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tv   New Day  CNN  September 29, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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retake the prison. the taliban got there and they freed hundreds of prisoners. the taliban said they have taken control of a local hospital, posting pictures on social media. this is what we've seen so many times but this time on a much larger scale. the taliban move in when they see some vulnerability. afghan forces have to respond. but what does this mean for u.s. troops? there are 9,800 u.s. troops left in afghanistan. most are scheduled to come home by the end of next year. but this now, a very open question debate inside the pentagon, inside the white house. should u.s. troops be left in afghanistan, more troops as this security situation continues to pose a lot of problems? john? >> does this development change that discussion? barbara starr at the pentagon for us.
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afghan security forces could not repel a taliban attack in kunduz, even with u.s. air strikes, do these american trained forces have the wherewithal to win that city back in nic robertson live in london with that part of the story. >> reporter: air strikes alone are not going to do it. this is an urban environment. there were 250 casualties yesterday, at least, the numbers aren't clear. this is a fight that everyone, the u.s., the afghan government, should have seen coming. the taliban have been taking control of areas, digging in north of kunduz since about april this year. the fight for them to take the city, a huge prize, the biggest town they've been able to take since 2001 is significant. this is an economically important town and province. it is a strategic and important highway to the north to tajikistan. this is a place the government should never had lost.
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they had the troop numbers, the police numbers, far outpowering the taliban. what we've seen in the past, when taliban have taken control back in the old days of the taliban, when they used to do this, the reason they could take control of the town so quickly would have been because they had sympathizers in the town. people that are dissatisfied with the government. that is going to be a big battle for the government. they should be able to do it militarily, take control again but are they going to win over the people there that they already appear to have lost to the taliban? >> we'll discuss this more ahead. back here in the united states, another important day for president obama at the united nations. after his closely watched meeting with russian president vladimir putin. both leaders clashing publicly on their competing visions to end syria's civil war. sitting down for the first time since russia's incursion into ukraine. michelle kosinski live at the u.n. with the latest. >> reporter: this happened after
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about two years of not having a real sitdown conversation, everything that's transpired since then, the fact that there are yewenormous differences. this was a showdown at the u.n. but it also seems to have worked. despite those differences, both sides are calling this constructive. that's about the most anyone had hoped for. the u.s. and russia's militaries will communicate in the fight against isis. and the two sides will at least talk about a political transition in syria. with that stiff, silent handshake preceded by an awkward, cold toast and two scathing speeches. >> we cannot stand by when the sovereignty and territorial integrity of a nation is flagrantly violated. >> translator: we think it is an enormous mistake to refuse to cooperate with the syrian government. >> reporter: president obama and putin did manage to tolerate
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each other enough to hash out their significant differences for an hour and a half behind closed doors. starting with obama confronting putin. over his refusal to back down in ukraine. but on syria, where putin continues to back an even try to rally international support for long-time ally president bashar al assad currently at war with his own people, and president obama believes he must go, calling him a tyrant. >> there cannot be after so much blood shed, so of carnage, a return to the prewar status quo. >> reporter: they do agree fighting isis is the priority, as difficult as that may be to coordinate. >> syrian government air strikes on a hospital killing three health care workers, there by, assad is empowering isis. the idea that you're going to fight isis by supporting the assad regime is crazy. >> reporter: so in this rare
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meeting, they decide the the u.s. and russian militaries will communicate to avoid fighting each other in battling isis. putin calling this face-to-face time with president obama "meaningful" and surprisingly frank. >> reporter: the relationship hasn't changed much. it's still described as business-like. what they share is a goal, although the u.s. has skepticism over whether russia's words will be matched with actions. because there always seems to have to be a divergence in how each side sees the conversation that just happened, vladimir putin told reporters afterwards that the u.s. had asked for this meeting although the white house has been describing putin as desperate to talk to president obama, they say he has asked for this meeting several times. alisyn and john. >> yes, there are differing reports. let's discuss all of these developments with christiane amanpour, she's our cnn chief
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international correspondent, of course, and jim sciutto, cnn's chief international correspondent. great to have both of you on set in studio. surprisingly frank were the conversations as described by putin. what do you think happened in there? >> all that matters beyond the atmospherics is do they have a plan to fix what's happening in syria? so far, no, they don't. neither president obama or president putin outlined anything resembling a real plan to stop the war. putin wants to support assad. really? he's the one responsible for the mass murders, for the mass fleeing of the refugees. >> he's been a failure in terms of combatting isis. so then what is putin's play? >> it looks like putin has skillfully, some might say, simply outleveraged the united states, which is not there, has no skin in the game, has no cards on the table. putin has put his military, aircraft, helicopters, armored vehicles, personnel and came up with a surprise intelligence
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sharing with iran, iraq and syria and said, here, this is our fait accompli. you don't know that isis is what you've created. in fact, putin -- rather assad is the one who people are fleeing and because he's been there, the terrorists have been able to rise there. >> let's show what russia has in syria. it is interesting by comparison. 500 actual russian troops, boots on the ground, 45 aircraft tanks, armored personnel carriers, surface-to-air missiles, fuel tanks underground. the u.s. has 50 guys they trained. 50 guys, syrians they trained that occasionally hand the arms over to isis. >> and four or five that made it to the battlefield. that's an utter failure. you heard vladimir putin poking fun at that u.s. effort. the conversation was surprisingly frank, of course it would. they have a fundamental disagreement on asaid. assad is the source of the
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problem, putin says assad is a solution to the problem. they both say you need a political solution. if you have that disagreement and haven't moved forward. >> there's no notion of how to do that, a political solution. the geneva talks, et cetera. this seems like past history, ancient history. they tried it and it hasn't worked. >> is the initiative more with putin right now than it is with obama in the white house? >> let's see. because the white house seems to have changed its strategy. in other words, in public, yesterday, president obama said i'm willing to work with anybody, russia and iran included. the iran bit is a change. they didn't want to talk to iran. they excluded iran for a long time. the other bit that's a change is from assad must go to assad can stay a little bit. >> christiane is right on point. putin has skin in the game right now, troops on the ground. we've had our experience there
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and let's see and you hear this quietly, privately from white house officials. let's see how it goes for them. >> most unfortunately that seems to be a trend that also happened with ukraine and actually they're still there in ukraine. >> absolutely. >> it's quite dangerous to give putin his head so to speak in these situations. >> let's move to the breaking news about what's going on in afghanistan. the taliban, jim, has taken over this city. how big of a surprise is that? >> it's a bit of a surprise. and it's also a real danger, because this is a taliban stronghold area. it's a real -- it becomes an indictment, again, as we saw in iraq, of the obama administration policy of train and equip. we spend a decade there, trillions of dollars training afghan forces and they couldn't hold this ground. >> with superiority. >> air strikes alone don't gain ground back. we've seen that in iraq. you've had hundreds of air strikes and iraqi security
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forces haven't been able to hold back isis. you need more than that if you're going to push them back from kunduz. >> there are 9,800 troops still in afghanistan due to leave over the next 12 to 14 months. does that change the situation. >> a lot of people are probably worrying about that. we saw what happened when forces left iraq. it left iraq unable to defend, stand its forces. the kunduz battle has been going on for pretty much a year. >> people have been watching this develop. this was a slow boil there. >> i mean, just the symbolic victory of the taliban being back. >> it's big. >> let's talk about what's going on at the u.n. today. there's constant news rolling out of there. there's a meeting with president obama and raul castro. what do we expect? >> the two big diplomatic engagements of this administration have been successful. the iran nuclear deal and the cuba -- it's not finished yet. they will meet today. president obama said yesterday
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that the engagement is good but there's much more to be done, human rights, et cetera. he hoped that congress and said congress eventually would lift the embargo. castro says congress has to lift the embargo if there's to be a formalization. that's standard rhetoric. the fact is it's moving forward. >> i don't know how castro plans to get things through congress when no one in the united states seems to be able to do the same. what are the limits of the progress, jim, in this relationship if congress doesn't move forward? they're not about to vote to lift the embargo. >> the president made clear that's a key stumbling block going forward. the president holds out cuba and iran as his endorsement, his defense of diplomacy as a way forward. that's what we heard from his speech as a model for other conflicts. the trouble is, there are fundamental differences between those and russia and ukraine and syria. can those be a model going forward? considering the differences between the u.s. and russia, on an issue like syria, it's hard to see how you make that progress. >> we'll be watching. great to get your input.
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thanks so much for being here. president obama is not the only one talking foreign policy. republican presidential front-runner donald trump telling our erin burnett where stands on everything from the iran nuclear deal with the united states relationship with russia. take a look. >> barack obama saying he wants bashar al assad removed from power. putin says he thinks that's an enormous mistake not to cooperate with vladimir putin. which man is right? >> i've been saying this for a long time. you look at what's going on in syria. it's a total catastrophe, a total mess. we're helping to make it a mess. we have isis. and isis wants to go after assad. but we're knocking the hell out of them. we're still dropping bombs all over the place, they're not exactly loving life over in syria. so we're stopping them to a certain extent from going after assad. you have russia that's now there, russia's on the side of assad and russia wants to get
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rid of isis as much as we do, if not more. they don't want them coming into russia. i'm saying why are we knocking isis and yet at the same time we're against assad? let them fight. take over the remnants. but more importantly, let russia fight isis if they want to fight them in syria. we can fight them in iraq but if you think about iraq, we've spent $2 trillion, thousands of lives lost, wounded warriors who we love and i love all over the place. what do we have in iraq? and did you see -- >> you said you'd put ground troops on the ground in iraq. >> we have to do something with isis. i was totally against the war in iraq from the beginning. 2003, 2004, because you'll destabilize the middle east. i was right. out of everybody running i'm the one person that said don't do it. >> how do you put ground troops in iraq but not in syria? >> there is no border essentially in those two countries. >> let syria and isis fight. why do we care? let isis and syria fight. and let russia, they're in syria
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already, let them fight isis. >> seasonally you're saying let russia take care of isis, if vladimir putin wants bashar al assad to stay because it makes sense for him, you're okay with that. >> i watched him a lot. i've made a lot of money watching people. deals are people. okay? people say what is a deal? it's all about analyzing people. i've watched assad and i've watched a little bit on the other side. the problem is, the other side, we have no idea who they are. i'm saying are we better off with assad? we have no idea who these people are. we give them weapons, give them ammunition, we give them everything. erin, maybe it's worse than assad. what are we doing? why are we involved? we have to get rid of isis very importantly but i look at assad and assad, to me, looks better than the other side and you know, this has happened before. we back a certain side and that side turns out to be a total catastrophe. russia likes assad, seemingly a lot. let them worry about isis. let them fight it out.
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now, in iraq, we have to do it. we shouldn't have been there in the first place but we left the wrong way. when obama took us out the way he took us out, that was a mistake. we should never have been there in the first place. >> when we talk about the middle east, you've been critical of the iran nuclear deal. you said you'd make it a better deal. >> i'm a person that's a business person. >> you would improve the deal. >> with that being said, you've known some of the deals, i've bought into really bad contracts knowingly and i bought them cheap because they're bad contracts. and i've taken those bad contracts and made them great. i've made a fortune. what you have to do is this. i will analyze that contract so strongly, i will go after -- believe me, if they violate that contract, they have problems. but what they've done is they have totally outnegotiated us. the fact that they get $150 billion, the fact that we have the 24-day wait period and it's actually -- >> before we can inspect, yes. >> 24 days before we can inspect? the fact that they self-inspect and how about the prisoners we
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don't get? we don't get anything. there's one other thing nobody talks about. if israel ever attacks iran, the way i read it, there's a clause, we're supposed to protect iran from israel. we're supposed to fight israel. that's not going to happen. how do they allow a clause like that in there? it's a horrible deal. with that being said, i will police that to a level that they will not believe even exists. >> so hassan rouhani said something about the gop, insulting all of you. what the republican candidates are saying are laughable. some of them wouldn't know where tehran was in relation to iran. some of them didn't know where iran was geographically. that's pretty harsh. >> i don't know who he's talking about. >> you know where iran is on a map? >> i do. >> what do you say -- >> let me tell you what i say to him. they have outnegotiated our people.
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they have no idea what they're doing. i don't know why obama wanted to make this deal so strongly. he lost on virtually every point. they will find out, i know he's not talking about me, they will find out, if i win, we're not babies. there's no more being babies anymore. >> we'll discuss more of this in our political roundup ahead. but he's making the rounds. he's making a note. he wrote an op-ed on his tax plan in the "wall street journal." speaking to erin burnett. >> there are specifics. >> yes. >> that is different. he's giving specifics and people can parse it however they want. we will be doing that. meanwhile, we do have to tell you about some breaking news. a terrible night of deadly violence in a chicago neighborhood when a family was fired on in a drive-by style shooting. an 11-month-old infant was wounded but his pregnant mother and grandmother were killed. this is the fifth deadly shooting in the area in as many
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days. >> that's awful. also breaking overnight, incredibly tense moment at new york's jfk airport. an aer lingus flight was forced to make a landing. the jetliner's brakes overheated, caught fire after landing. the firefighters put out the flames. luckily no one was hurt. >> new this morning, a tropical storm has formed in the atlantic. let's take a look at where it's headed and what it means for the residents of the east coast. cnn meteorologist chad myers joins us. joaquin is the tropical storm's name, i understand. >> i'm thinking to myself, how did we even get to "j"? where were the rest of them? >> good point. >> they were all small, tropical storms and big misses, fish storms. kind of affected the weighter but nothing made any significant landfall. this is completely a storm that we have no idea where it's going. even hurricane center says don't believe us after 48 hours
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essentially because this thing could go left or right. let me show you what the models look like right now. north, south, east, west, this is all the way till friday. we're talking now 72 hours from where we are now and no idea. after wilmington, the atlantic, the bahamas and then if you take that and extrapolate that out either farther, really all you need to do is watch this until thursday and friday. there are so many other players going on. there's a cold front, a low here to the south that will spread big rain for the northeast. northeast, you are going to get 4 to 5 inches of rainfall, not from joaquin, from the storm that is already here moving up the east coast. there's joaquin down there to the south. there's a cold front, high pressure, too many ingredients in the soup right now. i have no idea what to make of this. stay tune, thursday, friday, we'll know better. >> that does the give me confidence when he says that. >> he says i have no idea what to make of this. >> you have this, you have this, you have this and i'm not even talking about that. >> we'll check back with you. donald trump tax plan, if it
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becomes reality, half of the country will not pay any taxes. donald trump says. so how does the rest of it work? we're taking a closer look. thank you for calling. we'll be with you shortly. yeah right... xerox predictive analytics help companies provide a better and faster customer experience. hello mr. kent. can i rebook your flight? i'm here! customer care can work better. with xerox. wait i'm here! mr. kent? (gasp) shark diving! xerox personalized employee portals help companies make benefits simple and accessible... from anywhere. hula dancing? cliff jumping! human resources can work better. with xerox.
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i will probably end up paying more money but at the same time, i think the economy will do better so i'll make it up that way. i will probably end up paying more money. i believe in the end, i might do better because i really believe the economy is going to go boom, beautiful. that is republican front-runner donald trump talking to cnn's erin burnett about his brand spampging new tax plan. he's promising big tax cuts for millions of americans. >> not hedge funds. >> he does say billionaires like himself will have to pay more. there are questions about whether the plan is feasible, whether he's presenting it honestly and fairly. let's bring in errol lewis. you were there for the big unveiling of the tax plan. this is a serious proposal. he has specifics here. he's laying out his plan for
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taxes. he says the economy is in his wheelhouse. he told erin that he'd probably end up paying more. "the washington post" says that's not true. i'm not sure that matters in this case. >> people who don't like the plan, don't like the specifics of it but it is a detailed tax plan. we've seen that from jeb bush and marco rubio but not from a lot of the other republicans in race. he gets credit for putting meat on the bones and fleshing out the policy. donald trump did an expert job of marketing this as a plan that will be great for the people getting the small paychecks and the middle class. >> he says, you know, the wealthiest, the hedge fund managers who have been getting away from murder are going to pay more but everybody else, errol, taxes are going down. that sounds fantastic. >> sounds like a great idea. i have to remind everybody four years ago, we had mitt romney talking about how there. >> reporter: so many people, 47% who don't pay any taxes at all.
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>> that was -- remember, that was a republican narrative. >> moral hazard. they're not paying into the system. they done the have a stake in the country. >> donald trump is capitalizing on this. >> he wants to push it up to 50% as a matter of fact. the politics of this are interesting. do i agree with sara. many of the ideas he published in a book in 2000. he clearly obviously believes in this. the fact that he was reading from a script which he almost never does suggests that he wanted to get it right, that everybody understood what he was saying. the real break with reality is that he's talking about things that have been on the agenda for a long, long time, not just in his book but they've been trying to get rid of the inheritance tax for generations. >> i do want to get back to the political narrative. that was something republicans ran on, 47% of people who were the entitlement nation. now donald trump is running on it. won't this upset rains? or has he shifted the way to explain why half of the country doesn't pay income taxes?
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>> donald trump yesterday said he would not call it a populous plan. there definitely is a populous tinge to this, a push to bring in people who are lower on the income scale. donald trump is a smart man. he knows he's drawing a lot of support from people who make $30,000 to $50,000 a year. even though he's a billionaire and lives in trump tower, he has a certain appeal with them and he wants this tax plan to be pattalable to them. >> you said something interesting that he's doing a good job selling this. this plan isn't wildly different than jeb bush's plan which pretty much no one talked about. i get the sense that donald trump is perfectly happy talking about this for the next several weeks going into the next republican debate at the end of october. >> that's right. there is no specifics in his sp span. now he can say i have specifics. you start to pick it apart. it falls apart. jeb bush has been promising 4% growth. there are those of us who feel
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extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. this is not extraordinary proof. it's just kind of an outline of a lot of ideas that have been hashed around before, have gone absolutely nowhere. the alternative minimum tax. i'd love to see that go away. i have to wrestle with that every year like millions of other people. the inheritance tax on the agenda for generations has gotten nowhere. how is he going to get this done when others have tried? i think he's got to explain that. how is he go inge to get to growth that even ronald reagan couldn't achieve? he has to explain that, too. >> we're at 3.9% growth right now. there's growth out there. >> it can happen. sustained over time? never seen it. >> speaking of debates, let's talk about the big announcement. cnn announced it will allow joe biden to decide up until an hour before the democratic debate -- >> really, it's like right up until the last minute. joe biden can walk on that stage and debate if he wants. >> he can be waiting in the wings deciding for october 13th and then walk on or decide not
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to take part. >> how do you exclude the sitting vice president from the democratic debate? you just can't do it. it's impossible. if he decides to get in three days, four days before the debate, that's a big deal. that's someone who is a credible candidate and should be on stage. this was a smart decision. not just because i work with you. >> he has to say at some point, i can't imagine him not saying anything until the 13th at 7:59 p.m. and saying, well, yes or well, no. this forces some kind of decision. >> that might in fact be the intention of some of the planners here at cnn for all i know. the reality is, if he's planning to get in, if there are only four debates before iowa, he can't afford a chance to talk to 18 million, 20 plus million people in a scenario like that. he'll have to make a decision fairly soon. if he's going to do it, we'll know by the time of the debate. >> he could skip the debate and
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still get in. >> yes. >> it's not wise. >> it would almost be political malpractice to say, yes, we're going to get in but we'll blow the first chance to talk to 20 million people, we'll come in at some later time because that will somehow be better for us. >> errol, sara, thank you for being with us. appreciate it. i hope your taxes get cut no matter who is elected president. post your comment on facebook.com/newday or tweet us #newdaycnn. mark your calendar, cnn and facebook host the first democratic debate on tuesday, october 13th. will joe biden be there? he has until 8:00 p.m. to choose. >> where is that again? >> las vegas, nevada. >> you'll do anything to get to vegas, won't you. a fugitive for 25 years, wanted for attacking women and keeping them imprisoned in a house of horrors, he's been arrested. police say they couldn't have done it without the help of
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cnn's "the hunt" with john walsh. we'll give you details ahead.
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the u.s. and russian militaries will coordinate to avoid fighting one another over the issue with isis. there's little agreement on the future of syria where putin tries to build support for the assad government. president obama will host a summit today on countering extremism among young people. we do have breaking news overnight, u.s. forces launching an air strike genls the taliban in northern afghanistan. the offensive comes one day after taliban fighters seized control of the city of kunduz in a surprise, predawn attack. afghan security forces launching an offensive to try to retake the city this morning amid reports the taliban fighters are using human shields to thwart
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them. typhoon dujuan punishing taiwan with 150 mile-an-hour winds and more than 2 feet of rain. two people have been killed with hundreds injured and hundreds of thousands without water or power. six people are still missing this morning. bon jovi was forced to cancel two concerts there. this would have been the band's first performance there in over 20 years. a fugitive on the run for nearly 25 years featured on cnn's "the hunt" with john walsh captured in mexico. paul jackson is accused of kidnapping and raping women, locking them in a house of torture in oregon. cnn's boris sanchez joins us with more. they got another one of the bad guys off the street. >> another win for john walsh. at least the fifth fugitive captured with assistance by "the hunt." paul jackson had been on the run since 1991. he fled shortly after being put out on bond. he and his brother vance were arrested but they both got away before going on trial.
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vance turned himself in in 2005. thanks to a tip given by a viewer of "the hunt," authorities were able to track down paul jackson in guadalajara, mexico. he was arrested as he was walking to work at an electronics store there. john walsh was on cnn last night. during the initial investigation in the early '90s, officers discovered dozens of photos of women that they believe these brothers assaulted and raped but not all of the women were tracked down, not all of them were identified. leading to speculation that these brothers could be capable of worse than they're already accused of. >> not only would grab these girls and brutalize them but they took pictures to humiliate them and threaten them. they found out there were multiple victims and no one's really going to know how many of these girls they grabbed and the real question is how many of them didn't make it out of
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there. >> paul jackson is expected to be extradited back to the united states where several of the women that he's accused of attacking are likely to testify against him. >> oh, my gosh. it works, boris. to have millions of eye balls on the subject. thanks so much for that. russian president putin giving strong support for syria's president during his u.n. speech yesterday. also moving tanks and ammunition into syria. what's behind all of this? a top military experts joins us, next. re recommending as your consultants... the new consultants are here. it's not just big data, its bigger data. we're beta testing the new wearable interface... ♪ xerox believes finding the right solution shouldn't be so much work. by engineering a better way for people, process and technology to work together. work can work better. with xerox.
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united states is prepared to work with any nation, including russia and iran to resolve the conflict. that was president obama suggesting that he is open to working with russia and iran to resolve the conflict in syria. so far, the u.s. and russia don't see eye to eye on how 20 end the fighting there. russia is moving military assets into syria and has voiced support for the assad regime. we turn to lieutenant general, retired army former commanding general of europe and the seventh army. always a good voice to add to our conversations on these types
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of matters. good to talk to you. the two meet face to face, long-awaited meeting. they have competing visions on how to end the situation in syria. while they might agree on the political resolution, they don't agree on the outcome which essentially has russia on the side of assad staying in power. talk to us about the challenge here. if there's no breakthrough, no clear breakthrough, there's really no indication on how to move forward, is there? >> that's exactly right, michaela. it's critically important to understand that mr. putin is backing mr. assad for a variety of reasons. he has bases there. he sees them as one of his powers in the middle east. he sees the potential for continued influence in this area. so you're going to see a continued effort to back assad. now, the president moved a little bit yesterday which was interesting, basically saying we might look at other solutions and russia and iran might help. both of those are critically important aspects of this undertaking. >> might look at other solutions.
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let's talk about any potential room for wiggle room, if you will. do you see there's any type of scenario where the u.s. might agree, even reluctantly to keep assad in power? >> i do with the potential, that's certainly the status quo that was in existence before this event. but perhaps a power sharing element with the individuals who are looking for more independence within syria as part of the so-called backlash of the arab spring. you're going to see, maybe, issues of can assad stay in power by sharing power with others? a more representative government to bring an end to the civil war. what's been interesting, though, there's a contention that isis has caused all the problems in syria. the united states doesn't believe that. it believes that mr. assad has caused most of the problems in syria and caused isis as well. >> another topic of discussion obviously between the presidents of russia and america, was
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ukraine. it's the first meeting since the russian incursion into crimea. what leavae ag leverage have in region given the fact they need russia in terms of this big pressing issue of syria. it really makes you question that. >> not much, michaela. that's what's been interesting. you're seeing a shift and perhaps a sleight of hand by russia, taking the attention off of ukraine. they've done some things over the last several months in western ukraine that has established their positions there. they're building more military bases with eastern russia along the border of ukraine to reinforce that. russia is saying look over here towards syria and forget about what we're doing in ukraine. there's still a lot of issues to be resolved in ukraine, especially the violation of t certain accords. >> we know the taliban taking
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kunduz, a city in afghanistan, a province by the same name. there's been a lot of discussion about the u.s. troop drawdown. should that even be a topic of discussion when you see what is going on? we've even seen other attacks in the last few months from the taliban and other rebel forces in the area. the taliban is continuing somewhat unfettered, given this security vacuum in afghanistan. >> yes, there has been indications of these kind of x movements in the northeastern provinces for many months, michaela. general campbell, the commander in afghanistan comes back in just a few weeks to testify to congress as to what happens next. should we continue the drawdown as it currently is scheduled? i think this is going to certainly influence this. you also have to remember this is about the one-year anniversary of president ghani.
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he's under pressure to provide more security in all of his provinces. we've seen support because they can't do it alone just yet. you'll see u.s. special operating forces supporting the commandos in afghanistan as they attempt to reinforce kunduz. the important thing to understand is, kunduz hasn't been overtaken by the taliban. they are in and out of there. but it's a visual that the afghan government and the u.s. government can't afford right now. >> no. it certainly got at tension of leaders and of the media as well. lieutenant general, thanks so much for joining us. >> thank you, michaela. >> john? is jeb bush facing a critical point in his presidential campaign? big financial backers, getting nervous? might they abandon the former florida governor? we'll ask one of his biggest donors, next.
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big day? ah, the usual. moved some new cars. hauled a bunch of steel. kept the supermarket shelves stocked. made sure everyone got their latest gadgets. what's up for the next shift? ah, nothing much. just keeping the lights on. (laugh) nice. doing the big things that move an economy. see you tomorrow, mac. see you tomorrow, sam. just another day at norfolk southern.
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a stark warning to jeb bush from top donors, turn your poll numbers around or else. and by else "the washington post" reports that these donors mean look elsewhere or in other words, flee. here this morning to discuss the implications, francis rooney, former u.s. ambassador to the holy see under george w. bush. he's the co-chair of catholics for jeb and a long-time political donor and fund-raiser. ambassador, thank you so much for being with us. "the washington post" reports that fund-raisers and donors are getting nervous about jeb. saying turn your poll numbers around or we might defect. what are they nervous about? >> i don't know that that's really the case. i haven't had any of my donors
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exercise any concern whatsoever. people are dismayed about the mood in the country reflected in the current polls. i hope over time people realize what we're trying to accomplish is elect leader of our country, not posturing and demagoguery. jeb bush has the record to show he can do that. >> you say donors are dismayed by the mood in the polls. in the latest poll nbc news/"wall street journal," jeb bush is down at 7%, fifth place, and what might be a bigger concern is the trajectory here. in july he was at 17%. right now he's a tortoise sprinting downward. >> well, yes. the poll are saying something. we just don't know what they're saying. if you look back at previous selections, there are all kinds of people who have polled well, not polled well, com and gone.
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i believe we're in the early innings. i believe the governor is the only person who has the staying power and sound judgment to be the leader of our country and accomplish what we need done in light of what's happened over the last seven years. hopefully people will hear what he has to say, look at his tax plan, compared to the somewhat irresponsible one that's being talked about today. >> hopefully over time. those are the words you just used. according to the polls with be they're not seeing it right now. they're looking at four other people before they look at jeb bush. what's the problem in breaking through? is the campaign itself doing something wrong? could they be doing something better? or is it the candidate? >> well, i think the candidate and the campaign are doing exactly what they need to do. the governor put out a thoughtful tax plan which i wish the media would focus on the substance of what he's saying and realize he has substance
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behind him instead of the demagoguic rhetoric. few people are speaking about what they will do, like immigration, education, the two things that the governor is particularly expert in. >> one of the things that happens occasionally with jeb bush, you do hear concern about this, when he does talk, he does run into problems with some of the things he said. recently he was talking about african-americans. he was talking about what he would provide to them if he's president compared to what democrats offer. and he used the words free stuff. let's listen to what he says. >> message is one of hope and aspiration. it isn't one of division and get in line and we'll take care of you with free stuff. >> we'll take care of you with free stuff. there are african-american voters and commentators that say
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that's flat out patronizing. and the use of that phrase, they say, shows that jeb bush is somewhat insensitive. your reaction? >> well, i think it's easy to take one word out of context and misinterpret the overall message there. america is built on people having opportunity to rise up and have employment and obtain human dignity that comes from providing for your family. i think all americans share in that aspiration. i think that's what the governor's goal is, to come up with an economic plan and spending plan which will allow us to return to a broader base of economic opportunity for all americans. >> how long do you think jeb bush has before he needs to start moving up in the polls? >> well, that's a little above my pay grade. i'm not an expert in campaign organization and development. i would say this is a long time. we have over 100 days until the first primary. it's going to be a long struggle. we see many cam panes where people were well ahead and well
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behind and it flip-flops during the course of the campaign. >> ambassador francis rooney, thanks so much for being with us. appreciate your insight. >> thank you very much. >> we're following a lot of news. let's get right to it. >> they don't have much option but to coordinate and cooperate. >> there are no chemistry here. >> we, the nations of the world, cannot return to the old way of conflict and coercion. the united states launching an air strike overnight against taliban targets in northern afghanistan. >> the taliban has already done considerable damage. >> the largest city that the taliban have been able to take control of since 2001. >> i'm going to put people to work and we're going to have an economy that really is beginning to be hot. this is "new day" with chris cuomo, alisyn camerota and michaela pereira. good morning. welcome back to "new day."
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chris is on assignment. john berman is joining us. the leaders sitting down, butting heads on big conflicts in ukraine and syria. >> the meeting was described by putin as surprisingly frank. how does the white house categorize it? let's ask cnn's white house correspondent michelle kosinski, live at the u.n. with the details. good morning, michelle. >> reporter: this went from something of a face-off here, dueling speeches, president obama slamming putin's choices. vladimir putin blaming the u.s. for many of the world's problems to face time between the two of them for the first time in more than two years. it seems to have gone about as well as anybody would expect, both sides calling it constructive, at least opening the door to more dialogue on isis and syria. >> reporter: with that stiff, sideline the handshake, preceded by an awkward, cold toast and
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two scathing speeches -- >> we cannot stand by when the sovereignty and territorial integrity of a nation is flagrantly violated. >> we think it is an enormous mistake to refuse to cooperate with the syrian government. >> reporter: president obama and putin did manage to tolerate each other enough to hash out their significant differences for an hour and a half behind closed doors. starting with obama confronting putin over his refusal to back down in ukraine. but on syria, where putin continues to back and even try to rally international support for long-time ally president bashar al assad currently at war with his own people. and president obama believes he must go, calling him a tyrant. >> there cannot be after so much blood shed, so much carnage, a return to the prewar status quo. >> reporter: they do agree fighting isis is the priority,
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as difficult as that may be to coordinate. >> syrian government air strikes on a hospital killing three health care workers, thereby, assad is empowering isis. the idea that you're going to fight isis by supporting the assad regime is crazy. >> reporter: so in this rare meeting, they decided the u.s. and russian militaries will communicate to avoid fighting each other in battling isis. russia has agreed to explore the possibility of a political resolution in syria. putin calling this face-to-face time with president obama "meaningful" and surprisingly frank. so will this lead to anything more than just more dialogue? well, that remains to be seen. the u.s. is plenty skeptical that russia's actions will necessarily match its words. as for the relationship between these two leaders, the white house still describes it as simply business-like. alisyn? >> okay. thanks for answering that
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question, michelle. joining us is nicholas burns, former u.s. undersecretary for political affairs and former ambassador to nato. ambassador burns, thanks so much for being here. you say that vladimir putin has a very specific agenda. what is it? >> well, putin's agenda is to strengthen the syrian state and president assad. he made a big point in that speech where he had withering criticism for the united states and president obama, that you can't fight the islamic state, putin said, unless you have a strong government in damascus. the problem with putin's analysis is that the government of syria has caused most of the casualties, the great majority of them in syria over the last 4 1/2 years because of this vicious, brutal, barrel bombing of civilian towns and cities. >> isn't the other problem with vladimir putin's assessment is that it's not working. hears has been overrun by isis. it's now in control of 50% to 60% of the country. assad is not working to fight isis. >> in a way, syria ceased to
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exist as a nation state. president assad controls a decreasing part of the country, the islamic state is very strong. other terrorist groups are strong. i think the point that president obama has made is that there won't be any stability until president assad leaves. that's not going to happen immediately. i think what you'll see now, after this war of words at the united nations yesterday between president putin and president obama, they will try to piece together some start of negotiations that would include the iranians. it has to include turkey and the saudis to see if limited progress can be made towards reconstructing a syria, perhaps with a different leader but they've got to pay attention first and foremost to this refugee crisis which is catastrophic and most profoundly disturbing in the world today. >> let me put up for our viewers what russia says they are doing to strengthen syria. they are moving machinery into syria. they have 500 russian troops, 45
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aircraft, tanks, armored air carriers, surface-to-air missiles, fuel tanks buried underground. do you believe we will see russian air strikes on syria very soon? >> i think it's quite likely that the russians, having now built this new airstrip and put jet fighters into the country, as well as surface-to-air missiles and technicians and soldiers, you'll see them in battle on behalf of the syrian government. here's the problem. the syrian government is really not directing their fire at the islamic state. they're terrorizing syrian civilians so they can expand their sphere of influence in the country. if that's what russia is going to serve, then russia and iran, this unholy alliance of russia, iran and hezbollah serving the syrian government will simply add to the fighting, broaden the civil war and add to the number of refugees. that cannot be the answer. i imagine that is the point that president obama and secretary of state kerry have been trying to
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pound away at in their discussions with the russians. >> let's talk about secretary kerry and president obama. what is president obama planning to do about the crisis in syria? >> here's the problem. president obama has been very reluctant ever since the syrian civil war started back in 2011 to have the united states play a central role. i'm not talking mill titarily s much as politically. he needs to make decisions and articulate a more comprehensive american policy about what we're going to do. he in effect has left a vacuum there and president putin ever opportunistic has filled it at least for the time being. will the president decide to double down on arms for rebels because you had a failure in the u.s. government plan to try to help rebels. we've only trained four or five, the pentagon said who are in the field. will we do more on refugee
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relief? historically the united states takes in half of global refugees in any particular crisis. germany's playing the lead. other european countries not the united states. and will president obama make a commitment to try to create a stronger coalition with the arabs in cushingturkey that can back against the united states? >> michelle kosinski just used a photograph in her piece showing the moment that vladimir putin and president obama were toasting each other. maybe we have it again. no ice cubes needed. the frosty glare that president obama is giving vladimir putin says it all. are these two going to come up with some agreement for what to do in syria or are they each going to do it alone? >> i think there is going to be an attempt made for russia and the united states to pull together a united nations diplomatic process to start talking about the conflict in syria. this has to happen.
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nearly all wars, especially in recent decades, this war is bleeding into jordan, into lebanon, into iraq. it's now become a regional war. it's in the interest of the united states and russia to see it. i think you'll see secretary kerry try to piece together a negotiation. it will be extremely difficult. there really is no alternative to diplomatic talks. >> let's talk about other negotiations that are going on today at the u.n. that is president obama, raul castro. what are you expecting out of that? >> i think they'll try to continue this between the two. the establishment of relations after 55 years. i hope president obama would be able to raise in an assertive way human rights. cuba is a dictatorship where human and religious rights are denied. >> thanks so much. always great to get your insight. >> thank you. breaking news overnight, the u.s. unleashing an air assault on taliban targets in northern
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afghanistan. the attack comes one day after taliban fighters seized the northern afghan city of kunduz. afghan security forces have launched an offensive to take that city. this is developing right now. let's get the latest from pentagon correspondent barbara starr. >> reporter: u.s. conducting the air strikes in kunduz, the largest city the taliban have been able to take control of since back in 2001 in northern afghanistan. now, according to afghan officials, security forces are on the ground now. afghan security forces have been able to retake some key areas. but the fighting has been very nasty, a prison was taken by the taliban. they say they freed hundreds of inmates, the taliban also saying they took a hospital, posting some pictures to show their control as they moved through the city, afghan president ghani saying his security forces are now back there, moving through kunduz, trying to retake
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control. but this is where the taliban have been so successful and continue to be. they move in when they see some vulnerability in local security forces and they stake their ground. so what now? u.s. air strikes could continue in an effort to push the taliban back. the big question for the u.s., the future of u.s. troops there, there are 9,800 there with right now. they're supposed to come out at the end of next year. that is open to discussion to see if more u.s. troops should stay to deal with the security situation across the country. michaela? >> we'll continue to monitor that with you. thanks so much for the update, barbara. california republican and how long majority leader kevin mccarthy announcing his bid for speaker of the house. mccarthy is thought to be, by many, to be the front-runner for the position. he'll face off against florida congressman daniel webster. the house gop will meet this evening to discuss how they want to move on leadership.
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congress is close to passing a stop gap bill to avoid an immediate government shutdown. the measure keeps government funding at current levels through december 11th. cleared a key procedural hurdle in the senate on monday and could be approved in the house as early as today. this lasts until december where there could be huge fights over funding planned parenthood, raising the debt ceiling and more. with new leadership in place by then, a shutdown becomes a real possibility. on the same note, the head of planned parenthood testifying before a house overnight committee today. cecil richards says it will immediately leave 650,000 women with reduced or preventative health care. other organizes cannot pick up the slack if congress strips planned parenthood of federal funds. in her wide ranging sitdown interview with the donald, cnn's erin burnett asked him if he would benefit from his own tax
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plan. listen why he explains why he thinks his plan is the best option. >> i think it probably will do even more than before, if you look at what's going to happen to the economy. the economy is going to just be absolutely like a rocket. it's going to go up, this is my prediction. this is what i'm good at. this is my wheelhouse. so many other countries have taken our jobs, our base, our manufacturing. we're going to couple that with this tax plan but we're going to have a country that really is going to rocket again. we haven't had that for a long time, erin. you know, one of the things i mentioned during the news conference is that phony number of 5.3 and 5.4 and 5.5% unemployment. it could be 25% or 30%. when you stop looking for a job, they consider you for statistical purposes employed. >> they don't count you as unemployed. >> no.
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we have tens of millions of people that couldn't find a job and they're now considered essentially employed. we'll do something that's really great. this is the thing i like the most. i'm going to put people to work. i'm going to be great for business. i'll be great for business. and we're going to have an economy that really is going to be hot. >> you, will you pay more money? will it be millions and millions? hundreds of millions? how much more will you pay? >> i will probably end up paying more money but at the same time, i think the economy will do better. i'll make it up that way. i will probably end up paying more money. in the end i think i'll do better. >> counting on growth. there's a lot of ways to close loopholes. >> we are doing that. >> cuts in and of themselves can generate growth. you believe that's important. >> growth is important. >> let's talk about the loopholes. i called up some economists who like your sort of plan and one of them said i'm confused. it's a bit of a mess. they want to know what loopholes
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you want to close. you took the mortgage loophole off the table? >> you have to do because i really would be concerned if you do that, you're going to stop housing production. housing has had a lot of problems and you've reported on it better than anybody over the years. you can't take a chance on that. people need the mortgage deduction, mortgage interest deduction. >> where do you get the money if not that way? >> one of the ways you're going to get it, in my opinion, one of the ways you're really going to get it, many of your friends are hedge fund guys. you have carried interest deduction, a lot of other deductions, frankly it's a joke. it's tremendous amounts of money and it's money that they really don't need. they want it because they're used to paying no taxes or very little taxes. >> fair. >> it's not money they need. the other thing so importantly, this is something everybody agrees on for ten years, for years, the money that's outside of this country, nobody knows how much. they think it's $2.5 trillion. i think it's probably more than
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that. nobody knows. that money, erin, is going to come back into the country and stay here an invest it here. frankly, from now on when these companies make money outside of the country, they can bring it back in at a reasonable tax. the reason is stays there, the tax is so onerous, as you know. you have to be crazy to bring it back in. i have a lot of money outside of the country. the last thing i'm doing is for me, it's not that kind of money. i have money outside. you can't get it back into the country. you fill out forms, do this. i think my people have been working on it for a year and a half. when you make money outside of the country, you can't bring it back into this country. >> on the carried interest loophole, you're going to close it. i have campaigned about that on my own show. it's a fair thing to do but it doesn't bring in a lot of money, it doesn't pay for very much. >> it brings in this, psychologically when you have a hedge fund guy making $200 million a year and he has a huge
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loss against -- which isn't a real loss -- he has a huge loss against his income and he's paying a very low rate of tax, it's not fair, i think it says a lot. i think it tells people a lot. it's got to end. by the way, i have friends -- >> how do you get the money to make up for the trillions of dollars in tax cuts? carried interest isn't going to do that. >> i agree with that. we're going to create jobs, have an economy that will be robust. right now there's no incentive for companies. actually you'll have the opposite. in my opinion, you'll have people, companies, big companies, and you know the ones that are talking about leaving. they're leaving the country. they're going to other countries to get their money, number one and probably -- maybe that isn't even number one. it's because they have a better tax rate outside of the united states. >> yes. interesting stuff. i mean, you know, erin asked great questions about doing math there. and he answered them.
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psychologically speaking, which was an interesting answer. he gave specifics as we've been talking about. >> that's interesting is that we kept hearing him say, i'm going to have a tax plan, i'm going to have that, now he has it. >> he also talked about foreign policy in depth. they had a real interesting discussion there as well. we are going to break down donald trump's tax plan. >> you're going to do math? >> we are going to do math here on "new day." yes, we are. we will compare donald trump's plan to jeb bush's and to rand paul's. stick around. get the pencil and paper out. we'll be right back. >> carry the one.
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donald trump laying out his new tax plan and it's raising some questions. how does it compare to his rivals jeb bush and rand paul? let's examine it with the co-authors of jack kemp, the bleeding heart conservative who changed america as well as fred barnes. we'll do math but no calculator needed. you're going to walk us through it. let's look at the three plans for high income individuals. okay? donald trump just released his. it's getting some attention. for all of them, all of the highest income earners, their tax bracket will go from almost 40%, to jeb bush, 28%, trump 25%
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and paul, 14.5%. what do you see here, mort? >> over the whole thing, trump was trying to one up jeb bush. he goes to 28 so he goes to 25. we'll get to the corporate rate later. i think it's copycat stuff and meant to undercut jeb bush. >> that's interesting. did he basically steal jeb bush's plan. >> he did. both plans jack kemp would have liked. growth was kemp's favorite word. he would have liked both of them. you have to lower the top rate in order to produce the growth. >> that's what he says. he's saying he'll lower taxes for virtually everybody other than hedge fund people and that will bring in more in terms of the economy in revenue. you know, not everybody agrees with that but that's what he says. for the middle class, jeb bush
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will have them pay 25% maximum, trump 20% and rand paul with his flat tax, 14.5. how does it work, though, mort? >> well, i guess it works. the whole idea is supply side. that was kemp's specialty. that means lowering rates. the key thing, though, that's missing from trump's analysis is what loopholes are you going to close? you've got to close a lot of loopholes to make up the money that he's going to give in tax cuts. and we've yet to see what the loophole closures are. >> supply side economics doesn't always work. sometimes there has to be revenue. >> there does. you do get -- when you cut the rates, particularly the top rate, which stirs investment, stirs growth, creates jobs, you get feedback effects. the tax cuts may not pay for themselves immediately although the kennedy tax cuts in the '60s
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did. the reagan tax cuts were actually jack kemp's tax cuts came close but didn't quite achieve it. >> that was more of a mixed bag. let's look at the lower income. this is interesting. jeb bush says that he will lower to 10% for people who make $43,000 or less. look at trump's plan, though. he'll have it be zero for individuals who make $25,000 or less, which is virtually the same as we have now. rand paul will have zero for families for 50,000 or less. rand paul didn't lay out what he does for individuals. families, 50,000 or less. trump, 25,000 for individuals, 50,000, like ran paul, for families. mort, what do you see her? >> it looks like copycat stuff. i would say there is a question of whether you want to totally eliminate taxes for all workers?
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don't you want to have them have some skin in the game so they understand what taxes are about, what government costs. >> wasn't that the very argument mitt romney was making last time around, if 47% of the country doesn't pay anything in income taxes, they're not part of the conversation. >> well, yes. he was wrong about that because i don't think it was people who didn't pay any taxes. they pay social security. it was that they were getting money from the government and he acted like they were on the goal. this included military retirees and people like that who are conservative republican voters. a big mistake on his part. >> it was income taxes. what he didn't lay out, they're on a fixed income. that's why they're not paying taxes. >> mort is right about that. you want people to have some skin in the game. i don't pay tax, so let's raise tax on the rich people. >> jack kemp wouldn't like this
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idea of zero for under 50,000. >> up to a point. >> you have to remember back in the days when he promoted this stuff, taxes were very, very high. he was lowering them and did knock a lot of people off the tax rolls. >> let's talk about corporations and business taxes. the current plan is there's a top rate of 35.5%. under jeb's plan he lowers that for corporations to no more than 20%. trump even lower. 15% and then again rand paul, even lower, 14.5%. mort? >> well, you know, the question is, does this all add up? can you pay for it? how much does it cost? again, since you don't know what deductions he's going to eliminate for rich people and he says he's going to eliminate a lot of them, he ruled out mortgage interest and he ruled out charitable deductions. you don't actually know how the whole thing adds up. again, it looks to me as though he's trying to do jeb one
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better. >> fred, this is the thing. if you're not i beforing in tax revenue, you're just hoping that it gooses the economy. >> of course you are. supply side economics worked so famously in the 1980s and '90s with the reagan tax cuts that jack kemp proposed, there's a good reason to try it again, with these incentive effects. you don't need to pay for all of it right away. you have to choose. kemp will choose. what was more important? economic growth or the deficit? and he would accept a higher deficit if he got the growth and the jobs. >> right. i think trump and everybody, they're all right, that the corporate rate has to come down. we have an effective 40% tax rate on corporate income. it's by far the highest in the world or maybe it's the second highest in the world. it's got to come down in order to stimulate investment. >> we were talking about jack kemp. you've just co-written this book called "jam kemp: the bleeding
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heart conservative who changed america. >> he would hate this. he never went negative. he was all about optimism and growth and the idea of calling people pigs or calling them stupid, he is the absolute anti-trump. >> he was old school statesman. >> he was very nonpartisan for a guy very conservative, yet, he didn't use partisan argument. he would dislike the refusal of president obama to change his policy and cut taxes rather than raise them to generate growth. instead, we've had 6 1/2 years of very clowe growth. >> so great to have you both here and get your take on all of this. thanks for being in studio, also cnn and facebook, as you may
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know, will host the first democratic debate on october 13th. >> joe biden was right up until debate time to get in the race if he wants to. one of the men who has thrown his hat in the ring for speaker of the house, a man from florida. he will join us, next. three cylinders, 50 horsepower. go bold. go powerful. go gator. go bold. go powerful. i'm angela, and i quit smoking with chantix. for ten long years i was ready to quit. but i couldn't do it on my own. i needed help and chantix was there. and i did it. along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix.
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some had seizures while taking chantix. if you have any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse or of seizures. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if have these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have heart or blood vessel problems, or develop new or worse symptoms. get medical help right away if you have symptoms of a heart attack or stroke. decrease alcohol use while taking chantix. use caution when driving or operating machinery. most common side effect is nausea. i never thought i would be a non-smoker and i'm so proud. ask your doctor if chantix is right for you.
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president obama and vladimir putin finding some common ground in the fight against isis in a 09-minute talk at the u.n. they agreed that the u.s. and russian militaries will coordinate to avoid fighting each other. but there's little agreement on the future of syria where putin is trying to build support for the assad government. today, president obama will host a summit on fighting extremism among young people. breaking overnight, the u.s.
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targeting taliban positions in northern afghanistan with air strikes. the attacks come one day after taliban fighters took over the city of kunduz. they released hundreds of inmates from a local prison, include something taliban prisoners. afghan security forces claim they are launching an offensive to recapture the city with reports the taliban is using human shields to keep them away. joyce mitchell sentenced up to seven years behind bars for helping two convicted murders escape from maximum security prison in june. she must also pay $6,000 in fines and a hearing about an additional fine for restitution to repair the prison will be held at a later date. really scary moment for the st. louis cardinals last night. a little disturbing. two players converge as they were trying to track a fly ball. they collided. you can see right there, he takes a knee to the face. he was lying on the field motionless. he did wave, thankfully to the
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pittsburgh crowd as he's being taken off the field. he does have movement in his hands. all the tests came back, he remained in the hospital overnight for observation. >> that's terrifying to see. >> awful. members of the house starting to throw their hats into the ring to replace john boehner as next speaker of the house. our next guest hopes he gets the job. there are only two people that have thrown their hat in the ring for the job. daniel webster, he joins us right now. congressman, thank you for being with us. the other person to throw his hat in the ring is the house majority leader, kevin mccarthy, seen by most to be the front-runner by far. why you and not kevin mccarriageny? >> i'm running for one reason. i want to see a congress that is based on principle and every member is -- made a player. we have a member-driven, principle-based congress. i did that in florida. as speaker of the house there.
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i know it can happen. it's totally different in that you take that pyramid of power where at the top most of the decisions are made by just a few people, you push it down and spread it out. so every member has that opportunity to be successful. it is a great way. it's a freeing way. amendments that aren't heard and are killed by the process would go away. and that everyone would have an opportunity for amendments, bills, other things, participation in the process. it's a great way to run a house. in the end, in florida, when we did that, the numbers turned right side up. >> the man who's had the job for the last five years, speaker john boehner says part of the problem are there are people inside your caucus with unrealistic expectations. he calls them false profits. >> there are people out there, you know, spreading noise about how much can get done. i mean, this whole idea that we're going to shut down the government to get rid of
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obamacare in 2013, this never had a chance. over the course of the august recess in 2013 and the course of september, you know, a lot of my republican colleagues who knew it was a fool's errand, really, they were getting pressure from home to do this. >> was it a mistake to shut down government to try to defund obamacare? >> the point is, if you change the process, one of of the keys is taking up the most important issues first, not last. when you push against a deadline you're giving the members really just one choice. if you start early. you have the opportunity to work with the senate, work out the differences and come up with something that actually runs closer to what we call regular order. if we have differences, working out a conference long before the date that the deadline comes. same with re-authorization. the only option is passing a continuing resolution. that's wrong. we need to take up those issues
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first, not last. >> the senate majority leader, mitch mcconnell, when he came into power, he seasonally said no more shutdowns. will you vow as part of your campaign to be speaker that there will be no government shutdowns on your watch? >> well, sometimes, you know, we may pass something and the president himself vetoes it. at least i know when ronald reagan was president, that was called a shutdown by the president. if we do a responsible job, get our appropriation bills out early, if we send them to the president, we have plenty of time to deal with that without having to shut down government. >> you know, for instance, right now, he will veto any measure that defunds planned parenthood. so would you be willing to shut down the government or your half of a shut down, if it were, if the president vetoes such an action? >> well, i don't think that's the point i'm trying to make. what i'm trying to make is the point that we need to get away from deadlines where we push ourself into a corner. it's not the way to run a house.
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to me, i think we can do that. if we take up the most important issues first, we'll avoid those kind of catastrophes. >> what do you say to those 40 or so members in your caucus who want to see stronger language from the speaker? want to see republicans in congress taking on the white house even more? do you want those voices louder or would you warn them to calm down a little bit? >> i believe that if you let everybody have a say early on, up front, everybody, not just them, but anybody else. you work through the process where the committees hear the bills. they come to the floor and you vote on them, take them up first, we have plenty of time for opportunities. i believe that most of the people just want a chance to vote on their amendment or vote on a bill or vote on a proposal. if they lose, they lose. that's not the speaker's or
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anybody elseess problem. if is his or her problem if those ideas are killed only because they weren't aloued to happen. we go in every day and pass a rule that circum vents tstanc c we have. >> how many votes do you have lined up right now? >> well, i'm working on that. i work every day. we'll see. i can tell you that sometimes there are votes and you've got to wait till the vote take place before you really know. >> daniel webster of florida, good luck. thanks so much for being with us. >> good to be on. >> action on climate change has been slow despite constant calls to move. could this finally be the year something gets done? we'll have a look at why that could be the case, ahead. (vo) what does the world run on? it runs on optimism. it's what sparks ideas. moves the world forward.
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chinese president xi jinping is urging members of the international community to adopt measures to combat climate change. his remarks before the unl general assembly come a few days after pope francis advised countries to reach an agreement
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at the u.n. climate change conference this coming november. joining us to weigh in is the executive secretary for the u.n. framework convention on climate change. which means she's in charge of getting 195 nations to agree and to be ready to take on this goal of combatting climate change. we know in the past 20 years of u.n. negotiations, a legally binding universal agreement has been elusive. this is a daunting task. you probably have the hardest job in the world right now. you sit here in front of me looking so calm. >> actually, it's not the hardest job in the world, because so many good things are happening. just this morning, we hear six of the largest financial institutions in the united states are supporting this. we hear the pope. we heard president xi not just calling for measures on climate change but putting forward what china is going to do. >> acting.
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china is a big chunk of the problem. >> and wants to be a big chunk of the solution. >> wants to change. on the other side, i am generally a pollyanna. india is another big problem in this equation, has not been as quick to act. are you feeling like that will change imminently? >> i do. stay tuned for thursday. >> okay. >> they will be coming with very impressive news also on thursday, because here the thing. this is the new economy. this is the new growth. nobody wants to be left behind, because they all see this as good for their economy, this creates jobs. this gives them energy safety. it certainly contributes to water security, food security, on and on and on and on. >> except for here in the united states. you obviously are aware of what is going on. we have several men and women who want to become president of the united states. we know there are several of them that don't agree there is scientific consensus on manmade global warming and climate
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change. does it make your job more difficult when there isn't a major nation, like the united states, speaking with one voice? >> well, of course. actually, it only pains many he that the united states is not monolithically behind this, because there is such opportunity. there is not a country in the world that has the industrial potential of the united states. and why the united states wants to let china be number one in solar energy, china be number two in wind energy, because those are the energies of the future, why would they want to let those opportunities go? whether you believe in climate change or not, which is, frankly, to the point of competitiveness irrelevant. just from that point of view. >> what do you say to those skeptics and to the people that say the scientific consensus is just not there? >> let's leave that aside. my question is, do you want the
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jobs, the stability. >> you change the narrative and have them focus on a different aspect. >> this is the greatest opportunity they've had in many years. >> we know countries have been making pledges to battle climate change. do you think these pledges are enough to constitute real change? real progress? >> it's an exciting moment. as you and i speak right here, we may be getting the number 100 pledge. we already have maybe -- 99 certainly and maybe even 100 pledges of countries that are coming forward. >> okay. >> having said all of that, let me say, we know that even if 195 countries came in this year with their pledges, that is not going to be enough to put us into a safety zone. it is definitely progress because where we used to be in 2009, 2010 was heading for a four to five degree increase. that would have been a disaster. with all of the efforts we've seen up until now, if they're
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all implemented, we're actually on a trajectory of 3 degrees. we're definitely better but not good enough. it is not sufficient because we have to get down to 2 degrees. >> to 2. >> that's why the paris agreement we're all working toward is not going to be a one-shot deal. it has to be a progressive effort over several decades to get us to where we need to. >> the progressive effort you talk about, you're right, it's not just one and done, you make a pledge, meet the goal and forget about it. the countries have to prove they're maintaining. >> that's exactly right. >> that requires monitoring. how does that work? >> there's a monitoring system that is being put in place. first, the countries have to report and they have to be monitored and then they have to take a look at the capital that is shifting and the technologies that will be developing and they will be able to see that there is much more that they can do over time. >> well, i was expecting doom and gloom. this woman is very positive. she has a big job ahead of her. we appreciate you making time on
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this busy schedule you have to come in and talk to us about this. we wish you well. >> thanks for the tune. >> the hopefully we can talk to you again. okay, michaela, i know you've been looking forward to this, the new "daily show" host made his debut. how did it go? in case you were sleeping, we have the best late-night laughs for you. stick around. you totalled your brand new car.
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trevor noah, off and running as the new host of the daily show. the south african comedian took aim at the pope's visit and john boehner's resignation. and noah also paid homage to jon stewart. and readdressed the late night edition. >> jon stewart was more than just a "late night" host. he was our refuge and in many
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way ours dad. and it's weird. because dad has left. [ laughter ] and now it feels like the family has a new step dad. and he's black. >> atta boy. what a go. address the awkwardness of it. because it is new to him. >> meyers tweeted yesterday. after last night he's got to do it again and again and again. so hopefully he's got more jokes. so between donald trump t general assembly and john bayne ears resignation and the presidential race, the "late night" host had a lot of material. this was the case last night. >> without naming any names, if we have a female president next, would you leave a letter for her husband? >> things he needs to know more than anything else about the job. >> i would say follow your
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passion. just be you. >> i think he does. >> i think he would. >> the next speaker is going to face is same problems that boehner did. >> the same problems that include a hair trigger set of tear ducks that go off any time a child pick it is a flower. >> 193 countries. or as donald trump put it. offended them. offended them. them twice. still need to offend them. loser. >> but that would actually take him admitting that he's offended. he's like they love me. >> i love the hair trigger tear ducts. >> he feels deeply. >> he has no problem with crying. meanwhile, president obama clashing with vladomir put. >> announcer: a man who has never cried. >> right. he cries bullets. what is the plan over syria?
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their first face-to-face meeting in two years. >> i'm amazed they came out to do that handshake at all. >> putin blaming the u.s. for the rise of isis. >> united states is prepared to work with any nation, including
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russia and iran to resolve the conflict. >> the united states launching an air strike overnight against taliban targets in northern afghanistan. 500 taliban prisoners were freed from the city's prison. >> the largest city the taliban have been able to take control of since 2001. >> as far as hillary is concerned, i don't think she's be very difficult to beat. >> this is "new day" with chris cuomo, allsyn cammarata that and michaela pereira. >> good morning everyone. >> the meeting came just hours after both leaders clashed with drastically different visions on solving key issues at the united
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nations. michelle kosin skrski has more us. >> that's right. this happened. and after a showdown here at the u.n. also it seems to have worked. granted there are still garnet gargantuan differences there but both sides are calling it helpful. and there will at least be a dialogue about the potential political transition in syria. >> with that stiff, silent handshake, proceeded by an awkward, cold toast. and two scathing speeches. >> we cannot stand by when the sovereigntity and territorial integrity of a nation is violated. >> we think it is an enormous mistake to refuse to cooperate
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with the syrian government. >> they did manage to tolerate each other enough to hash out significant differences between an hour and a half behind closed doors. starting with obama con front fronting putin over his refusal to back down in ukraine. and president obama believes he must go, calling him a tyrant. >> there cannot be after so much blood shed, so much carnage a return to the pre war status quo. >> they do agree fighting isis is the priority. as difficult as they may be to coordinate. >> syrian government air strikes on a hospital, killing three healthcare workers. thereby assad is empowering i
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isis. thereby the idea you are going to support ice by supporting the assad regime is crazy. >> fighting each other in battling isis. and russia has agreed to explore the possibility of a political resolution in syria. putin, calling this face -to-fae time with president obama, meaningful, and surprisingly frank. >> everybody wants to know what went on in that room. how were thaf together? how was that relationship? has i changed at all? but the white house will only say that it is business like. they share a goal of fighting isis now. but there is criticism of whether putin's actions will ultimately live up to those words. and where we go from here remains to be seen. of course there always has to be this big divergence in how each side views the communication. putin says that the u.s. asked for this meeting. be thank you white house has repeatedly called putin
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desperate to talk to president obama and says that he has tried for this meeting a number of times. >> no consensus on even how the meeting came about. we'll discuss this and dig deeper in a moment. first, breaking overnight, the united states attacking taliban targets from the air in northern afghanistan, just a day after taliban forces seized control of the city of the kundu in a surprised pre dawn attack. forces are now trying to recapture that city. >> good morning michaela. some urgency for the u.s. to get the situation back under control. a short time ago, a statement issued from the coalition in afghanistan saying the air strikes have worked, saying that they feel like they have dealt with the taliban contingent there. afghan forces still battling to retake the city.
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several neighborhoods releasing prisoners from a jail. a very messy situation for afghan security forces to move into. this is where the taliban continue to demonstrate a battlefield advantage. they move in when they see vulnerability among local security forces and they are able to score some takeover of some areas. now the afghans pushing them back. but the big issue for the united states now besides this local security situation, what does it mean overall? there are 9800 u.s. troops in afghanistan. they are scheduled to come home most of them by the end of next year. but still a big question with the security situation so volatile, will some of those u.s. troops have to stay? >> can they believe cities falling? all right barbara. thank you so much.
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christiane amanpour. and seyria getting more complicated this morning with the presence of the russian troops there. putin and obama met for 90 minutes yesterday. an awfully long time. and this morning we're getting a sense from the secretary of state what they might have discussed. >> he's been talking to reporters already and fleshing out a little bit of what the plan might be. so from what i can gather, the plan is they all agree as everybody does that isis is bad. isis has to be defeated. and that is the first phase. then what is the next plan? the next plan appears to be well then it is absolutely up to one man, basher al assad to step down. that to me is a little touch and go. how do you convince him? you have to get russia and iran to make him stand down. how are you kwoik to do that? that seems to be the extent of
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where they are right now. and then the other thing which is incredibly worrying, and you didn't have the time to ask barbara. but she's been taking to the head of nato forces. has told her in detail what they are seeing, russia move from very sophisticated missiles which general breed love rightly says we don't know why they need that? does isis have planes? who are they going to be shooting down? and let's not forget. despite what president putin say, it is for the last four years of president assad's use of barrel bomb, heavy artillery, starvic his city, holding them at seas. that's what made all the refugees come out that's effecting europe and the united states right noult. >> the devil is in the details. what do we think the white house is going to agree with -- a. >> major detail is assad. putin says he's a savier.
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he's fighting valiantly in his words fighting isis and obama says he's a source of the problem. i was just thinking. remember when following the iran deal, you would hear from officials that in this brave new world in the mideast that perhaps russia and iran and others can be our partners and here you have them at loggerheads on theground heerp. the ink is not even dry in the deal --. yes, they have a common foe in isis. but they have diametrically opposed views about assad and the government. >> the discussion in 2015 was whether or not the troops should be there, because they are there. it's already beyond that and the discussion is what to do with them? >> precisely. and they were there, not coincidentally to preview putin's trip here. he's built up this military base like that, catching everybody by
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surprise. everybody unawareness. not telling everybody what this is about. all we hear specifically is from the u.n. ambassador. you hear they talk about deconflicting, whatever that means to make sure russia doesn't attack nato. but what about russia has only gone in there to prop up assad. and the real worry is that russia is not going to be taking out ice isis. think don't have boots on the ground. they are going to attack, attack, attack the anti assad forces who are trying to push them back. and i don't mean isis. i mean those who actually are patriotic who do want to see a different kind of syria. >> i don't think u.s. commanders think that russia is there to shoot down coalition war planes that. would be incendiary, anz act of war. but there is something here on the power play of the putin. putting troops on the ground where the u.s. has not been willing. and putting troops on the ground that send a message. and this is part of it. russia wants to not only for a
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the international audience but domestic. saying we are a world power again. and the perception is as the u.s. retreats. >> we've talked to the military men and the pundits who say the u.s. hasn't done enough. and there was a vacuum left. and so this is what russia is do doing. and there is one backwards logic that says by being unstrategic president obama is being strategic and letting russia deal with this now. >> we've talked about action. and we've talked about inaction. inaction has its own inexorable logic and that was that assad has been able to continue his way. we have 7 million plus syrian refugees moving around trying to escape his bombs and artillery. 4.5 million in surrounding countries. and tens of thousands trying to get into europe. that is basher assad. that is not doing anything about
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syria for four and a half years. now they are all saying okay, we're going to have to deal with assad for now. fight isis and let's see what happens. but the united states didn't oen fight, didn't equip and train any of the moderate forces. and then they are saying they are only five on the battlefield. well they debate do it. >> the -- that is with 98 hundred u.s. troops in the country. what happens two years from now if president obama's plan goes through and there are no u.s. troops? will it change the discussion? >> the fact is those troops, there has been talk it would purely in their bases and doing only force protection. they actually have been doing operations. but the question is do they do more of that? but yes fatty acidfatty acid a .
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it raises the question again. you spend a decade training and equipping afghan security forces just as in iraq. it didn't work in iraq. >> and they had superiority in numbers as in iraq. >> and the u.s. air cover. >> so how did the taliban come back swinging? >> you can go back to the political situation. you can go back to obviously $60 billion, according to reports, the u.s. and allies have spent. something went wrong there. we don't know exactly whether. or more importantly is local politics still the most important thing there? the taliban had either intimidated or sympathizers in kunduz and that seemed to be what tipped is situation. >> christiane, jim, thanks so much. we could find out if the trial for the first officer charged in the freddie gray case will be delayed. a hearing is expected this
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afternoon. officer william porter's trial is scheduled to begin in two weeks. but attorneys for the six officers charged say additional material turned over by prosecutors has a significant impact on defense strategy. the six officers are being tried separately. >> the battle to be the next speaker of the house is on. majority leader mccarthy is running. webster from florida is running. who will win? cnn political reporter joins us live from washington to explain how this will play out. >> it looks like it's kevin mccarthy's to lose. he is the heavy favorite going into the leadership elections which are going to be some time this month. they have not been scheduled yet. probably some time next week. and kevin mccarthy's rise to this position, if he does become speaker would be the quickest rise of anything in about since the 19th century. he's only been in congress about nine years. typically on average we're
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looking about 23 years or so that someone has become speaker from the time they were sworn in to take their house seat. and he's done this by methodically developing relationships with members over the years. he played a huge role in the recruiting effort for that big republican majority in 2010 and a lot of those members are still serve asking they remember those days. and he spent a lot of time just remembering small things about them. their family lives and what's happening with them back home personally and people remember that. and i should add that these kind of contests are popularity contests of sorts. and kevin mccarthy clearly is banking on that. now today is a very critical day for the future of the house republican conference. there are two important meetings, air-clearing sessions where the republicans will take stock where they should go for their future. not just for the next speaker's job but also for the positions down ticket and that will go a long way to determining what republicans will -- the tactics
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and strategies they will pursue heading into the 2016. >> real fights from the majority leader post and whip. thanks so much. now to the latest in the 2016 presidential race. donald trump not holding back against hillary clinton in his extended one-on-one with cnn's aaron burnett. if clint becomes his primary opponent he says she's totally beatable. where watch this. >> so bill clinton. obviously. you could be running against his wife. if you are the nominee. he was asked this week on cnn. he said you are a master brander. you have a lot of pizzazz and zip. and when asked if you could be the nominee. he says i think so. obviously he attended your wedding. would you go o so far as to say he's a friend. >> i'll tell -- no i haven't spoke on the him a long time. and -- i always respected him. i've actually liked him over the
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years. but when we look at what's going on in the world, when we look at the job that hillary did as secretary of state, she goes down as perhaps the worst secretary of state in history. and when i run against her evenly in the polls i'm doing very well against hillary and beating her. probably though i will tell you. i think kerry is maybe going to take her place as the worst because of this agreement. i think it is going to be the worst agreement in history. but as far as hillary is concerned. one, if she gets to the starting gate, which is questionable because of the e-mail situation. it really is a big question. but i don't think she's she'll be very difficult to beat. >> you are the front run effort to gop in the polls. when they put you ahead with hillary you still lost by a little bit. >> i have a i won. >> some of the gop candidates didn't. what would you do to turn that around. >> in other poll, other than the cnn poll, i beat her. i just have do my thing. >> i'm -- [inaudible].
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>> -- certain number of people. and you have to get there first. i think hillary in certain ways is going to be easier than any body else. in most polls i beat hillary. look i have a certain number of people i'm running against right now. one by one they drop out. >> who ooex nest. >> you have so many doing so poorly. rand paul is doing horribly. he was supposed to be a leader and he's down to 2%. a guy like marco rubio is a lightweight. i can't imagine he goes anywhere. who by the way has the worst attendance report for voting in the senate. people elect you to a position. you have to vote. bush, sadly, i think he's a nice guy but he's doing very poorly. the interesting thing is everybody that's attacked me. bobby jindal. perry. every single person that's -- senator lindsey graham. i mean, in south carolina i'm at
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34, he's at 3. and he's the sitting senator from south carolina. be all of these guys are out. even walker. and i think he's a nice person. he attacked me. i attacked him. he left the race. simply, i want to make america great again. i'm really good at things. believe it or not i have a great temperament for this kind of stuff. in this building i have some of the largest chinese banks in the world. and they pay me rent month and yet i'm very critical of the china and people say how can that be? >> this is a guy who will call someone a loser and they will. >> this is a campaign. >> and they say this is childish. >> it probably is a little childish but this is a campaign. and i'm responding to them. i'm a counter puncher. i think in every single instance i've hit.
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walker was very sundays. all of a sudden he hilt me, i hit him back. >> so you are saying you are not going to talk about the vladimir putin, calling him a loser or something like that. >> i actually say the opposite. i think i would get along very well with him. >> sounds like caddie shack. i didn't want to doismt i felt like i owed it to them. >> he says he doesn't start it. that is his point. >> i'm just curious, lindsey graham and bobby jindal will have to say. i guess you don't have to know their names. >> pronunciation open to interpretation. but he leaves out carly fiorina. he says everybody who attacks him falls off in the poll os quits. and not carly fiorina. she's gone you have. we'll discuss it and more in the political round up. including the tax plan that's getting so much attention. here is quite story for you. a fugitive on the run nearly 25 years. featured on cnn's" the hunt with
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john walsh." paul jan paul jackson is captured. what a terrible character. >> this is at least the fifth fugitive featured on the hunt that's been captured since. great story. paul jackson, essentially disappeared in 1991. he fled while he was out on bond. he and his brother were arrested. but they both got away before going to trial. his brother vance turned himself in in 2005. he's serving 108 years in prison but he still wouldn't give any indication as to where his brother might be. thanks to a tip from a viewer watching the episode of the hunt, he provided a significant tip to the u.s. marshall's office who tracked jackson down. in mexico. he was arrested while walking to work in a electronics story. john walsh last night made a very interesting note as well.
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they discovered photos of women who they believed had been brutalized by these men. many of the women were never tracked down. that's led to speculation that these men were capable of doing more than the horrible things they were already accused of. >> not only would grab the girls and brutalize them but took pictures to humility and threaten them. and found out there were multiple victims and known is going to know how many of these girl theus grab and the real speculation is how many didn't make it out. >> he could be charged with murder. he's expected to be extradited back to the united states. and wall says a lot of the women accused of being attacked by him are testifying in court. >> so great. >> absolutely. donald trump, unveiling his tax plan. not everyone is on board, including the ben carson campaign. we're going to speak to one of
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decisions, decisions. the new edge+. this one would keep me organized. i could list all the days i've been banned from social media. hmmm, wait this thing has built-in live broadcasting? i don't know what nerd came up with that, but it's awesome. you think they'd censor pippa's doggy-ola's? censored, not censored. censored, not censored. introducing the samsung galaxy s6 edge+ and the note5. >> this is my wheel house. >> that was front runner donald trump layings out his tax plan to cnn's aaron burnett. but his biggest rival ben carson disagrees with the vision.
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let's talk about it. joining us to explain both their candidates position, ben carson's business manager and close friend armstrong williams. and cnn political commentator jeffrey lord who will speak for donald trump's campaign. what i want both of you to do is comment on your rival's tax plan. let's start with you armstrong and talk about donald trump's tax plan. we know he says that no business will be taxed more than 15%. he says that there will be no federal income tax for individuals earning less than 25,000 or couples earning less than 50,000. the highest individual tax bracket will be 25%. and no longer close to 40. and he'll eliminate or reduce reduction for high income taxpayers. a what's wrong with his vision
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armstrong? >> the problem when you talk about this tax issue, it is not as if it has not been discussed before. and why is it that the middle class and the poor always carry the burden of this going for and why is it that it seems as though people who are wealthy become wealthier? >> unless if donald trump and doctor cars season very serious about moving forward on getting this under control, one of the first things you have to do, you have to reduce that 6,000 page document to a hundred pages. >> but isn't donald trump simplifying this? >> no. but there are four pillars that must be in the equation if you want to make a dent in the reductions. mortgage interest, which upsets the real estate industry, and big business whose get these great write offs from real estate mortgage write offs. you have to put the employee mandate on the terrible. charities on the table. and 401(k)s on the table.
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>> okay. and dr. carson is doing all of that you are saying? >> i'm saying -- i'm dr. carson's business ma manager. i'm his friend i'm not a part of the campaign. but unless they are talking about these sacred cows and finding a way to talk about it it is not going anywhere. >> that is what you are advising him to do but dr. carson hasn't dupreed to do that. >> if you are serious about it. but looked, in order for capitalism to continue to thrive you have to bring poor people out of the poor into the wealthy class. >> and he wants a 10% flat tax. let me let you listen to how he justifies his vision. here is dr. carsen. >> the one that i've advocated is basted on tithing. because i think god is a pretty fair guy. and he said, you know, if you give me a tithe, it doesn't matter how much you make. if you have had a bumper crop.
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you don't owe me the triple dies. and you had no drops at you'll don't owe me the no ties. so there must be something fair about that and therefore i've advocated a potential flat tax system. >> i think donald trump believes that in essence isn't fair. if you are a billionaire you pay a billion if you earned ten. and earning ten dollars and you pay one that there is an inherent unfairness to that. i would also add and this goes back to your earlier guests, i used to work for jack kemp. and i meanky hear his voice in my head as we speak talking about the economic growth that came out of reagan onlyics, which he was very much responsible for. that is what donald trump is going for. it cut black unemployment.
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boosted economic growth for latinos and women across the board. it cut across all sectors of the economy and was hugely successful. so i think that is where we are headed here with this plan and there is nothing wrong with that. that is good thing and it would take off like a rocket. >> isn't it interesting the different political debate happening this time around versus mitt romney. when he talked about how half the country doesn't pay any income taxes he was seen as pandering to the base of republicans for whom that felt outrageous. it was the entitlement nation. now somehow donald trump has turned into a selling point. for his tax plan. >> you know, allsyn, that is a very good observation. you know one of the things i could say that dr. carson would absolutely embrace is that that is non stater, unless you reduce spending. we have a $19 trillion deficit. you have some people here who have credit card debt of 4,
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$500,000 and yet they are making $40,000, 50,000 dollars a year. as the non starter because you have a bo hooemt federal government that needs to be fed. and money has to come from somewhere. and yes you need to talk about cutting entitlement programs and the issues republicans often discuss but also need to discuss the sacred cows republicans try to protect. the problem is everybody wants to protect their own interest and don't want to make the sacrifice. and everybody is going to have to come to the table, work with congress and make the tough sacrifices in order to work for every day americans who have not realized yet the american dream. >> therein lies the challenge. what about that? what about the republican base? are they okay with not only half the country is not going to pay income taxes, i support them. i champion their cause of that. >> there may be some who believe the skin in the game kind of concept. >> that's what fred and medical
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report ju-- mort just talked about. >> right. but i do think they are on board with this. reagan onlyics worked. it was a huge success for a couple of decades. so you are getting right to the heart of the republican affection for ronald reagan and jack kemp and their economic programs which were so successful. >> there you go. thanks so much for helping us understand both sides here. great to see you guys. what is your take on these tax plans? you can tweet us using #"new day" cnn. also a quick programming note for you. cnn and facebook host the first democratic debate, two weeks from tonight on october 13th. you don't want to miss it. set your clock now. it's set. multiple clocks in fact. now we'll look into some news that is out of this world. water flowing on mars' surface. how much of a big discovery and
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development is this in the search for life on the red planet? well we'll ask a former astrona astronaut.
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here are the five things you need to know for today. number one, afghan forces aided overnight, fighting to retake kunduz. it was seized monday by taliban fighters in a surprise pre dawn attack. president obama convenes a united nations summit on isis and violent extremism today with a focus on preventing it at early stages. the president also set to meet cuban leader recall castro for the first time since formally renewing the diplomatic ties. and the hearing is set for the first officer in the freddie
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gray case this afternoon. the trial will take place in two weeks. and donald trump said he wouldn't benefit from his own plan in the short-term but he says he will in long-term because he's betting the economy will boom. house majority leader kevin mccarthy and daniel webster pitching themselves for speaker of the house. the republican committee will meet today to discuss their future. a potential breakthrough in the search for life on mars. nasa says water still flows on the surface. how big a deal is this? flowing rivers of life? wire going to ask a former astrona astronaut.
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>> scientists from found water on mars. images captured yielded the strongest evidence to date. that water flows down martian's slopes every summer, and i say
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that in parentheses. what does this mean for finding life beyond earth? joining us a former astronaut, we should say this is new but it's not. now confirming what they suspected back in april. this is big. >> it is a big announcement. they have had signs of water caps at the polar caps, frozen water. and looks like there was old river beds, ancient river beds. but the idea, the hypothesis that there was actually water still flowing was something that would be new. and now there is confirmation of it. or very strong evidence. strong evidence. >> this is martian streams right now. that part is new. you have like the hudson although not quite as big flowing on mars right now. >> these lines of water. that during the warmer month, water looks like it is flowing down the slopes and looks very
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exciting. there was no evidence of this before. >> they think because it is not frozen that it is salt water. >> yes. >> so follow this line of logic. so therefore what? >> therefore -- there are two things when you find water. one is that maybe there is some sort of life there. not like a martian/alien necessarily. but some kind of microbial life there maybe even under the surface. >> or there has been. >> exactly. so maybe there is fossil evidence. that is one thing. the other thing is if we go visit this place there is mobile a water source to support our life. so these are two big things. >> would the rover be wrong? because this is -- this is mars. this is really far away. this is a planet that we don't know a terrible lot about. >> you are absolutely right. this is the first evidence of it. they took images, saw these lines and used spectroscopy.
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to use a fancy word. so they have analyzed it and they are pretty sure of what it is. i think the next step is to maybe try to get a sample. send people there or see whatever it is. but right, there is always that maybe you're wrong kind of thing. >> what are the qualities of this water that we know so far? >> the quality -- it is salty. >> how do we know that? >> okay. they look through the spectroscopy, they can analyze what is inside of it. and there are a couple of reasons. one is that it's there at the colder temperatures. salt, like when you throw salt on ice in the wintertime that is coming in a few months, it will melt the ice. so having salt in the water will allow the water to flow. it will freeze as the lower temperature. that is one thing. and they can look at the spectrosco spectroscopy, the colors and properties of it, and try to
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figure what type of salt it is. i think pz per chlorate. which will also have exciting possibilities that you can use that as some type of fuel. >> even in mars' summer it is i believe 10 degrees fahrenheit. >> colder than we are. >> so it is not working for humans yet. >> bring a blanket. no we think of hey, we can get to mars and we can -- but there is a lot to learn. it is another planet and a completely different orbit. the moon kind of follows us around. it is closer and easier to get to. this is much further away. so we are learning and more and more. and i look at this as getting us the information we need to actually send people there. this is a good thing to know before you get there. >> absolutely. you want to know what's waiting a the camp site. >> what do i need. exactly. >> i do need to bring water? >> exactly. >> does it speed up the idea of okay let's start raising money and get a craft that can take people there so we can see with
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our own eyes? >> i hope so. i think it is creating a lot of interest. and we're saying well this is maybe -- maybe this planet is closer to earth than we expected. absolutely. i think there is a lot we have to do to get there. we have to propulsion, spacecraft. how to protect people from radiation. how to keep them there that long. when to go and when to come back and a lot of stuff. but this gives motivation to continue. >> is it frustrating to you that we're not doing more as the space guy is this. >> we always want more. we'd always like to be faster and, you know, the reality is this is tough to do. 200 years ago it was tough to go from new york to australia. and these are really tough problems. so in some ways, yeah i wish we were there. but i'm very glad, you know,
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that we're and with the young people. and we with can have this as the goal and keep learning. i'm happy. >> happy to have you here. >> always a pleasure. meanwhile, comedy legend carol burnett is back with more. so exciting. lost episodes of her classic tv show finally be released on dvd. she'll join us next on "new day." >> best day ever. amplify our performance and recovery. they're essential for good health. your body's best source for protein? gnc. now get the world's best protein formulas at an astounding price. buy any gnc protein powder and get 1 half off. everyone needs protein, every day. and now all gnc protein powders are buy 1, get 1 half off. only at gnc.
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misswill turn anan asphalt parking lot into a new neighborhood for san franciscans. a vote for "yes" on "d" is definitely a vote for more parks and open space. a vote on proposition "d" is a vote for jobs. campos: no one is being displaced. it's 40% affordable units near the waterfront for regular people. this is just a win-win for our city. i'm behind it 100%. voting yes on "d" is so helpful to so many families in our city.
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that did it. that absolutely did it. i am leaving this house and i am not coming back until the end of
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the football season. in case you missed it, here's the instant replay. >> oh i can't. the iconic comedian and television legend carol burnett in a clip that hasn't been seen for more than 40 years. the first five seasons of the carol burnett show have never been in syndication or dvd. but now after a little wrangling they are finally available. it's called the carol burnett show, the lost episodes. i have to say quickly i'm a little overwhelmed by this. you are brought such joy to my family as you have to countless people. in fact the crew was even marveling. you brought us smiles for years. >> thank you. thank you. >> i was watching you watch it. the last epiode sodas. how does it feel to see it all.
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>> a little like norma desmond? sun set boulevard. >> i'm just tickled that we can have them out now. >> i am too. i spebl now. the world could use some laughs now in particular. i want to take us back in a time machine and i want to read a time review from 1962. the biggest yet to hit television since sid caesar's salad wilted is a goofty cousin clara sort of girl. every time when you hear that. when you look at that all those years ago, what comes up for
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you? >> well more one thing i don't remember that review but how nice it was. you know i -- it's -- it's -- i can't really explain it. i look at it and i see that girl there. and i thought oh wow. time has really passed. but in the other hand how wonderful that we can see it again. >> well what's neat about this is that, you know, we weren't necessarily topical. so that the sketches we did, i think they play well today. >> sure. >> i doubt -- i really would challenge anyone who watches the dennis sketch which tim and harvey not to laugh. and just totally crack up. and that is over 40 years old. so what i say is funny is funny. >> you and lucy were among the first women to have shows bearing their own names. we've come a long way.
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if you look at the "late night" line up now. >> that's true. and i'm very disappointed there's not a woman in the "late night" line up. >> so we've gone backwards in a way. >> we sure haven't gone forwards as far as that's concerned. however you a lot of wonderful women in comedy. >> what is it going to take to ghemt out front. >> probably someone in the network who isn't a guy. >> what a concept. we're in full election mode now here at cnn. and politics is ripe for laughs for comedians. what do you think about that relationship between the comedian and politics? >> i think it's okay. i'm not one to do that. i think it's more done by stand up comics. i'm a sketch comedian. edw winn who was an add vaudevillian said the difference between a comic and that comedic
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actor is the comic, like bob hope, says funny things. a comedic actor, like jack benny, says things funny. so benny could take one word and go "well" and get -- and it wasn't a joke. >> absolutely. or even the way you could with just one look at the camera or so movement. so physical. >> that is what a comedic actor does. i wanted to be able to say things funny. >> i could talk to you all day. carol i'm so glad we had this time together. a what a pleasure. be sure to pick up a copy of the carol burnett show, the lost episodes. it is no stores now. (gasp) shark diving!
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to and from work. last tuesday he was napping in a park when someone called 911 to report a suspicious person. lucky for him the responding officer knew just what do. officer not only drove him to work but later returned with a duffel bag to carry all his belongs and a new bicycle. >> nice guy. glad toe hear is that. >> good people in the world. time now for newsroom with carol costello. >> newsroom starts now. and good morning. thanks for joining e. many president obama begins a meeting trying to value van ini fight. and this morning the u.s. is launching air

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