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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  October 3, 2015 1:00am-2:01am PDT

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still in shock, how people are in roseburg are trying to come to grips with a deadly shooting on a college campus. plus, an aerial bombing in kunduz. workers say more than two dozen people are unaccounted for. and later, russia faces increasing pressure to stop air strikes in syria, but moscow doesn't seem willing to back down. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world, i'm mindy kinkaid, and this is "cnn newsroom."
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we'll begin in roseburg, oregon, where the tight-knit community there is grieving and trying to come to terms with thursday's deadly college master. right now authorities are providing a motive for the killings. what we know is the student was a student at umpqua community class. he bravely served in the army in 2008, but a military official says he never made it out of basic training. the nine victims who were killed were students and a teacher at ucc. john vause is covering all of this for us from the college campus in roseburg. john, we're starting to learn more about the nine victims. what can you tell us? >> reporter: lindsey, since all this began -- linda, since all this began, officials want to keep the focus on the victims. the sheriff, a man who has made a point of not mentioning the name of the gunman, on friday, he read out the names of the nine victims who were gunned
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down at the community college. >> the victims are -- lucera alvarez of roseburg, 19 years old. quinn glin cooper of roseburg, 18-years-old. kim saltmash dietz of roseburg, 5 years old. lucas eibel of roseburg, 18-years-old. jason dale johnson of winston, 33 years old. lawrence levine of glide, 67 years old. mr. levine was the teacher. serena dawn moore of myrtle creek, 44 years old.
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trevon taylor anspach, 20. and rebecka ann karnes, 18-years-old. >> the bodies arrived by black hawk helicopters after they were released by the medical examiner in portland. the body of the gunman was not among them. with the nine victims back home, if you like, that means another painful chapter for the families and friends that will start planning funerals and memorial service. >> such a tough time for those families. looking at the gunman, we know it was a young man who had quite a collection of handguns and rifles. and a serious special in high-profile shootings -- serious interest in high-profile shootings. what can you tell us? >> reporter: we were told a lot more details by officials.
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mostly that he had a lot more firepower. officials with the department of alcohol, tobacco, and firearms now say that he was linked to 13 weapons in all. they recovered six weapons from the scene that includes one rifle as well as five handguns. at his apartment, a shotgun, two handguns, and four rifles. also, they found body armor at the site of the shooting as well as five magazines of ammunition and recovered a large amount of ammunition from his apartment, as well. we're also learning more about his state of mind. and sources have told us that he handed pages of writing to one of the survivors to give police. in that writing, he has a hatred toward black men, a frustration that he couldn't form proper relationships. he also complained about the shooters in other mass shootings did not try to kill police. he vowed he would do just that.
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and cnn has learned that he also sought out treatment for mental health issues. linda? >> okay, thank you very much for that update, john vause on the scene in oregon. thank you. president barack obama has repeated the need for tougher gun laws, but there's little he can do. the second amendment to the constitution protects americans' right to keep and bear arms. a provision they strongly defend. besides federal gun laws, there are many state and local gun laws which vary, and any chance would likely -- any change would likely need approval from u.s. lawmakers. many of them are reluctant to take on the powerful gun lobby led by the national rifle associati association. in the hours after the shooting, an angry and frustrated barack obama challenged the u.s. news media to look at the number of americans killed by gun violence
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compared to those who died in acts of terrorism. cnn chief u.s. security correspondent jim sciutto crunched the numbers, and they are staggering. there's been another mass shooting in america -- >> reporter: showing deep frustration in the wake of one more mass shooting, president obama issued a challenge to the media. >> have news organizations tally up the number of american killed through terrorist attacks over the last decade, and the number of americans who have been killed by gun violence. post those side by side on your numerous. >> reporter: we did, and here are the answers. first, cnn went back more than a decade to 2001. [ sirens ] >> reporter: not to exclude 9/11, by far the largest terror attack on u.s. soil. from 2001 to 2013, more than 406,000 americans were killed by guns on u.s. soil. more than 100 times the number of u.s. citizens killed at home or abroad from acts of terrorism during the same time period, just over 3,000.
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nearly 60% of gun deaths, about 237,000, were suicides. exclude suicides, and gun-related deaths fuel 169,000. still drastically higher than the more than 3,000 killed by terrorists, 50 times higher. [ "taps" ] >> reporter: the enormous numbers lead some to call national gun violence on a par greater than terrorism and serve itting of similar attention -- deserving of similar attention. >> the number of dead, that's an average weekend in chicago. >> reporter: in some u.s. cities, as noted by cnn analysts, it exceeds death rates in war zones. the murder rate in new orleans, six times the rate of civilian deaths in afghanistan. and the nation's capital, washington, twice as deadly as the afghan war is for civilians. law enforcement officials trace many gun deaths to drug and gang warfare. >> the reality is on a daily
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basis, the drug problem is probably i would say one of the greatest national security threats that we have because the majority of people are dying from guns are related to drug violence. >> and as we mentioned, 13 legally found guns were traced to the gunman. six at the scene and seven at his home. the next half-hour, we'll have analysis on the gun control debate now back in the spotlight. we're following a developing story in afghanistan where a u.s. air strike may have hit a hospital. the group doctors without borders says three of their staff members were killed. it happened after the trauma center there was bombed several times in the northern city of kunduz. more than 30 people are unaccounted for. according to a u.s. military spokesman, u.s. forces carried out an air strike in the same area suddaturday morning that m have resulted in "collateral damage" to a nearby medical facility.
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we're the latest, we're joined by a reporter with "the guardian" newspaper live in kabul. thanks for being with us. officials calling it collateral damage. what can you tell us about the air strike, and did the medical staff receive any warning prior to the strike taking place? >> reporter: no. it seems there was no warning before the strike happened. there had been heavy fighting in the area surrounding the hospital, the police spokesman told me the area had been under taliban control. but there was no warning to the staff, and according to them, three killed, but that does not include staff at the hospital. over 100 patients with relatives were at the hospital. we expect casualty numbers to rise quite significantly i'm afraid. >> okay, we'll leave it there for now. thank you very much for joining us. and just still to this story,
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cnn international diplomatic editor nic robertson is also following the story and joins us from paris. nic has spent extensive time covering the region. the taliban, of course, nic called this their biggest victory in 15 years when they captured the city of kunduz. it's been a struggle with the afghan forces ever since. strategically speaking, explain why this is so important. >> reporter: kunduz almost sits on a strategic highway linking northern afghanistan to turkey. economically it's important. it's important for the taliban because we've not always understood their real power base was in the south and east of the country, and really this helps sort of put them on the map north of the country. really the taliban has areas of influence now that are in the northeast, the east, the south, the southeast, and a little bit
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in the southwest. so it does expand the influence. for them it's important because it's almost the reverse for government forces, putting them on the pack foot. also it highlights what the afghan government has been essentially saying, that they can defeat the taliban, the afghan national army is capable of doing that, cause that integration. i think perhaps also for the taliban, this was the last major stronghold to fall in 2001. to reclaim it back is also for them quite a morale boost separate to the sort of strategic significance today. >> i understand some of the taliban are hiding amongst civilians in the city, even wearing afghan uniforms to try and blend in, planned booby
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traps. what are the tactics, and are they gaining strength in the north of country? >> reporter: they are gaining strength. they're gaining numbers. i mean, we heard numbers, hundreds of taliban attacking the town. one of the reasons we understand is -- we used to see this in the past, the taliban were able to take towns quickly. the reason was quite simple -- the local townspeople, the sort of military commanders there sometimes would change sides and join the taliban. the afghan national army withdrew the complaints we heard about the commanders not being -- not being up to the task. the sense from the lower ranks that officers were corrupt, were looking after themselves and not the troops. that's undermined the morale of the afghan national army. you know, what we see and understand about the taliban and the way that they operate is that they have bigger numbers
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now. they are better organized than they were before. they're more spread around the country, and they have captured in the past police vehicles, army vehicles. they take the equipment, some that was left behind, indeed, there were pictures of the taliban monday in national army vehicles and police vehicles. they even had a government tank. we were told later destroyed in air strikes. typical for government tactics is to use government vehicles to take uniforms they've captured or bought on the black market, and to approach a target posing as the security forces of the country. that's how they often get close to targets for suicide bombings and such things in the past. this is a very normal tactic for the taliban. the difference in kunduz over previous attacks is they have significant -- they've gathered significant numbers of fighters
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to do it. >> a real worry. nic robertson, we appreciate the update from paris and your analysis on the situation. thank you very much. officials believe a fatal shooting in western sydney was linked to terrorism, and they say the shooter was just a 15-year-old boy. they say the boy shot and killed a civilian worker as the man left the facility. the teenager then died in a shoot-out with police. the prime minister has urged citizens there not to blame the country's entire muslim community. >> it is a shocking crime. it was a cold-blooded murder targeting the new south wales police service. it was doubly shocking because it was perpetrated by a 15-year-old boy. and it underlines the importance of families, communities, leaders being very aware of
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whether young people are becoming radicalized. it is also important that to remember that the australian muslim community will be especially appalled and shocked by this. as the commissioner and premier have noted, we must not vilify or blame the entire muslim community for the actions of what is in truth a very, very small percentage of violent extremist individuals. >> police identified the young president obama to as coming from an iraqi/kurdish background. he was previously unknown to police or counterterrorism officials. in nigeria, officials are investigating a pair of deadly explosions. they happened late friday on the outskirts of abuja. we're told there are an unknown number of casualties.
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so far, no claim of responsibility, but one of the targets was apparently once hit by boko haram. this is the first such incident in over a year near the nigerian capital. still to come on "cnn newsroom," the search for a missing ship lost at sea in the middle of hurricane joaquin. a deadly landslide buries homes in guatemala and leaves hundreds unaccounted for. [ female announcer ] take skincare to the next level with roc® multi correxion® 5 in 1. proven to hydrate dryness, illuminate dullness, lift sagging, diminish the look of dark spots, and smooth the appearance of wrinkles. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. that's a good thing, eligible for medicare? and smooth the appearance of wrinkles. but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company.
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hurricane joaquin was down graded to a category three storm friday, but it's still dumping plenty of rain on the bahamas. emergency officials say there have been no reports of deaths or injuries in the island chain despite lots of flooding and damage. meanwhile, the u.s. coast guard is searching for a container ship that's missing near the bahamas. 33 people are on board. 28 of them are americans. have a look at this view of the enormous storm from space. that's courtesy of nasa. let's check where hurricane joaquin is heading now. pedera -- pedram javah raari is
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here. >> you think about this coming down in a short time period, saturday into sunday, it could be devastating for a large area. we'll break down what the forecast appears to be doing over the region. we'll put the maps in motion. hurricane joaquin so powerful, weather observations across the bahamas stopped reporting conditions on the ground. the storm finally on the move, it will begin pushing away. want to show the deep fetch of motion from joaquin moving toward the state of south carolina in particular. a persistent storm system is also pushing toward the southern u.s. notice the conveyor built of moisture that literally is like an onion being peeled off, being drawn into the southeastern united states, precisely why we think the persistent event could be catastrophic as the models bring the narrow stream. some about 60 miles across or 100 kilometers across, the stretch of rainfall working this
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way. it will continue for a 48-hour period from, say, charleston toward columbia, south carolina, across the state capital. more than 30 million people dealing with flood watches, flood advisories in place. the storm track shifting further north and east and pushing out over open waters. the direct impact doesn't appear to be there. the indirect impact could be catastrophic. model indications put 10 to 15 inches of rainfall over the next two days from charleston toward columbia. you take this and think about what that is capable of doing. the rarity of such an event is on the order of once every 500 years when you talk about, say, 15 inches in a matter of a three-day period. we also have powerful winds well to the north. certainly enough to cause coastal flooding that is taking place across portions of the delmarva region, around chesapeake bay, the convergence taking place there. this is definitely a significant story developing over the region. we'll talk about this when it comes to how this will transpire. we talk it a one in a 500-year
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event taking place, linda. but i did calculations for the city of charleston. when you take 15 inches of rainfall, up to 20 inches evening, half a meter, you put this over an area the size of the city of charleston, it's equivalent to about 40 billion gallons of water coming down from the clouds in two days, 150 billion liters of water. it's hard to wrap your head around those numbers. you think about niagara falls, seven days of water flowing over the falls would be what's happening in two days over this area of the carolinas. a pretty scary situation -- >> there's going to be a lot of damage. >> i think thousands of roads will be under water, yes. of course, flooding is one of the top weather killers in the u.s. this is something that we're telling people to not try to across over the weekend. if they're noting to take care of something, not -- if they're noting to take care of someth g something, not this weekend. an effort underway in guatemala after a massive landslide outside the capital. authorities say heavy rains
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unleashed the mudslide on thursday, burying dozens of homes in guatemala city. at least nine people were killed, dozens more injured. emergency services say up to 600 people may still be missing. still ahead on cnn, the amazing story of the u.s. army veteran caught up in the oregon school shooting now being hailed a hero. also ahead, mounting concern over russia's military involvement in syria despite the country's claim it's only targeting isis. everyone needs protein, every day. there are more than 20,000 different proteins in the human body. they fuel our energy, support our metabolism, amplify our performance and recovery. they're essential for good health. your body's best source for protein? gnc. now get the world's best protein formulas at an astounding price. buy any gnc protein powder and get 1 half off. everyone needs protein, every day. and now all gnc protein powders are buy 1, get 1 half off.
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welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world, i'm lynda kinkade. this hour, doctors were killed saturday in the afghan city of kunduz. more than 30 people unaccounted for. according to a spokesman, an american air strike in kunduz may have resulted in "collateral damage" to a nearby medical facility. russia's news agency says the country has launched more than a dozen air strikes in syria since thursday. the international officials say they doubt smousk limiting attacks to isis targets. russia is also hitting rebels who oppose syria's president. the gunman in a u.s. shooting rampage was enrolled at the community college where he
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died thursday. he was involved with a shoot-out with police. president obama says he will keep talking about gun violence until lawmakers do something to stop it. robert spitzer is a distinguished service professor at the state university new york at courtland. earlier our natalie allen asked him about the fact that the gunman or someone in his family legally bought the guns used in the shooting. >> that's a very telling you about not unusual piece of information. one of the things we typically witness is these mass shooters in particular obtain their guns legally. that's a surprise to many people given what we have now learned about him, that he had deep personal and emotional problems. that these problems were on display, were known to his parents, to people who knew him. but the bar for background checks is so low nationwide, and as it's applied in most states, all you have to do is not be a convicted felon or judged mentally incompetent by a judge.
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and there are lots of people with all kinds of mental problems who don't get caught in either of those two nets. however, there are places in america where background checks are much more meaningful, and that extends to police making inquiries into the associations and friends and neighbors and work colleagues of people who apply to obtain a pistol legally, a firearm legally. and had that occurred in this person's case, local authorities would have immediately uncovered what people around him knew, that this person was deeply disturbed. since that kind of more thorough check did not occur in oregon and does not occur in most states, although it does include in my state of new york, he was able to obtain guns legally. that goes to the limitations and weakness of current gun law. >> so you're saying that if we raise the bar on background checks, there is proof that it can work to keep guns out of the
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hands of people like this shooter. i want you to respond to things we've heard since the shooting. one report i heard today, there are 300 million guns in the united states, what are you going to do? jeb bush said you shouldn't respond to tragedies with more regulation. donald trump, killers will slip through cracks despite our best efforts. what do you say to these? >> well, those are the usual expressions of futility. and you have to begin by saying, look, you're never going to be able to stop all gun crime any more than you'll be able to stop all crime. we have laws in america not because everybody follows them -- after all, i can't think of any law that isn't violated, but you have laws to determine behavior and use it for to catch and prosecute people who do bad things. that's why you have gun laws and every other kind of law. it's true, there are roughly 300 million guns in america, maybe a few less than that. but most of those guns are long
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guns. the guns that are used in crimes overwhelmingly are handguns. nearly all of the guns that the shooter had in oregon were handguns, for obvious reasons. moreover, the guns that are used in crimes are a very small subset of all guns. generally the guns used in crimes, the vast number of guns used in america are not used in crime, i should say. and there are a variety of mechanisms that could be put to place that would make it more easy for police officers and law enforcement to track weapons, to interdict the flow of illegal weapons when illegal weapons can into play, and other things that could definitely be done to help sever the link between guns and people like the shooter who are bent on killing lots of people. we'll say -- to say there's nothing you can do is false and designed to discourage people from having the government take
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meaningful action. >> that was robert spitzer, a gun control expert. and despite the continuing gun violence, most americans are not in favor of changing the existing gun laws. in recent cnn/orc poll, about half of respondents, 49%, say current laws are about right. 41% say existing laws make it too easy for people to buy guns. 10% say they make it too difficult to buy a gun. a hero has emerged from the horror of the oregon shooting. when the gunfire broke out, there was an army veteran that jumped into action to save the life of his classmates. as cnn reports, the student's bravery cost him physically, but it has earned him the thanks of many. >> reporter: happy birthday, tyriq. that message to his 6-year-old son was the last facebook post
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30-year-old chris mince made yesterday. >> college road -- >> reporter: hours later, the army veteran was shot seven times trying to save his college classmates from a madman on a shooting rampage. >> we have one female that has been shot at this time. >> reporter: according to witnesses, mince blocked his classroom door and told the gunman, "you aren't getting by me." >> tries to block the door to keep the gunman from coming in. gets shot three times, hits the floor. >> reporter: mince's aunt and cousin in north carolina say they're in shock. >> it's unbelievable. >> reporter: mince was shot several more times, breaking both of his legs. >> i was actually there when he rolled out of surgery. >> reporter: mince's co-worker at the ymca is hardly surprised by his friend's courage. >> it was a tragic thing, but a peace kime over me. i knew who we were talking about. i knew he would make it. he's stubborn. he's tough. >> reporter: the family says he is out of surgery and recovering from the gunshots to his hands, back, stomach, and legs. but he is smiling.
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a witness told abc news mince had the chance to escape but went back into the building to save others. >> he ran to the library and pulled all the alarms, and he was telling people to run, grabbing people, telling them, "you just have to go." he actually ran back toward the building where the shooting was. >> reporter: mince's aunt says as her nephew lay wounded, he had only one thing on his mind -- >> looks up at the gunman and says, "it's my son's birthday today." >> reporter: he was no doubt hoping, praying he would live to see another. >> just a great father. driven in that area, too. loves his son, loves his son with unconditional love, what every father should do. >> reporter: helping his classmates and community is nothing new for the army veteran who in addition to classes works the overnight shift at the ymca. >> the main thing is making sure our building is clean and working, and he's parts of that hard-working team. >> reporter: weeks ago, mintz
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posted, "i see ucc is holding training to help fight fires. i need a babysitter and the money to do it." little did he know he would end up being a hero in another way. mintz' family set up a gofundme page for his recovery and have already raised thousands of dollars. jake tapper, washington. >> if you would like it help chris mintz and the other victims of the shooting in oregon, cnn has vetted two gofundme accounts raising funds for them and their families. you can head to cnn.com/impact if you'd like to donate. criticism is mounting against russia's air campaign in syria. several countries including the u.s., turkey, and saudi arabia are urging russia to stop targeting syrian opposition groups and civilians. russia says it's only been hitting isis targets in the nearly 20 air strikes so far. u.s. president barack obama says russia's involvement in syria will only cause more bloodshed in the war-torn country.
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>> we are not going to cooperate with a russian campaign to simply try to destroy anybody who is disgusted and fed up with mr. assad's behavior. keep in mind also from a practical perspective the moderate opposition in syria is one that if we're ever going to have of to a political transition we need. and the russian policy is driving those folks underground or creating a situation in which they are decapacitated, and it's only strengthening isil. >> meanwhile, russia remains unphased by foreign criticism of its military action and says it did not carry out any strikes against civilians. phil black is covering the story for us from moscow.
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and senior international correspondent ben wedeman is in beirut, lebanon. thank you very much for joining us. let's start with phil. the u.s.-led coalition partners are reaching out to russia including french president francois hollande. what is it going to take for russia and iran to work with the u.s.-led coalition, or do they simply have no interest in doing that? >> i think that if you accept the analysis of the united states and its coalition partners at the moment the russian policy is in no way compatible with that was theirs really. according to president obama, as you just heard there, and other countries including the french president who said he gave the message to vladimir putin directly yesterday, they believe that russia is only striking and certainly focused on striking those groups which are presenting an immediate threat to the regime of president bashar al assad and his forces in syria. and those groups do not really
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include isis at the moment. they believe that they are challenge -- russia is only targeting those groups which are challenging the syrian regime. and that as a result is only causing civilian casualties. as you touched on there, russia denies that, insists that it is only going after what it describes as terrorist groups. and in fact, with every day that passes, and they give a long list of targets that the russian military claims to have hit, it insists that each group, each target, facility and so forth, is owned and operated by isis itself, lynda. >> and let's just bring in ben for now. stay with us, phil. ben, if you can just give us some more perspective on the exact targets. clearly as phil was saying and as we've heard from all parties involved, russia claims they're targeting isis, but the u.s.-led coalition claimed that russia's actually going after the rebels fighting isis. what's your reading, your understanding of what's going
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on? >> we heard just this morning, lynda, from the british defense minister who says that only one in five of the targets being struck by russian aircraft actually belongs to isis. and if you look at the pattern of the air strikes, many of them are focused around targets in western syria, around homs, hama, and idlib province where there are rebels operating. some of them part of this -- a coalition of a variety of groups including, for instance, the al qaeda affiliate within syria. but for instance, overnight, we understand there is one series of strikes around the north and west of it which, in fact, belonged to isis. by and large, it does appear that the strikes are focusing on other groups rather than isis. and there's an interesting
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situation developing in eastern syria. that's a city where there's a small government enclave still holding out, and there's an offensive by isis in that area to take the airport, the military airport. this isn't an area where the -- where the u.s.-led coalition operate. it will be interesting to see if the russians will come to the aid of regime forces or leave them be and, in fact, risk the possibility of losing a very important final outpost for the regime in eastern syria. so it really is a complicated situation. and we understand that the u.s. and russia are trying to deconflict their operations in syria. but denezor will be a test to see whether they can do that. >> deconflict is the word that keeps being used. but of course, president obama has said that he's worried that
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russia's involvement and russian and iran building up the russian regime will make-will escalate the conflict. what's your assessment, ben? >> well, you know, when you're fighting against isis, for instance, it's important to keep in mind their apocalyptic vision of this conflict. keep in mind, for instance, that al qaeda began its fight in afghanistan against the russians. four jihadis, members of isis. this is sort of their dream come true, to be fighting again the united states, to be fighting against russia in what they see as the final battle. so rather than being terrified, if you look on social media, many of them seem to be delighted by the fact the russians are involved. for instance, we see a leader from the al qaeda affiliate in syria is offering jihadis a two
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million syrian lira, about $9,000 reward for the capture of russian soldiers. they are liking their lips at this opportunity -- lick their lips at this opportunity. definitely it will galvanize even further those who support this gee had, this holy war in syria, and it will be interesting to see, for instance, the reaction of the jihadis around the muslim world to this intervention. now-direct intervention by russia in this seemingly endless conflict. lynda? >> a very good point, ben. and just finally to phil, russia's economy is, of course, struggling. and it has huge trade ties with syria. how is this military move by moscow being viewed by the russian people? >> it's mixed really. the support is far from overwhelming. an independent poll taken just before the russian military action began in earnest showed that only about 40% of people
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support russian policies in syria. now that is tempered somewhat by vladimir putin's approval ratings which still soar at around 80% and have done so consistently for a long time now. he can't take that for granted. as you mentioned, the economy is in real trouble. it's not going anywhere. the turn continues to suffer under economic sanction -- country continues to suffer under economic sanctions and policies in ukraine. they dropped well below who what it needs, and the country is depleted. these facts influence the quality of life for russians here. they have been driven to support the government by a nationalistic fervor inspired by policies in ukraine and so forth. it will be interesting to see the ongoing reaction to the actions in syria as they continue to be championed by russian state media with
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round-the-clock images of flying sorties, combat video of the targets being struck and so forth. >> we'll see if that continues. phil black and ben wedeman, thank you very much, gentlemen. we appreciate it. you're watching "cnn newsroom." another controversy, now major sponsors are calling for fifa to ask seth blatter to step down. i'm only in my 60's. i've got a nice long life ahead.
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welcome back. fifa president sepp blatter says he's not going anywhere let. sponsors calling for his immediate resignation. last week the swiss attorney general opened criminal proceedings amid an alleged bribery scandal. cnn has the details. >> reporter: for so long, fifa's main sponsors remained mostly silent as football's world governing body lurched from one
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corruption scandal to another. on friday, some of the world cup's biggest corporate backers spoke out, demanding the immediate resignation of the beleaguered president, sepp blatter. one week after the swiss attorney general's office opened criminal proceedings against the 79-year-old president, coca-cola called for him to step down saying, "every day that passes, the image and reputation of fifa continues to tarnish." minutes later, mcdonald's followed suited saying, "we believe it would be in the best interests of the game for sepp blatter to step down immediately so that the reform process can proceed with the credibility that is needed. other sponsors echoed those sentiments. ever since investigators in both switzerland and the usa launched a spectacular raid on fifa's executive committee meeting in zurich in may, the organization has been in crisis. despite everything, the president is unmoved even though he's also under investigation from fifa's ethics committee. he will not surrender his
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office. he now only speaks through his lawyer, richard cullen, who responded on friday by saying, "mr. blatter respectfully disagrees and believes firmly that his leaving office now would not be in the best interest of fever anor would it advance the -- fifa, nor would it advance the process of reform and, therefore, he will not resign." though they're speaking out, it remains to be seen if they're prepared to back their words with actions. only if they threaten to pull money out of fifa will these statements really mean anything. don riddell, cnn. well, it's been a big week for mars. topped off with a new movie about the red planet. we'll have an inside look at "the martian." growing up, we we. we danced in a german dance group. i wore lederhosen. when i first got on ancestry i was really surprised that i wasn't finding all of these germans in my tree.
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welcome back. mars has been making news this week with nasa announcing it's discovered evidence of flowing water. now the red planet is hitting the silver screen. the new film, "the martian," with matt damon is in theaters
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this weekend. we have more. i got to make water and grow food on a planet where nothing grows. in your face, neil armstrong. ♪ okay, let's do the math -- >> reporter: in "the martian," matt damon stars as an astronaut stranded on the red planet. >> ready? >> reporter: mistakenly left for dead after a powerful storm forces his crew to abandon their mission. >> this is mark wattney, and i'm still al.a. >> reporter: with help more than 100 million miles away, damon has to survive all along while nasa plans a daring rescue. damon, director ridley scott, and the rest of the all-star cast recently turned out on the red carpet in london for the film's european premiere. >> really uplifting message and uplifting movie. and felt like right now with everything happening, it was a nice thing to put out into the world. >> i think the movie works very well. i got to work with some terrific people. >> amazing.
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it's matt. it's people -- people like to see matt, what ridley is doing. it's exciting to be here. >> reporter: the movie is also getting some help generating buzz thanks to this week's news that nasa scientists have found water on mars. >> cheers, congratulations to everybody at nasa. this is huge, huge news. i wish i knew about it while i was stranded on mars. but the next time i'm stuck there, at least i know there will be water. >> reporter: maybe movie makers can tackle that in a sequel, cnn. >> looks like a good film. before we go, nasa has released some new photos of pluto's largest moon. sent back were sharper pictures. scientists had only expected to find craters on its surface. instead, the photos reveal mountains, canyons, and landslides. a lot out there. thank you very much for joining us.
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i'll be back after the break with another hour of news from across the world. everyone needs protein, every day. there are more than 20,000 different proteins in the human body. they fuel our energy, support our metabolism, amplify our performance and recovery. they're essential for good health. your body's best source for protein? gnc. now get the world's best protein formulas at an astounding price. buy any gnc protein powder and get 1 half off. everyone needs protein, every day. and now all gnc protein powders are buy 1, get 1 half off. only at gnc.
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good morning across america after another mass shooting. we now know the names of all of those who lost their lives, and we're hearing stories from those who saw it happen. also ahead, a u.s. air strike in afghanistan may have hit a medical sfimfacility. doctors without borders say three members were killed after a bombing at their trauma center. we'll go live to kabul. why the u.s. says russia is strengthening the terror group isis. a war of words

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