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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  September 30, 2015 10:00pm-1:01am PDT

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i just say i love you and please tell people the truth. breaking news, donald trump . this is "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. >> ahead this hour, a major storm is picking up strength as it heads towards the u.s. east coast. >> while american officials are skeptical of russia's claim its strikes in syria are targeting isis. >> and more women have come forward with accusations against bill cosby. we have an interview with one of them. >> hello, everybody. great to have you with us. we would like to welcome our viewers in the united states and all across the world. >> "newsroom l.a." starts right now.
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>> joaquin is upgrated to a category three hurricane. the storm could make land fall on the coast of north carolina as early as sunday. >> the northeastern region of the united states already dealing with heavy emergen emergency. does that impact the track where it's head right now? >> it does not impact the track. we knew it was going to get stronger. we knew that was going to happen in at least the next couple of days but it's happening within a few hours from now. the sea surface conditions are conducive to what's happening. but i want to show you what's going on with joaquin. we have watches and warnings in place. take a look at this. look at the environment the storm is dealing with. the wind shear showing you an area where you have winds going in different directions above the storm at different speeds.
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that will shred a storm system apart. it's pretty moderate across the region, but the storm continues to intensify. water temperatures into the 80s, fahrenheit, upper 20s celsius. certainly conducive to fuel the storm system. it's trying to battle winds that are trying to rip it apart, but the water temperatures are fuelling it plenty to keep it stronger. the models indicate this could get to a category 4. here's what's happening over portions of the northeastern united states and really why this could be a huge story when it comes to what has transpired. hateful across this region. forces of the northeast were actual ly sitting in a drought. the state of massachusetts had its driest temperatures on record. now we're talking about a surplus in the works.
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hurricane watches and warnings are in place. the complexity of the storm system, lal one to behold. you take a look at what we call a negatively tilted trough, one that isn't pointed to the north and west. when you have these in place and a tropical feature parked just offshore. we also have an area of high pressure. wo the european model is statistically one of the most accurate models. it's still holding ground. it will be pulled offshore. almost everyone else is staying it's going back towards the northeastern u.s. so the national hurricane center right now, split spliting the difference, paralleling the u.s. coastline, potentially coming in as a category two somewhere around the northeast.
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we'll watch this for a heavy hateful potential in the forecast in this region, guys. >> it's interesting, the european model has it taking one track. the americans have it another way. i guess we just have to wait and see. >> we have to wait and see, yeah. >> the northeast preparing for this right now. >> pedram, i know you're going to stay on top of the story for us. we appreciate it. >> now u.s. and russian officials are preparing for military talks about air strikes in syria possibly as early as thursday. >> john kerry and the russian foreign minister spoke at the u.n. about the need to avoid unintended incidents between russia's air force and the u.s.-led coalition. >> meantime, u.s. officials tell cnn russia hit elements of the free syrian army in its first day of air strikes. those are the forces fighting against syrian president bashar al assad, russia's ally. >> one group said russian air strikes killed 28 people including women and children.
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>> the syrian national coalition put that number at 36 saying those are all civilians. barbara starr has more on the strikes and the unorthodox way the u.s. found out about them. >> the first russian combat camera video of their air strikes in syria. russian war planes struck near the city of holmes in western syria, an area where anti-government forces are operating, not isis. the terrorist group russia claimed it was going after. defense secretary ash carter had been assembling a military team to talk to the russians about how to keep u.s. and russian pilots safe when they fly near each other. but earlier wednesday, the u.s. embassy in baghdad got a sudden visit from a russian general. >> so a russian general shows up this morning at the embassy of baghdad and apparently reads you people a note saying air strikes are going to begin in one hour. is this not a little bizarre?
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>> this is not the kind of behavior that we should expect professionally from russian military professionally. and that's one reason why i think it's a good thing to have an avenue of communication that is less unprofessional than a drop-in. >> the russian general giving just one hour notice strikes were to begin and telling the merps to keep their aircraft out of syrian skies. >> the russians are using this opportunity to basically do their best to shove the u.s. out of the middle east. and they're doing it literally and figuratively right in front of our noses. >> one of the areas the russians hit, north of holmes where several faction, including the al qaeda affiliate al noosra and other anti-s a said groups are fighting the regime. the state department trying to defuse rising military extensions between the u.s. and moscow, but only going so far. >> the united states and the
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coalition will continue our ongoing air operations as we have from the very beginning. >> vladimir putin says his military was invited into syria by bashar al assad. the russian leader clearly ready to prop up assad. >> we support the syrian army only in its legitimate fights against syria. >> he wants to prop up assad. >> barbara starr, cnn, the pentagon.
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. >> welcome to the quagmire, mr. putin. the russians how the potential to make things a lot worse. >> they certainly do. they started off doing just that, showing up in the american embassy in baghdad and just dropping this ham handed demand that we leave syrian skies which is not going to happen. it's not the way to set up a useful relati relationship. i applaud the efforts to set up some sort of coordination with the russians. when you've got these many forces flying this much of an aircraft, there is the potential for one mistake that will end up in someone shooting somebody else down. we don't need that. we need to focus on what we're supposed to be doing there. >> i worry about what the russian goal is here because it doesn't appear that they're going after isis as they did.
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they're going after the anti-regime rebels. >> you mentioned the way the russians informed the americans they were about to launch these air strikes. clearly the russians know the way this is done. they know how this should be done. they clearly went about -- what? just kind of an insult to the americans? how do you read it? >> well, i think it was an in your face attempt to have the americans back down. >> it was a great ploy if it had worked. why not try it. go in there and say we want you out of syrian air space and they believe they' got legal grounds to do that. they say we were invited into syria by the legitimate government of syria. you were not. so we're taking over now. the russians are here, you guys can back off now. fortunately, the united states is taking the position that we are conducting air operations in iraq and syria against isis, which we regard as a threat. so we're going to have to work this out with the russians, though. we can't have this confrontation without some sort of
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coordination. i believe that it's important that we talk to the russian, but we shouldn't back down. we should assert our right to be there. >> the russians say they hit isis targets. the u.s. says that's just not true. is it possible the russians may have hit nonisis targets by mistake? it's not unheard of. the russians wouldn't be alone in getting it wrotening. >> i don't think so. the russians are talking to the iraqis, they're talking to the iranians, they're talking to the syrians. they all have good intelligence about what's going on on the ground in syria. i would have thought the russians would have at least played the game and hit isis targets first and then moved on to the anti-regime wrerebels, wh is what they really want to hit. the turks hit isis the first few days and then they concentrated on the pkk. i think the russians are just being the russians. they're going to do what they want regardless of what the world thinks. >> colonel francona, good to speak with you as always.
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thank you. >> good to be with you. now a historic day for the palestinian authority in the united nations. the group's flag is now flying outside the u.n. headquarters in new york. only the member flags are on display. the palestinian authority has nonmember authority status. >> palestinian authority leader says palestinians will no longer be bound by the accord either. they date back to the early '90s and were meant to fulfill the palestinian right to self-determination. >> as long as israel is not committed to the signed agreements and undermine all agreements, we for our part are not committed to those agreements and israel must bear full responsibility for development. and this situation. >> we're following developments
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from jerusalem. or rin, good to have you with us. it's one thing for mahmoud abbas to say palestinians will no longer be bound by the oslo peace accords. but what does his announcement actually change on the ground? >> that is the major question here, isha. his statements were a bit vague when he threatened to cancel the oslo accords and the other arrangements. what's significant about this, threatening to cancel oslo. it was the bedrock of cooperation and coordination between israelis and palestinians and it has been for the last 22 years. but critic of the agreement say it has been a failure. it was supposed to set a time line of five year, which would have been right around 2,000 for creating a final status agreement, if for creating a two-state solution. obviously it didn't do that. and that's where the see the frustration of mahmoud abbas. but he didn't come out blatantly and say i'm cancelling oslo and all of the other agreements.
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he said if israel doesn't abide by those agreement, we won't either. what that changes here, that's something we're still waiting to see, whether he's carrying out these threats and how soon he'll carry out these threats to cancel oslo and these other aringments, if that's really what he meant. if he really cancels them, that's a big statement. but there are skeptics here who say these are more statements from palestinian president mahmoud abbas that won't change what's happening here and won't change the relationship between palestinians and israelis. >> also waiting to see what the israeli prime minister benjamin net who will address the u.n. general assembly on thursday,, what will he say. what are the expectations for that speech? >> before netanyahu boarded a plane in tel aviv to head to the united nations general assembly, he laid out what he wants to talk about. he is still talking about the iran deal. he's always been one of the deal's most vocal critic, and at least he says he's going to bring it up again. at least even at this point, if it doesn't seem like that will change anything. he's almost certain to respond
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what palestinian president mahmoud abbas will say. it's expected that he will talk about what's happening in syria. it's seen as a security threat, but there is coordination with russia. he learned yesterday that russia called israel before conducting those air strikes. we'll expect to hear somewhat more about how israel views what's happening in syria as well as, again, as i mentioned, the iran nuclear deal and we'll see how he responds to mahmoud abb abbas. >> we will all be watching very, very closely. thank you. >> the governor of oklahoma has delayed the execution of a man on death row. the execution was postponed until november 6. the state can now address questions about procedures and the chemicals to be used in the execution. glossip would have been the first person executed with a sedative now approved by the supreme court. he was sentenced to death for
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hiring another man to kill a motel worker. his accomplice is serving a life sentence. >> the vatican is not denying that the pope met privately with a controversial clerk during a visit to the united states. >> more women have come forward due to accusations of sexual inappropriate behavior and one of those women talked to cnn. that interview is still to come. technology empowers us to achieve more.
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el chapo escaped from a max many mum security prison in mexico. >> the suspects include a leader better known as the barbie. and an american who allegedly supplied weapons to cartels. >> three more women have come forward accusing actor bill cosby of sexually inappropriate behavior. they held a news conference with gloria allred on wednesday. >> one of the accusers alleges cosby tried to pressure her into sex in a hotel room in exchange for help with her career.
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more than 40 women have publicly accused kos pi of sexual misconduct over the past 40 years. he has steadfastly denied the allegations against him and he has not been charged with any crime. i sat down with christie and allred for an interview. >> you told part of the story in your book, in your first book. but you didn't name him. you didn't name bill cosby then. many people asked the question well, why now? >> i was afraid no one would believe me. this man is so powerful, who would believe my story? i thought they wouldn't need me because there was enough people who came forward. i wasn't one that was molested in a sense, was drugged and stain advantage of. but now that so many other women came forward and i can have a voice now and support those other victims, that's why i'm coming forward. >> how many women have publicly
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come forward to make these allegations against bill cosby and how many directly reached out to you? >> only one in a lawsuit, but 26. however, more than that number have contacted me. some do not wish to go public and some said that they would be available to be subpoenaed if as and when they would be subpoenaed to testify in the lawsuit that we have own bhand of judy huff. if there's one, that's one too many. two, three, way too many and the numbers now are so high that post people don't have an accurate count. >> you mentioned judy huff. there will be a deposition of bill cosby in relation to the civil suit against him on october 9. >> that's correct. you have said you expect him to
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turn up. >> we do expect him to turn up because it's a court order that his deposition is going to take place on october 9. and our client's deposition will take place on october 15. and his attorney has represented that his client will be there. >> as you make the point, so many women have come forward, such is the number well over three dozen that it has some people out there in the public saying, are you all telling the truth? what do you say to those people? >> i didn't hear all those stories in detail, but now on thursday, i started to watch a couple of the videos of the testimonies and i was like, they're so similar. this was a man who was firm on education. i thought he was the father figure, the mentor to help me in the industry. and this man ended up turning out to take power and position and try to use that against women. myself. i can only take my situation, but someone needs to speak. and that's what glory is doing. that's why i wanted to help.
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i said i want to do whatever it takes, how long it takes to help support these victims. because thank god that i didn't have anything else happen to me in those situations. >> if bill cosby was to walk into this room right now, giving you an opportunity to speak to him, what would you say. >> i had told him that last time i had seen him that i would never talk to him. again. i don't think that i need to at this point in my life. i forgive him, i just don't need to have a lunch or a conversation with him. i wouldn't say anything. i would probably leave the room. >> she wrote in the book a weak later, this man's son died pu but at a news conference, she said it happened in the late 1980s. cosby's son died in 1997.
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>> gloria allred the book made a mistake. it was blamed on clumsy editing and will be corrected. they declined to offer my response. >> she also said one of the key thing that motivated to speak out is her daughter. she wanted to set an example for her 10-year-old. >> it's absolutely incredible. this deposition on october 9 should be very, very interesting. >> a u.s. county is suing volkswagen for $100 million allegi alleging they're polluting the air. >> the county says volkswagen vehicles evaded u.s. emissions standards and spewed, quote, dangerous chemicals into the air around the city. >> diesel models allowing them to cheat on emissions tests.
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>> it appears the american county clerk who was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples did, in fact, meet privately with pope francis. kim davis' lawyer says that happened last weekend when the pope was in washington. the vatican is not denying the meeting took place. >> stfs a surprise to many, but he did weigh in on what was discussed. >> he did hug her, as kim davis said. he did encourage her for standing. he said that his words were, stay strong. and the meeting was conducted in english from beginning to end. came davis was incredibly amazed that a man such as his stature was so humble and caring and kind. and it's a moment she'll cherish for the rest of her life. >> the meeting lasted ten
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minutes and was just between the pope, kim davis and her husband. he said pictures were taken and will be released at some point. >> a lot of people quite surprised by that meeting. >> a rlot of people want to see the pictures. >> a short break here. when we come back, a fierce battle in northern afghanistan. we'll have the latest developments in a live report. >> plus, donald trump takes a hands-off stand on russian involvement in syria. that story is just ahead.
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>> welcome back. >> the headlines this hour, u.s. and russian military officials could meet as soon as thursday to talk about how to stay out of each other's way while carrying out air strikes in syria. russian fighter jets began bombing targets on wednesday after giving the u.s. just one hours notice. russia says it's hitting isis targets. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu will address the u.n. general assembly on thursday. he's slamming palestinian leader mack hud abbas for his u.n. speech. he says his group will no longer be bound by the oslo peace accords signed with israeli in 1993. >> three more women have come forward accusing actor bill cosby of sexual abusive behavior. cosby has denied the allegations
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against him and he has not been charged with any crime. >> after a humiliating defeat in days of fierce fighting, taliban seized the key northern city on monday. >> the interior ministry said there were heavy taliban casualties and the local police spokesman said a senior taliban commander was killed in an air strike. the taliban denied that. >> we're hering that kunduz has been retain by afghan government forces. but the key question is, can they hold on to it? >> can they maintain a presence and government forces in the
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local population. one of the big problems in kunduz that created fertile ground in the first place said there is immense public discontent with the government and local security forces in kunduz. it's not just the city that was taken. there was also a lot of districts that are under taliban control last night. according to a police spokesman in kunduz, only two districts now remain in taliban control, but that doesn't mean the taliban are not there, influe e influencing and not able to launch an attack in the later stage. >> indeed this what are we hearing about fighting there? >> it seems like there hasn't been that much fighting today, not that i'm aware of at least.
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seems 50 miles ahead which is a great district north of kunduz which was taken last night. hasn't fallen back into government control. this is a place where fighting can flare up quickly. foreign fighters have streamed kunduz and they have run their own hearts and mind campaign. >> the taliban numbered a couple of hundred, were able to take kunduz. there were some thousands of afghan forces, afghan government forces. are we getting a clear explanation as to how this all went down on monday. >> there are a lot of guesses as
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to what this was like. thousands of forces fled the city, leaving it open for taliban to overrun it. then re-enforcements came in from kabul, from neighboring provinces including special forces, including u.s. air strikes as well. which helped retake the province. but low fighting morale among the security forces is one reason. but also, because of when the taliban advanced, a lot of civilians seemed to pick up weapons to fight alongside the insurgence. that doesn't mean they outnumber the security forces. far from it. but there is is a problem of a lack of fighting morale, which is also a challenge now with for security as they move forward. >> many, many problems they contend with. >> we appreciate it, thank you. >> we move on now to american politics and republican presidential contender zond trump says he has no problem with russia's military
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involvement with syria. u.s. officials warn the blasts will enflame syria's civil war. >> taking a hard line stance against syrian refugees seeking asylum here in the united states. >> this migration, this big migration, now they're talking about bringing 200,000 people into the united states. and i will tell you, if i win, ill'm going to say it right now, and i'll say it to you, those 200,000 people -- and they have to know this, and the world will hear it -- are going back. we're not going to accept 200,000 people that may be isis. when you look at the migration, there's so many men and there's so many men that look strong to me. i'm pretty good at analyzing things. i say where are all the women? you see so few women. and they look young and strong. number one, why aren't they fight narg country? number two, why are we accepting all of these thousands. i heard a number today, 200,000.
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that's almost like are they bringing, are these people isis. we have no idea where they come from. '. >> carson, fiorina tie at 13%, rubio at 9%, jeb bush right down there on 8%, still doing better than a lot of numbers in the race. in an interview with cnn's dana bash, he says he will let voters make up their own mind by focusing on his political record. '. >> you lost 50% of your support.
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went from double digits to single digits. what do you think changed? >> first of all, i never considered myself a front-runner. i knew i had to overcome perceptions related to people who don't know me. if you're in new hampshire and there's a television on, hopefully you see an ad that we've put up in the right to rise put ads up as well. talking about my record. so as i get to talk about how i cut taxes, reduce the size of government, create the most ambitious school in the country, turn the whole system upside down as a disruptor, i can lay out my plans for what i can do in washington. over time, that's what people are going to decide. >> jeb bush also mentioned john mccain's comeback in the 2008 race when mccain won the republican nomination. >> a new test for ebola, faster and cheaper, and developed by a high school student.
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>> caitlyn jenner won't be charged for a fatal car accident because they can't prove negligence. >> the driver of the lexus died at the scene. an investigation found jenner was driving below the speed limit and was breaking when the crash happened. jenner is a transgender advocate and a former olympic common once named bruce. >> when the disease arrived in the united states it starked an
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epidemic of fear. one reason for that is really difficult to know. someone who has been exposed to ebola is actually infected. the early symptoms are similar to flu. and testing for ebola is expensive. about $1,000. rut rults can take up to 24 hours. a new test can detect ebola in its earliest stages. it takes about 30 minutes. it's cheap, easy and developed by a high school student. that's a 16-year-old olivia hallassey. she joins us now from new york. how did you actually come up with this? >> i'm in a science research class at school. so every student does an independent research project. and i didn't really know what i wanted to focus on, so my teacher advised me just to look in the news and find something that i was passionate about or felt outraged by or something
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that could be done better and that's when i began looking at the ebola outbreak and how it's growing so quickly and ways to limit that growth. >> this new testing kit, it took first prize at this year's google science fair. do you know if it might actually be used in the real world? >> that's my goal. just a way to measure people before they're showing symptoms. if they are positive, they can be isolated without spreading to other people. when someone is asymptomatic, they're not contagious. >> so essentially, the sooner the diagnosis, the better the chance of survival, the better you can reduce the spread of the disease. essentially, if this does play out, you could be safing thousands of lives. >> that's definitely my goal. with this project, i really just wanted to give people hope. with ebola, usually it's a death sentence. so with this project, i hope if
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swrun is diagnosed if they're asymptomat asymptomatic, they can receive better care. that's the goal of this project to save lives. >> how does this test differ from every other test out there? why is this one so good? >> this test is rapid, portable and visual test. but one of the main advantages is that it is also cheap. but the really big thing is that it's temperature independent. current testing is refrigeration from point of manufacturered at point of administration. this uses a silk fibroid solution and it's temperature stabilize which means it doesn't need refrigeration, which is a problem where ebola is most prevalent. >> olivia, you make us all underachievers and put us to shame. it's great to speak to you. thank you. >> thank you so much. >> it is just incredible. and someone who is from sierra leon, one of the countries
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ravaged by ebola outbreak, i can't put into words the gratitude and admiration for that young mind. >> a test now costs $1,000, that test, $25. >> amazing. if you jumped on apple music when it launched, your free trial is up. what you need to know about the music service and how it stacks up to other streaming services. so you're a small business expert from at&t? yeah, give me a problem and i've got the solution. well, we have 30 years of customer records. our cloud can keep them safe and accessible anywhere. my drivers don't have time to fill out forms. tablets. keep it all digital. we're looking to double our deliveries. our fleet apps will find the fastest route. oh, and your boysenberry apple scones smell about done. ahh, you're good. i like to bake. add new business services with at&t and get up to $500 in total savings. hai'm messing up every dish, pot, and plate...
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hello, everyone. it's a big day for apple. the company will find out whether the customers are sticking with its music service. it's been three months since apple music launched. if you signed up when it first went online, your free trial expired wednesday. >> it cost $10 a month for people in the united states. close to $2 in india, $15 in the uk where everything is so much more expensive. apple music also just launched in china after the three-month trial, it will be about $1.50 for month. good deal in china. >> twitters are naming jack dorsey its permanent ceo.
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>> if you look at the numbers, apple reportedly has 50 million users under the free trial. the new york post is talking about how many of them haven't filled out the auto pay function. that's a good start. >> isn't that the best and worst feature? all of us are paying for so many things that just automatically eare new every month or every year, whether it's netflix or amazon prime. apple music wants to be the most recent version of that. apple music is poised to disrupt and in some ways revolutionize the way we all listen to music. if it can get enough paying subscribers. like you said say, this is judgment day for apple music.
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the big decision day over whether people are going to actually go ahead and hand over their credit cards and keep paying for this service. that three-month tree trial was a very big deal. it gave people a long time to get familiar with the service and get dependent on the service. but really, it is the weeks and months to come that will really judge how successful it's going to be. >> and brian, is it a zero sum game for apple to succeed? do they need to take customers and listeners away from pandora or spotify? >> at the moment, there are so many people who aren't paying for music subscription. there is amazon and spotify, but there are many, many hundreds of millions of customers that are not paying for any form of music service. that's what apple is really trying to target with apple music. >> brian, turning our attention to twitter now, we know that twitter is currently facing a host of challenges. the biggest of which is stalled growth. we're hearing that jack dorsey is going to be reappointed. why reappoint jack dorsey as ceo?
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>> this town aflutter with the radio uh mors today. an announcement expected on thursday, possibly as early as thursday morning about the permanent ceo position. he's one of the co-founders of twitter. he was briefly the ceo many years ago and then he took over in an interim basis when the ceo was removed several months ago. why is he going to become the permanent ceo? he knows the company better than anybody else. he has credibility and he's a talent magnet. what twitter needs is a sense that it can figure out how to gain hundreds of millions of more subscribers. not subscriber, excuse me, but users, daily users, than they can figure out ways to make more money from those users. facebook is so much bigger, has so much more scale than twitter. and twitter is seeking new ways to figure out how to reach more of those consumers. the people who use twitter love twitter. lots of journalists like us use twitter all the time. but it has to figure out how to gain that next number of people. and the bet from the board is going to be on jack dorsey.
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>> the traditional wisdom has come out this week that he could run both. twitter is moving more into e zs commerce. they're looking at ways to let you buy prikt products directly from a tweet. it's an introduct toy h ductry product for people who get closer to facebook, which has so many more user thans twitter today. >> absolutely fascinating. >> great to speak to you. >> thank you.
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come back and see us soon. >> yeah. the best distinction between facebook and twitter. twitter is for journalists, facebook is for people, families. >> good point. but you're not really avid on either. >> celebrities are used to having their fans fawn over them, but one fan took things a little far at a recent concert. >> jeanne moos tells us more about this on-stage love fest. >> katy perry sewure knows how pick them. >> the girl with the smiley face [ bleep ] come on stage right now. >> at a concert in brazil, the fan with with the smile y face bustier put a smile on our face. she wasn't just hugging katy. >> she's kissing my face. >> she whispered how to pronounce her name in the singer's ear.
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the versed katie's chest. >> most folks seemed to think katie handled the handling well. >> are you a katie cat? i think she's rolling. >> the fan told tmz she wasn't high. she was just exhausted. adding she couldn't stop hugging and smelling katie. the star asked for some help, speaking portuguese. how do you say selfie in. >> reporter: there was more neck nuzzling. she was kissed by a girl, but she didn't seem to like it, commented someone. that's not being kissed by a girl. that's being assaulted by a person, replied another.
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>> let's take a selfie. >> reporter: the encounter lasted 3 1/2 minutes. katie finally sent her off with a slap on the rump, and the fan returned the favor. looks like katie can use a little selfie defense. new york. [ laughter ] >> no words for that. thanks for watching cnn. >> please stay with us. just might be the one. to clean the oceans, to start a movement, or lead a country. it may not be obvious yet, but one of these kids is going to change the world. we just need to make sure she has what she needs. welcome to windows 10. the future starts now for all of us.
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human rights groups accuse russia of killing civilians after military launches air strikes on key sites in syria. >> and hurricane away queaway qn strengthens. >> and later researchers said they've found the final resting place of one of egypt's most famous queens. >> welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and errol barnett.
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this is cnn news room. it's 9:00 a.m. in syria where an opposition group says 36 people, all civilians are dead after russia unleashed military air strikes. >> a senior u.s. official says that's not what's happening at all. that official says russia is targeting opposition groups like the free syrian army which is supported by the united states. >> the u.s. secretary of state and russian foreign minister met at the u.n. on wednesday. they agreed military officials from both sides should talk soon to figure out a way of how to stay out of each other's way. that talk could come as soon as thursday. matthew chance as more on the russian air strikes from moscow.
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>> reporter: this is the aftermath of russia's first air strike in syria, and it's violent announcement of involvement in this brutal war. the kremlin says it's targeting isis forces. but these chaotic images are from the province where other rebel groups hold sway. moscow draws little distinction from the enemies of the syrian government allies. it look russia's parliament less than half an hour to rubber stamp the use of military force. russian officials justify it as legal under international law, and the like the air strikes, they say, carried out by the united states and it allies. >> translator: i want to inform you they addressed the leadership of our country with a request for military assistance, so we can state that it is necessary to fight terrorism.
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international efforts should be united, but come plying with the forms of international law is preferable. >> reporter: but few expected to see russian military action so soon, despite emerging evidence over the past month of a russian military buildup. moscow has good reason to support its syrian ally, including military and economic interest in syria and a genuine concern about the spread of radical islamic groups like isis, but the kremlin seems driven to realert power. it was a message delivered by vladimir putin so forcefully. western policy on syria and elsewhere, he said, had failed. leaven chaos in its wake. >> translator: i'm urged to ask those who created the situation,
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do you at least realize now what you've done, but i'm afraid it will remain unanswered because they've never abandoned the policy. >> reporter: russia is now offering it own answers. these are pictures from the russian defense ministry. communication centers and motor vehicles were among the targets attacked, and this is just day one of what could be an open ended syrian war. matthew chance, cnn, moscow. >> cnn military analyst joins me now to talk more about what's going on in syria right now. so, from what you can be able to ascertain, what were the targets that russia likely hit in these air strikes in syria? >> it looks like they were going after anti-regime rebels. i know their talk about going after isis was probably just that.
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the areas they struck, there's very few isis targets in that area, and all the videos we've seen coming out after the strikes don't show any isis involvement. >> so it begs the question, what is russia's intent here? syria, do you think? and wouldn't it have been a wiser move for russia to go after isis targets first no matter their intentions? >> i thought they would go after isis first, and kind of establish that as their baseline. much as the turks did. they went after isis first and then they devoted their attention to the pkk targets. i thought the russians might do the same. they want to maintain access to the bases in the future, and -- >> if they're not saying it, and, of course new phase of u.s.
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russian relations. >> right. you know, the way the russians went about this today, marching into the u.s. embassy in baghdad and demanding we remove our aircraft and we're going to begin bombing in one hour is not how to act to people you're supposed to be coordinating with. this is going to get very dangerous. right now you have the aircraft and the russian air force and the u.s. led coalition operating in a confined area. these are high-performance aircraft with lots of people on edge when they're flying these missions. any misjudgment could result in an incident that will lead to fatalities on somebody's side. the decon flix has to be worked out. but there's going to be a confrontation between the united
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states and russia over who controls that air space. and right now we're seeing the gauntlet laid down. >> you say confrontation. what sort of confrontation are you suggesting there? >> well, i think it's going to come in the form of a -- somebody in the air like the american pilots are going to see russian pilots attacking pro u.s. rebels on the ground. are they going to be ordered to stand down, or are we going to warn the russians offer, and are we willing to engage if they don't. these haven't been thought through. we're doing this on the fly. i heard the foreign minister of russia and the secretary of state say we're going to work out things as soon as possible. we need to have done this possible. >> lieutenant rick, a delicate situation. thank you for your analysis, keeping an eye on what is perhaps occurring on the ground here in syria. many thanks to you.
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>> good to be with you. >> and coming up in our next half hour, we will speak with the co-author of isis inside the army of terror. we will get his view on whether these russian air strikes could be a game-changer for the region. the palestinian flag is now flying outside the united nations head quarters in new york. typically only the flags of member states are on display, and the palestinian authority has nonmember observer status. palestinians see the move as a symbolic step toward cementing their place in the international community. meanwhile, the group's president addressed the general assembly saying the palestinian authority would no longer honor the peace agreements with israel. >> israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu is expected to respond when he gets his turn on the u.n. stage thursday. he also said he will discuss the iran nuclear deal.
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for more, let's bring in oren lieberman. how are the israelis responding to the palestinian flag being raised at the u.n. and the fact that mthey have publically abandoned. >> reporter: it's simply a ceremony and they've called for direct negotiations. that's been their criticism of the flag raising from the beginning. they were one of eight states including the united states to vote against the flag raising at the united nations. as for what he said, he made a powerful statement. the question is where do the statements lead? he hedged just a little bit saying that if israel won't follow the accords and agreements, then the palestinians won't either. he didn't say they're off the table. if he wanted to, he could have said that at the top of the
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chance. i'm kacancelling cooperation. he didn't say that. that would be a big statement. oslo is essentially the foundation upon which the palestinians coordinate their working together. it was signed 22 years ago. palestinian acknowledged israel's right to exist. and acknowledged the plo as the leader of the palestinian people. but they hedged a little bit. the question now, what does that change on the ground? are we going to see the cancelling of security coordination? if so, it's a big statement and big moment that could shake up the region. if not, it could just be more statements here. >> and so what you've outlined there is that mr. abas has left some wiggle room. skeptics wonder if that was more desperation on his part because the pa has been rendered so weak politically, or if this is just a different way to get israel to fall in line, as you say, the
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way he set it up is if israel won't abide by it, we won't either. >> there have been a lot of critics of abaas. just last month we saw half of the plo executive committee resign, including abaas. that was seen as a way for him to consolidate his power, critics saying this could be another way, very little in the way of action. the real question will be what does it change? how does it change here? that's something that if it does change, we should find out very soon. >> all right. live for us in jerusalem this morning. 1 1 minutes past nine. thank you. now other big stories we're following for you. after days of bitter fighting, officials in afghanistan say government forces are back in control of most of kunduz. it was the first major city to fall to the taliban back in
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2001. >> the taliban easily seized the city on monday. nato forces backed the afghan effort to retake the city. two of the city's six districts are still under taliban control. we have a reporter with the guardian newspaper in kabul joining us now live. afghan authorities said they are now in control of kunduz, but the key question is whether afghan forces can hold onto it as well as clear out the taliban hiding out in the surrounding area. how likely is that? >> reporter: well, i think eventually they will clear out the insurgents inside the city. there's fighting going on around the police head quarters which is a pretty central place in
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kunduz. the districts around kunduz district itself are still contested. as you said, the taliban are only effectively in control of two of them. that doesn't mean there's not fighting going on potentially later, and there's still parts of the districts under taliban control. the problem here, and the crucial question is if the government security forces are able to exert authority and get people support behind them. this has long been a problem for the government security forces in kunduz, that there is public animosi animosity. it's not just about clearing the city of insurgents. this requires a more long-term solution to create stability in kunduz. >> it's difficult when the authorities, afghanistan authorities, don't really have the people there on site, so how
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long would it likely take to clear out all the taliban? is that achievable to make sure they don't return also? >> this has been the problem for the past 14 years in afghanistan, that the international forces thought you should flush out the taliban completely. it's not possible. the taliban is not this coherent, uniform movement that you can pluflush out of an area. this is about getting people on the side of the government security forces. and one of the big problems in kunduz is a lot of the security relies on private militias that are not under the government's control but are fighting against the taliban. they have a long reputation of abusing the local population. so unless you get the security forces in and have a more streamlined defense and a more
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streamlined defense of the local population, i think this local unrest in kunduz is going to fermented for a long time. >> reporting there live from kabul. and we will have more on the battle in afghanistan, and one former soldier's story of fleeing the country to escape the taliban and isis coming up in the second half of cnn news room. also ahead for you, hurricane joaquin is getting stronger and moving slowly toward the u.s. we'll look at the possible paths when we come back. you fifteen percent or more on huh, fiftcar insurance.uld save yeah, everybody knows that. well, did you know that playing cards with kenny rogers gets old pretty fast? ♪ you got to know when to hold'em. ♪ ♪ know when to fold 'em. ♪ know when to walk away. ♪ know when to run. ♪ you never count your money, ♪ when you're sitting at the ta...♪
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welcome back. hurricane joaquin is getting stronger and quickly. a few hours ago it was a category two, and now it's a category three. >> pedram is here, our resident meteorologist, to talk to us about where it's heading. who's in its path, and how bad is it likely to be? >> it's one of the more difficult forecasts we've had in a long time. there are so many models. some reliable ones are saying this is going to go offshore. the national hurricane center is
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splitting the difference and taking it parallel to the eastern seaboard. we've had six to ten inches of rainfall in the past couple of days having nothing to do with an approaching hurricane. you bring the moisture again in about a week period in this region, this could be a devastating story. we'll show you exactly thousand this will break down the next three days. near the turks and cay coast, that's associated with joaquin. another one bringing rainfall. to the north, a drought in place. the driest september on record for the state of massachusetts coming to an end, and now you look to the south, things could change quickly. joaquin sitting there, 120 miles per hour sustained winds. the concern is a slow-moving
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storm system. it's going at about 6 miles per hour. you can jog at the speed past the storm system as the speed its moving. here's the concern. we call it a negatively tilted trough. it's pointed to the northwest. when you have this with a tropical feature offshore, it typically steers it north. if that happens, we have this impact in the eastern united states. off store, clockwise flow that likes to pull it toward it. that's where the models are having trouble. it literally is going in both directions when you take a look at the models. some of the most reliable models we have, the european model, it had a spot on forecast for sandy, says it's going past bermuda and east. but the vast majority going along with this guidance taking
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the storm system toward the eastern seaboard, taking it in toward potentially north carolina and even as far north as new jersey. as strong as a category 2 sunday afternoon and sunday night. and if this happens, the rainfall will be upwards of 10 inches coming down. nearly a half a meter of rainfall on top of fully saturated soils. these areas had gone on a dry stretch for the summer season, and now we're talking this much rainfall. the spot on knock on effect of what can happen, the fall colors and all the leaves will be gone. the tourism hit largely and the aviation industry. this could be a large story. >> it could be a wet winter. balancing things out in. >> yes. >> thank you. we'll see you next hour.
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>> now, 2015 could go down as the warmest year on record. but that is not the case everywhere in our globe. there's a particular spot in the northern atlantic that's abnormally cold. jennifer gray explains why this could explain weather patterns around the world. >> you may remember the area in the pacific where temperatures were running well above normal that impacted everything from the fisheries to the weather. well now, we have the atlantic blob. it's quite the opposite. with the entire globe warming, you may find it odd that there's a spot in the northern atlantic that's breaking records for cold. in fact, globally we have seen some of the warmest temperatures on record. 2015 has had eight of the warmest months ever. but if you look closely, it's easy to notice that blue blob. it's an area where temperatures
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are well below normal. in fact, some areas are record-breaking. the ocean acts as a huge conveyer belt. salty warm water from the south travels north. as it does so, it cools, and it becomes so dense it sinks and mixes with the cooler water deeper in the ocean. this circulation is constant. it helps maintain balance in the ocean, but if too much fresh water is added, the water is too buoyant to sink. that can either slow the circulation or grind it to a halt. that's exactly what's happening in the northern atlantic. the greenland ice sheet is melting and dumping massive amounts of fresh water into the ocean and causing the circulation to cool. the result? that large pool of colder water. with the circulation slowing, it could mean faster sea level rice for the east coast of the u.s. it could also mean different storm patterns in europe.
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>> now, if you'd like to learn more about climate change in our two degrees initiative, head to our website and type in cnn.com/2degrees. russian fighter jets take aim at targets in syria. we'll look at the violent entrance could affect the region. >> and scientists believe they found the final resting place of an ancient egyptian queen.
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states and those of you tuned in around the world. >> it is time to check out the main stories we have been following this hour. benjamin netanyahu will address the u.n. general assembly thursday. he is slamming palestinian leader for his u.n. speech. abbas says his group will no longer will bound by the peace accord signed with israel in the 1990s. >> afghanistan officials say officials have retaken much of kunduz back from the taliban. it was the first time the taliban took over a provincial capital since 2001. they now say they defeated the afghan military. >> urn officials could meet to talk about how to stay out of each other's way while carrying
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out air strikes. russia says it's hitting isis targets but u.s. officials say russia is actually hitting syrian opposition groups. >> russia's actions this week have been very fast moving. we are joined from paris to discuss what's really changing in the region. michael, russia's making bold and obvious moves to prop up the asaad regime, but what could be the strategy post asaad. the action against rebels only helps isis in many weeks. what could be the long-term plan here? >> i think there isn't so much of a long-term plan with russia. their goals are two-fold. to prop up the asaad regime and also to deter the united states, and embarrass the united states. if you look at the way this air strike was conducted in the midst of the united nations general assembly just days after
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putin gave his first speech in decades where he called an an international anti-isis coalition like the world war powers of ii. who did they bomb? everyone but isis? they killed an fsa commander. this guy had been on the ground fighting both asaad and jihadist since 2012, actually. he hung in there. he was also a recipient of u.s. aid, backed by the cia. he received the tow anti-tank missiles. given the manifold groups on the ground, to be vetted by the cia to receive these missiles meant that this guy was actually okay. he was one of the few good guys left. russia wants to destroy any credible opposition to the regime. they don't care about isis.
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for was asaad. i mean, you look at the number of sor tees they've flown, few of them have been against the top theory jihadists who are lined up in east of the country. asaad is in control of about 14% of syrian country. what russia has done is create a bubble of air supremacy over that sliver. they have sent in 22 anti-aircraft missiles and some of their most sophisticated attack jets with air to air missile capability. what do you need air deterrents for? this is to deter the united states. >> which they've done successfully, especially if the aim was to embarrass the states. but barack obama is remembering history in the region if you go into iraq and take out
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leadership, you're then responsible for propping up whatever government comes in after that. russia is going for it, but with risks. let's talk about that. russia is economically strained back home thanks to low oil prices and sanctions, and let's remember it was a lack of funds that forced the soviet union to abandon efforts in afghanistan in the 80s. could syria be another zban for moscow. >> i don't buy it. they're not looking to occupy the entire country or install a pickup tru puppet regime. they're looking to fortify stated institutions. number two, they have actually succeeded. this is sort of odd if you look at it from the western point of view, but they have succeeded in repressing all information inside russia about dead russian
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soldiers that have been deployed to ukraine. this was a report two weeks ago suggesting they can find evidence for about 600 dead or wounded russian soldiers in the last year. their deaths or their injuries have been uncovered by russian's civil society. the problem is, given the policies of the kremlin today, any attempt by russian journalists or ngos to bring attention to the fact that so-called dead russian soldiers have come back is suppressed. people are beaten up. there was one russian opposition leader who was beaten within inches of his life. journalists are attacked. they are branded by traitors. if putin is able to coverup 600 dead or wounded russian soldiers in ukraine, in syria he's only deploying maybe 1500 to 2,000. this is mostly an aerial bomb d
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bombardment campaign. if eve an few hundred are killed in syria, this will be covered up. he's not looking to put a full scale thing in place. i think we have to be much more hard-headed in the approach here. he's not had his moment yet. this is what i'm trying to get at. >> it is stunning, the manner in which putin has been able to line up intelligence sharing with iraq and iran in the urn, and the action so quickly. great to have michael on. our viewers can google his name. he's a writer for the daily beast, taking interesting angles on this. thank you for your time and if our viewers want to learn more about the intervention in syria and what kind of impact this can have in the middle east, head to our website,
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cnn.com/international. fears isis may gain a foothold in afghanistan, has driven some afghans out of their homeland. >> one soldier left and paused in germany. he told his story to our nick paton walsh. >> reporter: you can't imagine what's going through his head. the fears he's overcome and those he still has for the safety of his family, unless we take you back to where he was two months ago. this front line of what was once america's longest war, here this man is still fighting it. he filmed his afghan army fighting in the worse clashes outside kunduz. but now america is leaving and they're left wanting for basics and losing. >> translator: once the taliban
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surrounded us in a base of 12 days. our dead bodies began to stink. our wounds were bleeding. we didn't have food or ammunitions but we had to watch officials say we did and were no longer under threat. >> reporter: back in august he confided in kabul telling us how army money was often spent not on basics like fuel but on perks for commanders like grilled chicken. you three-quarters of his unit fled. no comment from afghan officials. he soon realized he would have to flee afghanistan to taliban and isis knew where he lived, even ran to recruit him. staying brought that threat upon his family. the nightmare journey through iran, turkey, greece, to germany, was, he felt the safer option. >> translator: i know the risk,
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but i have to. better than being killed by the taliban or having them behead me in front of my family orch kidn my children. >> reporter: smugglers led them to a cave where 100 migrants huddled with no food, water or target. they sell water at inflated prices. one night they took 50 on a four-hour march to a steep border. the climb was easy for an afghan soldier, and he led the way. >> translator: when he got closer, the iranian police saw us and started shouting. some ran away. others ran with me. i told people to keep running. but the bullets got closer. he hid behind rocks. i got 15 people out and across. we walked for 18 hours. >> reporter: in the next
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pictures we see why his smile is not that simple. they shaved his beard for the trip to greece and until his family wired them money. 30 people drowned days earlier in high winds. here the 1800 euros double price they spent on a good boat has paid off. they've arrived in europe, the greek island. he remembers filming these pictures and thinking, i'm here, and i'm alive. yet, he only cried once on his journey, and that moment was still ahead of him. this is the border between hung ri and serbia. migrants, refugees, call them what you will, the hungarian police won't let them cross.
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anger, young men lashing out. they are soon hit with tear gas and water cannons. >> translator: i didn't see one. tens of women and children in their tents were crushed by protesters escaping the tear gas and water cannons. certain ban police quickly sent balances. i was crying, not because of the gas but because of what was happening to these people. >> reporter: the police and their fence hold. this is an afghan who helped nato fight the taliban as they said, that would keep europe safe. and now hungary in both europe and nato has a front line against him. keeping him out no matter if he means he's sent back to face the taliban again. in munich, where he arrived, small worries here now vie with larger ones at home.
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he must register in germany, but will that stop him from going to belgiu belgium. a bigger fear haunts his every step. only his brother knows where he really is. >> translator: the taliban think i've gone back to the army. they've taken the phone. when i try to call my wife, they can force me to go to them. my wife is ill, but she can't go to the doctor. she's afraid to leave the house. i love all my children the same, two sons and a a daughter, but i miss her the most. she's always on my mind. %-p. left haunted and incomplete by the old life. nick paton walsh, cnn, munich. >> so eye-opening.
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it's difficult for us to put r ourselves in the shoes of migrants. witnessing death just to get a better life -- >> and that is one of the many stories. >> yeah. >> that's the extraordinary thing. there are so many other stories like that. >> thanks for that report. the volkswagen emission scandal has exposed a huge problem with emissions tests around the world. coming up, we'll show you a test car companies can't cheat on. stay with us. whatever you're doing, plan well and enjoy life... ♪ or, as we say at unitedhealthcare insurance company, go long. of course, how you plan is up to you. take healthcare. make sure you're covered for more than what just medicare pays...
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movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. after volkswagen admitted it cheated on emissions tests. there's now more scrutiny about emissions testing. >> that's right. governments worldwide rely on the car makers to police themselves when it comes to emissions. think about that. we visited one independent test house that says its results are far more accurate than those
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found in a lab. >> reporter: this is what it takes to test a car's emissions. but this isn't the kind of test any car maker could cheat. when properly done, emission standards vary from country to country. according to an icct report, during road tests, depending on climate and driving conditions, as well as the driver's themselves, co 2 emissions are 40% worse than lab results. and nitrous oxide numbers are violating world standards anywhere making lab testing useless. >> we can see in a second by second basis, how that car is performing as you're driving through the mountains or driving down by the coast and see how that all impacts on the emissions. >> reporter: emissions analytics contributed to that icct report. their equipment will measure things that can drive up a car's emissions. everything from speed bumps to
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temperature and humidity. all the emissions coming out of the exhaust are traveling through this tube into this gas analyzer. this will measure the composition of the gases. how much this car is putting out. while all this equipment can be found in a lab, this is designed to be mobile. >> ready? >> reporter: absolutely. >> as far as we're concerned, the way that cars are monitored on the road needs to be improved. whether that's in america testing more of the vehicles that come off the production line or in europe, testing cars as they're driven on the road rather than just in a lab. >> reporter: what do higher emissions mean for consumers in public health? >> it has a detriment tall effect for health, particularly in urban areas, because they are known to aggravate heart and lung conditions such as asthma.
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>> reporter: poor testing is also bad for the consumer, resulting in worse gas my language than advertising. the gap between the lab cost the arch consumer an extra $500 per year. for regulators and car companies, it's still a long road ahead to cleaner emissions and better testing. cnn, london. we want to get you some new information we've just received. iraq's prime minister says russian iraqs in syria are, quote, beneficial, and he would welcome their expansion into his country so long as it's to fight isis. >> he made the comments during an interview on pbs on wednesday. he also said he met with russia's president and urged him to join the fight against isis. we're going to take a short break. ,
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egyptian queen. >> many say it would be one of the greatest discovers to date in egypt. >> reporter: a new dawn in egypt as archaeologists make the greatest discovery ever, the tomb of nephratite. her name means a beautiful woman has come. the search for this mysterious queen starts in a valley for kings. nicklaus reeves leads the expedition. reeves believes the queen shares a tomb with the most famous king. the journey begins in the bowels of his resting place. but subtle clues evolved into a
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theory. >> i think it was a tomb made for a queen and then adapted for the burr yul, if it was the queen, it was a queen who had become pharaoh. the fpharaoh in question looks o be nefertiti. >> reporter: the walls are a distraction, camouflaging a secret j but modern secnology pierces through the distraction. >> you can see all sorts of things, lines which indicate corners of cut walls and these are the things that i've been -- that i noticed at first, and have since been trying to provide a context for. if i'm right, this is simply part of the entrance of the tomb of her. >> reporter: another clue is that tut's tomb compared to the
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rest is small. he was not very important, but what makes him famous is his tomb was found entirely intact. and with it, rooms of treasure. >> there's no evidence it's been breached in anticty. all the indications are whatever was buried there is still there. >> reporter: and that discovery could depeas the king. >> i think it must be more important than the discovery of it himself. >> reporter: there's a lot more testing to be done before digging begins. even if tut has a tomb mate, it's not guaranteed to be the queen. >> it could be more than just her. let us wait until the results. >> reporter: will the beautiful woman come? or will she make us wait a little longer?
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cnn in the valley of the kings egypt. >> fascinating there. one quick story before we head out. tickets for a chance to eat christmas dinner at harry potter's hog warts have sold out. ticketholders will get to eat at the great hall in london. >> this is cool, but you can't get a ticket. they're sold out. they cost $349. dinner does come with a wand. we should mention cnn and warner brothers are both part of time warner. >> better be a magical wand for that price. >> no kidding. >> i'm sure there's a rosemary in there. >> i'm sure, hidden away. >> don't go away. >> stay with us. just might be the one. to clean the oceans, to start a movement, or lead a country.
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air strikes hit rebel positions in syria, and some of those rebels are backed by washington. >> back in charge j afghan authorities say they've retaken most of kunduz from taliban fighters. and the former punk rocker
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turned jihadist, why the u.s. and britain say she's one of the most dangerous women in the world. >> welcome to our viewers in the united states and all around the world. >> thanks for joining us on this second hour of cnn news room. >> u.s. and russian officials are preparing for military talks about air strikes in syria, possibly in the coming hours. russia says syrian president, bashar al assad asked for the countries help in fighting isis, so it has strikes on wednesday. >> oppositions say it's not the terror group but civilians who are dying in these bombings. the syrian national coalition claims 36 people, all of them civilians were killed in the air
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strikes. those are the forces fighting against president asaad who is russia's ally. while the u.s. and russia disagree who was targeted, they agree they need to talk to avoid unintended incidents. >> the first instruction to us was to make sure that the military of the united states, the coalition led by the united states on the one hand and the military of the russian federation now engaged in things at the request of the syrian government get in touch and establish channels of communication to avoid any unintended incidents. >> it is one thing, obviously, to be targeting isil. we're concerned if that's not what's happening. >> u.s. officials say the russians gave them very little notice of the impedding air strikes in syria, and that the
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notice came in an unorthodoxed fashion. >> we asked the u.s. defense secretary about that. >> you've been dealing with the russians for years. to a russian general shows up this morning and apparently reads you your people a note saying air strikes are beginning in one hour. what do you make of that? as secretary of defense, is that acceptable military to military relations with you, and where does this leave you in you sit down and talk to the russian military about a way ahead? is this not a little bizarre? >> you're right. i have been dealing with them for a long time, and this is not the kind of behavior that we should expect professionally from russian military professionally, and that's one reason why i think it's a good thing to have an avenue of communication that is less unprofessional than a drop-in. >> now, russia insists the army
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of asaad is the only legislate fighting force in syria and that the u.s.-led coalition is breaking international law. matthew chance joins us live to talk about all of this. it's all happened quickly, but all evidence suggests russian forces struck rebel-held strongholds and were nowhere near isis hot spots in syria, but the kremlin saying that isis are the only enemies in their fight. what's the latest you're hearing from there this morning? >> that's right. i mean, the russian defense ministry issued a statement late last night saying they struck eight positions including vehicles and command centers and ammunition dumps. they even released video from airplanes taken as the air strikes were carried out. there is a big discrepancy in what one side is saying, what the russians are saying and with
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the united states and others are saying as well. just to get to this one issue, the recent question over what russian's ambitions are in syria, but it's actually made that quite clear from my reading of the situation, anyway. vladimir putin saying this at the urn general assembly a couple of days ago, saying it was a mistake to not give asaad the support he needed to fight isis. that's what russia is doing now. if that means striking isis, fine, but it may also involve striking over groups that are fighting asaad. their goal is protecting the government of the syrian leader. yesterday morning the russian parliament approved the use of russian forces abroad in a combat operation. within a few hours after that, russia has formally entered the
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syrian civil war. >> reporter: this is the aftermath of russia's first air strike in syria, and its violent announcement of involvement in this brutal war. the kremlin says it's targeting isis forces. but these chaotic images are from where other rebel groups hold sway. moscow draws little distinction between the enemies of the syrian government ally. it took russia's parliament less than half an hour to rubber stamp the use of military force, al bee it temporary and limited to air power, but they justify it as legal under international law, and like the air strikes they say carried out by the united states and its alleys. >> i want to inform you the president of the syrian arab republic requested assistance.
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we can state that it is necessary to fight terrorism. international efforts should be united, but complying soft norms of international law is acceptable. >> reporter: few expected military action so soon, despite emerging evidence of a russian military buildup. moscow has good reason to support its ally. a genuine concern about the spread of radical islamic groups like isis. but the kremlin also seems driven by a desire to reassert its power and to show that russia remains a global force to be reckoned with. it was a message delivered by vladimir putin forcefully at the u.n. general assembly earlier this week. western policy on syria and elsewhere, he said, had failed, leaving chaos in its wake. >> translator: i'm urged to ask
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those who created this situation, do you at least realize now what you've done in but i'm afraid this question will remain unanswered. >> reporter: now it seems russia is offering its own answers. these are the first official images from the russian defense ministry of the air strikes. military equipment, communication centers and motor vehicles are among the targets attacked, it says. and this is just day one of what would be russia's open-ended syrian war. now starting day two. there has been a statement after a meeting with the u.s. secretary of state. they said the rumors that targets other than islamic state had been struck by russian war planes are unfounded. he also said he had no data on the reports that there have been
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civilian casualties already as a result of the air strikes. >> matthew chance live in moscow for us. thanks. cnn military analysts, rick fran cone joins me to talk about what's going on in syria right now. from what you have been able tossto tosser ascertain, what were the targets they hit? >> it looks like they were going after anti-regime rebels. i know their talk about going after isis was probably just that. the areas they struck, there's very few isis targets in that area. and all the videos we've seen coming out after the strikes don't show any isis involvement. >> so it begs the yquestion, wht is russia's intent in syria, and wouldn't it have been a wiser move for russia to go after isis targets first no matter what the
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intentions? >> yeah. i thought they would go after isis first and establish that as their baseline. much as the turks did. the turk went after isis first and then they devoted their attention to the pkk targets. i thought the russians might do the same. it looks like their intent is solely to prop up the asaad regime. they want to maintain access to those bases in the future, and if asaad falls, they may lose that. >> and they seem to be pretty open about that, certainly by actions here, if they're not saying it. and these russian air strikes come a few days after that fr frfrs frosty meeting between barack obama and putin. how should the united states respond to russia's actions, and how dangerous is this new phase of u.s./russian relations? >> the way the russians went about this today, marching into baghdad and demanding we remove
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our aircraft from syrian air space, this is going to get dangerous. right now you have the u.s.-led coalition operating in a confined area. these are high performance aircraft with lots of weapons and lots of people on edge flying these missions. any misjudgment could result in an incident that will lead to fatalities on somebody's side. the deconfliction has to be worked out. there's going to be a confrontation between the united states and russia over who controls that air space, and right now we're seeing it laid down, and we're going to see what each side is made of. >> a delicate situation. thank you for your analysis. keeping an eye on what is, perhaps, occurring on the ground here in syria. many thanks to you. >> good to be with you. >> now, some new information into cnn this past hour.
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iraq's prime minister says the russian iraqs in syria are beneficial, and he would welcome them in his country as well, as long as they were to fight isis. that is if moscow joins the u.s.-led coalition. he made the comments during an interview on wednesday. he also said he met with putin and urged him to join the fight against isis. let's get a bit more analysis on this now and bring in a senior research fellow in russian studies at the royal united services institute. he joins us this morning from london. thanks for coming in to cnn today. president putin appears to be going all in and gambling big here in his words, to protect the al asaad regime. in your view, why did russia take such fast and obvious actions that didn't hurt isis strongholds. that undermines the argument putin has been making. >> the problem is that the
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kremlin is extremely successful in cheating its own population, and it seems the kremlin got the feeling it can cheat everybody. it's very difficult to locate where, actually, a bomb falling. this that is the belief. they probably hope they can cheat, and the additional problem is that it seems to me that actually, the goal of the kremlin does not have anything common with fighting isis or maybe even defending asaad. it's just side effect. it seems that the main goal now is just to get sanctions which are imposed against the kremlin after ukraine, to get the sanctions lifted, and that is probably the kremlin's calculation. it would be difficult to extend things in december. >> however, if they continue, as you say, even if they're trying to lie or cheat, the video, the reports, are obvious that these
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are rebel-held areas being hit. what do you make of the goals with the short-term? if you're hitting rebels, you're helping isis. those rebels are fighting isis. and if you look at the positioning of russian assets, they're not poised to attack isis. if you look at where they are, what do you think they are trying to accomplish in these next few months before believing that they may get sanctions lifted? >> well, it seems to me that they will adjust their actions, and they will start hitting isis targets. because it is quite possible for aviation to fly over heads of asaad opponents and then to hit behind their lines, somewhere on the territory controlled by isis. i do think they will do that, but still will keep doing their own business, defending asaad. which is still a sort of side effect of their policy. >> and what fascinates me
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watching this is it's done despite the many risks of taking such action. you noted they only have two enemies, russia and the united states. russia is on fumes but could this intervention invite an isis family memb attack on russia? >> it could and i'm afraid it will will. there is the branch of isis. we can't discount how formal, but the branch of isis on the russian territory, and so they can launch terrorist attacks on the russian territory. but that is another example of the short-sided nature of the kremlin's politics now. it seems that they use as the universal rule, let's solve problems as they come to us, and there is no isis attacks right now, so we can become and keep
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doing what we're doing. it seems to me it is the mistake, very potentially, very serious mistake by the kremlin. >> saying it there, saying this is a mistake for russia and the nation is misleading all of us. we appreciate your insight. with us from the united royal institute. >> after a humiliating defeat, afghan officials say government officials are back in control of most of kunduz. that was some of the recent footage out of the city. a local police spokesman said they were clearing out taliban fighters early tuesday, but two of the six districts are still under the taliban's control. the united nations has heard reports that up to 6,000 civilians have fled the city.
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and with more from kabul, we are joined by a reporter from the guardian newspaper. it appears a little premature with taliban still evident in some districts there as we mentioned there. but can afghan forces hold onto the city and keep the taliban out long term once they do clear the remaining areas? >> that's a good question. i think that's what a lot of people in kunduz is asking. i think keeping the city is going to be possible, but the kunduz has long seen public unrest since the invasion in 2001. and part of the reason for that is that the government forces rely to a large extent on private relations. for example, that they are known for human rights abusers, and
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for not having a lot of support among the people. even if the taliban are now pushed out of kunduz city, they will be present in the districts, and the security forces and government will have to work on long term solutions to create stability in the city, and as we speak now, they're still fighting in some areas of the city, for example, around the police head quarters. but also in districts of -- in parts of districts that the government actually now declared under government control. still, for example, in a district captured last night. the government forces say they have control over that, but i hear from locals, that approximately 60% is in taliban control. >> where are the taliban who took over kunduz on monday? where are most of them now? and are they simply regrouping,
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ready to return on mass again? >> they don't seem to be regrouping in significant numbers but some of them left prior to the operation last night. i went to a district where they brought vehicles and they brought weapons that they seized during these past four days when they were in control of kunduz. others simply just fled to the suburbs, to districts around kunduz, and some of them are hiding in civilian houses. we get reports this is fighting going on with shooting from civilian houses. it's a little bit spread out. in other districts they're regrouping, some of them just hiding inside kunduz. >> all right. hearing the latest there from a reporter from the guardian and reporting for us from kabul. >> many more big stories following for you. hurricane joaquin could make
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land fall in the states. we'll get you the latest information. >> and the palestinian president drops what he called a bomb shell at the united nations. details just ahead here on cnn news room. i'm caridee. i've had moderate to severe plaque psoriasis most of my life. but that hasn't stopped me from modeling. my doctor told me about stelara® it helps keep my skin clearer. with only 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses... ...stelara® helps me be in season. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and increase your risk of infections. some serious infections require hospitalization. before starting stelara® your doctor should test for tuberculosis. stelara® may increase your risk of cancer. always tell your doctor if you have any sign of infection, have had cancer, or if you develop any new skin growths. do not take stelara® if you are allergic to stelara® or any of its ingredients. alert your doctor of new or worsening problems including headaches, seizures, confusion and vision problems. these may be signs of a rare, potentially fatal brain condition. serious allergic reactions can occur. tell your doctor if you or anyone in your house
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we have this story just into cnn. a series of bombs have exploded in southern china. a news agency reports the latest came thursday morning, although, there are no reports of casualties in that blast. the string of bombings has killed at least 7 people over the past day. >> you can just see the wreckage that we're getting a glimpse of. investigators say 17 parcel bombs have exploded across the town. they say a suspect paid couriers who carry the bombs across the area. we will keech watching this developing story for you. >> hurricane joaquin is picking up strength. >> it is now a hurricane three
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category. fa forecasters think it may hit the united states. >> the north eastern region is dealing with heavy rains and could expect more flooding. k virginia has issued a state of emergency. let's bring in pedram for the latest on joaquin. it could soak a place that's already wet. >> absolutely, and because of the amount of people in the path, it's a big story. we're calculating around 80 million people in the path of this storm. about 320 million people in the united states. that's one in every four people impacted by this. it's a big story, and this time of year, the trees have a lot of foliage. put rainfall and the trees weigh down. they can come down. millions could see power outages if it comes toward the northeast. there's a lot of elements to be seen if this takes it toward the
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most densely populated corner of the u.s. we know the moisture is plentiful in this region. the area indicated with the 80 million people, people are making the preparations, getting your hurricane kits in line and getting yourself ready for food and water. necessities ahead of the storm so if the storm goes in that direction, something you would expect with a storm something this menacing. 120 miles per hour winds. bahamas seeing the brunt of the storm. it's sitting there moving 6 miles per hour. you can jog past the storm system if you're on land. that's how slow it is moving. and it's pouring rainfall across the region. the complexity of the storm comes into what we would call a negatively tilted trough. with the sort of pattern, telling you a storm has reached full maturity, and it approaches
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the south eastern united states, parking off in place on saturday afternoon into sunday. typically what we see, they like to guide storms to the north and sometimes steer storms toward the united states. some are saying it would go toward bermuda. a couple of elements here. a category three. the blue means light winds directly above it, the storm system is expected to strengthen. above that into category four, the red is stronger winds above the storm shredding it apart. at that point, it could still be a category two. now winds trying to rip the storm apart. the water temperatures are warm. because it could get to category four, it won't have enough time to weaken past a category 2.
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10-plus inches of rainfall on top of the rain already had. it could be catastrophic. and with the trees, and the weight of the trees when the winds are blowing and the rain is coming down. >> we just don't know -- >> it's a complex storm system. a lot of weather elements. we're saying be prepared for worst case. >> people will be ready. they've had the warnings. >> absolutely. at least the warnings are there four or five days in advance. >> certainly. thanks so much. there's a few flag outside the united nations head quarters in new york. that's just ahead. along with israel's reaction to a surprising announcement from the palestinian leader. back in a moment. [announcer] you're on the right track to save big
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welcome back to those of you watching in the u.s. and tuned in from around the world, this is cnn news room. >> we want to check the headlines for you this hour. afgh afghan officials say most of the city of kunduz is under local control. an online taliban statement claims government forces were pushed back. u.s. and russian military officials could meet as soon as thursday to talk about how to stay out of each other's way while carrying out air strikes in syria. russian fighter jets began bombing targets on wednesday after giving the u.s. one hour's
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notice. russia says it's hitting isis targets. the u.s. says they're hitting syrian opposition groups. and iran's press tv reports a higher number of iranian victims from last week's stampede. the report says 464 iranians were killed, much higher than previously thought. saudi arabia says in all at least 169 people died in that stampede. now to palestinian flag is flying outside the united nations head quarters in new york. typically only member state flags are on display there. they have nonmember observer status. >> they see the move as a symbolic stand. >> earlier in the stay the palestinian president got his chance to speak at the u.n. general assembly. >> he says as long as israel is
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not honoring the peace agreements known as the oslo accords, his group will not be bound by them either. he told the assembly wednesday, and i'm quoting here, palestine is a state under occupation. >> translator: as long as israel is not committed to the signed agreements and undermined all agreements, we, for our part, are not committed to those agreements and israel must bear full responsibility for this development and this situation. >> the israeli prime minister will get his chance to address the united nations general assembly on thursday. and let's go live to jerusalem. what is he likely to say about the palestinian flag raising, the comments and the iran deal? he has a lot of material to
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cover there? >> reporter: he does, and i suspect his big topics will be the iran deal. he said he'll keep speaking against it and telling the world why he thinks it's a bad idea. he'll talk about syria. that's the big story in the news, especially since russia called the u.s. about the air strikes but also israel. and then perhaps we very much expect him to address the c conflict here. they called the flag raising a show and said it won't create a palestinian state, and newt newt ca -- benjamin netanyahu called it a deceitful speech. he didn't come out and say economic cooperation is done. he said if israel refuses to abide by the agreements, palestinian won't either.
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we expect a similar speech from benjamin netanyahu. we'll hear the israelis blaming the palestinians. >> when we look at what the palestinian president said, he's basically saying if israel won't abide by the peace agreements, palestinians won't either. how does it relate to what might happen on the ground? >> that's the big question that we're waiting to see. if he did call off security coordinations, that will lead to dramatic changes here, especially in the relationship between israelis and palestinians, and those are changes that if he did cancel them, we would see very quickly. if they're not statements, it will be more of the same. the situation hasn't changed and the status quo will continue. so that's what we're all waiting to see. because what he said is vague, earn
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everyone is waiting to see what his statements made or if they're just statements. >> indeed. live from jerusalem. thanks for that. next, she's considered the female face of isis and she's now labeled a global terrorist. what u.s. and british officials say she's done. >> and ahead, some warning the republican front runner takes a hard-line approach on refugees from syria. [ female announcer ] when you're serious about fighting wrinkles, turn to roc® retinol correxion®. one week, fine lines appear to fade.
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welcome back, everyone. there are growing concerns about the role women are playing within the ranks of isis. the u.s. homeland security committee says 30 american women have joined or tried to join isis. >> this all comes as new intention emerges on a british woman who's become a prominent member of the terror group. >> reporter: she reportedly played guitar in a punk band and analysts say she was eager for
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adventure. now sally ann jones is. to freeze her money. >> i think sally jones is the most visible woman in isis right now. >> reporter: the image of her now, dressed as a none, pointing a pistol at the camera. >> her stature will grow. she's been able to build up a significant twitter following. >> reporter: with postings like this. her threats are serious. u.s. and british officials tell cnn jones has encouraged jihadists to launch attacks in britain. analysts say this is one of the last people you'd expect to join a terror group which practices strict sharia law. >> she was into black magic, and she used to be a tragic figure.
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>> reporter: she is said by u.s. and british officials to have traveled to syria to fight along her husband, a well-known isis operative, head of the group's hacking division. believed to have inspired the only isis attack on u.s. soil. the foiled attack. they tried to get lone wolves to target american military personnel by publishing their information. now in addition to her other activities, u.s. and british officials say sally jones uses social media to recruit women to join isis. >> she's a cougar. she was 20 years older when they started corresponding. there is a possibility that there are other women who are converts who are older, who are
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basically lost souls that might be drawn to her. >> reporter: a state department official tells cnn sally jones is likely in the isis stronghold of syria. she is believed to be the third western born woman to take a prominent role. there's a widow of the paris gunman believed to be in syria. and the so-called white widow. her husband blew himself up in the july 2005 london train and bus attacks. she's believed to have raised money for terrorist cells in africa. all three women still at large and very dangerous. brian todd, cnn, washington. donald trump says he has no problem with russia's military involvement with syria. >> this comes as moscow claims its targeting isis with its latest air strikes. u.s. officials warn the blasts
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will only aggravate syria's civil car. trump said the u.s. shouldn't interfere. listen. >> number one, they don't respect our president. they really don't respect us anymore, and that's why they're doing this. at the same time, if they want to hit isis, that's okay with me. i'm not going to be saying we have to do it all. we're like the policeman of the world. >> according to u.s. officials, the areas being hit are not isis strongholds. these are areas that are propping up asaad, they believe. >> i'm hearing that, i hear they're hitting both, and then you say to yourself, asaad bad guy killed hundreds of thousands of people, but you wonder what's going to happen with the other people that we don't even know who they are. we give weapons and billions of dollars in weapons and they turn them against us. we have no control. we don't know the other people that we're supposed to be backing or who we're backing. >> and trump is clashing are rival candidate, jeb bush over how to handle the syrian refugee
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crisis. >> during town hall meetings, trump took a hard line stance against people take asylum in the u.s., and bush said the u.s. is duty bound to help. >> i'm putting the people on notice coming here from syria as part of this mass migration that if i win, if i win, they're going back. their going back. i'm telling you. they're going back. >> we have a noble tradition of taking care of refugees. we've done it since the beginning of time. and i think we need to maintain that. having said that, we need to make sure we screen people and do all the things appropriate to make sure that the people coming here are legitimate, but send them back? this is the same guy that's advocating what seems to be supportive of putin and his emergence in syria. >> donald trump's lead continues
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to surge in the republican race for the white house according to a new poll. the suffolk university usa today poll of almost 400 likely primary voters shows trump with 23% nationally. >> he leads carson and fiorina. marco rubio comes in fourth and bush has 8%. >> and the world has heard a lot from u.s. presidential candidate, donald trump. now we're hearing from his wife. >> so far she has only made brief appearances at his campaign events, but we could be seeing much more of her. >> we met in new york. >> reporter: when donald trump first laid eyes on his future third bride, she refused to give him her number, but the former super model says she thought
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donald did have, quote, sparkle. she eventually called him, and the rest is history. people magazine interviewed her at the couples's penthouse apartment in trump power. politics was off the table. i'm not ready to go political yet. she also said, i'm my own person. i'm not a yes person. i tell my opinions. when asked about giving donald advice, even if you give him advice, he'll maybe take it in but then he'll do it the way he wants to do it. this was her first interview since he declared his candidacy. until this cover story, she's been seen barely but never heard. remember, it was donald's daughter who introduced him when he announced the run for president. >> my father, donald j. trump. >> reporter: his wife attended the debate, but her husband never acknowledged him in his
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opening remarks. and in a recent interview with the candidate, mrs. trump was also visibly absent. people magazine senior editor says she has had a busy summer traveling with the couple's nine-year-old son. he needs somebody as a parent, so i am with him all the at the same time. the trumps reportedly have a cook but no nanny. donald talked to people about the challenge. >> i don't have the time that i would love to have to spend with my children and my wife, and but it's something they understand how important it is, what we're doing. >> reporter: she is an immigrant who became a naturalized citizen in 2006, the year after she married donald. when asked about becoming a citizen, her response was i went through a long process. it didn't cross my mind to just stay here. i think people should follow the
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law. she says she enjoys tennisen and fashion. she works with the american red cross. does she imagine herself as first lady? maybe not as clearly as her husband does, acknowledging it's a long road. saying she takes it day by day. if they do reach the white house, she is sure to request her own space. she told people the secret to a happy marriage is simple. have your own bathroom and your own tv. it's a great relationship, she says. cnn, new york. >> own bathroom and own tv. >> okay. now we know. katy perry is probably used to fans flowing themselves at her, but one fan got carried away. [ female announcer ] take skincare to the next level with roc® multi correxion® 5 in 1. proven to hydrate dryness,
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prosecutors say they will not charge caitlyn jenner for her role in a deadly multicar accident because they can't prove intelligence. her suv slammed into a lexus in
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malibu, california. the collision sent the lexus crashing into oncoming traffic and the driver died at the scene. >> jenner was breaking when the collision happened and driving below the speed limit. she is a transgender advocate. celebrities are used to having their fans fawn all over them. one katy perry fan took things to another level. >> and we have more about this on stage love fest. >> reporter: katy perry sure knows how to pick them. >> the girl with the smiley face [ bleep ]. come on stage right now. >> reporter: at the concert, the fan with a smiley face bra put a smile on our face. >> she's kissing my neck.
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what's your name? >> reporter: she nestled and whispered how to pronounce her name in the singer's ear. the super fan's hands traversed katy's chest. >> that's my boo boo. okay. hold on. >> reporter: most folks seemed to think katy handled the handling well. >> are you a katy cat? i think she's rolling. >> reporter: the fans told tmz she wasn't high. she was exhausted. she couldn't stop hugging and smelling katy. the star asked for help speaking portuguese. there was more neck nuzzling. they kept joking about katy's old hit. she was kissed by a girl, but
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she didn't seem to like it commented someone. that's not being kissed by a girl. that's being assaulted by a person, replied another. >> let's take a selfie. >> reporter: the entire encounter lasted three and a half minutes. katy smacked her in the rump and the fan returned the favor. >> looks like she handled it well. that fan has a moment she'll remember for the rest of her life. >> we're going to head out on her weekend. we appreciate you joining us. >> early start is next for our viewers here in the united states and for everyone else, stay tuned for cnn news room. have a great day. >> see you.
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. . . [announcer] you're on the right track to save big
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during sleep train's triple choice sale. for a limited time, you can choose up to 48 months interest-free financing on a huge selection of tempur-pedic models. or choose to save $300 on beautyrest and posturepedic mattress sets. you can even choose $300 in free gifts with sleep train's most popular stearns & foster mattresses. the triple choice sale -- on now at sleep train. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪
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east coast floods. reporting rainfall as hurricane joaquin gains strength. russia targets isis strongholds. i'm glad to be here. welcome to "early start." i'm boris sanchez. >> i'm christine romans. breaking news this morning.

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