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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  October 5, 2015 10:00pm-1:01am PDT

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keep in mind. thank you both. that's it for this cnn special report "being 13: inside the secret world of teens." if you want to learn more about our study go to cnn.com/being13. i'm anderson cooper. good night. this is "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. >> dam breaches and rising death tolls after historic floods in the american southeast. >> the fallout over the deadly strike on an afghan hospital. u.s. forces now say it was an accident. doctors without borders say it's a war crime. >> and california's new bill on life and death. we'll talk to the woman who sued the state for the right to die. hello and welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm isha sesay. i'm john vause. "newsroom l.a." begins right now.
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our top story this hour, recovery efforts under way in south carolina after days of unrelenting rain across the state. historic flooding caused 11 deaths. two others were killed in north carolina. >> at least one dam has overflowed leading to mandatory evacuation. officials say so far 18 dams have breached or failed. cnn's martin savidge reports. >> reporter: desperate days. a man in columbia clings to a tree as floodwaters rip at his waist and threaten to wash him away. in south carolina, the rain may be easing but not the danger. in many areas the water continues to rise. and so does the death toll. many of those who have been killed died trying to cross through rushing water. >> he just made a mistake. >> this man nearly made the same fate when racing waters threatened to carry him and his truck away. it would become one of many dramatic res xups just outside charleston a mother and her
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15-month-old baby had to be rescued by a coast guard helicopter after floodwaters surrounded their home. officials say there have been so many rescues like these, they've lost count. south carolina's governor is warning people not to let down their guard as waters recede. >> this is not over. just because the rain stops does not mean that we are out of the woods. we very much still have a vulnerable situation that's out there. i'm still going to ask citizens to please stay inside. >> the greatest danger is south of columbia where as much as two feet of rain has fallen since friday. several area dams are overflowing or giving way. >> we have probably about ten dams that broke in lexington county yesterday. >> reporter: this this afternoon a cnn crew guard helicopter flew over overcreek dam shortly after it breached. warnings of the beach sent reporters and emergency crews rushing to get out of the water's potential path. meanwhile some 1300 national
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guard troops have been called in to help hundreds of troopers and state work eshs. residents are being asked to say on the roads to allow emergency crews through. but it's still not easy. more than 500 roads have been closed due to high water or damage, including 100 bridges in and around the state capital. in most areas, it's too early to begin assessing the damage but many residents already know the cost is high. >> what i got on my body is what we have. pretty much everybody down that hill there has lost everything this morning. our vehicles, our clothes. everything. but the best thing is that we still have our lives. why still have our lives. >> reporter: martin savidge, cnn, columbia, south carolina. in just three days, charleston received almost half a year's worth of rain. at one point, tens of thousands were without electricity. hundreds of others were evacuated from their homes. while the situation there is bad, it's not as bad as it was just 24 hours ago.
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mark will berlt is the director of charleston a department of emergency management and joins us on the line. mark there is still trouble ahead. what is your biggest concern now in the coming days? >> well, i think the biggest concern in the coming days is to begin to understand what we don't currently know. as the water recedes we'll begin to get an understanding of what kind of damage may have been done to infrastructure, roads, and when we get our first real good looks at what happened to people's houses as we begin to deploy our damage assessment teams and they begin to get out and survey the damage. >> how long before schools and government services return to normal? >> well, that's a good question. the schools here in the county are closed again tomorrow. and a lot of that is because many of the neighborhoods throughout the county, the schools, the buses, it's just not safe for them to go in. a lot of standing water left.
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and they do need to get in and survey all the schools to make sure that the schools are safe for the students to go to the schools. >> and tremendous amounts of rain have fallen over the past few days. so much rain in some places the gauges couldn't keep up. have you ever seen anything like this? >> certainly not in my career. previous to this i was 30-plus years with the u.s. coast guard. plenty of time and rain storms and many different hurricanes, but this was certainly one for the record book. it just did not want to stop. >> mark, good to speak with you, mark wilbert from charleston's department of emergency management. our meteorologist is following this for us. the hope now is of course, that the residents of south carolina are over the worst of all of this rain. how is it looking? >> the rain should all be done with within the next couple of hours. we then get sunny skies.
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you see some of these images out of columbia and just incredible to compare the before and after perspective. we often say you only need 30 centimeters, about one foot of moving water, about six miles per hour to give about 500 pounds of lateral force. it does not take much water to create substantial damage. we know the northern portion of the state, the appalachian mountains rise up to about 3500 feet. farther to the south you bring in the hundreds of rivers and tributaries. the low country, the marshland. all of this water has rained upstream and want to come down eventually into the atlantic ocean down stream. about a dozen or so dams have been jeopardized and levees as well. you look at this situation when it comes to dams and the amount of stress involved. in the united states, 30% of dam failures are because of overtopping. you get extra water that goes over the banks of the dam itself.
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that causes problems what we saw across south carolina in the columbia area in the past several areas. you also have failures where fractures occur because of tremendous amount of stress on the water at about 90% of dams and 2400 dams across the state of south carolina. you look at the numbers, the vast majority are privately owned. some of them outdated. some of them not having the regulations in place that would be able to withstand historic events, ones that you'd see 1 in 1,000 years. problems that come down with tremendous rainfall in place. drying in the forecast. look at the long term. look where joaquin and its are slated to go. western europe could get in on some rainfall. a story we're still following. >> thank you for the update. we move on. turkey's morn minister is condemning weekend air space violation. a russian war plane flew over a southern province on saturday. air force jets intercepted the
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plane. it continued into syria where it went on to conduct air strikes. >> turkey said there was another violation on sunday. turkey and russia don't see eye to eye over syria. russian officials say there's nothing corrupt about what happened. >> translator: the following incident was caused by unfavorable weather conditions in this region. don't look for any conspiratorial reasons here regarding the information about the incident with the following of a turkish jet on sunday by an unidentified mig 29 fighter. it had nothing to do with the russian air group. there are no planes of this type at the air base. >> a top nato official says the air space violation is unacceptable. israeli prime minister netanyahu says he'll do whatever it takes to end what he calls a wave of terror. on monday he lifted restrictions on the israeli defense forces which he says will allow soldiers to protect themselves and civilians. >> the idf came upon people
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throwing rocks. one man says his 13-year-old nephew was shot and killed but the idf has not commentod the deceased's identity and is promising to investigate. mr. netanyahu says israel is -- it is a difficult struggle but rather it will win. >> translator: we are acting with a strong hand against terrorism and against insiders. we're operating on all fronts. the police are going deeply into the arab neighborhoods which has not been done in the past. we'll demollush terrorist homes. we're allowing our forces to take strong action against those who throw rocks and fire bombs. this is necessary in order to safeguard the security of israeli citizens. to afghanistan now where the commander of u.s. forces is clarifying what led to the air strike oz a hospital in kunduz on saturday. ten patients at the doctors without borders hospital were killed. >> three separate investigations are under way to determine what went wrong.
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>> we have now learned on october 3rd, afghan forces advised they were taking fire from enemy positions and asked for air support from u.s. forces. an air strike was called to eliminate the taliban threat and civil civilians were accidentally struck. this is different from the initial reports which indicated u.s. forces were threatened and the air strike was called on their behalf. as has been reported, i've ordered a thorough investigation into this tragic incident and the investigation is ongoing. the afghans ordered the same. if errors were committed, we'll acknowledge them. we'll hold those responsible accountable, and we'll take steps to ensure mistakes are not repeated. >> nic robertson joins us from kabul with more. u.s. officials saying the afghans asked for air support because they were taking fire. but an unanswered question remains. what rules were the u.s. operating under? >> well, the u.s. general in
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charge, john campbell, you just heard him speaking there was asked that question. precisely what, you know, when you are calling in helicopter air support or an aircraft air support that had heavy machine guns on the ac-130 compared to calling in a fighter jet with a bomb or drone with a guided munition on it, what different rules of engagement are -- come into play there? he said he didn't want to get into those kinds of details until the investigation is carried out. what we do know from u.s. officials, they say whether or not air support is called for by u.s. forces under fire or afghan forces under fire, it goes through a very strict vetting procedure. there are target, buildings, locations, such as the cordina.
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the explanation of what happened here absolutely isn't clear at the moment. but what we understand is the rules of engagement would require buildings like this hospital to be placed off limits. >> nic, strenuously rejecting the afghan claims that taliban fighters were on the hospital grounds which takes us to the heart of one of the key issues here. the reliability of the afghan side in this counterterrorism fight. >> that has been called into question before over the years. and again, the u.s. checking before they conduct air strikes is part of that process to make sure that every piece of information they get is reliable and that they can be held to account on it later. there have been instances where questions have been raised over what the government says transpired and what we later find out has transpired.
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at the moment we're not hearing criticism from the united states or from the special forces on the ground saying they were given erroneous information. that's not what's being presented at the moment. certainly that has been a question in the past. and certainly one can imagine investigators will look very closely at those details in this situation. >> nic robertson from kabul, afghanistan. appreciate it, thank you. you're watching "newsroom l.a." when we come back, california's governor signs a landmark right to die legislation. and coming up, we'll speak with a terminally ill woman who celebrated the news. plus, 12 countries and years of negotiations have paved the way for a trade agreement that could affect the prices of the things you use and eat every day. details just ahead.
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next. ♪ expected wait time: 55 minutes. your call is important to us. thank you for your patience. waiter! in the nation, we know how it feels when you aren't treated like a priority. we do things differently. we'll take care of it. we put members first... join the nation. thank you.
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decisions, decisions. the new edge+. this one would keep me organized. i could list all the days i've been banned from social media. hmmm, wait this thing has built-in live broadcasting? i don't know what nerd came up with that, but it's awesome. you think they'd censor pippa's doggy-ola's? censored, not censored. censored, not censored. introducing the samsung galaxy s6 edge+ and the note5. welcome back, everyone. after years of negotiations, 12 nations have agreed to a deal that will account for 40% of the world's economy. the trans-pacific partnership is
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the deal reached. details from lynda kinkade. >> reporter: it's the biggest trade deal in history. 12 countries representing 40% of the world's economy. it's taken more than five years of intense negotiations to seal the trans-pacific partnership. >> we've come to an agreement that will support jobss, drive sustainable growth, foster inclusive development and promote innovation across the asia-pacific region. >> reporter: the deal could affect all sorts of products from the price of cheese, the cost of a car, even the sale of cancer drugs. and the expectations are high. >> we expect this historic agreement to promote economic growth, support higher paying jobs, enhance innovation, productivity and combetativeness, raise living standards, reduce poverty in our countries and promote
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transparnessy, good governance and strong labor and environmental protections. >> reporter: industries like automobile manufacturing, pharmaceutical and agriculture will see huge changes. japan would be required to let in more american farm goods, although it's argued for exceptions to protect some farmers. >> translator: we were also able to get exceptions to demands that we abolish tariffs on rice, beef, pork and dairy products. >> overall thousands of tariffs and taxes will be scrapped, many to be phased out over the coming years. the one major economy not included in the deal? >> china. and our goal with china -- >> reporter: it will create an economic bloc challenging chin's influence at a time they're asserting more economic and military posture. lynda kinkade, cnn. here in california, governor jerry brown signed a landmark right to die bill into law.
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it would allow terminally ill patients to voluntarily end their lives using prescription drugs. in a letter addressed to lawmakers, brown said this controversial decision was very personal to him. he wrote i do not know what i would do if i were dying in prolonged and excruciating pain. i'm certain, however, that it would be a comfort to be able to consider the options afforded by this bill and i wouldn't deny that right to others. >> brown also says he was inspired in part by pleas from brittany maynard's family. maynard was the terminally ill young woman who left california for another state so she could ind her life. we're joined by christie o'donnell, a cancer patient whose been a strong advocate for the passing of this bill. thank you for joining us. some supporters of this bill that's now become law have described today as a bittersweet moment. how are you feeling? what does it mean to you? >> after this long journey,
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today really has been just the culmination of so many people for so many years. and then ending with brittany maynardae family, her husband dan, her mother debbie that i'm dear friends with, being involved with this, being terminally ill, today is truly a bittersweet moment both for my daughter bailey and myself. >> i want to ask you some of the details of your condition right now because you have lung cancer. >> yes. >> it's spread to the brain and liver. the chemotherapy, it's stopping the spread at the moment? is that correct? >> the chemotherapy stalled it for a short period of time. i don't have any more chemotherapy left and it's spread to my liver, rib, spine. so the cancer is pretty much everywhere at this point. there's no more chemochrp i can have. >> what happens next? >> what happens next, i'm willing to try a new fda
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procedure with immuno therapy, a new direction in cancer treatment. given the fact i have been a nonsmoker my whole life, the irony is the immuno therapy is less likely to work. for someone like me, i've got a prognosis of two, maybe three months left. so bhil this bill has passed today, when my daughter and i decided to speak out, we always knew it was highly unlikely that i'd personally be automobile bl the benefit of it. for thousand of terminally ill across california and across the country this is a landmark for them. >> there are critics. governor brown was clear in his statement that this was based on his personal background. as someone of wealth and access to the world's best medical care and doctors, his background is very different from thousands of californians living in health care poverty without the same access. these are the families and people hurt by giving doctors the power to prescribe leethsal
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overdoses to patients. if you are poor, if you are disabled, they will decide who lives, who dies. they'll decide what life is worth. what do you say? >> i would tell them that after spending a decade as a civil rights attorney in los angeles fighting for the rights of the disabled, if i thought for one second that this law was going to harm them in any way, i would not be here today speaking out for it. given the fact that insurance companies are there to make money, if the opposition to this act actually took the language at the bill itself, the language of the bill provides that insurance companies are not supposed to discriminate that way. and the bill is not passed now. and yet in my treatment, i've had several medical treatments recommended by a doctor, already denied by the insurance company. this act is not going to change the way insurance companies treat their patients. >> let me ask you this. this issue of assisted dying,
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assisted suicide, is one that has been debated by californians for more than two decades. >> correct. >> why do you think it crossed the line now? what was different about now? >> i believe that what was different about now is because, you know, with social media and given the fact that you had someone as young as brittany was at 29 years old deciding to speak out, the conversation. people are now talking about the way in which they're going to die at their dinner tables. they're talking about it at different age groups. they're talking about it on social media which never happened before. this is a conversation that's so important for everyone across america and in all countries to have, and it's happening now. >> so we're talking about concerns of potential abuse here. the right to die or assisted suicide has been law in many european countries for a very long time.
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a law in oregon for a few knreers and other states here in the u.s. is there any examples out there that it has been abused in any way as the critics have been arguing? >> i'm about as anal a lawyer as you are ever going to find. and before the first word that ever came out of my mouth advocating for this end of life options bill in california, i read everything i could get my hands on. and i, to this day, have not been able to substantiate or find any evidence whatsoever of abuse. >> do you see this movement here in california providing a momentum for other states? >> absolutely. not only do other states look to california to set these types of civil rights movement issues, but other countries look to california as well. i absolutely hope that the decision by the governor today and all this hard work is going to create a domino effect across america and then to continue to those other nations that don't have this law.
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>> christy, we know that you have three months left, and we so appreciate you spending your valuable time with us. >> our thoughts and prayers are with you and your family. thank you again for spending time with us. >> thank you. appreciate it. we'll take a short break. thank you for calling. we'll be with you shortly. yeah right... xerox predictive analytics help companies provide a better and faster customer experience. hello mr. kent. can i rebook your flight? i'm here! customer care can work better. with xerox. wait i'm here! mr. kent? (gasp) shark diving! xerox personalized employee portals help companies make benefits simple and accessible... from anywhere. hula dancing? cliff jumping! human resources can work better. with xerox.
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welcome back, everybody. you're watching "cnn newsroom." recovery efforts are under way in south carolina where historic flooding has caused at least 11 deaths in the state. two others were killed in north carolina. rising floodwaters forced at
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least one dam to overflow prompting a mandatory evacuation. officials say 18 dams have breached or failed so far. the death toll has risen to 151 after last week's massive landslide near guatemala city. hopes are fading for rescue crews trying to find them. israel's prime minister promised strong action against what he calls a wave of terror. this comes after a rise in deadly violence in jerusalem and the west bank this past beak. the prime minister says the israeli defense forces no longer face restrictions when it comes to dealing with people believed to be terrorists. more than 50 people are dead after three separate suicide bombings in iraq. isis claimed responsibility for a car bombing but that killed nine and wounded 22. there were other bomb attacks at a crowded marketplace killing 45. two people were killed in a car bomb in baghdad.
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u.s. president barack obama is scheduled to visit roseburg, oregon, on friday. that's the city where a gunman killed nine people at a community college last week. >> while the president's visit may help many there to try and heal from this tragedy, many others in roseburg just want to be out of the national spotlight. with his relation hills and treeline valleys, roseburg sits in a beautiful part of the middle of nowhere. for many a drive through on the way to somewhere else, and that's how they liked it here. when a shooter opened fire last thursday, this community joined the long and growing list of places, including many small towns, shattered by gun violence. >> roseburg, sandy hook, columbine, plattsburg, jonesboro. the list goes on. now you're on the list. >> we don't want to be on that list. we don't want to be known for
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that. >> what do you want to be known for? >> how we loved each other so well. how everyone jump anded into action. >> wilson has lived here for 25 years. she's a mother who blogs about faith and hope and wants everyone to know what this town was like before the shooting. >> photographs of the injureding by rolled into the hospital doesn't tell the whole story either. most of our babies have been born at mercy and lives are saved there every day. ♪ >> for days they've held vigils and prayed. >> we're not saying there's not any pain but we're saying there's hope. there's light at the end of the tunnel. >> gathered in parks to raise money for survivors. >> this is an amazing town. and the people who live here are full of love and joy and what happened here is not going to break us. >> and as they come together to cope and to grieve, she forgives the shooter but can't help but
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wonder why he never asked anyone for help. >> this was caused by someone who was living among us who was living in our town. who anyone would have helped out. who anyone would have reached out to. >> in the wake of the shooting, a lot of focus on gun laws. many in roseburg want to keep their guns and they don't want those laws to be -- >> one u.s. presidential candidate has announced her plans to stop gun violence in the wake of those deadly shootings. democratic candidate hillary clinton has been outspoken on gun control throughout her campaign. she stepped up her calls for stricter gun laws after last weerk's events. >> how much longer will we just shrug, oh, my gosh, something else terrible hand. whether it's in your neighborhood, erin, or at a
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community college or the murder of children in their classrooms. >> some of the highlights of clinton's plan, closing loopholes on background checks. allowing victims to sue gun manufactures and prohibiting domestuc abusers from getting their hands on guns. >> looking at these proposals put forward by hillary clinton, how politically risky is this move for her? >> this is the most, without a doubt, the most ambitious gun control agenda by a first tier democratic candidate since gore. when gore lost that race he lost states voting democratically before like arkansas and tennessee. blue collar, rural and with a strong gun culture. that had a lasting, chilling effect on democrats. neither john kerry nor barack
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obama talked about gun control issues. for the voters they can actually win now gun control is still a relatively popular proposition. it's most unpopular among people they've been losing anyway. these blue collar and rural whites. program obama to clinton, a growing interest to re-engage this issue in a way we haven't seen in years. >> interesting you bring up the past and what happened. let's go back to 1968. let's go back to robert kennedy. this issue has been talked about and debated in this country for a very long time. listen to this. >> does that make any sense that you'd put rifles and guns in the hands of people who have long criminal records, of people who are insane or people mentally incompetent or people so young they don't know how to handle rifles or guns? >> do you know where he was when he says that? roseburg, oregon in 1968. the irony, the coincidence. it gets to this bigger point.
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this has been talked about and debated for a long time. talk about hillary clinton. they don't seem to be that ambitious in the grand scheme of things. >> it's been an incremental policy. under bill clinton they passed the brady bill which required a background check. they passed the assault rifle ban. george bush ran on supporting it but did not really lift a finger when house republicans let it die. congressional republicans in his early presidency. it's closely divided on public opinion and has a symbolic cultural resonance that goes way beyond the medicine praimmediat impact. it's seen as an attack on their values. by urban america in urban america it's seen -- >> an attack on them? >> as an attack on communities. and what you have is in many ways this is james madison's revenge. in the u.s. system, every state,
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regardless of size, gets two senators. the last time the senate voted on a major gun control bill, 2013, the universal background check they're talking about, 55 senators voted for it. 45 voted against it. if you assign half of each state's population, senators representing 194 million people voted for the bill. those opposing it represented 118 million. because of the filibuster, those 118 were able to block the 194. it's very difficult to move forward legislatively but the politics of the presidential level may be changing. you saw that in hillary clinton's very ambitious agenda today. >> this move is not just about separating her from her republican opponents. it's also about the sharp contrast with bernie sanders. this is considered to be an achilles heel for him. >> bernie sanders opposed the brady bill in 1993. vermont is one of those states with a rural hunting culture. he has been a friend of the nra.
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he's moved away from that position over time. likely to put out a much more liberal gun control plan in the next few days himself but his core constituency in the democratic primary are college edicated white liberals. and they are strongly pro gun control and it's one issue where hillary clinton can go to his left and peel away some of those voters gravitating towards him. >> if you look at the crowds. he got 20,000 at that rally in boston. obama in 2008 got 10,000. bernie sanders is running a really good campaign but he can't win. we should just say he's running a really good campaign. >> he still has to do one more thing which if you think about the democratic primary electorate it divides almost in thirds between the socially liberal white collar whites, blue collar whites where hillary clinton was much stronger in 2008 and her trump card, which
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is minorities. hispanics and african-americans. so far bernie sanders like candidates like him before has not shown much appeal to those voters. until he shows he can attract african-americans and minorities, it's going to be very hard for him to get out beyond places like new hampshire, connecticut, oregon, vermont, where there are a lot of white liberals. >> fascinating conversation. >> a really interesting horse race if nothing else. >> ron brownstein, always a pleasure. thank you. and the sheriff now leading the investigation into theoringing or campus shooting is facing tough questions about his very controversial social media postings. >> one post cast doubt on whether the sandy hook shooting in connecticut ever happened. kyung lah has more. >> reporter: as the investigation in oregon is winding its course, there's new scrutiny on the man leading the investigation and calls for him to step down. douglas county sheriff john hanlin heading the investigation
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that killed nine people at umpqua community college denying he posted a controversial video on facebook. >> you didn't post it? >> no. >> i know what's you're referring to. no, that's not a conspiracy theory belief that i have. >> reporter: that belief is spouted on this viral video produced by conspiracy theorists. it claims that sandy hook is a hoax cooked up by the government to take citizens' guns away. the video viewed 11 million times on youtube calls the victims' families actors. it even claims the murdered first graders are still alive. on the sheriff's facebook page, this post now removed linking to the youtube video with this xlent. this makes me wonder who we can trust anymore. watch, listen and keep an open mind. while he says he didn't post it, it was on his personal facebook page since 2013. >> the idea of having this man, it's beyond hypocrisy, to have this man charged with leading
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the investigation? >> the brady campaign citing the facebook conspiracy post urging him to step don. >> he's been put in a position to try and lead an unbiased investigation into this tragedy and think about the things that we can do to prevent future tradition like this from happening. and so to the extent that wearing a badge keeps him in that position, no, he does not deserve to be wearing a badge. >> the campaign also points to this letter postod the department's facebook page that the sheriff sent to vice presidented by be after the sandy hook massacre. gun control is not the answer to preventing heinous crimes like school shootings. he says federal restriction on the second amendment shall not be enforced by me or by my deputies, even pledging to stop any federal agents from doing so in his county. the letter is dated one month after sandy hook. on the heel hfss county's own tragedy, he tells cnn this. >> this isn't the time and this
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isn't the place to have the conversation about my position, political or not, on gun control. >> we tried to contact the sheriff today through e-mail, through multiple phone calls. all of them went unanswered. we did manage to reach the oregon governor's office. the governor's office that clashed with the sheriff over a new state law requiring background check oz private sales of guns. the governor's office saying the sheriff is an elected official. the people of his county are the ones who will hold him accountable. john, isha? >> thank you for that. we should also say he has a lot of support. >> he does, indeed. >> those questions are going to keep coming. edward snowden says he's made an after to u.s. authorities to be able to come home. details from the nsa leaker's latest interview ahead. ♪ while you're watching this, i'm hacking your company. grabbing your data. stealing your customers' secrets.
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we'll take care of it. we put members first. join the nation. thank you. ♪ nationwide is on your means striking a the right balancesco between economic growth, housing we can afford, and our quality of life. aaron peskin has been a champion for the middle class, fighting bad growth and income inequality.
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and mayor ed lee has transformed san francisco into the nation's most thriving city. vote peskin/lee. san francisco needs them both. aaron peskin for supervisor and ed lee for mayor -- the perfect balance for a better san francisco. welcome back. the u.s. coast guard says it's
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focussing on the search for survivors from a cargo ship that went missing near the bahamas. searchers found debris including a life boat and unidentified human remains. 33 crew members were on board when the "el faro" lost contact in the wake of hurricane joaquin. it is no longer looking for the ship itself. edward snowden who revealed nsa spying offered to serve prison time as part of a plea deal. >> snowden fled the united states after exposing details of the national security agency's surveillance programs. he spoke with a bbc program "panorama." >> i've volunteered to go to prison with the government many times. what i won't do is serve as a deterrent to people trying to do the right thing. >> what would you be looking to from them for you to return? >> well, so far they've said they won't torture me, which is a start, i think, but we haven't gotten much furth ir than that.
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>> snowden tells the bbc he and his lawyers are still waiting for u.s. officials to call them back. an american airlines pilot died in his cockpit during an overnight flight from phoenix to boston. air traffic controllers diverted the plane to upstate new york after the co-pilot declared an emergency. firefighters there responded to an unconscious person on the plane. passengers eventually made it to boston, just four hours after their scheduled arrival time. the medical examiner says the pilot died of natural causes. and in france, angry protesters rip the shirt off air france executives after learning about layoffs. monday's protests turned violent when the airline announced plans to cut nearly 3,000 jobs, including ground staff, flight attendants and cockpit crew. >> demonstrators tore the shirt off. they had to be escorted away by
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security. the ceo was also targeted in the attack. an unusual fight in the front yard. two male moose duke it out to impress some chick. we'll show you how it ended. when you're not confident your company's data is secure, the possibility of a breach can quickly become the only thing you think about. that's where at&t can help. at at&t we monitor our network traffic so we can see things others can't. mitigating risks across your business. leaving you free to focus on what matters most.
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welcome back. this just in to us. officials in yemen say at leaflet a dozen people were killed after a hotel was hit by a rocket propelled grenade. it happened in the city of aden. it is unclear if the deputy prime minister was in the building at the time. still not clear who was behind the attack. we move on to china where a biotech company has tweaked the genes of pigs to make them really tiny and they'll sell them as pets. >> these micro pigs will only ever grow to the size of a medium dog around 15 kilograms. that's about one-third the size of the pig they're cloned from.
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>> scientists managed to snip out a gene of the growth hormone. nice pork chop. >> they originally created them for research projects but it's now planning to put them on sale as pets. >> itty bitty pork chops. >> $1500 each. >> tasty pork chops? >> you are awful. just awful. >> they would taste very nice. to giant moose fighting in an alaska family's front yard. when male moose try to impress the ladies. jeanne moos has the play by play. >> reporter: put up your dukes. make that your antlers. a fight over a female in mating season spilled on to the streets of suburban anchorage, alaska. recorded by a father and son hiding behind a car. >> it was crazy.
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>> when the moose brawl got too close for comfort -- >> get back, get back. >> the driver of the car fled and bill and josh had to head for higher ground. >> i filmed a lot of that video from about right here. >> where they had front row seats. at least these two weren't as dumb as the colorado moose that tried to mate with a bronze moose statue. not since two kangaroos faced off near sydney, australia, have we seen such a wild kingdom donny brook in a suburban setting. the guy who shot this set it to "nutcracker." which made sense since that's where many of the kicks were aimed using both legs, weight resting on their tails. back at the moose fight. the struggle intensified. >> one was just like carrying the other one all the way across
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the street. >> and that's pretty much how it ended with the alpha moose giving the evil eye as his rival high tailed it away. they left behind scattered moose hair. the two did manage to bang into the subaru parked in the driveway leaving a dent or two. have no fear, insurance agents assure us that as long as the motorist has comprehensive coverage, moose damage will be covered. when the top moose went to claim his prize after all that work, what did the female do? she va-moosed. jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> and that is -- >> do you want to know the political equivalent? donald trump and marco rubio going for it in a political sense. both men running for the republican nomination for president. >> indeed. they took a break from campaigning to play a prank on
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marco rubio. trump sent a special care package to rubio's washington office that included a case of water with the billionaire's face on it and the slogan, make america great again. you may remember when he frantically grabbed for a bottle of water when giving a reply to the state of the union. the rubio campaign has not yet commented on it. donald trump is the greatest political troll this country has ever seen. >> that is "cnn newsroom." i'm isha sesay. >> please stay with us. errol barnett will be back after a short break.
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with 40% affordable housing, 8 acres of parks and open space, all connected to public transit, and generate $25 million a year in revenue for san francisco. vote yes on d to turn this into this. ♪ outrage after the u.s. bombed a doctors without borders hospital in afghanistan. now the group is demanding a war crimes investigation. plus 18 dams have breached or failed in south carolina and the death toll is climbing. and jerry brown signs a controversial right today bill into law. >> lots to get to in the next two hours, but we want to
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welcome you from around the world. >> thanks for joining us. this is "cnn newsroom." more questions are being raised about the deadly air strike on a hospital in afghanistan. the u.s. commander there says afghan forces requested air support during their battle against taliban militants many kunduz. >> but there are no answers on how a sustained attack on a hospital took place at all. three separate investigations are now underway. barbara star filed this update. >> reporter: international outrage after a hospital in northern afghanistan was struck from the air by the u.s. the u.s. is investigating its role in the attack that left 12 medical staff and 10 patients, three of them children, another
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37 wounded. the hospital is run by the aid group, doctors out borders, a global charity that works in war zones. they call the attack a war crime. >> well, again, i wouldn't use a label like that because this is something that continues to be under investigation. >> reporter: survivors described the who wor to the bbc. >> there were flames all around me. i saw patients and doctors burned to death. >> there was no place to hide. >> reporter: the damage massive. it struck the hospital with the on board guns. >> the afghan forces advised they were asking for air support. an air strike was called to eliminate the taliban threat. >> reporter: doctors without borders says it gave the military exact location of hospital weeks ago. saying their description of the attack keeps changing from collateral damage to now
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attempting to pass responsibility to the afghanistan government. the reality is, the u.s. dropped those bombs. defense secretary ash carter trying to reassure the group. >> we've been in touch with them to assure them a transparent investigation will be held. >> reporter: doctors without borders general director says the taliban were not at the hospital. >> if there was a major military operation ongoing there, our staff would have noticed. and that wasn't the case, actually, when the strikes occurred. >> reporter: contrary to first reports, u.s. forces were not under attack. just afghan forces. but nonetheless, a senior u.s. official says all strikes the afghans ask for have strict approval procedures. not all are approved. barbara star cnn, the pentagon. >> and we have a reporter for
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the guardian joining us live from kabul. initially this deadly attack was described as collateral damage. then a tragic accident and now the u.s. commander says afghan forces called for support while battling the taliban. when will we liking get some more answers from the nato investigation on how this hospital was attacked and why has the afghan president been silent on this matter? >> reporter: yes. that's right, rosemary. the explanations keep changing a bit, and the coalition forces here say they expect some results of this inquiry in a matter of days. h there are a lot of questions that remains to be answered, and from the statements that the u.s. general john campbell gave yesterday, it's not completely
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clear what actually -- what he means. he said they called in the attack. it doesn't mean there weren't special forces on the ground. this kind of air power, it's rare for this kind of air power to be used with only afghans fighting in kunduz around a hospital like this. and in addition to everything you just mentioned, they also said that the main building of the hospital was precisely and repeatedly hit indicating this was not an accident. we don't know if the u.s. military knew it was a hospital, but they are indicating they hit the building that they were targeting. >> yes. still so many questions to be answered here. so what impact will this deadly and tragic incident have on the draw down of u.s. troops in afghanistan? >> reporter: that's a good
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question. president obama has plans to withdraw almost all troops by the end of next year. he'll keep around 1,000 troops in the u.s. embassy in kabul, but now there's a word that this might be reconsidered. some media reported today that perhaps the president is considering keeping in about 5,000 troops beyond 2016. and this is a sign that the afghan security forces are strong enough to contain the insurgency on their own. it's a sign that the training mission that nato is conducting in afghanistan has some difficulties and is maybe not as thorou thorough or as complete as some people hoped. that leads to questions as to how long they stay and when the afghanistan forces are ready to take full responsibilities of security in their country. that day has to come at some point, but when that is is still
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a little bit unclear. a lot of afghans here and the u.s. general would like that to be -- the withdrawal to be -- >> keeping us up to date on the latest investigation coming out of kunduz and afghanistan. bringing us up to date from kabul. other stories, officials in yemen say at least a dozen people are dead after a rocket propelled grenade attack on a hotel. it happened in a southern port city. >> pictures show smoke coming out of the hotel. it's not clear if the prime minister was in the building at the time. it's also not clear who's behind the attack. >> turkey says a russian war plane flew over a southern province on saturday and its air
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force intercepted the jet. >> that russian plane continued into syria and conducted air strikes. there was another incident on sunday. on monday, turkey's prime minister said russia blamed bad weather. >> translator: what we have received from russia was that this was a mistake and that they respect turkey's borders and that will not happen again. ing turkey's rules of engagement apply to all planes. turkey's armed forces are very clearly instructed. >> everyone has different views on this. turkey and russia don't see eye to eye over syria, but russia insists there was nothing sinister happening. nato, on the other hand, called this incursion unacceptable. the u.s. coast guard says it's focusing on the search for survivors from a cargo ship that went missing near the bahamas. searchers have found debris from
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the vessel including a lifeboat and unidentified human remains. >> 33 crew members were on board when it disappeared on thursday. the coast guard says it's no longer looking for the ship itself. we turn now to recovery efforts in south carolina. historic flooding has caused at least 11 deaths. >> two others were killed in north carolina. officials say so far 18 dams have breached or failed. the rain has stopped, but as cnn's boris sanchez reports, the threat of rising flood waters remai remains. >> reporter: we're standing on highway 301 and there is water as far as the eye can see. this is a major highway that leads all the way to florida, but we can see water at least for a mile, covering this entire stretch of road. there are businesses around and cars submerged. officials say they don't know exactly when this water will
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recede, likely into the coming days if not the coming week. more rain pounding parts of south carolina. and officials are warning residents the danger is not over yet. >> people are off the roads. they've really listened, but those that didn't listen, this is dangerous. this is very real. >> reporter: the governor said today there could be more evacuations with flood waters likely to rise. crews across the state have been working around the clock, rescuing people from their homes and cars as flood waters rise. in georgetown county, the fire chief says one man was found clinging to a tree after his truck was swept away by an overflowing river. >> the witness saw a truck go around the barricade and went down the water and the water pushed him into the river. i hope it sends a strong message. this guy could have lost his life. >> reporter: the call to stay off the roads echoed by officials across the state. >> this is not the time to take
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pictures. we have enough media out there that you can look at to see the pictures and see the views of what's happening in south carolina. >> just don't be stupid. that's the thing. keep saying don't try to drive through flooded areas. >> reporter: crews are not only having to get to resident's cars but also if you take a look behind me, that's a national guard vehicle that came down as the bridge went out. underneath it is a car. another sign of how powerful the flood waters can be. according to the governor, about 550 roadways and bridges are closed. some completely washed out. and dozens of streets are impassable in one county. in georgetown along the coast, business owners rush to pump water out even with the threat of high tide looming. thousands of residents are also dealing with power outages and
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contaminated water due to sewage overflew. despite the obvious problems, there are signs of progress. the lights are back on in town and the water is slowly but surely receding. we're not sure whether or not it's going to be raining into the coming days and making the situation possibly worse. boris sanchez, cnn, manning, south carolina. joining me on the phone from columbia south carolina is the information officer. i know you're busy. what's the latest assessment of the dam failures and breaches and how much of a risk do they pose right now? >> well, we've received several reports of localized voluntary evacuations issued by our local public response agencies and communities around the columbia area due to dam concerns. we've got one report of a dam that's being intentionally
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slightly breached so that it doesn't break further, and they can control the water flow. the president has declared a disaster for several counties in south carolina. that will free up many programs to be made available to the citizens directly affected by the storm. >> and we have a bit of a distortion on the line, but we're going to power through this with you because it's important information we want to get. these flood waters, they're projected to move southeast from the carolinas down toward the atlantic coastline, but five of the deaths so far are a result of people trying to drive through these waters. how long do you think that flooding threat will remain? >> everything we've been told is the flooding throughout the south carolina river system unfortunately is going to continue for at least the next couple of days. the good news is that tomorrow is the first time in week that we've had no rain for the state anywhere in south carolina, so
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that's the good news. the bad news is the water that is here will still be here. and that many more communities further down the river could be put in harm's way, particularly residential areas on waterways that are in the middle or next to smaller localized lick filak or dams. we're not out of this disaster yet. we'll have many more energy response activities to take place, but we're starting to transition into a longer-term recovery operations. the top priority is going to be life safety. we're encouraging people to stay home and not go outside or get on the roadways unless they absolutely have to. save 9 9-1-1 for life threatening enerthreate threatening emergencies only. this is very much a hazardous
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situations. it's all going to be based on some rapidly changing conditions because as some of the waters recede, they will start to rise elsewhere further down the water system. >> and, of course, do not try to drive through any of those flooded roads. on the line with us from columbia, south carolina, the information officer for the emergency division in the state. thank you for your time today. and pedram joins us now. as we've heard, just because the rain has stopped doesn't mean the danger is over. >> that's such a serious note to make. it will be sunny in the afternoon in south carolina. the water will want to flow downstream. we saw this in pakistan in 2010. upstream river flooding caused problems down the river. upstream flooding in the gulf of
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t thailand by the sea level areas. the conditions are not going to improve in the immediate future. look at the before and after images we're getting. you see what it looked like before. look at the significant damage done to some of the property with the water coming. i often talk about getting one foot of moving water on the order of six miles per hour. the lateral force is 500 pounds. the amount of weight associated with the moving water of about 30 centimeters. portions of myrtle beach, wilmington, north carolina getting the last bout in the storm system. the drying condition pushes into this region. it looks like conditions will want to improve, and certainly fantastic news for people to see sun shine but the appalachians across the northern portion of south carolina, elevation across north carolina gets as high as 1000 meters.
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charleston, hundreds of rivers, down at sea level. all the water wants to go to the ocean, and it will, but we know there's been so many areas where property is locking up some of the rivers. the dams have been jeopardized as well. put the moisture in place, it's a recipe for trouble if everything doesn't go perfectly well. the remnants of joaquin could impact portions of western europe by later this weekend. the rainfall not done for just about everyone, and it always comes back to the climate change related to what's happening here. what i've been telling people recently is we know our planet is warmer than the 70s, and we have more water vapor and more heat and more evaporation from the oceans. we've had a 5 to 10% increase in the amount of rain in extreme rain events and an increase in rain events.
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every rain event is related to climate change. >> in many ways get used to storms like this. >> the data supports more water from storms. >> but not in the right places. >> unfortunately. >> thanks pedram. california's government signs landmark right to die legislation. >> we'll hear from one group that calls the new measure flawed.
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now we want to get you to the state of california where jerry brown signed a landmark right to die. it allows patients to voluntarily end their lives who are terminally ill. >> a terminally young woman left california for oregon so she could end her life. earlier we heard from a single mom with stage four cancer who has strongly advocated this bill
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and says the passing is bittersweet. >> after this long journey, today really has been just the culmination of so many people for so many years, you know, and then ending the brittany menard ea a 's family. >> california now joins a hand full of countries and other u.s. states that allow doctor assisted suicide. the netherlands was the first country to legalize in 2002. luxe um burg approved it only for adults. and it is also legal under some conditions in belgium. >> in switzerland doctors can help a patient. in oregon, washington, montana
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and now california allow doctor assisted suicide. there are many that oppose the passing of this right to die bill, including the group californians against assisted suicide. we're joined by their spokesman. thank you for speaking with us. explain to us why don't you support a person's right to die if they're terminally ill and suffering intense pain? what are your main reasons for opposing the right to die legislation? >> one of the challenges is that the legislation is modelled on the state of oregon. here in california, we have a much more diverse state with our 38 million persons, and what our fear is this is endangered the cost of high cost, low income patients, those that don't have the means to advocate for themselves.
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>> sorry to interrupt you, but how does it do that? as we heard from the woman who spoke earlier, she said she has read through all of the legislation, and she hasn't found any proof in fact of that being the case. >> well, the challenge is for -- and let me be clear. i feel horribly for miss o'donnell, and i wish her nothing but the best and that she finds comfort as she ends her life. the challenge that we have is in california if you're a low income person, we're not like the rest of the other persons out there. if you're in the hospital and you're reimbursement rate is lower, you're at the whips of hoping the insurance company does the right thing. >> under is structure of this legislation, you have to have two doctors that approve the use
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of this drug. you have to be able to take the drug yourself. you have to be physically able to do that, and you have to have two witnesses present. it's a structured situation, and isn't the main point to allow people to die with dignity? would you want to take that away from a person who is suffering and slowly dieing? >> it's not so much taking away from a person who is suffering and dying. back up a little bit with what you kind of pointed to. the challenge is there's nothing in the law that protects someone from people pushing them from persons who are in the hospital and they have family members who they can't afford to be away. they're at their hospital bed and feeling guilty that they're losing time from work and losing money, so they opt to terminate their life early. there's nothing in that that keeps a person from pushing a person from losing their life
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early. in oregon, there's few doctors who constantly approve many of these, so there's a situation of doctor shopping. >> i think a lot of people would disagree with what you have to say, and this is a debate that will continue for now. five u.s. states who agree with this, and many others that are trying to move in this direction, and we'll watch this debate as it continues. thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. you are watching "cnn newsroom." when we come back, isis destroys another priceless cultural relic in syria. glad i could help you plan for your retirement. alright, kelly and promise me that you'll try that taco place on south street. and we have portfolio planning tools to help you manage your ira. yeah, you're old 401k give me your phone. the rollover consultants give you step-by-step help. no set-up fees. use your potion. sorry, not you. my pleasure. goodnight, tim.
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viewers in the united states and around the world. >> let's update you on our top stories this hour. the u.s. nato and afghanistan will conduct investigations on an air strike in kunduz, afghanistan. they said afghan forces called for air support on saturday. 22 people were killed at the doctors without borders hospital. recovery efforts in underway in south carolina where flooding has caused at least 11 deaths. two others were killed in north carolina. rising flood waters caused one dam to overflaw. officials say 18 dams have reached or failed so far. >> more than 50 people are dead after three separate suicide bombings in iraq. isis claimed responsibility for a car bombing.
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another bomb exploded in a crowded market killing 45. two people were killed by a car bam in baghdad. >> an international trade deal would lower the cost of many products we use every day like cheese and cars. >> the u.s. j japan, and other nations agreed to a landmark deal that expands trade among the nations. >> we successfully concluded the transpacific partnership. >> after more than five years of intensive negotiations, we have come to an agreement that will support jobs, drive sustainable growth, foster inclusive development and promote innovation. >> excitement there. let's bring in andrew stevens for more details on this
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agreement. andrew, this deal still needs approv approval by all the local governments. where might the resistance be. as encouraging as it is, it's not set in stone. >> it is encouraging. you're right. no it's not set in stone, and there is criticism, and there has been criticism around the region. the tpp region, the transpacific partnership. it takes in the ring around the pacific ocean, as you can see there. but i think just by the fact that this is an election year in the u.s., 2016, when congress will get to actually vote on tpp means it is going to be a very political issue. we've already heard donald trump and ted cruz, two presidential hopefuls coming out to slam the deal. a nobel winning economist slammed it in the recent past saying this is a deal that favors big business over small
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business. there's no doubt it's going to generate a lot of extra money through extra exports because tariffs on hundreds and hundreds of different types of goods from cheese to auto parts to drugs, all sorts of things will be cut. so the actual benefits to real people will be there in the form of cheaper food and cheaper car parts, for example. but they're not all winners, because the big businesses, they say big business with the economies won't be able to ramp up production to get benefits and get cheaper prices at the expense of smaller businesses. people will be forced out of business or won't be able to compete as easily. >> some of the resistance will come from countries that will feel the jobs will be exported and they'll lose out, but there's china's role. there are mechanisms for them to
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become a member, but the reality is the tpp is a counter balance pushed by the u.s. to kind of push against china's economic influence in the region. do you see a scenario where china might sign on? their public comments have been luke warm. >> probably more than lukewarm if you look at what china has said in response to the tpp agreement. just take a look at the ministry saying that whatever is good for trade, basically, they will support, so as you see there, this allows us together to contribute to trade. so it gives you an idea of there is some sort of support within china. certainly they're not anti-it. and that means to some union leaders in the u.s., if china doesn't mind it, they'll benefit. what china says is we don't want
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to enter. they were invited initially. they said no. this is seen as a pivot by the u.s. president to counter balance china's weight in trade in the region. it could allow a country like vietnam to aid into chinese exports because it will have the benefits of lower tariffs so it can produce cheaper stuff. it can edge out chinese exports. certainly at this stage, china has been invited at this stage, it's not joining. >> at the least, it's good to have a story that we can work on different countries working together. live in hong kong for us. andrew, thanks. >> thank, errol. >> isis militants have destroyed another syrian cultural treasure.
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the arch of triumph in palmyra. a syrian official claims the 1800-year-old arch was flown up on sunday. >> isis destroyed two palmyra temples in august. we have more on the loss of syria's iconic arch of triumph. >> reporter: the arch of triumph was build 1,800 years ago to mark a victory over the persian empire. but now it's fallen to isis. just the latest act of pointless destruction by a group bent on obliterating the past. in may when isis took control of palmyra, they said they would not harm the ruins, only pagan iedles. the pledge quickly went up in smoke. first they destroyed muslim
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shrines, in august they rigged the 2,000-year-old temple with explosives and blew it up. then a few weeks later did the same to a larger temple. meanwhile, the ruins of palmyra have served as a backdrop for isis's perverse world view. this summer they used an amphitheater to conduct a mass execution of captured syrian soldie soldiers. across the areas isis controls in syria and iraq, the group is revelled in an ar orgy of destruction at one ancient site after another. hundreds killed by isis or in attacks by the asaad regime. in august, isis publicly executed the 82-year-old retired head of antiquities for reportedly refusing to reveal
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where artifacts were kept for safekeeping. >> we go to guatemala where the death toll has risen to 161 after a landslide near the capital. >> the government has declared three days of mourning for the victims in fact at least 300 people are missing and hopes of fading for rescue crews trying to find them. >> reporter: a solemn procession through the streets of guatemala. a young girl is carried to her final resting place. workers hoist her body into a crypt where fresh pavement seals others recently buried. another victim of guatemala's landslide is laid to rest. now her grandfather is left without any grandchildren. >> translator: when i came here to visit, all my grand kids received me with love. i played with them. that was my happiness. i am so sad now.
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who am i going to find here now? >> reporter: in one of the greatest natural disasters to hit central network america in rock and dirt engulfed homes, trapping hundreds of people at once. so far no one has been found alive. >> translator: 19 of my family members were in the mud slide, including my children, my wife, my mother. i have four children. one is in another town. the others are one i can't haan six, and 11 years old. i hope i can bury them together. >> translator: i'm sad and afflicted because i can't find them. we only found one of my nieces in a state nobody would want to see a family member. >> reporter: mexican rescue teams are now helping the frantic search for survivors. workers and volunteers search beneath debris that buried some
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homes up to 15 meters at the site of the mud slide east of guatemala city. for the dangerous search area, bad weather slows the process. >> translator: there are bodies that we won't be able to recover because this land washed the houses and when the houses were pushed, bodies were dragged. >> translator: we've located vehicles and brought in machinery, but there's a crack in the top of the hill that wasn't there before. we found eight landslides from the same mountain which crammed the river. >> reporter: they warned of the potential for disaster last year, and they'll relocate those nearby. that means little for those waiting in makeshift camps desperate for news about their family members as the death toll rises, funerals continue one after the other. even though we don't understand your ways, the pastor says, we
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give thanks to you, god. communities struggling to cope as hope dims that their loved ones will come home alive. >> too tragic and heart breaking. >> it is. at least some of the folks nearby will be relocated. but so much to deal with. still to come, a former iraqi lawmaker and her husband risk their safety to save women and children sold into slavery by isis. when you're not confident your company's data is secure, the possibility of a breach can quickly become the only thing you think about.
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that's where at&t can help. at at&t we monitor our network traffic so we can see things others can't. mitigating risks across your business. leaving you free to focus on what matters most.
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zblchlk zblmplt as part of the cnn freedom project, we want to
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focus now on a former iraqi lawmaker and her husband. they're on a mission to rescue yazidi women and children. >> the desperate phone calls from some of the enslaved women kept coming in. atika shubert tells us more. >> reporter: the sound is muffled. crackly, barely audible over the sound of children, but this is a lifeline, a way to plot an escape from slavery under isis. every day this woman takes calls like this, pleas for help to escape. a former air strike iraq ri mai remembers when isis first captured mosul. >> we said why are they coming,
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because there is no oil, not anything. >> reporter: but isis did come for the yazidi. they took the women and children and killed the men. many of the families turned to aamina. >> i am yazidi. i know many of the people kidnapped. >> reporter: the recording was one of the first rescues, a 35-year-old woman with six children all captured, bought and sold in the save markets of isis. she described what happened when isis surrounded their village. [ speaking in foreign language ]
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>> reporter: together with her husband, she manages a network to smuggle the women out. she takes the calls. her husband makes the dangerous journey to bring them out. those are photos of some of the rescues. so far, they have brought you more than 100. but there are still hundreds more. and for many, the wait is too long. some have taken their own lives rather than wait for rescue. she collects photos of the girls she could not save. >> we just want the rescue. we just want that. i said there is a lot of them we don't have contact with them. we don't know where they are now. >> reporter: and you try to talk to them so that they don't lose hope? >> when they lose the hope to rescue, and when isis, many
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times, sell them and rape them. >> reporter: her work has been recognized, awarded by the suspect department this year. but she says it's the voices of the people she could not save that she can't forget. >> when you will rescue us, but i don't have answer. i don't have answer. and i'm not government. i'm not anything. i'm just people. but it's very difficult. >> reporter: her weapon against isis is her phone. delivering the sound of hope, however distant, and her promise that help is coming. atika shubert, cnn in the kurdish region of iraq. >> and our coverage doesn't end here.
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our week-long coverage continues on wednesday. >> he showed me a letter and says this shows anyone if ten isis fighters rape her. >> reporter: then, she says, he raped her. >> a firsthand account of the brutality of the terror group. that report wednesday on cnn news room. take a look at these bbq trophies: best cracked pepper sauce... most ribs eaten while calf roping... yep, greatness deserves recognition. you got any trophies, cowboy? ♪ whoomp there it is uh, yeah... well, uh, well there's this one. best insurance mobile app? yeah, two years in a row. well i'll be... does that thing just follow you around? like a little puppy! the award-winning geico app. download it today.
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it is ratting season in alaska. we all know what that means. a male moose trying to imprez the ladies. >> it can have dramatic consequences. >> put up your dukes. make that your antlers. a fight over a female in mating season in alaska recorded by a father and son hiding behind a car. >> it was crazy. >> when the moose brawl got too close for comfort, the driver of the car fled and bill and josh
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had to head for higher ground. >> i filmed a lot of that video from about right here. >> reporter: where they had front row seats. at least these two weren't as dumb as the colorado moose that tried to meet with a bronze moose statue. not since two kangaroos faced off in australia have we seen such a thing in a sur urban setting. the guy who shot this set it to nutcracker. which made sense since that's where many of the kicks were aimed using both legs. back at the moose fight the struggle intensified. >> one was just carrying the other one all the way across the street. >> reporter: and that's pretty much how it ended, with the alpha moose giving the evil eye as his rival high tailed away.
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they left behind moose hair. the two managed to bang into the subaru parked in the driveway, leaving a dent or two. have no fear, insurance agents assure us as long as the motorist has comprehensive coverage, moose damage will be covered. but when the top moose went to claim his prize after all that work, what did the female do in she left. jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> it was hardly worth it, was it? >> that's always the case. >> and thanks for watching "cnn newsroom." >> our second hour begins after this short break. stay with us.
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rising tensions nato condemns russia's violation of turkish air space. >> a growing disaster. people in south carolina struggle to cope with epic flooding with more on the way. >> and aviation nightmare, a commercial airline pilot dies in mid flight. the crew's reaction caught on tape. >> welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world.
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>> our second hour of "cnn newsroom" starts now. we'll have all those stories in a moment, but we want to begin this stour in the middle east where israel appears to be following through on its threat of strong action. >> they say their military demolished the houses of two palestinian men they say are terrorists. the officials say the men were responsible for three deadly attacks last year. >> for more on this, let's bring in erin mclaughlin. she joins us live. tell us about the demolition and what problem it solves. >> reporter: well, demolitions took place overnight in east jerusalem. one of the homes belonged to a
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man responsible for in part, a knife and ax attack on a sin nothigog last year. another one belongs to a man responsible for a deadly bulldozer attack. both of the attacks took place last year. so it would seem that this action was designed to send some sort of message, part of a wave of measures, a series of measures, announced by the israeli government last night that includes sending, approving the sending in of riot squads into arab neighborhoods in east jerusalem. this is all in response to what has beener is soo has been perceived as a recent escalation of violence that's left four israelis dead in the past week, and the israeli government wants to appear as though it's responding. >> and tensions are heightened
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right now. tell us more about the palestinian teenager who was shot and killed under suspicious circumstances because that also has been one of the many flash points we've seen over the past week. >> reporter: that took place yesterday, and a palestinian refugee camp. a 13-year-old boy was shot and killed by israeli forces. residents say he was on his way to play football with a friend w when clashes broke out at the camp. they say he tried to hide. israeli military says that a riot did take place. they tried to disperse the riot. and they say they opened fire at the main instigators. they acknowledged a palestinian was killed. they say the incident is being investigated. what we're seeing is an escalation in the clashes. israeli forces responding by
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sending in four additional battalions. separately, last night, the israeli government announcing that four palestinian -- excuse me, five palestinian men were arrested, allegedly part of a hamas terrorist cell that they allege were responsible for the killing of two israeli people, they were shot last week, a man and a woman. they were shot as they were driviing inbetween settlements with four children in the back stee seat. >> so much anger and violence in that area. erin, thank you. >> officials in yellmen say at least a dozen people are dead after an attack on a hotel in the southern port city of aiden. >> pictures show smoke coming out of the hotel which is used
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by government fishofficials. the yemeni prime minister lives there. it's not clear who was behind this attack. turkey has someone who russia's ambassador and condemned the country's violation of its air space. >> they say there was another violation on sunday. on monday turkish prime minister said russia blamed the violation on weather. >> translator: we have received from russia this morning is that this was a mistake. and that they respect turkey's borders and this will not happen again. turkey's rules of engagement apply to all planes. turkey's armed forces are very clearly instructed. >> atop nato officials said the incursion was unacceptable, and a nato statement called russia's recent military activities
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dangerous. >> russia's actions are not contributing to the security and the stability of the region. i call on russia to fully respect nato air space and to avoid escalating tensions with the alliance. i urge them to take the steps to align the efforts with those of the national community in the fight against isil. >> meanwhile, the united states says russia has moved troops on the ground in syria. >> two u.s. defense officials say this activity could signal they're planning to bolster the asaad regime and attack opposition forces. >> reporter: several u.s. officials are now telling me the observations have been made by u.s. intelligence that russian artillery and rocket systems, heavy weapons, essentially, are on the move in western syria. let's go to the map.
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everything landed at an air base near the coast. now all of this is on the move in two places. it's going on those corridors, the city of homes and north to the city of idlib. all of this is an area where anti-regime forces are strong. the asaad regime fighting them. the thinking at the moment is that the russians are on the move here, putting this equipment out in the areas in these corridors so they will be ready to support asaad's forces in ground combat. the russians not ready yet. not enough equipment to do something on their own on the ground, but putting themselves in place to support asaad. this equipment is not in any area where isis is located. the group that the russians continue to insist they are fighting. >> barbara star reporting there. and coming up in 20 minutes, we've live know moscow with
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more. >> we keep our focus in the region now. suicide bombings across iraq have killed more than 50 people. southeast of because ra, nine people killed and others wounded when a bomb exploded. isis claimed responsibility. >> another bomb exploded in a crowded market killing 45. two more people were killed by a car bomb in baghdad. no one has claimed responsibility for those two attacks. now to the united states. recovery efforts underway in the state of south carolina. historic flooding has caused at least 11 deaths across that state. two others were killed in north carolina. >> and at least one dam has overflowed forcing a mandatory evacuation. officials say so far 18 dams from breached or failed. the governor warns more evacuations could be on the way. >> this is not over.
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just because the rain stops does not mean that we are out of the woods. we very much still have a vulnerable situation out there. i'm still going to ask citizens to stay inside. >> ten gary tuchman reports the threat of rising flood waters remains. >> reporter: the deluge was sudden and intense. when the road collapsed in south carolina, sheriff's departments put up barricades so no one would drive on the road, but for some reason, a man did, and this is what happened. the county sheriff is jim matthews. >> it was mostly submerged, but there was a piece of the vehicle that was out where she was able to get above the water and stay alive and breathe. >> reporter: rescuers got to the car. the driver was upside down as the flood waters continued to rise. the woman had her window open. the rescued grabbed her.
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>> they were able to get her out. i think she was holding onto one of the wheels of the cars, but the man, they were not able to get him out. >> reporter: when the water went down, departments came to the scene where they recovered the body of the man inside the car. all over this region, both rescues have been taking place. grateful people being brought to safety. angela williams is one of the flood victims. >> what i got on my body is what we have. pretty much every down there has lost everything this morning. our vehicles, our clothes. everything. but the best thing is that we still have our lives. >> reporter: late this afternoon, many residents received recorded phone calls that nearby dams were being topped. and to go to shelters. >> this is joe joe. >> reporter: and who are these three? >> mr. fluff, mrs. fluff, and fluffy. >> reporter: you all evacuated. >> mandatory evacuation. >> reporter: they just arrived
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at this high school shelter after getting the phone call, and there's great concern. >> my heart is coming out of my chest. >> reporter: there is much flooding in this area. incredibly, this is the ninth fairway of the golf course. sadly it's become the ultimate water hole. it's become a water with literally a current. six of the holes of this course are now covered with water and because we're so far away from the coast, most people here don't have flood insurance. so the owner says it's likely he won't be able to afford to reopen it. and with waters expected to continue to rise, an entire region wonders what might happen next. cnn, columbia, south carolina. joining me on the phone is daerk becker, the information officer for south carolina's emergency division. thanks for your time. i know you're very busy. what's the latest assessment of the dam failures and breaches and how much of a risk do they
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pose right now? >> we've received several reports of some localized voluntary evacuations issued by our local public response agencies and communities around the columbia area due to dam concerns. we've got one report of a dam that's being intentionally slightly breached so that it doesn't break it further, and they can control the water flow. the president has declared a disaster for several counties in south carolina. that will free up many programs to be made available to the citizens who are directly affected by the storm. >> and i should let our viewers know, we have a distortion on the line, but we're going to power through this with you because it's important information we want to get. these flood waters, we're seeing footage, they're projected to move southeast from the carolinas down toward the atlantic coastline, but five of the deaths so far are a result of people trying to drive through these waters.
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how long do you think that flooding threat will remain? >> yes. everything we've been told is that the flooding throughout south carolina east river system is going to continue for at least the next couple of days. >> and, of course, just do not try to drive through any of those flooded roads. derek becker on the line with us the information officer for the emergency division there in the state. thanks for your time today. and our meteorologist joins us again. pedram, as we heard from the governor and we keep hearing, just because the rain stopped doesn't mean the danger is over. what more details do you have? >> it has a lot to do with the dams. in south carolina 200 dams are considered high risk. people don't realize about 60% of all dams across the united states are privately operated. there aren't the restrictions you'd think to keep them up to
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date. the average dam age in the u.s., a recent study found was 53 years old. a lot of them are outdated so you're not able to get the proper precautions when these events take place. >> aging infrastructure in. >> yes. it doesn't help. some of the images coming out of south carolina. the water taking down into the lower lying areas. this is in charleston, south carolina. you see the before and the after. the reason, the concern is here when you work your way toward the northern portion of south carolina, you're getting 3500 feet. around sea level, all that water wants to go down sea level. it will want to make its way downstream. some of the communities in the path could be inundated even after the sun shine on tuesday over this region. notice we're getting final bands of showers moving offshore now
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and beyond this, high pressure trying to establish itself. back toward a drying trend that will be of help for people, and then people can get outside and assess the amount of damage left in place with hundreds of roads inundated by the water. >> we still don't know the full scope. folks don't have access. >> dangerous to be outside. >> stay indoors. thank you, pedram. >> there are many questions about what went wrong in kunduz, afghanistan. we'll bring you an up date. >> plus a scary moment for some u.s. airline passengers after the pilot dies mid flight. we'll have the details for you. d it's ready to explode? you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec®-d to powerfully clear your blocked nose and relieve your other allergy symptoms. so, you can breathe easier all day. zyrtec®-d. at the pharmacy counter.
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go to ziprecruiter.com and post your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards with a single click. then simply select the best candidates from one easy to review list. and now you can use zip recruiter for free. go to ziprecruiter.com. international outcry is growing over the deadly air strikes in the doctors without border hospital in afghanistan. the commander of u.s. forces there says the attack happened when afghan troops requested air support. >> doctors without borders says both the afghan military the u.s. coalition had been told the coordinates for the hospital. the white house is defending the u.s. military.
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>> i do think it warrants mentioning that there is no country in the world and no military in the world that goes to greater lengths and places a higher premium on avoiding civilian casualties than the united states department of defense. >> currently there are multiple investigations into the air strike. >> as nick robertson reports, the ongoing fighting is hampering efforts to find out what went wrong in kunduz. >> reporter: three investigations underway, and the u.s. military investigation, the nato investigation, resolute support says they're having a casualty assessment team that should have answers preliminary answers within a couple of days and also the afghan government is beginning an investigation as well. one of the problems we're hearing is that the u.s. forces cannot get to the locations on the ground that they want to get to in the city of kunduz, close to the hospital, because
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fighting continues to go on around that area. doctors without borders remains strong in their position that the taliban were not using the hospital as a base of military operations. the u.s. commander in charge in afghanistan has said that this inquiry will be -- this investigation will hold people to account and is already throwing up details that were unclear in the beginning. >> we have learned that on october 3rd, afghan forces advised they were taking fire from enemy positions and asked for air support from u.s. forces. an iraq wair strike was called. this is different from the initial reports which indicated that u.s. forces were threatened and that the air strike was called on their behalf. as has been reported, i've ordered a thorough investigation into this incident and the investigation is ongoing. the afghans ordered the same. if errors were committed, we'll
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acknowledge them. we'll hold those responsible accountable, and we'll take steps to ensure mistakes are not repeated. >> doctors without bordered say the u.s. has gone from saying it was collateral damage to it was a terrible tragedy to blaming it on the afghans. they say this is the reason why they continue to push for an independent international transparent investigation. doctors without borders say that is very important, because of the broader implications to their hospitals across afghanistan, to the hospitals of other ngos in conflict zones around the world. this continues to be a contentious issues, and they're not priding the issues in part because the fighting in kunduz continues. >> the u.s. coast guard says it is focusing on the search for survivors from a cargo ship that
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went missing near the bahamas. they've found debraidebris. >> 33 crew members were on board when it disappeared thursdayed in midst of hurricane joaquin. they say they're no longer looking for the ship itself. we turn to a scary and sad moment in the skies. the pilot of an american airlines passenger jet died mid flight at the controls. >> 147 passengers and five crew were on board. listen here to what the co-pilot said when he told air traffic control his plane's captain was dead. >> medical emergency. captain is incapacitated. request handling for runway. >> the balance will meet you. >> are they going to have a way to get into the airplane quickly? >> they'll have a way to get
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into the airplane quickly. >> understood. we'll need them to get to the captain. >> incredible how calm he is. the co-pilot took over. and the flight was diverted to syracuse without incident. >> an airline official says the pilot died from natural causes but didn't do go in any specifics. >> russia and turkey are having words over air space, but russia has an innocent explanation. >> al ahead, new clues into joe biden's presidential plans.
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welcome back all around the world. this is your last half hour of "cnn newsroom" with us. >> it is time to check the headlines for you this hour. israel has demolished the houses of two palestinian men it say carried out deadly attacks in jerusalem last year, including a knife and ax attack at a s synagog synagogue. they promised to use any means necessary to stop what the prime minister calls a wave of terror. turkey's foreign minister called for a protest. turkey says its air force jets intercepted the russian jets saturday and now we've learned of a second incident. russia says bad weather forced it into turkish air space before itted into syria for air strikes.
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>> the death toll that has risen after last week's massive landslide. at least 300 people are missing. dozens of homes were buried after the side of a hill collapsed on the village thursday night. >> a candidate for the presidency of fifa says he's fa facing allegations. he's being investigated for the world cup tournaments. >> let's turn back to russia and the movements in syria. there's growing concern the country is getting ground troops ready as officials deal with the violation of turkish air space, and now we're hearing of a second incidence. matthew chance joins us live.
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vladimir putin had previously said he had no intention of sending in ground troops to syria, but now we're hearing that's what russia may be planning. what are you hearing on this? >> reporter: well, we're hearing from u.s. officials that that's their assessment of the intelligence. they believe that artillery pieces and rocket launchers and bits of weapon ri like that are being moved in position along with troops to operate them. what we're not talking at at the moment is any kind of large scale movement of russian troops to fight the land war. there's the syrian army, the iranian troops there as well as hezbollah fligighters. they also have their own troops there, several hundred russian marines already on the ground in syria. but they're mainly playing a forced protection role,
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protecting other russian installations. if it's confirmed that the russians are moving in additional troops to man the weaponry they're said to be preparing for a land offensive, that would be a major development. at the moment, the kremlin is saying they're not prepared to put in troops. >> you talked about the air strikes. let's look at that. we're also hearing about this second incident of russian violation of turkish air space. what are you learning about that? >> reporter: there was a lot of confusion about that yesterday. initially the turkish foreign minister, on saturday, there was an incursion by a russian fighter jet. it was intercepted by turkish f-16s. it turned around. the russians have acknowledged that saying it was a mistake, a
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navigational air. it went for a few seconds as it was approaching an airport. there were weather conditions in the area, they said, so explain that, to avoid that weather, but it's emerged now, first of all from nato, that there was a second incursion into turkish air space the following day, also by a russian fighter jet. no comment from the kremlin about that or any word from the turkish authorities either. it seems the turks and the russians want to try and play this down to avoid this crisis escalating to a higher pitch. >> yeah. and where is that leaving the turkish, russian relationship at this point? >> reporter: good question. it's a very complex relationship between russia and turkey. there's been a lot of animosity. they've fallen out over many
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issues. the situation in syria, of course, they are opposed, syria, turkey, is an impeccable foe of president asaad. president asaad, of russia's long standing ally. there were conflicts of interest over the independence of kosovo. they have lots of political disagreements, but there's a burgeoning trade relationship. bilateral trade has been growing and neither side wants to jeopardize that. >> all right. matthew chance. joining us live from moscow. many thanks. >> after years of negotiations, 12 nations have agreed on a deal that will account for 40 % of the world's economy. >> the transpacific agreement, we have the details. >> reporter: it's the biggest trade deal in history. 12 countries representing 40% of
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the world's economy. it's taken more than five years of intense negotiations to seal the transpacific partnership. >> we have come to an agreement that will support drives, drive stainable growth, and promote innovation across the region. >> reporter: the deal could affect all sorts of products from the cost of a car, even the sale of cancer drugs, and the expectations are high. >> we expect this agreement to promote economic growth, support higher paying jobs, enhance competitiveness, raise living standards, reduce poverty in our countries and to promote transparency, good governance and strong labor and environment tall protections. >> reporter: industries like automobile manufacturing, pharmaceutical and agriculture will see huge changes.
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japan would be required to let in more american farm goods. it's argued for exceptions to protect some farmers. >> translator: we were also able to get exceptions to abolishes tariffs on rice, beef, and dairy products. >> reporter: the one major economy not including in the deal? >> china, our goal with china. >> reporter: the deal will create an economic block at a time when the communist country is displaying military and economic posture. >> the landmark deal creates the largest world trade zone. andrew stevens joins us live with more on this. andrew, there's excitement on the part of officials who negotiated this deal after years of working behind the scenes,
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but because of that secrecy, critics fear that this could be a kind of job killer. what else are they saying? >> reporter: it's a double edged sword. there have been negotiations ongoing, and they have been in secret. we don't know the real details. big numbers being thrown around. tens of billions of dollars added to exports, good for jobs and growth, but in some places it's being seen as a zero sum game. if you talk to american unions, they're worried that what this deal is going to mean is more american companies are going to seek markets to put their own manufacturing in because it's cheaper to do that. jobs will go offshore once again, and they point to nafta which is seen as a similar sort of a deal. and one thing they claim that 700,000 jobs have been lost in the u.s. because of nafta over the last 20 years.
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those are the concerns the unions have. there's also concerns that big companies, big business will be able to ride over the smaller operators because they'll have economies to scale. they'll have heft and muscle in the marketplace that they didn't have before that will squeeze the locals out. the other interesting one is drugs. now, the u.s. fought long and hard for protection on new biotech drugs, before 12-year patent protection. when they go into a new market in australia, they're protected for 12 years. that means the drug maker as a 12-year monopoly. countries pushing back on that. there's a real sticking point. australia is understood to bring that down to five years. this is not being welcomed by everyone. top down, it looks good. bottom up, it looks like there
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are a few more concerns. a lot more concerns. >> and what's interesting is china turned down an offer to be part of this group, but there is a mechanism within it that allows them to join in at some point. do you think that's likely considering the u.s. push for all of this to counter china's economic influence in the region? >> reporter: it's an interesting point. this was seen very broadly as the pivot, a legacy of barack obama where the u.s. sort of economy and economics and trade really focussed moved away from europe, and moved toward the east into asia. also seen as the u.s. setting up this 12-country operation as a way of counter balancing the growth of china and china's trade strength within the region. china has been asked whether they would like to join. they said no. they've also said under this latest agreement that they welcome it, and they say that anything which promotes trade is
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generally a good idea. there's no bad or ill feeling, at least, noticeably on china's part. whether they join or not will become one of the points of is it good for china to do that. at this stage, they don't think it's good enough to join. >> that's right. china released a statement saying they're happy to work with this deal, this agreement and these neighs. andrew live for us in hong ckon. thank you. >> will he or won't he? that is the question many of the u.s. vice president to answer regarding his potential run for the white house. details, still to come. we stop arthritis pain, so you don't have to stop. tylenol® 8hr arthritis pain has two layers of pain relief. the first is fast. the second lasts all day. we give you your day back. what you do with it is up to you. tylenol®.
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barack obama is going to roseberg, oregon on friday. the site of that mass shooting at a community college. >> the white house says he'll meet privately with the victim's families. the visit comes during a
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previously scheduled four-day trip to the west coast. >> hillary clinton is jumping into the debate over gun control on monday the democratic front runner for the white house proposed her plan for stricter gun laws. it includes closing loopholes on background checks and allowing victims to sue gun manufacturers. >> this acomes among new signs that joe biden plans to challenge hillary clinton. >> reporter: two weeks from testifying before the house benghazi committee, hillary clinton is slamming the republican effort as a partisan exercise. >> they were set up. >> reporter: she's seizing on these comments from kevin mccarthy. >> we put together a benghazi special committee, a select committee. what are her numbers today? >> reporter: new polls show
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clinton leading in iowa by five points. but in new hampshire, sanders is beating clinton by 14 points y. a lead that shrinks but only to 9 be biden in the race. >> i'm excited to be leading everywhere else. >> reporter: she says she's expecting a primary fight. sanders is generating enthusiasm in a clinton is not. in massachusetts this weekend, he drew a crowd of more than 20,000. in the wake of the shooting in an oregon community college last week, she laid out proposals to combat gun violence. >> it's time to say we're better than this. our country is better than this. >> reporter: she railed against the national rifle association. >> i would love to see gun
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owners, hunters, form a different organization, and take back the second amendment from these extremists. >> reporter: she's trying to draw a distinction between herself and sanders who has more moderate views on guns that reflect his rural state. while clinton's voting record on guns has been liberal, her tone hasn't always been so sharp. in 2008 she made this appeal. >> it's part of a culture and a way of life. >> reporter: she's also trying to show a lighter side. laughing at herself on saturday night life this weekend. >> this has been to nice. you are really easy to talk to. >> thanks. that's the first time i've ever heard that. >> joining me now from new york is cnn political analyst, and editor and chief of the daily
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beast. john, thanks for joining us. hillary clinton is wading into the gun controversy, laying out proe proe proposals for guns. what impact will this have, and is this an effort to remove the attention from her e-mails and benghazi. >> reporter: anything she does is an effort to move attention away from the e-mails. today she unleashed a gun proposal which builds on her long record on this issue. she has a clear dividing line with bernie sanders and she is on the liberal side of that divide. bernie comes from vermont where they have cozy relationships with guns. she's taking him to task for some of his votes.
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it's a great contrast for her campaign. she can play to the base. and this coming on the heals of the kevin mccarthy stepping his foot in a benghazi question. she's had a pretty good couple of days on the campaign trail. not what we've seen over the past couple of months. >> interesting, and joe biden, he's waiting in the wings. and many are suggesting he will likely announce a run for the white house if that happens, what impact will it likely have on clinton? >> reporter: i think we need to be honest about the fact that nobody can see into the future where biden is concerned here. there are rumors saying he's likely to go. other people saying he's too grief stricken about the death of his oldest son. but what cnn polls show us is if biden gets in, he takes a large chunk of support from clinton.
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he takes some from bernie sanders. but the majority comes from hillary clinton. if he doesn't get in, hillary clinton gets a big boost in the polls. you can bet the hillary clinton camp is hoping and praying that biden doesn't get in. >> and before you go, i want to ask you, we've all seen hillary's appearance on saturday night live. she's gotten mixed reactions. including a suggestion she stop trying to be likable. what do you think? does this effort help or hinder her? >> reporter: i think it was smart to the extent that the character kature on her have been brutal. it softens the blow to the negative associations. she's showing she can take a joke. that humanizes her. at the end of the day, she needs to stop worrying about being likable and needs to focus on her core strengths which is competence. the people who hate her are never going to love her.
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the more she can show a real person, the better she will do as a candidate overall, and in essence, it was a win for her. >> all right. we'll see if it works for you. >> still to come, an unusual fight right in the front yard. coming up next, two male moose duke it out to impress a female. we'll show you the surprise twists after the break. we stop arthritis pain, so you don't have to stop. tylenol® 8hr arthritis pain has two layers of pain relief. the first is fast. the second lasts all day. we give you your day back. what you do with it is up to you. tylenol®.
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edward snowden, the man who revealed the spying says he offered to serve prison time as part of a plea deal. >> he fled the united states after exposing details of the u.s. national security agency surveillance program and he spoke with the bbc program panorama. >> i volunteered to go to prison. what i won't do is i won't serve as a deterrent to people trying to do the right thing. >> reporter: what would be looking to for you to return? >> so far they've said they won't torture me, which is a start. but we haven't gotten much further than that. >> snowden also tells the bbc
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that he and his lawyers are waiting for u.s. officials to, coat, call us back. >> now, it is rutting season in alaska. that's when male moose try to impress the ladies. >> it can have dramatic consequences. >> reporter: put of your dukes, make that your antlers. a fight over a female in mating season spilled onto the streets of alaska, recorded by a father and son hiding behind a car. >> it was crazy. >> reporter: when the moose brawl got too close for comfort, the driver of the car fled and bill and josh had to head for higher ground. >> i filmed a lot of that video from about right here. >> reporter: where they had front row seats. at least these two weren't as
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dumb as the colorado moose who tried to mate with a bronze s t statue. not since the kangaroos in australia have we seen such a thing. it was set to the nutcracker. back at the moose fight the struggle intensified. >> one was just carrying the other one all the way across the street. >> reporter: and that's pretty much how it ended. with the alpha moose giving the evil eye as the rival high tailed it away. they left behind scattered moose hair. >> i collected this. >> reporter: the two managed to bang into the subaru parked in the driveway leaving a dent or two. have no fear. insurance agents assure us that as long as the motorist has
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comprehensive coverage, moose damage will be covered. when the top moose went to claim his prize after all that work, what did the female do? she left. g jeanne moos, cnn. >> who says politics is all work and no play. donald trump took a break to play a prank on rubio. he sent a case of water with the billionaire's face on it and towels with the trump's slogan make america great again. >> and you may remember when rubio grabbed a water bottle and gulped it on live tv. no comment so far from the rubio campaign. what a jab. i'm rosemary kmuchurch.
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>> and i'm errol barnett. >> have a great day. . . .
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a flooding disaster in south carolina. the death toll is rising. the waters rage around that state. dams breached. homes washed away. hundreds of rescues. we have the latest. the mother of a young man spared in the oregon shooting speaks to cnn. she talks about how her son is recovering from the trauma as hillary clinton unveils her plan for gun violence. details moments away. good morning. welcome to "early

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