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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  October 25, 2015 1:00am-3:01am PDT

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spared the worst, mexico dodges a weather bullet but the effects of the strongest hurricane are still felt. tony blair tells cnn he's sorry for aspects of the 2003 invasion an the repercussions that are still felt today and 80 minutes away from history. new zealand makes it to the world rugby finals. aiming to become the first team to go back-to-back. from cnn world headquarters in
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atlanta, i'm george howell. we will have those stories in a moment. first, we're getting new video from the regional government of kurdistan that shows the u.s. raid on an isis compound inside iraq. u.s. special forces and kurdish fighters storm the compound on thursday in a mission to rescue hostages believed to be in danger of execution. a u.s. soldier was killed during the operation. 70 hostages were freed but not the kurdish captives they were september in to rescue. that raid has critics raising questions about the u.s. role in iraq. it was the first time the u.s. forces directly engaged isis militants on the ground in iraq. yet, american officials say the role of u.s. forces is to train and assist the iraqis, not to engage in combat. earlier, our john mann spoke with cnn military analyst and
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retired lieutenant general mark perkily. he once served in that area. >> general, thanks for being with us. you know that area well and we can imagine this attack, planes, helicopters, bridges being bombed nearby, dozens of armed personnel from two nations go in and encounter an intense firefight. what's your sense of what we've learned about it? >> it's a tough area, jonathan. this town is midway between the oil refinery and the capital of kerr kuck city. my condolences to the family of master sergeant wheeler. this is a tough area. i'm sure they have been watching this area for intelligence and they obviously received it. i think the action that was taken this week was critically important and it had -- an operation had to be conducted very quickly to counter what they perceived as a threat to
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the lives the people being held in this community. >> quite separately, there's a political issue which is the american people were told they're not in a combat role in iraq. journalists jumped on this calling this mission creep. if the government is saying one thing about what the men and women in uniform are doing but giving them something much more dangerous on the ground. >> don't believe that. it is not mission creep. this is a special operations unit that has -- i saw that when we were there. they're very intense fighters. they want to take the fight to the enemy. i think this special relationship between our special ops and their special ops, really the intelligence it showed, there were enemy activity in this area, the potential that they were holding hostages assumed to be kurdish at this point meant that hey, we have to get them quickly. indicators are that bad things are going to happen.
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those decisions are made every day in combat. as they determined what the situation was, how they had to go after these forces, the special operation forces of the united states went with the pesh mur ga to provide them support for this complex and complicated mission. >> from a distance, a lot of armchair general are saying this was a lapse because the u.s. forces didn't know who the captives were, how many there would be. when they got there, they didn't find the captives they were expecting. is that a small detail? >> it is not. but it's also something that as you plan operations you try and get the most intelligence on the operation you're about to conduct. but that's got to be weighed against the requirement to act in some cases and in this case the requirement was act quickly. because there's an apparent execution about to take place, so you can weigh all the intelligence you want, but sometimes the commanders on the
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scene have to decide when to decide. when the action has to take place to overcomminie implications that might be on the ground. that's what they did in this case. when you talk about the number of people observed in the camp near that area and you see the number of captives that were there, i'm sure the u.s. special operations forces says the pesh murg a can do it, but it will be complicated. they need american intelligence and backup and they -- >> they needed all those things. thank you lieutenant general. an interview earlier with our own john mann. the death of a u.s. soldier in that raid is raising questions whether or not the u.s. military returned to a combat role in that country but those who have been down this road before know the consequences all too well, like
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former british prime minister tony blair. in a new interview with fareed zakaria, he feels how the move may have helped isis come to power. >> given, however, that saddam hussein did not prove to have weapons of mass destruction, was the decision to topple his regime a mistake? >> whenever i'm asked this, i can say that i apologize for the fact that the intelligence we received was wrong. because each though he had used chemical weapons ex tense tifl against his own people, against others, the form that we thought it was did not exist in the way that we thought, so i can apologize for that. i can also apologize, by the way, for some of the mistakes in planning and certainly our mistaken in our understanding of
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what would happen once you removed the regime. but i find it hard to apologize for removing saddam. >> many people point to the invasion of iraq as the principal cause. what do you say? >> i think there were elements of truth in that. but i think we've got to be extremely careful. otherwise, we misunderstand what's going on today in syria and iraq. you can't say those who removed saddam in 2003 bear no responsibility for the situation in 2015, but it's important also to realize, one, that the arab spring which began in 2011 which also have had an impact on iraq today and two, isis actually came to prominence from the base in syria and not in iraq. that lead me to the broader point, which i think is so essential looking at policy
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today, which is we have tried intervention and putting down troops in iraq. we've tried intervention without putting in troops in libya. and we've tried no intervention at all but demanding regime change in syria. it's not clear to me that even if our policy did not work, subsequent policies have worked better. >> you can see the full interview on fareed zakaria at 11 a.m. in london. monday night at 9:00 p.m. eastern in the u.s. tuesday morning at 9:00 a.m. in hong kong. only here on cnn. now, on to the war in syria. russia says its air force is prepared to help the free syrian army and other opposition groups fighting isis but there's a catch. moscow wants the u.s. to help
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identify where the rebels are. here's how russian foreign minister lavrov put it. >> translator: we are ready to provide aerial support to the patriotic opposition, including so-called free syrian army. but it's important to us to get in touch with people who are authorized to represent the groups that are standing against terrorism. >> the offer is being considered but with a good deal of skepticism. the united states has accused russia of using its air campaign to target rebels and civilians instead of isis. al qaeda is also battling for territory inside syria, but its affiliate there, the al nusra front has been killed in quote, action. the group is not providing further details and there are conflicting reports on how al masri died. some say he was killed by syrian government troops. other report say that he died in
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a gun battle with kurdish rebels. this just in to cnn, an arab israeli man was spotted paragliding into syria late saturday. you see the map here. israeli defense forces tweeted late saturday that the man was spotted from a watchtower. a spokesperson tells the ju jerusalem post that he was going to join -- the -- israel captured the territory from syria during the 1967 israel arab war. israel approved a new security measure at one of the holiest sites for jews and muslims that's been at the center of recent turmoil. john kerry met with jordanian and palestinian officials on saturday before announcing this new proposal. he called it a potential game changer. cnn's report. >> the agreement to put 24-hour
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surveillance on the compound is designed to put an end to disturbances on the compound. the compound is very much at the start of the tensions here in jerusalem, israel and the west bank and has remained april very sensitive spot for the israelis and palestinians. jordan played a big role here since they're custodian of the compound. kerry came into the meetings with president mahmoud abbas and jordan's king abdullah optimistic. is sound like he's still cautiously optimistic. >> today i hope we can begin to turn the page on this very difficult period. we have to join together in calling for an immediate end to violence. we must stress the importance of avoiding provocative actions and rhetoric, and we must work
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cooperatively. it's the only way to go forward is to work cooperatively to restore calm. >> kerry says there will be more meetings in the coming days between jordan and israel to work on the arrangements for surveillance and work on the tensions that have been prevalent here. it has been quiet here. but that quiet remains very fragile. warren lieberman, cnn, jerusalem. still to come, mexico, it has weathered the world's strongest hurricane but there are still worries. top u.s. democrats, they spent the day in iowa on saturday rallying support at one of the biggest rallies of the campaign season. the story straight ahead as "cnn newsroom" continues.
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nonetheless, george, lots of people still being rescued from their swamped automobiles. >> karen maginnis, single
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dollar and still making a profit. that story ahead as this broadcast continues around the world this hour on cnn international and cnn usa. [female announcer] if the most challenging part of your day
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back to our viewers here. you're watching "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. the headlines we're following this hour. mexico appears to have dodged a bullet. the worst hurricane recorded in the world, patricia. it made landfall as a powerful category 5 storm but quickly fell apart. so far, no major damage reported. the remnants are expected to
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make flooding worse in the u.s. state of texas. look at those images there. some areas had already gotten more than 20 inches or about 50 centimeters of rain in the past few days. russia says its air force is ready to help the free syrian army and other opposition groups fighting isis. there's a catch. moscow wants the u.s. to help identify where those rebels are. the u.s. accused russia of targeting rebels and civilians instead of isis. israel's prime minister agreed to set up a 24-hour surveillance at a holy site in jerusalem. the temple mount as it's referred to by jews or noble sanctuary as it's known by muslims, has been a hotspot of violence in recent weeks. british prime minister tony blair says he's sorry for mistakes made leading up to the invasion of iraq. he tells fareed zakaria about what -- overall, the country is
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better without them. a contentious three-week long conference of bishops at the vatican ends with recommendations regarding catholic divorceees and gay marriage. 2/3 of the senate fathers agreed catholics who divorced and remarried may rejoin the church but only after working with a priest or bishop to determine the individual's full integration. not much changed regarding gay marriage. but the senate document saying gays should not suffer discrimination but that there was no foundation whatsoever for same-sex marriage. cnn's vatican correspondent delia gallagher joins us with more. delia, talk to us first about this decision to allow divorcees to return to the catholic church. it's significant. >> reporter: yeah. absolutely, george. this was a difficult one from the start. pope francis wanted to bring
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together bishops from countries around the world to talk about issues facing them regarding the family. what the bishop discovered is what's important in one country for families is not the same in another country. one of those topics was the question of divorced catholics, which is a big issue for european bishops and perhaps american bishops. but the african bishops said polygamy is important for us. they had a plethora of issues to deal with. one of the most divisive being divorced and remarried catholics. currently, if you're divorced in the catholic church and not received an annulment and remarried, the church considers you in an adulterous situation. you cannot participate in a lot of the things that the church does, for example, you can't be a god parent or you can't read at mass. and you can't receive communion which is a sign of your full
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participation. some of the bishops were looking for a way and they've got it in the final document allowing divorced and remarried catholics to participate fully in the church. the other bishops against it said it's in the bible, we can't change the doctrine. what the final recommendations have come up with, there could be a way called the internal forum to speak with a priest, to make an exception for certain situations because they say not all divorces are the same. you could have a partner who has been left, who has been abandoned and therefore, would not be culpable in a situation so should be allowed to participate. they've left the door open to try to find ways on a case by case basis to allow certain divorced and remarried catholics to participate. they haven't said everybody can come back to communion, but they've put it on the tablg, back to pope francis, remember they're only recommendations. no final decisions are made until the pope pronounces on it.
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on the question of gays and lesbians there was some thinking there might be change in the language toward gays and lesbians, because currently the catholic church in their catechism says the homosexual orientation is objectivelily disordered. some of the bishops said that language is too strong, we need more welcoming language. in the final document, george, the bishops reiterated the basic teaching of the catholic church, that yes there is respect for gays and lesbians, but as you mentioned, they do not equate gay unions with marriage -- >> no changes on gay marriage but divorcees allowed to return to the catholic church with some restrictions it seems. these are only recommendations. delia, thank you for your reporting live in rome for us this hour. leaders in ten countries are holding a mini summit in the coming hours in brussels. the european commission chief
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called the meeting to discuss the flow of migrants along the west balkan -- governments are expected to come up with action plans for thousands of people camped out, waiting to move into northern europe. indonesia's president is set to visit the united states. he'll meet with u.s. president barack obama on monday and his visit comes amid a range of geopolitical tensions in southeast asia. climate change and trade are expected to be discussed as well. he will travel to the west coast of the u.s. to meet with executives with companies like apple, google and others. it's the first presidential visit for the leaders of the world's third largest democracy. now to a medical story that has drawn strong reaction. drug maker has said it's taking on a notorious $750 pill with another alternative. a life-saving drug. so far it's cheaper, it's just
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$1 and the company says it can still make money. kyung lah takes us inside the controversy. >> this is the market's answer to price gouging. >> how much is each pill here? >> each pill is 99 cents. >> just under a buck a pill. compare that to this pharmaceutical company. >> it was $18. >> it was $18. >> you took it to $750. >> when he rose the price 1,000% a month ago, outrage followed. the hedge fund manager became an internet pariah headlined as the most hated man in america. a new icon of modern greed and big pharma's biggest expletive. ska really defending his price hike that helps people with compromised immune systems, pregnant women and children.
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>> we can take the profit and put it back into research for this disease. >> he still hasn't lowered the price something he promised to do four weeks ago. he won't tell us why he hasn't. too small amount of patients use it. his company was the only pharmaceutical selling this drug. that got -- >> if you can sell it for a dollar a pill? how much does it cost to make this? >> that's a good question. it's less than a doll haar a pi >> with the drug outrageously priced, they sense a market opportunity. a chance to help the patients that ska really outraged with a close cousin of the pill. >> why not make more money? isn't that what your companies are about? >> there's a point of inflexion if we try to push the limits and collect more money, we go against everything we've stood for as an organization.
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>> to get affordable reform lagss to patients in need. inprim is is still a for profit company. 99 krepts a pill is still -- >> their facebook page flooded with support. bravo, heroes. patients call in with emotional thank yous. >> thank you. thank you for saving lives. >> does greed have to be the rule when it comes to pharmaceuticals in america? >> absolutely not. cnn's kyung lah reporting there. he said it's not a threat to us. i think that it's a publicity stunt and i hope this company has the best of luck. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still to come, south korea is struggle with a slowing economy. that's taking an extra toll on the
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what was once a powerhouse of growth, south korea is now struggling with its economy and it's taking an extra toll on an already vulnerable segment of the society, the elderly. >> this small shop is all this woman has. she hasn't seen a customer in two years. >> translator: i feel that my generation is being forgotten she says. i worked really hard and been so diligent but somehow i ended up here. here living alone among the stock with barely enough money to feed herself getting more and more depressed. >> translator: i tried to kill myself next to my husband's grave. someone discovered me and i survived. >> it's a situation her social worker says is all too common.
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the elderly suicide rate is the highest among developed nations. this is the generation that helped rebuild the economy from the ruins of the korean war. now about half of south korea's elderly live in relative poverty. pastor wong runs this mobile soup kitchen every saturday. he blames the problems on the slowing economy. and he says the old social structure where children look after their aging parents has broken down. >> translator: i think there's a growing number of homeless elders because sons and daughters and our government are not taking good care of them, he says. >> south korea has only had a pension system for less than three decades. the government says because of that, some are being left behind. last year, more benefits were extended to the poorest of south korea's elderly, but they still only receive under $200 per month. many agree that's simply not
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enough. the population here is aging. in just 15 years, a quarter of the people are expected to be over the age of 65, putting enormous pressure on the economy and forcing more to join these food lines. kathy novak, cnn, seoul. argentina is a nation also struggling with a stagnant economy. in just a few hours' time, citizens will head to the polls there to elect their new president. cnn's diego takes a look at some of the economic challenges the next leader will face. >> argentina's inflation is among the highest in the world and nobody really knows the rates. why? >> because many experts challenge the accuracy of the government's -- and most analysts believe it's somewhere between 15 and 25%. but this isn't the country's only challenge. >> the main problem this administration leaves behind is
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an economy that's been stagnant since 2011. it doesn't grow. it has serious investment problems. investments fell in the last few years and this complicates and affects its job creation capacity. >> argentina faces another risk. brazil, its largest trading partner is in trouble. >> i'd say brazil is going through two problems. one is a higher exchange rate. the reality values. this makes brazilian importers spend more to buy one dollar. therefore, it's harder to sell our exports in brazil. our exports should decrease and furthermore, they're in a recession. >> the countries meltdown at the beginning of the century is still an ongoing story. 1.5 billion worth of bonds are still in defaults. creditors have taken the country to court in new york demanding a
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full payment. >> reporter: the outgoing president has had a hard line against international creditors and refused to negotiate. this will be a major challenge for the next administration, but at the same time, if the question is settled, it will be a hope for incoming investment in the current headwinds. diego, buenos aires. guatemala, they head to the polls to choose their next president and april comedian seems to be in the lead in the presidential runoff. jimmy morales faces sandra torres. the former president sits in jail over a bribely scandal. he resigned under pressure but denies the allegations. you're watching "cnn newsroom" and still to come, new zealand fans are celebrating again not only as their rugby team is headed back to the world cup finals, it could make history if they pull off a win. that story.
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two points. that's all that separated the teams in saturday's rugby world cup semifinal match. and in a come from behind
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victory, that could have historic implications. the defending world cup champions from new zealand beat south africa. in turn securing their spot in the finals. the all blacks defeated the spring bucs 20-18. new zealand is hoping to become the first team to win back-to-back titles. they'll play the winner of sunday's australia/argentina matchup. a lot of people will be watching that around the world. the new film, steve jobs is having a wide release debut in the u.s. this weekend. jobs was the visionary behind apple computers, the iphones, ipads, many of the things we use every day. aaron sorkin some say got the subject wrong. >> some of the folks who know steve jobs have loved it and then there's the other folks saying this isn't the steve jobs we knew. i had the opportunity to speak to to sorkin and he opened up to me a little bit about trying to
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research this character of steve jobs and what getting it right in that portrayal meant. >> there's a difference between what you do journalism and what i do. my obligation is to create something subjective while yours obviously is to be objective. if you're writing about real people, obviously, you can't make things up. if there was something i knew to be true, that would be damaging, say, to steve's widow or to steve's children, i wouldn't do that. i'm not looking to hurt anybody. so i want to get it right in that sense. you take a hippocratic oath and say first do no harm. but there is a difference between a photograph and a painting. and this is a painting. >> you have these really touching moments in the film, then you also had these moments where steve jobs comes off as really unkind were you worried about the portrayal? >> no. i went with the information that
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i had. walter isaacson's book. just wasn't authorized. it was requested. steve gave him complete access. he was given instructions by steve and lore even not to whitewash anything or pull any punches. and between the book and the sort of the first person research that i did, there's no question but that he was a difficult and complicated man with a temper who would express his displeasure in ways that weren't always comfortable for the people he worked with. >> i can only imagine all the time you spent trying to get into his head. what did you learn about the real steve jobs by trying to create this character of steve jobs? >> i think the biggest thing i learned about steve jobs is that i'm never going to know who steve jobs is. he's just much too complicated. and so i just knew pretty early on that there was no point in trying to write the steve jobs
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story in trying to write a biopic and trying to get all of him into a two-hour movie. so this movie has a much narrower lens and as a result, i think it's pretty exciting. >> i'm interested, i've covered tech for years. it really certainly didn't seem like a hollywood cared about technology when i started covering it back in 2009. there seems to be this fascination with silicon valley. hollywood's fascination. why is that happening now? >> that's where the stories are. big stories. some of these companies, whether apple or google or yahoo or as big, if not bigger than governments, so we want to tell these stories. >> any other tech figure you're interested in potentially giving the sorkin treatment and turning into a hollywood blockbuster? any hints you can give us it. >> the sorkin treatment. i think they dove under their beds. i'm not really a tech guy. i think it's more of a coincidence that i've written two movies about tech titans.
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it's more of the human stories that i was interested in than the machinery and the technology. >> fascinating interview there. aaron sorkin speaking about the new film, "steve jobs". >> legendary actress, maureen o'hara has died. her long time manager says she died in her sleep from natural causes on saturday at her home in idaho. the acclaimed actress starred in dozens of films during hollywood's golden age. in a career that ran from 1939 through the '60s. her notables include miracle on 34th street and the quiet man. she appeared in a number of westerns and was the favorite co-starve john wayne. maureen o'hara was 95 years old. we end the show on that note. we thank you for watching this hour. i'm george howell. i'll be back after the break with another hour of news from around the world. you're watching cnn.
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the world's news leader.
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dramatic new video showing u.s. forces in their deadly mission to rescue hostages from isis in iraq. details just ahead on that video. hurricane patricia, the storm dissipated over mexico, but it may yet add some major flooding to parts of the southwestern united states. and the vatican. it seems to be loosening its stance on divorce and remarriage. we'll have a report from rome where a mass is marking the end of a three-week long summit. welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
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we begin this hour with that new video from the regional government of iraqi kurdistan that reportedly shows last week's raid on an isis compound inside iraq. u.s. special forces and kurdish fighters stormed the compound on thursday in a mission to rescue hostages believed to be in danger of execution. a u.s. soldier was killed during the operation. u.s. officials say 70 hostages were freed but not the kurdish captives they were sent in to rescue. for more on this, let's go to the senior correspondent, nick payton walsh live near the syrian border. nick, what can we learn from this video? what does it tell us? >> reporter: welsh as far as we can see, we only have the edited version to corroborate this. it does appear it's from the helmet camera.
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you see what must surely be one of the kurdish fighters on that mission which was supported by an advise and assist smaller group of u.s. commandos. it doesn't appear to corroborate much of what we've heard. you can see a long stream of what must surely be prisoners emerging. they were in familiar dress. what would potentially be the sunni arabs -- it is a staggering look at how the raids are undergone. at one point, i think i hear an american voice which gives you an idea of how close to the front of this some of the american advisers actually got. we know, of course, the proximity to the fighting, of one master sergeant joshua wheeler from oklahoma, it did cost him his life. thought to be potentially when they were choosing -- trying to move through a compound wall and detonat detonated, he was caught in fire
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there. it shows the extent of the fire they received from what seems to be isis -- you can't see them but you can hear the level of crossfire going on there. you see isis flags as well and there are moments when you obviously understand how complex and lengthy will be. they have 17 men to pull out of that area. you can see at one point, they're physically having to search them one by one to be sure within their midst they don't have potentially any isis fighters or god forbid a suicide bomber in their midst as well. a very complex task. this video released by it must surely be the kurds. suggestion of how the kurds want to perhaps corroborate what's put out. this seems to do that for the most part. it's hard to see in its entirety whether this footage began and ended. george? >> nick, again, this video does show u.s. military engage in an operation in iraq.
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maybe he's having trouble with nick pat on walsh's signal. nick, thank you. the raid has raised new questions about whether the united states has returned to a combat role in iraq. but those who have been down this road before, they know the consequences all too well. in a new interview with fareed zakaria, former prime minister tony blair says he's sorry for some of the things that happened and helped isis come to power. >> given that saddam hussein did not prove to have weapons mass destruction, was the decision to enter iraq and topple his regime a mistake? >> whenever i'm asked this, i can say that i apologize for the fact that the intelligence we received was wrong.
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because even though he had used chemical weapons extensively against his own people, against others, the form that we thought it was did not exist in the way that we thought, so i can apologize for that. i can also apologize, by the way, for some of the mistakes in planning and certainly our mistaken in our understanding of what would happen once you removed the regime. but i find it hard to apologize for removing saddam. i think even from today in 2015, it is better that he's not there than he is there. >> when people look at the rise of isis, many people point to the invasion of iraq as the principal cause. what do you say? >> i think there were elements of truth in that. but i think we've got to be extremely careful. otherwise, we misunderstand what's going on today in syria and iraq. you can't say those who removed saddam in 2003 bear no responsibility for the situation
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in 2015, but it's important also to realize, one, that the arab spring which began in 2011 which also have had an impact on iraq today and two, isis actually came to prominence from the base in syria and not in iraq. that leads me to the broader point, which i think is so essential looking at policy today, which is we have tried intervention and putting down troops in iraq. we've tried intervention without putting in troops in libya. and we've tried no intervention at all but demanding regime change in syria. it's not clear to me that even if our policy did not work, subsequent policies have worked better. >> you can see the full interview on fareed zakaria at 10:00 a.m. eastern time in the united states, 11 a.m. in london. tune in for cnn special report
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long road to hell, america in iraq, monday night at 9:00 p.m. eastern time in the u.s. tuesday morning at 9:00 a.m. in hong kong. only here on cnn. russia says it's its air force is prepared to help the free syrian army and other opposition groups. there is a catch. moscow wants the u.s. to help identify where the rebels are. here's how russian foreign minister lavrov put it. >> translator: we are ready to provide aerial support to the patriotic opposition, including so-called free syrian army. but it's important to us to get in touch with people who are authorized to represent the groups that are standing against terrorism. >> the offer is being considered but with a good deal of skepticism. the united states has accused russia of using its air campaign to target rebels and civilians instead of isis. russia also says it wants syria to prepare for presidential
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elections and according to reuters, syrian leader bashar al assad he's ready for that. we're joined from moscow with more on the russian push for diplomacy. nick, russia made no illusions about the fact that it's backing the syrian government here. what is behind this move? >> well, we also have sergei lavrov saying the government doesn't, if you will, discriminate between the opposition in syria, the patriotic opposition, that is, and bashar al assad's interests. saying it's essentially playing with an even hand inside syria. but it's also said it's come into syria and it is supporting bashar al assad's forces on the ground with an air campaign. we also heard today from the russian state media quoting the free syrian army as saying that they don't want this help, this
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offer of air support that russia has offered them. what they are quoted as saying, as though russia should stop bombing the free syrian army br they can consider that kind of offer. we've heard as well from state -- the parliamentarians returning from a trip to damascus having had meetings with al assad and others and quoted al assad as saying he would not be opposed to running in the presidential elections if the people of syria wanted it. this really isn't from his perspective, something particularly new. but i think when we analyze it in the perspective that russia is approaching this and russia's position has been it should be up to the people of syria to determine their future, i think we're beginning to see more pieces of how russia sees the syria puzzle and problem going forward and presidential elections would be one of those things. it would be up to the people of
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syria to decide on their future leader. that is one of the foundations or corner stones if you will of the geneva communique. an effort to bring peace to syria. we're back to talking about what we were talking about at an international diplomatic level several years ago. clearly, from what we've seen on russia state television here, less of the military bombardments inside syria yesterday compared to the past weeks or so and much more talk about dip lem si. that's where the shift seems to be going. al assad's role in that, a part of that process. it seems gaining greater prominence. george? >> nic, is there any late reaction from other countries involved in the war on syria in this concept of the presidential election? >> i think there is a general agreement that it's down to the
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people of syria to determine their future. the question is when do you get to that point? do you have to have an end to the fighting in syria? that seems to be russia's position right now. that is generally accepted as being a good time and place to hold elections. you can't hold elections if half the country is under fire and they can't get to polling stations, you can't -- in that context, the context today where isis has a large amount of territory. where there is fundamental differences still is what role bashar al assad should play. the general -- the perception outside, let's say, from turkey, let's say from saudi arabia, the principal players here. assad must go. how he can be standing there saying that if the people of syria want him in the presidential elections, that's something that's going to fly in the face of what we're hearing from saudi arabia and turkey and others at the moment as well, george. >> nic robertson live in the
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capital. thank you so much for your reporting and breaking down very complicated issue there. thank you. al qaeda is also battling for territory inside syria, but its affiliate there, the al nusra front has been killed in quote, action. the group is not providing further details and there are conflicting reports on how al masri died. russian state media say he was killed by syrian government troops. other report say that he died in a gun battle with kurdish rebels. mexico came out relatively unscathed after being hit by the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the world. on saturday, the nation's president enrique pena went to the city of manzanillo to survey the damage from hurricane patricia. the storm's winds knocked down structures, power lines and uprooted trees. officials say there was no major damage reported. the city of puerto vallarta, a tourist area on the coastline was predicted to bear the brunt
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of this storm but there was no major damage there either. schools are expected to reopen on monday. our john voss has more from mexico. rs a little more than a day after bracing for a worst case scenario, puerto vallarta like many communities on the pacific coast of mexico, life is returning to normal. that's not to say that patricia went quietly into the night. there wasn't the devastation so many feared. more than 3,000 homes were damaged. thousands of areas of farmland impacted and thousands remain without electricity. when the storm hit as many as 230,000 people lost power. this is a remarkable outcome, though, especially considering patricia's strength before making landfall. wind up to 325 kilometers per hour. mexico's president was in the storm zone on saturday looking at some of the damage and he thanked emergency responders and praised the preparation and that is why he said there was so
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little damage. but there was also a good amount of luck involved here as well. if we look at where the storm made landfall south of here of puerto vallarta, north of another major city, manzanilla, that was an area sparsely populated. patricia then moved inland, headed towards the mountains and weather experts say the mountains essentially shredded the storm and why it lost intensity so quickly. airports and road have reopened, tourists returned to hotels and residents back home after thousands were evacuated. shops and misses removing the boarded up windows and so many people grateful that the worst never happened. john vause, cnn, puerto vallarta, mexico. it was one of the biggest hurricanes on record. it was not only surprising for its intensity but how quickly it disappeared. karen maginnis has an update on what's happened to the storm
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system. >> is it really is amazing to watch this seeming innocuous storm mushroom into this astounding hurricane, category 5 and now we have a remnant area of low pressure across northeastern mexico. some of that moisture is going to be tapped into texas over the next couple of days. in the meantime, from puerto vallarta to manzanillo, who are the rainfall reports. we have expected much, much more in the way of rainfall potential for mud and landslides. now a little bit of that leftover moisture is getting caught up with a system in mexico. ark-la-tex, texas, louisiana, arkansas will see substantial rainfall over the next 24 hours. but take a look at this out of texas. just to the south of dallas, so much rainfall that the railroad
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tracks were dislodged or displaced. this train car tipped over. there were two people, two employees of union pacific and it tipped overment they were able to get out safely. what happens as we go into the next 24 hours. as the disturbance shifts further to the east but staggering amounts of rainfall just to the south of dallas, lots of high water rescues with people stuck in their cars unable to get away and corsicana where that train wreck occurred, they have seen in some instances 20 inches of rainfall. over the last several days. george, back to you. >> as karen was saying. the remnants of patricia set to cause more trouble in the u.s. state of texas. all exits on an interstate leading to downtown houston are closed because of high water. you see it right there. many roads in texas are
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underwater and authorities are warning drivers to steer clear of them. some residents near galveston were told to evacuate. still to come, after three weeks of debate, catholic bishops are bringing their historic meeting to a close at the vatican. they've made big decisions on catholic divorcees and the issues of gay marriage. you see live images from the vatican where the meeting wrapped up. a live report is ahead. plus -- police use tear gas on anti-government protesters in montenegro's capital. more on that ahead. leaders in the middle east have agreed to take steps toward curbing violence in jerusalem. it centers at one of the most contested and revered site. "cnn newsroom" continues after this.
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you could choose a card that limits where you earn bonus cash back. or, you could make things easier on yourself. that's right, the quicksilver card from capital one. with quicksilver you earn unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. so, let's try this again. what's in your wallet? these are live pictures from the vatican where on saturday new recommendations were announced regarding catholic divorcees and the issue of gay marriage. after a three-week long conference of bishops, 2/3 of them agreed catholics who divorced and remarried may rejoin the church but with stipulations. not much has changed regarding gay marriage.
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the senate document saying they shouldn't suffer discrimination. more on this, let's turn to delia gallagher live in rome on the catholic senate. first of all, to point out, niece are only recommendations but no change when it comes to gay marriage. >> that's right. there was some indication last year that the church might want to soften their language towards gays and lesbians. they currently call it disordered. some suggested they might be able to change that language. in the final document issued yesterday, they did not address that issue. they reiterated that the catholic church respects gays and lesbians, wants to accompany families who have gay and lesbian members. as you say, is not equating gay unions with marriage between a man and a woman. basically restating what the traditional catholic teaching on
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that is. interestingly, yesterday the cardinal of vienna told us that the bishop felt that the question of gays and lesbians was too delicate to get into considering the political and cultural context of the question in the different countries pointing to one of the problems of this senate. you had 270 bishops from 120 countries around the world all coming together to talk about what were some of the mine priorities for them. there were different priorities considering the different countries they came from. interestingly, yesterday the pope in his closing remarks to the senate said that the catholic church should not be a church issuing condemnation but should show mercy. that is probably the lens through which we should look at this report. because on one of the most divisive issues on the question of divorce and remarried catholics, the bishops did allow some leeway there. they're making recommendations
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to the pope to say previously and the current teaching is that if you are divorced and you have not annulled that first marriage and in a second relationship, a second marriage, they consider that adulterous and therefore you cannot participate in many of the activities of the church such as being a god parent, reading at mass and reading communion. some of the bishops were pushing for a little more leeway in what's called the internal forum. some of the marriages could be looked at together with a priest, the couple examines their conscience, looks at the particulars of their case and the priest or bishop could make an exception. the bishops have made that recommendation to the pope. again, any decisions on that are going to be made eventually pope francis himself, george. >> these are only recommendations. is there a next step and when could these recommendations
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become a final dictate? >> well, the procedure in the past has been that the pope received the recommendations from the bishop and then issues what is called an apostolic exhortation or his definitive document on where he wants the church to go. it is not clear yet whether pope francis will actually write that document or if he will let the recommendations sort of roll on for a little bit and be further discussed because there has been a lot of debate, particularly on that question of divorce and remarried catholics and the bishops, you know, in this final document vote paragraph by paragraph. they have to have a 2/3 majority to approve the paragraph. the question of divorce and remarried catholics only just slid by with a majority vote. the pope doesn't have a full consensus yet from the bishops on that particular question. so we may or may not have a final document from the pope. he may let it go on a little bit further.
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he's starting this year of mercy in november which he wants to be kind of the overriding theme for welcoming people who have been excluded back into the church. so we'll have to wait and see, george, whether the pope will come out with a definitive statement on these recommendations >> delia gallagher live for us in rome. thank you for your reporting and context on this. in a couple hours' time, people in argentina will head to the polls to elect their new president. president christina hernandez did he kerch ner cannot run again this year. the ruling power is expected to stay in power. in guatemala voters head to the polls to choose their new president and turns out a comedian seems to be in the lead in the presidential runoff. he's jimmy morales facing former first lady. the election comes as the former president sits in jail over a bribery scandal. he resigned under pressure last month but denies all
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allegations. a second weekend of violent protests in montenegro on saturday. police fired tear gas to break up thousands of protesters who marched on parliament in the nation's capitol. they're demanding that the prime minister step down and that the country hold elections. they accuse the prime minister of corruption, but the government rejects the accusati accusation. a car plows into a crowd of spectators, turning a festive parade in the you state into this scene much horror. the story ahead. later, we're getting new video of one of the world aes most mysterious magss, cuba, letting unmanned vehicles be flown across the sky. breathtaking images to show you as this broadcast continues on cnn international and cnn usa. (cole) alright, now that we have merged with cableworld,
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from cnn world headquarters in atlanta welcome to our viewers around world and in the united states. the headlines we're following in hour. new video reportedly shows thursday's raid on an isis compound inside iraq. u.s. special forces and kurdish fighters stormed the compound in a mission to rescue kurdish hostages. a u.s. soldier, though, was killed during that. the remnants of hurricane patricia are set to make flooding worse in the u.s. state of texas. some areas have gotten more than 20 inches or about 50 centimeters of rain in the past
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few days. right now, exits on an interstate leading to downtown houston, they're all closed. russia says its air force is ready to help the free syrian army and other opposition groups fighting isis but there's a catch. moscow wants the united states to help identify where those rebels are. the u.s., though, is skeptical it has accused russia of targeting rebels and civilians instead of targeting isis. and this just in to cnn. an arab israeli man was spotted paragliding into syria late saturday from the israeli held golan heights. it was tweeted late saturday that the man was spotted from a watchtower. a spokesperson tells the jerusalem post the man was headed to join a militant group. israeli forces shot and killed a palestinian teen who attempted to stab security officers at a west bank checkpoint on saturday. the incident is just the latest in weeks of violence that now has led israel to approve a new
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security measure at one of the holiest sites for both jews and muslim. u.s. secretary of state john kerry met with jordanian and palestinian officials on saturday before announcing this proposal and he called it a potential game changer. cnn's boren lieber man has the story. >> the agreement to put 24-hour surveillance on the compound is designed to put an end to disturbances on the compound. the compound is very much at the start of the tensions here in jerusalem. israel and the west bank and has remained a very sensitive spot for israel is and palestinians. leaders accusing each other of trying to change it status quo. the unwritten agreement supposed to benefit the compound. jordan played a big role here since they're custodian of the compound. kerry came into the meetings with mahmoud abbas and king abdullah cautiously optimistic. it sounds like he's still
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cautiously optimistic. >> today he hope we can begin to turn the page on this very difficult period. we have to join together in calling for an immediate end to violence. we must stress the importance of avoiding provocative actions and rhetoric, and we must work cooperatively. it's the only way to go forward is to work cooperatively to restore calm. >> kerry says there will be more meetings in the coming days between jordan and israel to work on the arrangements for surveillance and work on the tensions that have been prevalent here. it has been quiet here. relatively in jerusalem and the west bank. but that quiet remains very fragile. warren lieberman, cnn, jerusalem. in the state of oklahoma, four people were killed and 44 injured after a car plowed through a group of spectators at a homecoming parade on saturday in the city of stillwater. the home of oklahoma state university.
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the 25-year-old driver has been arrested on suspicion of driving while drunk. he will make a court appearance on monday. the university president calls it an incomprehensible act. >> the oklahoma state homecoming parade is probably one of the most wholesome, happy events in the country. to have it fouled like this and these victim, this terrible tragedy, we reach out and embrace the victims and their families. >> chambers was the driver. one of the victims was a 2-year-old boy who died of his injuries at the hospital. now to the u.s. presidential race. they made their pitches in iowa at the jefferson jackson dinner. bernie sanders, martin o'malley and hillary clinton took the and addressed the crowd.
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it's an early test so see who will grab support ahead of the iowa caucuses in early february. just 99 days away. sanders took the stage first and declared he would win the election without the help from independent fundraising groups that are known as super pacs. >> they said that in this day and age you cannot win a campaign unless you have a super pac. unless you go -- unless you go to the millionaires and the billionaires and you beg for money. >> the stakes are especially high for the vermont senator. he's seven points behind front-runner hillary clinton in the latest iowa polling. senior washington correspondent jeff zeleny was also at that big event and he has more from iowa. ♪ >> fireworks in the presidential race. democratic rivals descending on
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iowa, 100 days before the first votes of the 2016 primary. hillary clinton seizing on the star power of katy perry. >> fight on, 2016 is right around the corner. >> the political power of bill clinton. in his campaign trail debut. >> i've never been the warmup act for katy perry before. but i'm well aware i am the warmup act. >> the biggest week yet of the democratic presidential race ended in iowa where clinton had plenty of company and competition. senator bernie sanders has become a democratic star of his own. his campaign chartered a plane to fly over their dueling rallies. calling for a revolution before marching side by side with his followers. >> this is a march which will end up in a year when you will join me in the white house. >> a festival of politics coming
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to a full boil at the jefferson jackson dinner, a marquis event for democrats. it was at this dinner eight years ago where illinois senator barack obama jump-started his presidential campaign. >> if we are really serious about winning this election, democrats, then we can't live in fear of losing. >> sanders said history could repeat itself. >> about eight years ago, all of the political experts talked about how another democratic candidate for president just couldn't win. he was unelectable. you remember that guy? what's his name? oh, it's president obama. >> sanders presented himself as a principled progressive talking about iraq, gay rights and wall street reform. >> i will not abandon any segment of american society just because it is politically
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expedient at a given time. >> former maryland governor, martin o'malley said it was time for a new generation to lead. >> new leadership or the same old battles of our past. actions or words. do we want to get things done or do we just want to keep kind of shouting past each other? >> but clinton argued her experience makes her the party's strongest nominee. >> it's not enough just to rail against the republicans or the billionaires, we actually have to win this election. >> in iowa, clinton has an edge in the polls. but sanders is capturing the enthusiasm a sign this democratic race is not yet settled. >> with 100 days remaining before the iowa caucuses, hillary clinton is clearly in the democratic driver's seat. she spent more time talking about republican rivals than her democratic ones. but bernie sanders's followers are still looking for a primary fight.
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jeff zeleny, des moines, iowa. >> you're watching "cnn newsroom." a pricey life-saving drug is getting competition after causing international outrage. coming up, the company says they can sell a similar pill for a single dollar. they can still make a profit. plus, new stunning news from the sky over cuba. one of the world's most secretive countries. the images are ahead.
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welcome back.
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now to a medical story drawing reaction. imprimis pharmaceuticals announced it's taking on a notorious $750 pill with another alternative life-saving drug and this is far cheaper. it sells for just $1. the company says that it can still make a profit. young la takes us inside the lab and the controversy. >> this is the market's answer to price gouging. >> how much is each pill here? >> each pill is 99 cents. >> just under a buck a pill. pair that to turing pharmaceuticals. >> it was $18. >> it was $18. >> you took it to $750. when he rose the price 5,000% a month ago, outrage followed. the hedge fund manager became an internet pariah headlined as the most hated man in america. a new icon of modern greed and big pharma's biggest expletive.
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shkreli on fox business channel defending his price hike that helps people with compromised immune systems, like hiv and cancer patients, pregnant women and children. >> we can take the profit and put it back into research for this disease. >> shkreli still hasn't lowered the price of daraprim, something he promised to do four weeks ago. he won't tell us why he hasn't. only a 100,000 patients use it. too small amount of patients use it. his company was the only pharmaceutical selling this drug. that got imprimis pharmaceuticals thinking. >> if you can sell it for a dollar a pill? how much does it cost to make this? >> that's a good question. it's less than a dollar a pill. >> with the drug outrageously priced, they sense a market opportunity. a chance to help the patients that shkreli outraged with a close cousin of the pill. >> why not make more money?
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isn't that what drug companies are all about? there's a point of inflexion if we try to push the limits and collect more money, we go against everything we've stood for as an organization. their mission is to get affordable reform lagss to patients in need says imprimis. it's still a for-profit company. opening bell this summer. 99 krepts a pill. that's profit enough they say. >> their facebook page flooded with support. bravo, heroes. patients call in with emotional thank yous. >> thank you. thank you for saving lives. >> does greed have to be the rule when it comes to pharmaceuticals in america? >> absolutely not. cnn's kyung lah reporting there. >> as for shkreli, he told fox news, "there is not a threat. this is not a threat to us. i think that it's a publicity stunt and that i wish this company the best of luck. but i have faith in our team and
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our competitive standpoint." now i want to show you cool images over cuba. these are images thanks to drones. these drones are getting new views over the nation that had not been seen before. a group of engineers convinced cuban authorities to let them fly drones over the secretive nation and we have more on the footage. >> the filming of a music video in havana. the crew get a little help from above. you don't see this very often here. unmanned aerial vehicles or drones are virtually nonexistent in cuba. the island's secretive government isn't a fan of flying cameras. intel's tourists and visiting journalists they can't bring them to the island. for the first time, a group of cuban techies building their own drones received permission to fly them throughout cuba.
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the results have been breathtaking. >> translator: everyone, cuban or foreigner, as soon as they see the video, they say, the first reaction is always the same. wow. they're allowed to film hotels and attraction toss promote the growing tourism industry. their cameras have captured and until now unseen cuba. images from above of a 1950s classic car traveling down the havana sea front. residents of old havana watching life go by from their apartment balconies. the tile rooftops of a small colonial town in the cuban countryside. pilot alejandro perez de la cruz shows the first models that they brought from china or they themselves invented. >> translator: we experimented with different propellers and
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motors he said. it took us years. years of research paying off as clients line up to have them filly vents like this concert on the sea front. >> for those who have figured out how to maneuver the red tape of aerial photography, the view is worth the hassle. >> cuba's drone pioneers says the -- >> translator: these are times to challenge ourselves. to try new things he says. that's what we're doing. next they say, they want to organize and exhibition of aerial photography to be shown in other countries. so more people can see the drone's eye view of cuba. patrick ottoman, cnn, havana. very cool. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still to come. halloween is just a week away. have you got your costume redd i? if you don't, we look at the more popular costumes ripped from the headlines. you're watching "cnn newsroom."
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you're looking at ecstatic new zealand fans. celebrating as their reigning champs head back to defend their title and potentially mark their place in rugby history. on saturday, the all blacks defeated them in a lows match winning just by two points. final score 20-18. new zealand is hoping to become the first team to win back-to-back tight ms. they'll play the winner sunday's australia/argentina match. it's almost halloween. pretty cool costumes have hit the store shelves. jeanne moos has a look at some of the best and some of the worst. >> halloween adventure. >> adam and eve costume. >> you can pick up props ranging from snakes to wings to hearts. but if your heart belongs to topical costumes -- >> look at it. isn't it great? >> it is great. >> how many did you order? >> i have about 48. >> trump is outselling.
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hillary is old news. >> and this is is what the media is calling sexy donald trump for the ladies. yandy.com sells lingerie but branched out to halloween costumes. >> the video blew up over this. >> they introduced the pizza rat costume. rat ears, tail and pepperoni pizza pockets. the number one best selling costume is the blue/black versus white/gold dress called what is the color. peta is selling costumes. >> this is cecil the lion. as you can see, he's getting revenge on dr. palmer. >> it's a tongue in cheek way to provoke discussion of trophy hunting. >> you know, be the talk of the party. >> price, $140. the lion's share goes to fund petas causes. >> who needs a costume if you've
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dressed your baby up as the pope. other ideas, movie popcorn or spaghetti and meatballs. if you happen to be pregnant, turn your baby bump into the perfect pearl with a magic eight ball. halloween mainstays tend to be mundane. >> the bread and butter are vampires. everybody wants to be a vampire and everybody wants to be a zombie. >> what's a kid want to be? disney's -- >> on the inside of it that you blow on it and it unravels. >> you can't get better than that. >> there are those who would probably argue that people who dress up for halloween -- >> they're losers. >> jeanne moos, cnn, new york. so you've got some options there. before we leave you today, let's look up to the stars. scientists discovered an extremely rare type of star system. it's in the tar ant la neb la. some 160,000 light years away
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from us. they've found two very large two very hot stars. so close they're actually touching. the centers of the two stars are just 12 million kilometers apart. but their surfaces actually overlap. in this artist impression, you can see a bridge of stellar material between them. to give you an idea of the scale here, their combined size is about 57 times bigger than our own sun. the stars could be headed to a dramatic ending either combining into one giant star or remaining apart and eventually collapsing into a pair of black holes. but that image, wow. the things that can happen out there. we thank you for joining us for this hour of "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell in atlanta. for our viewers in the united states, new day is next and for other viewers around the world of quest starts in a -- best of quest starts in a moment.
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you're watching "cnn newsroom." yet gentle. but even they'll tell you, dawn helps open... something even bigger. go to facebook.com, dawn saves wildlife. find out how the little things you do, can make a big difference. at&t and directv are now one. so get ready to laugh here and cry here. scream over here and freak out over there! and maybe go back to laughing here. and crying there. try not to laugh here though, it's rude. and maybe don't cry here, people will get the wrong idea. introducing the all in one plan. only from directv and at&t.
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i saw something black coming so i didn't know what it was. >> but the grace of god, it could have been my grandchildren! >> witnesses, you hear them there, reliving what they went through. police say a drunk driver plowed into a homecoming parade crowd in oklahoma killing four people, including a 2-year-old. and dozens are still hurt. flooding overnight in texas. houston, galveston hit hard. a lot of the roads are under water. the southeastern coast, get this, is bracing for even more rain. andma

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