. unfortunately we are a long way off this target. >> the united nations estimates
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that 850,000 migrants will cross the mediterranean sea into europe between 2015 and 2016. >> now that is a hefty number but one the u.n. high commissioner on refugees says europe should be able to handle. >> europe would be properly organized it is a manageable crisis. 4,000 or 5,000 people a day in a union with 508 million people. so i think we need recognizing that these became a very serious crisis in europe. it is a very serious crisis also largely because europe is not organized to deal with it because the asylum system has been extremely dysfunctional and in recent weeks, completely chaotic. >> our senior international correspondent ivan watson joins
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us live to talk about this. and while politicians debate a comprehensive plan and we do expect to hear new information in the next few hours, thousands of migrants and refugees suffer. what is happening where you are today? >> reporter: well, you know, errol, europeans are grappling with this flood of migrants coming across the borders better get ready. judging by the scenes we saw in a turkish port city there are many, many more syrian refugees on the way and it does appear that the business of smuggling people in broad daylight in fact across the sea from turkey to lesbos which is visible over my shoulder, that business is very much booming. this is how some are smuggling themselves to europe, cramming more than 30 people at a time in
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broad daylight on board an overcrowded bonn toon boat. armed with life jackets and inflated inner tubes in case of an accident this footage filmed secretly a week ago off the coast of turkey. turks who appear to be smugglers a shove the overloaded boat out into the water. seconds later a man appearing to pilot the boat abandons ship. the boat turns into circles until the migrants figure out how to steer themselves. it motors off to the greek island of lesbos, an inform gateway to europe. and it looks like many more are on the way. in ismyr on tuesday, scores sit on cafes and sidewalks with backpacks full of belongings and garbage bags full of life
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jackets. the passage by sea is big business here. cafes are selling life jackets and syrians trying them on in the street just wait for their trip across the water. this shop owner does not want us filming his business. several syrian refugees who don't want to be identified for fear of reprisal back home tell me they just arrived in turkey from syria within the last couple of days. >> aren't you afraid these are bad boats? you know? >> i know. i know. >> something terrible could happen. >> i know. >> people are dying in the water. >> what can i do? stay in syria? they are taking guys to the army. i don't want to fight with anyone. i don't want to kill. >> reporter: it costs 1300 u.s. dollars to buy passage to a greek island. awaiting calls, many families with children. when i ask a father if he is afraid his kids will drown at
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sea? he answers they will die anyway if they stay in syria. on the turkish coast, the refugees just kept coming, some walking with children down to the water. under the olive groves they wait for their chance to escape. errol, i think what was striking is that the syrians i was meeting yesterday were not people who have been living in turkey now, some 2 million syrian refugees and iraqi refugees, many in refugee camps who have been living here in some cases for years fleeing the conflict across the borders, the people i was speaking with just arrived the preceding day from damascus. this is a fresh wave of people determined to make that potentially deadly sea crossing to greece and then move on to europe. they are paying substantial sums
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of money to try to make this journey again, 1200 euros or $1300 per person to make this trip. and what was striking is that some of them have said it has gotten more difficult in recent weeks. one young man telling me he has made four attempts to cross the water. this would be his fifth. one of the refugees said we have to get moving now because this is pretty much the last month of good wateather to make the sea crossing and then it will be more dangerous due to wind and currents and storms. >> which would add to that sense of urgency so many of the refugees and migrants have as many nations try to figure out how to limit the smugglers and those profiting from such an act. ivan watson joining us live,
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thank you very much. further to the west in hungary, hundreds of fed-up migrants in a cramped holding camp gathered their things and took off running, cnn's arwa damon was there. >> reporter: a frantic dash after breaking through a police line. stay together, this man shouts, carrying his daughter as they charge into the corn field. no one knows where they are going, just that they need to get far away. they had spent hours, for some, days, waiting at a holding area that was supposed to be temporary and just couldn't take it any more. stumbling over uneven ground, shouting out the names of the war zone they fled. >> syria, iraqi. >> jubilant, breathless, defiant, desperate to move. >> reporter: people are in a panic. they are worried that the police
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are going to use violence to get them back into the camp and you can hear the sirens right now causing people to run even faster especially those with the kids. they are really struggling to get away. fumbling through thick undergrowth. the police close in. forcing the refugees to scatter. split into two groups, families lose each other but this is no time to stop. drains of what little energy they had, the police eventually catch up but the refugees keep going. a sister and brother lose their shoes, rocks digging into their tiny feet but they don't complain. their mother carries the
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youngest, unable to comfort him, she ignores his cries. after hours of walking, the police finally block their path. again, they try to push through. crushing bodies, screams, babies crying. the police eventually convince them to stay. they bring food and much-needed water. negotiations lead to a compromise. buses to take them elsewhere for the night and then in the morning, they are told a train to the austrian border. a breakout driven by sheer mental, physical, emotional exhaustion, having travelled this far unable to cope with waiting any longer. arwa damon, cnn, hungary. now as so many refugees fled all at once, other camera crews recorded an appalling scene. we want to show it to you, a
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hungarian camera woman appears to deliberately trip refugees running through the field. he trips a man carrying a young child. >> it is unbelievable, the far right television station she works for says she will be fired. it echoed what so many are saying on social media the behavior was unacceptable. at a news conference tony abbott plans to extent his military's fight against isis. he also said australia will take in 12,000 refugees from syria and iraq. >> today's commitment to take refugees on a permanent basis will be one of the largest commitments made to date anywhere in the world.
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but hundreds of thousands of people are in camps and they need urgent assistance. so in addition to these new resettlement places the government is also announcing that we will directly pay for the support of 240,000 displaced people in countries neighboring syria and iraq through the unhcr and other agencies. >> and abbott says the program will focus mainly on refugees in jordan, lebanon and in turkey. in the united states, 172 passengers and crew members about to leave las vegas on tuesday walked away from could have been a disaster. the pilots of british airways flight 2276 aborted takeoff when the left engine burst into flames on the runway.
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>> everyone on board got out. firefighters doused the flames. 14 people suffered minor injuries mostly from sliding down the emergency chute. dan simon tells us quick thinking is credited with keeping injuries to a minimum. >> this was a quick reaction by the pilot and the crew. obviously they knew right away there was something wrong and they quickly deployed the emergency chutes. we happened to be in las vegas working on another story. once we realized this was a potentially serious situation we raced over to the airport and it was surreal for a while hanging out in the international terminal and all of a sudden we saw lots of ambulances show up. this was an hour after this all happened. we figured mostly everybody had been evacuated at that point but it's no, they were still assessing people and lots of passengers were coming out. thankfully these were minor
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injuries. but from what we understand, when people were going down the emergency chutes, some had, you know, some friction injuries basically going down. they may have burned their elbows and such. so the paramedics were tending to them. everyone seemed to be in relatively good spirits. one passenger was in emotional distress. this was someone who had some smoke inhalation. she looked really torn up. you can imagine looking at that video how frightening that must have been. we saw video of passengers literally running for their lives, going down those chutes and just running away from the aircraft. >> unbelievable. federal aviation officials are investigating the cause of that fire. it all comes down to timing. imagine if that plane had taken off. >> it would be a much different story. we'll see what the cause was. still to come we'll hear
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from the county clerk in the u.s. who went to jail rather than grant permission for same-sex couples to get married. apple is scheduled to make a big announcement today. we have a full report on what to expect. we're back in a moment. technology empowers us to achieve more. it pushes us to go further. special olympics has almost five million athletes in 170 countries. the microsoft cloud allows us to immediately be able to access information, wherever we are. information for an athlete's medical care, or information to track their personal best. with microsoft cloud, we save millions of man hours, and that's time that we can invest in our athletes and changing the world. which means you can watch movies while you're on the move. sitcoms, while you sit on those. and even fargo, in fargo! binge, while you lose weight!
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this is a major story. the county clerk in the u.s. who defied the supreme court by refusing to issue marriage licenses for same-sex couples is free from jail. kim davis has been celebrated by some that say that she shouldn't have to issue the licenses in violation of her religious belief. >> martin savage has more on davis and where things might go for her. >> reporter: it was a stage fit for a presidential candidate but it was kim davis who stole the show. fresh out of jail and welcome by cheered from hundreds of supporters. >> i want to give god the glory. you are a strong people.
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>> reporter: davis went to jail after refusing to offer all marriage licenses following the june supreme court decision on gay marriage. she was religiously/posed to having her name appear on a document for same-sex couples. she spent five days behind bars while support grow. the effort to free her drew two republican candidates to her jail cell, mike huckabee and ted cruz despite the fact that davis is a democrat. the judge that sent her to jail suddenly freed her on one very big condition, that she shall no interfere in any way with the efforts of her deputy clerks who are issuing marriage licenses. some of them, to same-sex couples. davis' attorney says she hasn't changed her position on same-sex marriage and hinted another legal showdown could be brewing. >> she will do her job good and serve the people as they want
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her to serve and she was elected and she'll also be loyal to god and not going to violate her conscience. >> she has shown more courage than every politician and pastor i know. she has not only said something but willing to put her life as risk. >> reporter: as davis goes home many of her followers and detractors wonder how long that freedom will last. martin savage, cnn, grayson, kentucky. and of course it's worth pointing out not every was cheeri cheering at that rally, members of the rock band survivor don't support her viewpoint and don't want her using their song. >> help me welcome to the stage,
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kim davis. >> so that was "eye of the tiger" playing as davis greeted her supporters on tuesday. >> seems like a bit of an odd fit. frankie sullivan took to facebook to vent his feelings about this moment and he said we did not grant kim davis any right to use my tune "eye of the tiger" i would not grant her to the right to use charmin. usually iphones are the stars of the apple events. this time it looks like the apple tv console might steal the spotlight. no one is expecting an iphone 7 until next year likely a 6 s and
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6 s plus with improved processor and better camera. the bigger change might be a force touch. we are also expecting a new ipad. sales are going down for apple's tablets. they are hoping that a 13-inch screen will help turn things around. all eyes will be on the apple tv set-top box that connects your tv to the internet so you can watch video from netflix and youtube. sales show that apple tv is the most popular streaming device in the united states beating out google's chrome cast. apple tv costs $60 but the updated model could jump to $150 or more. that would get you an improved remote control with a touch pad and gaming options, possibly better integration with siri.
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the company called apple tv just a hobby and now is one of the most lucrative areas of entertainment and tech. and it may come as no surprise that chinese is the world's smartphone battleground. >> and big names like apple are having to fight for market share there. >> the launch of the iphone 6 and apple is the most popular smartphone brand in china but that didn't last long. chinese smartphone brands are stealing the show, taking back the smartphone crown. relative new kid on the block xiaomi has taken 15% of the market. >> it is worth more than airbnb
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and pinterest. >> hot on its heels is huawei. huawei is china's fastest growing smartphone maker. that leaves apple with an 11% bite of market share. sales dropped a whopping 21% between the first and second quarters of the year. is the honeymoon period for apple in china over or will the next-generation iphone help the smartphone veteran show upstart xiaomi who's boss and regain the smartphone crown in the world's second largest economy. saima mohsin, beijing. serena williams is one step closer to a tennis grand slam. she beat her dearest rival, her
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sister venus in the quart quarterfinals at the u.s. open. >> serena won two sets to one. if she wins she will be the first player in three decades to all four majors in a calendar year. she will play in the semifinals on thursday. should be cool stuff to watch. extraordinary new details about isis' leader. a woman saying she was enslaved by abu bakr al baghdadi and met kayla mueller. and historic day for britain's queen elizabeth. we will tell you about her milestone after the break. stay with us. why do so many people choose aleve?
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you are still watching "cnn newsroom" and we appreciate that. i'm errol barnett. >> we certainly do. i'm rosemary church. want to check the headlines this hour. australian prime minister tony abbott says his country will take in 12,000 additional refugees fleeing the war interest -- against isis in syria and iraq. a british airways plane caught fire in las vegas, nevada. the fire broke out in the boeing 777's left engine as it was about to take off for london. the cause of the fire remains under investigation. a county clerk in the u.s. is a free woman five days after she was jailed for refusing to
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issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. the judge said she could be released on the condition she does not interfere with issuing licenses to all legally eligible couples. it is not clear what she will do when she returns to work next week. more information now on the worsening migrant crisis. many are from syria, a country devastated by years of war that has left hundreds of thousands dead. as the european union struggles to contain the crisis, some world leaders like the special envoy to syria believes solving that problem requires cooperation from other middle eastern nations. take a listen. >> no more time for niceties or diplomatic postponements or partial solution. it is push russia and america to
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continue their dialogue and conclude it and put more pressure on those who can make a difference, iran and saudi arabia, sit together and do something about what otherwise will implode the whole region. >> and amid the fighting in syria one man sits at the head of isis and we have heard very little about abu bakr al baghdadi on a personal level until now. >> that's right. cnn's senior international correspondent atika shubert talked to a woman who says she was hand picked by the elusive isis leader. >> reporter: in 2014, kurdish, iraqi and u.s. troops rescued thousands of yazidis in a dramatic air lift. thousands of others were captured. women and children parcelled out
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as slaves to isis fighters. one year on this girl says she was enslaved by not just by any isis fighter. this man, abu bakr al baghdadi. she instantly recognizes kayla mueller, the young american aid worker killed in captivity. they shared a cell together. we sat down with her at a safe location. she was hand picked from among hundreds of captured women. >> the first time he came i was sitting and crying. he came close to the man who was in charge of the house. when i stood up he told the man put her to the side. >> reporter: she began as a slave girl in the baghdadi household cleaning up after his
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three wives and six children. she was 15. the family was on the move. an air strike destroyed the house next door. eventually she tried to escape with another girl. >> translator: they would look us in and one night we got the key and unlocked the door. we were six girls. we ran and ran. after three kilometers we saw a house outside aleppo and a v village. she said she would help us but they took us back. >> they were punished, beaten, dislocate her elbow. the last blows delivered by baghdadi himself. what did he say when he hit you? >> translator: abu bakr al baghdadi told us we beat you because you ran away from us. we chose you. you belong to the islamic state.
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>> where did he hit you? >> reporter: this is when she met kayla, she says, locked in the same cell. >> translator: the first time i entered the room, i saw kayla. and she said they captured me. after that we stayed together and became like sisters. >> reporter: one day, she, kayla and another yazidiy girl were moved to the home of a high-ranking fighter. shortly after, she says, baghdadi came to visit. he called for kayla. >> translator: when kayla came back to us we asked her why are you crying? and kayla told us that baghdadi said i'm going to marry you by force and you're going to be my wife. if you refuse, i will kill you. she was telling me everything.
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she wasn't siding anything from me. abu bakr al baghdadi raped me. that's what she told me. >> reporter: how many times did this happen? >> translator: four times. >> reporter: four times that you know of? did he ever rape you as well? >> translator: abu bakr al baghdadi told us i did this to kayla and i will do to you. >> reporter: she plotted their escape. >> translator: kayla refused and said if i skipped they will behead me. >> reporter: she waited until 1:00 a.m. and pushed over a broken window and after three hours they made it to a village and one man agreed to smuggle both girls out. >> translator: at the time i didn't know it was abu bakr al baghdadi, but when i escaped i saw him on tv and i heard his voice. i could not have imagined it would be the leader of isis.
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i was so frightened. he could have killed me. >> reporter: there is no way for cnn to independently the story. but she says she has spoken to u.s. investigators, including details about baghdadi's routine how he woke up at 10:00 a.m., went to bed at midnight and had no phones relying on others to relay messages. >> what kind of a man was baghdadi? was he ever, ever kind to you? >> translator: no, he was always evil. >> reporter: she says she hopes that some piece of information however small will lead to the downfall of the man who once called her his slave. atika shubert, cnn. >> we'll take a very short break here and be back in just a moment. 30lexus gs.wer
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welcome back, everyone. a new era in pop culture has begun in the u.s. comedian stephen colbert has started his run as the host of the cbs late show taking over for david lettermen. jeb bush was one of his first guests. >> the two joked about bush's famous family and campaign signs which include jeb's first name and not his last. we can't reveal the funny clips just yet. they will be available to us in the next hour or so. so stay tuned for that. >> the west coast still has to watch it. late night television has become a rite of passage in u.s. politics. >> and you have no shortage of candidates as potential guests. brian stelter takes a look at that. >> my guests will be george clooney and jeb bush or as --
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>> late night tv, the new sunday morning for politicians as stephen colbert takes of the late show the buzz is not just about george clooney but about jeb bush. >> late night couches are a place for political q and a. hillary clinton is doing the tonight show with jimmy fallon next week. he also beat him to donald trump. he will be on the tonight show next friday. this book battle shows the similar -- >> they are not going to talk about economic policy as much as what is your favorite midnight snack and things about your family and childhood and not important necessarily to a voter and get to show their
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personality. >> reporter: they use the guest couch to humanize themselves like chris christie eating a donut. and mitt romney did a top ten list. >> isn't it time for a president who looks like a 1970's game show host. in 1968, richard nixon did "laugh in" and who can forget bill clinton playing the sax on arsenio hall. but there is always the risk of an awkward moment or coming off dull. many thought john kerry bombed on the daily show in 2004. >> are you or have you ever flip-flopped? >> i'm flip-flopped, flop flipped. >> and viewers will be watching
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to see if jeb bush and donald trump are hits or political misses. >> i watched a fair amount of it. i do love the trump and oreo segment. >> but you get the sense he will have political guests on and grill them somewhat and try to make news or get an interesting side of him we don't see. >> he's a smart guy. you'll have to wait to see what happens with jeb there. a historic milestone for the british royal family as queen elizabeth becomes the longest reigning monarch in history. winston churchill was the prime minister of the united kingdom when the queen ascended to the throne at 22 years old. >> in total, her majesty has seen 12 prime ministers during her reign. >> the tragic news reached
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princess elizabeth and her husband. >> reporter: king george had died and the 25-year-old queen set aside her grief and prepared for duty. ♪ for a nation weakened by world war ii, elizabeth ii brought homes of renewal. winston churchill called it the new elizebethan age. >> i think it was supposed to mean a country becoming a kin to its predecessor, queen elizabeth i. >> reporter: the 1950s, many food items were still rationed and backens in britain's
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finances was having a severe impact on britain's diminished empire. >> much of the empire went before she ascended the throne. there is the question undoubtedly of a decline in military power. >> reporter: anti-british feeling was heating up in the middle east. in 1952, deadly protests erupted in egypt over britain's control over the suez canal and a greater strain on british morale and finances. >> with speed and honor i shall go to korea. >> reporter: in 1952 as dwight eisenhower was elected u.s. president 100,000 british troops were fighting alongside their u.s. allies in korea. it was a war now as old as the queen's reign itself. june, 1953, as the coronation
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got underway, edmund hillary had conquered president everest. for elizabeth, staying the course came naturally. she had made a promise between god, queen, and country. >> i declare before you all that my whole life, whether it be long or short, shall be devoted to your service and to the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong. >> our richard quest reporting there. is it a big weekend ahead for american football fans as the regular season gets underway. up next we'll introduce you to a fury canadian fan that has captured the sport's attention. . what we're recommending as your consultants... the new consultants are here.
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>> this is an annual event this type of year when you have farmers clearing land a lot of times illegally just to set up the growing season. and with the fire you see how expansive it is. it takes over the entire map but it's we know the smoke travels in a west to east direction. and you put the maps in motion and you can pick out the hazy areas in singapore and malaysia. and you look at the fine city famous for its cleanliness. and what is illegal is improper use oft chewing gum. if you improperly dispose of it you can be fined over $1,000. but you have things out of your control like the fires to the west. it has halted travel over the region. down to the south we have unhealthy to very unhealthy back to the east.
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this is a pattern you see set up this time of year as the patterns change back and forth. israel and much of the middle east with significant sand storms. they were so significant we have had multiple fatalities. and look at the smoke that takes over this entire region when it comes to how expansive this area was. and in the western united states if you are up late with us, an extreme heat event in the bay area of california and southern california, temperatures in places like san francisco in recent days have shot up to the mid-90s and the forecast remains in the upper 80s before finally cooling off to about 70 fahrenheit. even the city by the bay feeling a bit of summer the next couple days. >> thanks. now the national football league kicks off its season thursday night with a match-up
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between the new england patriots and the pittsburgh steelers. >> but the smart money may be on the jack rabbits. >> reporter: blink and you'll miss this silly jack rabbit, faster than a speeding receiver, dodging and juking. there was no way that they were going to take this guy out of the game. >> somebody sign him up. >> reporter: across the 20, 30, 40, the 50. stadium manager here in calgary says that the jack rabbit could have wandered in since the gates don't touch the ground and watch him leave the ground. >> and he scores and has a touchdown dance. woo-hoo! >> silly rabbit, tricks are for kids. >> reporter: usa today raved look at the height, the distance, the majesty. not since a hare skittered
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across an avalanche have we been so impressed. he joins the alligator on the golf course, the squirrel on the u.s. open tennis court, the squirrel on tiger woods' shoulder put there by lindsay vaughn, the chicken in the soccer net. but our favorite used a getaway car. spider-man the streaker crashed a high school game in seminole, florida. spider-man jumped two fences and was picked up by a getaway car. police got a partial license plate. when they caught him the charges included. >> exposure of sexual organs. >> reporter: at least the jack rabbit had the decentcy to wear
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right on his rear end. >> and that naked note will wrap it up here. i'll see you tomorrow. i'm errol barnett. >> i'm rosemary church. i'll be back in just a moment the with more "cnn newsroom." don't go anywhere. so far, you're horrible at this, flo. yeah, no talent for drawing, flo. house! car! oh, raise the roof! no one? remember when we used to raise the roof, diane? oh, quiet, richard, i'm trying to make sense of flo's terrible drawing. i'll draw the pants off that thing. oh, oh, hats on hamburgers! dancing! drive-in movie theater! home and auto. lamp! squares. stupid, dumb. lines. [ alarm rings ] no! home and auto bundle from progressive. saves you money. yay, game night, so much fun. rudy and i have a lot of daily rituals. namaste. stay. taking care of our teeth is one of them. when i brush my teeth, he gets a milk-bone brushing chew.
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com the eu releases its strategy for dealing with the migrant crisis this hour. we will have an exclusive look at the dangerous journey thousands take to get to greece. a british airways plane catches fire moments before takeoff in las vegas sending passengers scrambling to get off. hillary clinton tries to get away from scandals. and welcome to our viewers here in the united states. and all around the world. i'm rosemary church. and this is "cnn newsroom."
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as thousands of migrants continue to flood into europe the european commission is set to announce new plans for dealing with the influx of people. the flow shows no signs of stopping. the united nations says at least 850,000 migrants are expected to arrive in europe this year and next. australia's prime minister announced his country will take in 12,000 additional refugees from syria and iraq in hopes of taking the pressure off europe. and the white house spokesman is look at ways to help as well. we are waiting for the eu to unveil its plan on how to cope with this migrant crisis. now many of the migrants are relying on human smugglers to take them from turkey to greece. senior international
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correspondent ivan watson joins us now live. talk to us about what the situation is there right now. >> reporter: if europeans are troubled and concerned about the flood of refugees that have come across their borders in recent weeks they better get ready. the scenes that we saw in the turkish port city this week indicate there are new waves of particularly syrian refugees determined to smuggle themselves across the aegean sea to islands in greece like lesbos which you can see several kilometers away in the distance. the indicators is that this smuggling business is very much booming right now. this is how some refugees and migrants are smuggling themselves to europe. cramming more than 30 people at a time in broad daylight in an
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overcrowded pontoon boat. this footage filmed secretly a little more than a week ago off the coast of turkey. turks who appear to be smugglers, shove the overloaded boat out into the water. seconds later, a man appearing to pilot the vessel abandons ship. the boat turns in circles until the migrants figure out how to steer the vessel themselves. it motors off to the greek island of lesbos. the inform gateway to europe. in a turkish port city on tuesday scores of syrians sit in cafes and on sidewalks with backpacks full of belongings and garbage bags full of life jackets. the passage to greece by sea, cafes are selling life jackets
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and syrians trying them on in the street just waiting for their trip across the water. this turkish shop owner does not want us filming his business. several refugees who don't want to be identified tell me they just arrived in turkey from syria within the last couple of days. >> aren't you afraid these are bad boats? >> i know. i know. >> something terrible could happen. >> i know. >> people are dying in the water. >> what could i do? stay in syria? they are taking guys. i don't want to fight with anyone. i don't want to kill. i don't want to get killed. >> reporter: they say it costs around $1300 u.s. to buy passage to a greek island. among those waiting for the call, many families with children. when i ask a father if he is afraid the kids could drown at sea? and he answers they will die any
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way if they stay in syria. on the turkish coast the refugees just kept coming, some walking with children down to the water. under the olive groves they wait for their chance to escape. now rosemary, what was striking about the syrian refugees that i spoke with was that they don't tend to come from the roughly 2 million syrian and iraqi refugees who currently reside in turkey. these people were freshly arrived from the capital city, damascus. from areas controlled by the syrian government. they had flown into turkey within just a day or two prior to arriving here with the express purpose of getting across the aegean sea and getting to greece. now some of them had mentioned that it does appear that it is getting -- becoming more difficult to try to make that cross-sea passage.
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some of them said they had made multiple attempts and been forced to turn back but their determination to get to europe was as firm as ever. rosemary? >> it is incredible what some of them have gone through on their journey. we are talking with ivan watson in turkey. many thanks to you for that live report. as europe struggles to take in the migrants the european commission is coming up with a plan. i want to take you quickly the to these live pictures. i think we were going to go to the live pictures of the european parliament as we await to hear from jean-claude juncker to hear his plan for the migrants. let's go quickly to fred pleitgen as they prepare there. fred has the very latest. what are we likely to hear today? >> reporter: i think it's a
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two-pronged approach that jean-claude juncker will take. on one hand he wants to mend divisions as far as the refugee crisis is concerned. and on the other hand he needs to come up with some sort of overarching sustainable europe-wide policy to deal with this issue. and at that this point in time the two sides in this debate are far apart. you have countries like germany, austria, italy and france who take a humanitarian approach and who say that the european union need to take more refugees in. but they also say they need to be distributed among all the european countries. and you have nations like in eastern europe who see this more as a border control issue and that is the big problem that juncker is going to have and his policy or proposal are going to have to reflect.
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we expect he is going to call for man tear quotas to distribute some 160,000 refugees among various european countries. there have been backlashes against that. the polish president, saying that he doesn't necessarily want people he doesn't know anything about coming to poland. the poles pledging less than what they think their quota should be. and one of the key things he is going to call for is also bigger efforts to try and secure the borders of europe. that is of course something that is -- has come under criticism over the past couple days especially when you look at the border fence that is being constructed by the hungarians at this point in time. there are some politicians that don't believe it will lead to a solution of the problem but that it would exacerbate the problem and move it to other countries. there are really -- there is a
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balance that jean-claude juncker needs to strike between the nations that want to restrict immigration to the european union and the nations that feel that at this time in time there is no alternative to letting many of the refugees in and angela merkel has said they are talking about these 160,000 and the owe thquota to that. she believes the numbers will be far greater and they have a much larger problem on their hand and many more people flocking to their shores. >> our fred pleitgen reporting there. many thanks to you. u.s. presidential candidate hillary clinton is apologizing for using a private e-mail server for official government work when she was secretary of state. this comes as her popularity shrinks. >> reporter: hillary clinton's
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numbers are down ten points nationwide as she tries to turn a corner. tonight she directly apologized for her use of a private e-mail server while secretary of state telling abc news. >> that was a mistake. i'm sorry about that. i take responsibility. >> reporter: aides are crafting a way for her to show spontaneity, heart and humor. >> i do kind ofny what donald is going through. and if anyone wonders if mine is real. here's the answer. the hair is real, the color isn't. >> reporter: but president obama's former adviser saying that it red more like the onion. her plan just do it, in iowa this weekend, clinton tried to shore up her shrinking lead in the polls. >> i have the vision, the
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policies, the skill and the determination to get us back on the right track. >> reporter: her loss is joe biden's gain. new poll numbers out today show a swell of support for the vice president. he's up 10 points since last month and still deciding whether to get in the race. dodging questions about a possible run. >> you have to talk to my wife about that. i've got to talk to my wife about that. >> reporter: biden is neck and neck in the polls with vermont senator bernie sanders who is winning in a poll of new hampshire primary voters. but while this summer has been all about the sanders surge it is the biden bump that is dominating headlines going into the fall. talking to clinton campaign sources they say they're not too worried. if biden were to enter the race his numbers would dip under the harsh spotlight of the campaign trail. u.s. democrats have given
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president barack obama the votes he needs to prevent the senate from rejecting the iran nuclear deal. four more democrats announced their support on tuesday, bringing the number of supporters in the senate to 42. that means that the president likely won't have to use his veto power to protect the agreement from a republican plan to kill the deal. democratic presidential front runner hillary clinton is expected to announce her support for the deal today. republican candidates ted cruz and donald trump will hold an antiiran deal rally on capitol hill. the deadline for american lawmakers to vote on the agreement is september 17th. we do want to take you back live now to france. european commission president jean-claude juncker is delivering his state of the union address and expected to audiocassette about the migrant
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crisis. >> translator: i am going to try toic ma the general picture more understandable. >> translator: i'm the first president of the commission who is in a way directly endorsed including by the european parliament. that was my direct path to office. right from the very beginning, in fact when i was spoking to you on the 14th of june, i made it quite clear that i intend to make the commission more political. and therefore, the president of the commission -- because of the democratic procedures, the nomination procedures, would also be a political president.
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when i say political, basically, i mean political in the very best con notations of that world. we are politicians. i feel like political people rather than just politicians. these days in french it's a bad connotation. so in the best connotations we are as you say in english, politicians. and by political i don't mean that we are going to politicize everything. that's not our wish. i just want to say that i really do feel that now is not the time to go ahead willy-nilly business as usual. please don't feel that's the case. [ applause ] >> translator: don't count up
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how many times i use the word "social" just take it my heart is full of the social. and don't count how many times i use "economic" "monetary" or "budget," those words. very often people make rather empty speeches about. this now we've got to be frank. it really -- the bell tolls. the time has come. we have to look overtly at the huge issues with which european union is now confronted and that's what i want to focus on now. our european union -- i don't really want to fall into derespond but it's not in a good situation. it is no point of the president of the commission, the
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representatives of european democracy and the peoples of europe to just put things in rosie colors, no. we're not in a good place. there's a lack of europe in the european union and there's a lack of union in this european union. [ applause ] >> translator: and that has to change. we have to change it, and now. work together to that end. i think that is the remit we've got from the european electorate. and that actually corresponds to the remit you gave to me. >> you are becoming nervous when you are speaking about the european union. i know.
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you can't interrupt me from time to time. i will not at each time respond to what you are saying because what you are saying is worthless. [ applause ] mr. president, ladies and gentlemen, whatever work programs or legislative agendas say, the first priority today is and must be addressing the refugee crisis. since the beginning of the year, nearly 500,000 people have made their way to europe. the vast majority of them are
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fleeing from syria, the terror of the islamic state in libya, or dictatorship inn ertray yeah. the numbers are impressive. for some they are frightening. but now is not the time to take fright. is it a time for determined, concerted action by the european union by its member states and by its institutions. the first of all the methods before other considerations is a matter of humanity and human dignity.
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and for europe, it's also a matter for historical texts. [ applause ] we europeans, we are all europeans here. oh, yeah, okay. okay. i'm noting that you do think you're not europeans. okay, well said but not well done. this is not a time to take fright. it's a time of humanity and of human dignity. we europeans, all of us, i thought before the interruption, all of us should remember well that europe is a continent. we are nearly everyone has at
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one time been a refugee. our common instrument is marked by millions of europeans fleeing from religious or political persecution from war, from dictatorship, from oppression. fleeing from france in the 17th century, many others fleeing from germany during the nazi era of the '30s and the '40s of the last century. spanish republicans fleeing to camps in southern france after their defeat in the civil war. hungarian revolutionaries fleeing to austria and elsewhere. everywhere in europe. after their uprising. [ applause ]
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after their uprising against communist rules was oppressed by soviet tanks in 1956. czech, slovak citizens seeking refuge in other countries including mine in 1968. hundreds of thousands were forced to flee from their homes after and during the yugoslav wars at the end of the last century. in the last decade of the 20th century. have we forgot therein was a reason there are more -- living in the united states than in the entire population of scotland?
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there is a reason the number of o'neills and murphys in u.s. exceeds by far those living in ireland. have we forgotten that 20 million people of polish ancestry live outside poland as a result of political and economic emigration after the many border shifts forced expulsions and resettlements after poland's painful history. have we forget after the second world war, 60 million people were refugees in europe. that as result of this terrible european experience, a global protection regime the 1951 geneva convention was established to grant refuge to those who jump the walls in
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europe to escape from war and oppression. we europeans should know and should never forget why giving refuge and complying with the fundamental right to asylum is so important. the fundamental right to asylum is one of the most important international and european values. you should not forget that. [ applause ] i have said in this house and elsewhere in the past that we are too seldom proud of our european heritage and our european project. yes, in spite of our fragility, and our weaknesses, our
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self-perceived weaknesses, today it is europe that is sought worldwide as a place of refuge and exile. it is europe today that represents a place of hope, a hac haven of stability in the eyes of women and men in the middle east and africa. i have to say this year, this is something to be proud of, not something to fear. [ applause ] you have today, ladies and gentlemen, in spite of many differences amongst the member states, is by far the wealthiest place and most stable continent in the world. those who are criticizing europe, the european integration and construction and union have
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to admit this is a place of peace and we should be proud of this. we have -- we have -- [ applause ] we have the means to help those fleeing from war. terror. oppression. i know that many now will want to say that this is all very well but europe cannot take everybody. it is true. that europe cannot house all the misery of the world. but let us be honest and put things into perspective. there is certainly an important and unprecedented number of refugees coming to europe at the moment. however, they still represent just 0.11% of the total european union population.
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in lebanon, by comparison, the refugees represent 25% of the population in a country which has only 1/5 of the wealth we do enjoy in european union. who are we that we are never making this kind of comparisons? who are we? [ applause ] let us be clear and honest with our often worried citizens. as long as there is war in syria and terror in libya, the refugee crisis will not simply go away. we can build wars and tents. but imagine without being demagogue, imagine for a second
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if it were you, your child in your arms, the world you knew torn apart around you. there is no price you would not pay. there is no wall you would not climb. no sea, you would not go to sea. no border you would not cross if it is a war of the barbarism of the so-called islamic state. we have to accept these people on the european territory. [ applause ] it is high time to act, to
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manage the refugee crisis because there is no alternative to this. there has been a lot of finger pointing, not enough finger painting but too much finger pointing in the past weeks. member states have accused each other of not doing enough or doing the wrong thing. and more often than no fingers have been pointed from national capitals to -- if member states are not doing their jobs the commission the european parliament is accused of not doing the job. we could all be not all the majority of this house and myself and my commission, we could be angry about this blame game.
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but i wonder who that would serve. being angry does not help anyone. blaming others does not help the refugees and the migrants. and the attempt of blaming others is often just a sign that politicians, policymakers, sometimes lawmakers are overwhelmed by unexpected events. instead, we should rather recall what has been agreed that can help in the current situation. it is time to look at what is on the table and move swiftly forwards. we are not starting anew. since the early years of this century, the commission, not mine, the one of baroza has persistently tabled legislation
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to build a common european asylum system and the parliament and the council have enacted this legislation piece by piece and the last piece of legislation entered into force just in july 2015, two months ago. because europe, we now have common standards for the way we receive asylum seekers. in a respect of their dignity, for the way we process their asylum applications and we have common criteria, which our independent justice systems use to determine whether someone is entitled to international protection. but these standards need to be implemented entirely and respected everywhere in europe in practice. and this is clearly not the case
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before the summer, not after the summer, before the summer, the commission started the first series of 32 infringe judgment proceedings to member states of what they previously agreed to do. doesn't matter of credibility. we are doing, we are legislating and we are not implementing. it's a matter of credibility that member states are implementing and respecting commonly agreed international and european laws. [ applause ] second series of infringe judgment proceedings will follow in the days to come. common asylum standards are important but they are not enough to cope with the current refugee crisis.
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the commission, the parliament, the council said in the spring, that we need a comprehensive european agenda on migration. we proposed this as a commission in may. and it would be unfair to say that nothing has happened sense then. we have tripled our presence at sea. 122,000 lives have been saved since then. every life lost is one too many. it's one too many. but many more have been rescued that would have been lost otherwise, an increase of 250%. we should be proud of that performance.
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[ applause ] 29 member states and countries are participating in the joint operations. 102 guest officers from 20 countries, 31 ships, three helicopters, four fixed-wing aircrafts. >> europe has the means to help those who flee from war and terror. a powerful message from jean-claude juncker. european commission president in france. he was unveiling and still unveiling a plan to deal with the massive flow of immigrants and refugees we have seen into europe. a matter of humanity and human dignity. the bell tolls. the time has come to confront the displaced people. it's no secret that some eastern european countries are not happy with what will be announced
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which is quotas where basically, jean-claude juncker is saying that all european countries need to share and take a portion of these refugees and migrants and take them into their countries and look after them. a lot of eastern european countries are saying they don't have the resources to do that. but he used history. he used world war ii as a reminder that most of us have been immigrants and refugees or our ancestors have. we are going to monitor this keeping an eye on ear out on what jean-claude juncker says in terms of these quotas. we'll move on for the time being but keeping an eye on. that. one man sits at the head of isis. we have heard very little about abu bakr al baghdadi on a personal level until now. a young yazidi girl talked with atika shubert and she said she
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became a slave of the caliphate, hand picked by baghdadi himself. she said she met and became friends with kayla mule whoevel. atika joins me now with more on her interview and the startling details about kayla mueller. talk to us about what all she told you about the situation. >> reporter: zenat, which is not her real name, we're trying not to reveal her identity for her own safety, really has an incredible story and we tried our best to her fie it. we verified several details with the mueller family about kayla's captivity and with u.s. officials who we know spoke to several yazidi girls and zenat was one of them, about what
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happened to kayla mueller. but zenat's story is incredible. she was hand picked by baghdadi out of hundreds of girls and ultimately held in captivity with kayla mueller. take a listen to what she told us. [ speaking foreign language ].
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did abu bakr al baghdadi come to visit in? [ speaking foreign language ]. >> reporter: so kayla was brought to see baghdadi and they were alone in a room and baghdadi raped kayla. is that what she told you?
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[ speaking foreign language ]. >> reporter: how many times did this happen? four times that you know of. did he rape you as well? [ speaking foreign language ]. >> reporter: how did you escape? [ speaking foreign language ]. >> reporter: do you think that kayla was valuable to baghdadi? [ speaking foreign language ].
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>> reporter: and she wore it in the camp the whole time so no other man could see her face? [ speaking foreign language ]. >> reporter: one of the key details that she told us was that she believes that baghdadi had in effect made kayla mueller one of his wives not only because she had to wear the nikab all the time and couldn't reveal her face to other men but because she was given special gifts including a watch that was worn by baghdadi's other three wives. it's this kind of level of detail that is incredible and also that zenat was in the baghdadi household and she has a number of details about his daily life. he got up at 10:00 a.m. and went
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to bed at midnight. he never carried a phone because he was afraid of being tracked and hit by drone strikes. we have more details throughout day here. >> it is unbelievable what she was saying and talking about him being an evil man. atika shubert reporting from berlin. many thanks to you. a historic moment for britain today. we are monitoring the european parliament. you heard jean-claude juncker talking about what europe has to do. we understand he has said 160,000 refugees and migrants must be taken in by europe. we're waiting to hear what sort of quotas for each of the countries within europe he is expecting. and so, as soon as we have that we will share it with you. but let's take a very short break for now. we're back in a moment. .
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all right, taking you back now to these live pictures from france. european commission president jean-claude juncker is delivering his state of the union address. we have learned that europe has the means to help those fleeing from war and terror and europe is a place of hope for these refugees and he has announced a number, 160,000 migrants and refugees are to be accepted into europe. at this point we are waiting for him to give us a breakdown because those 160,000 refugees and migrants or immigrants will be basically send out to the various european countries. but we haven't got those quotas yet. we are monitoring this and will come back to that when we get more information. but let's move on for now. we have other things to cover as well.
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queen elizabeth ii becomes britain's longest reigning monarch today. she will surpass the record set by her great, great grandmother queen victoria. she has reigned for more than 63 years and that adds up to 23,226 days, 16 hours, and 30 minutes. how about that? queen elizabeth has ruled through the tenure of 12 british prime ministers and 12 u.s. presidents and despite making 97 state visits she has no passport. let's bring in max foster for details on today's historic moment. he is live at buckingham palace. talk to us about this. it is extraordinary, isn't it, the time she has been there as queen. so tell us about her legacy and also i wanted to ask you, could
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this possibly mean now that she has reigned the longest in britain could she possibly be thinking once she reached this milestone maybe it's time to step aside? >> it's always the big question, isn't it? and there are other monarchs in europe and the middle east that have abdicated in recent years but there is no signs at all she is planning that herself. we are in the garden. she is coming down from scotland today, really playing down events. she doesn't want this to be seen as a celebration although she is proud of her achievement, this is also hinged on the fact that this date is based on her father's death and the death of queen victoria. she doesn't want to celebrate it but will be marking it up in scotland. the palace has issued this photograph today. this is a photograph with a lot of meaning to it.
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it was taken by paul mccartney's daughter mary. she receives these red boxes every day from the government full of government papers. she reads them every day. i think the message we are giving here is she is still work every day. she is working as hard as she has any other day and there is no sign of her retiring. and that in raw terms is abdication. >> a very strong message there. our max foster, many thanks, reporting live from buckingham palace and now bring in richard fitzwilliams live in our london bureau. i want to talk about that. she is, of course, very healthy and in very good condition and nearly 90 years of age. quite extraordinary what she has achieved but a lot of people wondering now that she has reached this milestone could it mean she may step aside and give
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charles his opportunity? >> i'm absolutely convince shed won't. firstly it's important to remember at the sage of 21 in cape town she broadcast to the empire and commonwealth and pledged her whole life in its service. that's what she has done so brilliantly. i'm absolutely convinced she wouldn't abdicate. it's well worth remembering that her uncle edward viii did abdicate and that has not been forgotten by the house of windsor. and as has been pointed out she is physically extremely robust. in november she is going to march on the state visit and for the heads of commonwealth government meeting. and over the years it's been a remarkable reign. >> and talk to us about her legacy. of course you have followed her and her activities and all other
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things she has done across the globe for many years now. talk to us about what she has achieved up to this point. >> reporter: what she's achieved firstly is a wonderful exemplar of unity. at the time of change and empire and the loss of military power for britain but also a different form of society, a great deal more liberal and egalitarian and there has been somewhat of an artistry renaissance during her reign. there is no question at all, though she has been superb in the projection of soft power. the highlight of her reign was the remarkable visit in 2011 to ireland when she was 85 and that, in fact, gave tremendous impetus to the peace process that continues when the prince of wales visited ireland this year and helped to change the
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policy of the republican movement there. also, the commonwealth almost single handedly she has kept it together. and if it wasn't for her i doubt the monarchy would enjoy the esteem and popularity that it does today. >> certainly. and talking there with richard fitzwilliams on this historic day for queen elizabeth ii of britain. many thanks to you, sir. late night television in the u.s. gets a facelift. stephen colbert has made his debut as host of the late show. one of his first guests is a politician who gets a few laughs. we're right back with that. right. 100% real milk, just without the lactose. so you can drink all you want... ...with no discomfort? exactly. here, try some...
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welcome back, everyone, a new era in pop culture has begun in the united states. ♪ >> comedian stephen colbert just started his run as the new host of the cbs late show taking over from david letterman. as such he required the faux
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conservative commentator he played for years. >> we have been working so hard to get the show ready for you. as long as i have nine months to make one hour of tv i could to this forever. with this show, i begin the search for the real stephen colbert. i just hope i don't find him on ashley madison. >> and one of colbert's first guests was u.s. republican presidential candidate jeb bush. the two joked about the former governor's famous family and his campaign signs that only use his first name with an exclamation point. >> i have been using jeb since 1994. it connotes excitement. >> yep! -- jeb! how many of us don't just go
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jeb! >> most of them in florida do even out of happiness or deep anger. the european commission president jean-claude juncker is delivering his state of the union address in france. he is expected to outline plans for country by country quotas for european member nations to take in refugees and juncker is giving an impassioned speech about the right of asylum seekers and the horrors they are seeing in iraq and syria and the responsibilities of countries to help ease the crisis. he says leaders need to remember the lessons of world war ii and almost everyone's family members were at one time or another refugees in europe. a very powerful message there. that does it for us. i'm rosemary church. thanks for your company.
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"early start" is next in the united states. for everybody else, stay tune tuned for another hour of "cnn newsroom." ooñóokñ.??????ó
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♪ ♪ overnight, hillary clinton with a brand-new facebook apology for using a private e-mail server while secretary of state. but is it coming months too late? a british airways plane erupts in flames on the runway. passengers onboard making an emergency exit. plus, stephen colbert, late-tv debut. good morning, everyone. welcome to early start. i'm john berman. >> and i'm christine

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