Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  October 26, 2015 10:00pm-1:01am PDT

10:00 pm
truly know. thanks for watching. i'm fareed zakaria. this is "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. ahead this hour, disturbing new video shows the violent arrest of a high school student while she sat at her desk in her classroom. plus, a u.s. warship ignores warnings from china and sails straight into a messy territorial dispute. and cnn takes you to the front lines of a battle to drive out igs ssis fighters. hello and welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'mi i i'm isha sesay. "cnn newsroom" starts right now. we start tonight with shocking video out of a south carolina
10:01 pm
high school. >> put your hands behind your back. give me your hands. >> the video is causing an outrage on social media. many saying the officer acted too violently. other defended him saying the student refused to listen. the school district says it is working with the sheriff's department which is investigating the incident. the officer identified as deputy benefie ben fields has been placed on administrative leave. a local police official describes the few details that are known about the encounter. >> the student was asked to leave the class several times by the instructor at the school. assistant principal was there as well. then the officer was called on scene to actually have the student removed from that location. the student refused. and the officer acted that you see on the video. now, again, what we saw was just
10:02 pm
a tidbit of what that video showed. of course we're going to look at what happened that led up to it. that incident that took place. and then what happened afterwards. all that's going to take part in what the sheriff decides. >> cnn legal analyst sony hostin joins us from new york. sunny, great to have you on the show. let me ask you, what went through your mind the first time you laid eyes on this video? >> i was horrified, isha, as a mother, as the daughter of a family of teachers. i've taught school myself. i know that what i saw from a legal perspective was an assault on a child. in my view, there is just simply no justification for using that kind of force in a classroom in front of other children because you are dealing with a child who doesn't want to leave the classroom. and so i think my first reaction and my sustained reaction is one
10:03 pm
of horror. >> the individual in the video, the school resource officer who lays his hands on this child, what do we know about him and, beyond that, for our international viewers who don't know of this role, what is a school resource officer? what are they supposed to be doing? >> well, they are certainly responsible for keeping and maintaining control and discipline of students. they are there for the safety of the students and oftentimes they are trained police officers. this person, this school officer, resource officer, isha, was and is a trained sheriff in the county department and sort of on loan to this school. so we do know that about him. we also know at this point that there have been at least two lawsuits that we know of filed against this officer. one by a student claiming that
10:04 pm
there were civil rights violations, and another lawsuit by two people that he arrested. again, force was used there. and we also know that he is a competitive power lifter, a very large police officer. and i say that because i think when you look at the video the legal standard is, okay, what is reasonable and necessary to discipline and control this child. well, if you are a power lifter, if you are a strong person, do you need to exert that amount of force on a young child. i mean, we ask our police officers to put their lives in danger, certainly, day in and day out. there are really great police officers out there doing this difficult job. but with that comes great responsibility. and i think that we expect more from our police professionals than what we saw in that video. >> now, i know legal
10:05 pm
professionals or law enforcement professionals would say she was resisting arrest. okay? so let me ask you this. she was resisting arrest. even if that was the case, does a lawmaker make a distinction between a child and an adult and how you respond in that situation? >> i think certainly the law can do better with making the distinction between an adult and a child, but i think when you're talking about a classroom setting, yes, the law does make some distinctions about what is reasonable and necessary to deal with a child. and when you're talking about resisting arrest, she wasn't physically resisting arrest. she didn't have a weapon on her. she didn't rush to attack this police officer. she was sitting down, and i guess refusing to leave. that in and of itself, in my view, isha, never can justify what we saw. and that's why, you know, oftentimes we have these videos. and i think they're so
10:06 pm
important. people don't want to believe what their eyes are showing and showing and telling them. i think that people should look at this video and ask themselves, is this appropriate? what if this were my child, is this excessive? and i think it's really clear that it is. >> the video is very, very disturbing. actually difficult to watch. sunny hostin joining us there from new york. thanks as always. >> thanks. well, a south carolina incident is the latest in a series of heavily publicized encounters between police officers and civilians in the last year. many involving white officers engaging with people of color. experts credit the turmoil in ferguson, missouri, as having an important impact on police work in the u.s. but others have pointed to the increased scrutiny of officers as a possible reason for high murder rates in a few big cities. fbi director james comey weighed in on what some are calling the ferguson effect. >> i spoke to officers privately
10:07 pm
in one big city precinct who described being surrounded by young people with mobile phones held high, taunting them when they get out of their cars. they said to me, we feel under siege and we don't feel much like getting out of our cars. the suggestion, the question that's been asked of me is, are these kinds of things changing police behavior all over the country and is that what explains the map and the calendar? the honest answer is, i don't know. and i don't know that that explains it entirely. but i do have a strong sense that some part of the explanation is a chill wind that has blown through law enforcement over the last year. and that wind is surely changing behavior. >> the incident in ferguson and other u.s. cities may also be having an impact on the number of future police department candidates. major cities across the united states report significant double digit declines in police department applications. cnn's kim law has more.
10:08 pm
>> reporter: the los angeles police academy, where the next generation of cops learn how and when to fire. high speed pursuit tactics and takedown moves on armed suspects. >> suspect, put your hands up. >> reporter: a tough job, yet recruit officer hardy longs to wear the badge, even if others around her don't support her career choice. >> i think that is not as easy for the people -- you know, for our family member or our friends to actually accept the profession that we're going in to just because of the perception that african-americans have towards law enforcement. >> reporter: a perception effected by high-profile officer involved shootings from ferguson, missouri. two north charleston, south carolina, to cincinnati, ohio. outrage leading to high-profile targeted killings of police officers. the fallout seen across the
10:09 pm
country as police departments struggle to attract new officers. in philadelphia, the number of police we kruts has dropped 47% in 2014 compared to 2008. since 2013, new york, the country's biggest police force, applications are down 18%. in los angeles, 16%. lieutenant aaron mccrany joined the p.d. at another tough time for cops, the rodney king era. when you go out and talk to recruits, potential recruits, are you hearing them mention incidents? >> sure. that's one of the questions, okay, why should i be a police officer when all of these bad things are going on? why should i put myself at risk? >> reporter: coupled with relatively low pay and tough entrance standards, and that chance that they could be hurt or killed. this is a hard sell, especially for women and minorities. but not for asia hardy, she
10:10 pm
wants to improve not just her community but how others view her and her brothers in blue. >> despite all of the backlash that law enforcement is getting, this is a personal choice of mine, this is my passion. so i'm moving forward with it, despite everything that's happening right now. >> reporter: a number of the police departments we spoke with say it's not just public perception affecting the applications, it's also the job market as well as the economy. they say these things are cyclical and they hope this is the bottom. kyung lah, cnn, los angeles. turning now to syria where kurdish fighters have pushed isis out of their territory and northern eastern city. fighters are preparing for offensive toward isis strongholds including isis headquarters in raqqa. senior international correspondent clarissa ward has been touring the front lines in northern syria. here's some of what she found. these men are at the core of america's latest strategy to
10:11 pm
defeat isis. manning positions along a vast and desolate front line with isis entrenched in villages just through the haze. they are fighters are the ypg, force of 30,000 syrian kurds which backed by coalition air power has dealt decisive blows to islamic state militants across northern syria. commander is in charge of this front line position in the city which the ypg took from isis in august after months of fierce clashes. >> translator: they tried to attack us again ten days ago. we were prepared so they didn't reach their target. >> reporter: but they keep trying. isis has control of the next village along which is just over a mile in that direction. but the men at this base tell us that isis fighters often go at night to that building just over there so that they can launch attacks on these positions. the u.s. hopes the ypg will soon
10:12 pm
move from defense to offense, taking the fight to isis' stronghold in raqqa but at makeshift bases across the front line the ones we saw were lightly armed, poorly equipped, and exhausted from months of fighting. senior commander knows the battles ahead will be even tougher. can you take raqqa without heavier weapons from the coalition? >> translator: the weapons we have are not high quality for this campaign, we will need new, heavy weapons. >> reporter: the most important weapon they do have but don't want to talk about is this device, which helps the ypg get exact coordinates foreign my positions. those coordinates are sent to an operation room and minutes later fighter jets come screaming in. he told us he was given a week of training before using the
10:13 pm
device. who trained you how to use this? >> translator: believe me, i can't say. when you finish the training, it's a secret. but they weren' speaking kurdish. >> reporter: a mystery as is so much of the unfolding u.s. strategy in this critical corner of syria. clarissa ward, cnn, syria. well, all this week our senior international correspondent clarissa ward brings you a series of reports from northern syria. cnn visits the area's newly liberated from isis yet still vulnerable and meets the people who are defending the front lines. you won't want to miss it. it's only here on cnn. well, parts of south asia are still reeling from a magnitude 7.5 earthquake that struck monday. 304 are confirmed dead. mostly in pakistan and afghanistan where the quake was centered. hundreds more are injured. rescue and recovery crews expect to find more victims
10:14 pm
particularly in remote areas. let's bring in ivan watson live from hong kong. ivan, what can you tell us about ongoing search and rescue eff t efforts? >> unfortunately that death toll just grew to 306 now. the chief executive in afghanistan announced on twitter abdullah abdullah 76 people including women and children have died as a result of the earthquake in afghanistan and another at least 268 wounded, he said, and he fears that the numbers may increase. far more casualties have been confirmed thus far across the border in pakistan where the death toll now stands at 229 killed as a result of this earthquake. and one moreern, one more casualty in kashmir. this was the most powerful earthquake to strike central asia in years. and it was felt across central
10:15 pm
and southern asia. as the death toll grows and the aftershocks continue, millions of people are on edge across-countries in south and central asia. the 7.5 magnitude quake rocked northern afghanistan and pakistan monday afternoon. toppling building, leveling homes, and sending hundreds of thousands into panic. among the victim, 12 afghan girls who died in a stampede trying to escape their school building. medical workers scramble as the injured are rushed into this hospital in peshawar, pakistan. the moment the quake struck in kabul, captured live during a news broadcast. its epicenter was near the city of jarm, about 40 miles west of the afghanistan/pakistan border. it was felt more than 500 miles
10:16 pm
away in the capital. and in new delhi where frightened office workers poured on to the streets. rescue efforts are complicated by spotty communications and rural mountainous regions which are hard to access. >> it's a very difficult terrain. so to get information and to get in to some of the remote affected areas is going to be difficult. >> reporter: just ten years ago this same region suffered another major earthquake that left more than 70,000 people dead. now, isha, the u.s. geological survey issued an orange alert which means significant casualties are likely and the disaster is probably wide spread. past events with this alert level have required a regional or national level response. now, we've had statements issued by the afghan governments, the pakistani governments talking about meetings of emergency disaster response teams and what
10:17 pm
will be essential certainly in the northeastern province which is a very mountainous and remote and somewhat sparsely populated region of afghanistan which is going to be essential is to get reports back which presumably will require aircraft from some of those stricken areas to hear the extent of the damage in those areas. those are areas also that can be vulnerable to landslides and avalanches, especially as aftershocks continue to jar these stricken areas. but most likely, people in these regions and the cellphone connectivity has been spotty of late. people in this region most likely slept outdoors which is completely understandable after what many afghans describe as the most terrifying earthquake they've seen in 30 years. isha? >> it is a massive undertaking for the afghan government. this really is a tragedy.
10:18 pm
senior international correspondent ivan watson joining us from hong kong where it's just gone 17 minutes past 1:00 in the afternoon. thank you, ivan. well, u.s. navy ship deliberately sails into what china claims are territorial waters. ahead, the ship, its mission, and the message. and a new world from world health experts puts processed meat in a category alongside stuff likes a bess stos and tobacco. their reasoning just aseed. stay with cnn.
10:19 pm
♪ ♪ the beautiful sound of customers making the most of their united flight. power, wi-fi, and streaming entertainment. that's... seize the journey friendly. ♪ (vo) what'scorn? dog food's first ingredient? wheat? in new purina one true instinct grain free, real chicken is always #1. no corn, wheat or soy. support your active dog's whole body health with purina one. when it comes to helping you reach your financial goals,t taking small, manageable steps can be an effective... and enjoyable approach... compared to the alternatives.
10:20 pm
push! i am pushing! sfx: pants ripping how you doing eddie? almost there. small steps. at axa, we'll help you take the next steps, with more confidence. for advice, retirement and insurance, talk to axa today. vo: it happens so often, you almost get used to it. i'd like to make a dep-- we got this. vo: which is why being put first takes some getting used to. ♪ nationwide is on your side nationwide is the exclusive insurance partner of plenti.
10:21 pm
(ee-e-e-oh-mum-oh-weh) (hush my darling...) (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) (hush my darling...) man snoring (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) woman snoring take the roar out of snore. yet another innovation only at a sleep number store. decisions, decisions. the new edge+. this one would keep me organized. i could list all the days i've been banned from social media. hmmm, wait this thing has built-in
10:22 pm
live broadcasting? i don't know what nerd came up with that, but it's awesome. you think they'd censor pippa's doggy-ola's? censored, not censored. censored, not censored. introducing the samsung galaxy s6 edge+ and the note5. hello, everyone. u.s. warship has past within 20 kilometers of a manmade island in the south china sea. beijing insists it's chinese territory and passage of a ship within 20 kilometers crosses into china's territorial waters. the u.s. sddisagrees. i spoke with senior u.s. security correspondent jim schuitto about this u.s. mission. u.s. security correspondent jim schuitto joins us now on the line. jim, thanks so much for joining us. what message is the u.s. administration sending china >> they're sending china the
10:23 pm
message the u.s. does not rec nice these islands as chinese territory. 12 miles is the accepted territorial waters for any land mass, so to sail within those 12 miles is to say we don't recognize this as chinese land mass. these manmade islands here. and it follows on a step that the u.s. took in may this year when it flew a u.s. surveillance plane, and we were an board, directly over these islands, to say that the u.s. does not rec nice chinese airspace over these islands. you can view the two of them together as a direct message with military backing, in effect, in the air and on the sea that the u.s. is going to challenge china's territorial claims in the south china sea. >> so to be clear, what is the desired outcome the u.s. is seeking here? >> fantastic question, isha, because, listen, in an ideal
10:24 pm
world, the u.s. would like them to, you know, tear these islands up and move away. but, you know, practically china has built 2,000 acres of land, didn't exist, in the south china sea on a number of what were just hole, really, piles of rocks in the ocean, now created a number of islands with airstrips and ports and military installation, barracks, et cetera. so i don't think anyone expects that china is going to chop those up and move away. but the point will be that, okay, you've created these land masses but we're not going to recognize them or treat them as your territory going forward and we'll continue to fly these planes and continue to sail these ships as such. now, from a practical standpoint china would still have the island and some would refer to them as unsinkable aircraft carriers in effect. they've got landing strip, ports, et cetera. so it's a bit of a stalemate.
10:25 pm
>> jim schuitto joining us on the line from washington. we very much appreciate it. thank you. >> thank you. now canadian investigators are trying to figure out why a whale watching tour boat sank off canada's vancouver island sunday. 27 people were onboard when the boat capsized. five are dead and one is still missing. cnn's stephanie elam has more on the deadly accident from tofino, cana canada. >> reporter: isha, the owners of whale watching tour boat said this boat had made this journey twice a day for 20 years, making it all the more mysterious why this accident happened in the first place. >> the ambulance was just like one after another after another. like they didn't stop. >> reporter: the 65-foot two-deck whale watching boat sends out a mayday late sunday afternoon and a desperate effort to help the passengers kick into gear. >> the first boat on scene sort of saw bodies in the water. and that was sort of like, this is bad.
10:26 pm
>> reporter: but the question is, why? why did the large boat carrying only 27 passengers capsize on relatively smooth seas? >> it was a beautiful day here and there were -- there were some big swells out on the ocean but we don't know anything about what may have happened at the scene. >> reporter: it all happened around eight miles off the coast of tofino, british columbia, hugs the west coast of vancouver island. popular among tourists and nature lovers alike. >> this is a small community. tofino is 2,000 people and everybody knows everybody. >> reporter: the company operating the excursion released this statement that says, it has been a tragic day. our entire team is heartbroken over this incident and our hearts go out to the family, friends, and loved ones of everyone involved. we're doing everything we can to assist our passengers and staff through this difficult time. we are cooperating with investigators to determine exactly what happened. the coroner's office provided preliminary details on the five
10:27 pm
killed. three were tourists from britain and two british nationals living in canada, all found in the 50 degree water with no vital signs. >> the paramedics were working with people in the boat, those critically injured. >> reporter: one passenger out of the 27 remains missing. the royal canadian mountain police now picking up the search as the commune toif fishing and tour operator boats troll the waters day and night. >> we're on that water and right in that spot and the water was, what, there was 2 1/2 meter waves yesterday. >> big waves. >> reporter: even with less than ideal conditions a small community still hopes to find one more survivor. >> and the owners say there were life vests for everyone on the ship. however, with this kind of vessel they weren't required to wear them while they were out on the water. isha? >> thanks so stephanie elam for that report. with the focus on iowa the u.s. president shall campaign attacks are getting sharper. ahead how the democratic front-runners are carving out separate positions.
10:28 pm
plus, with a touch-up, the beatles get a new look for the 21st century. you will want to see and hear this enhanced album. oh no... (under his breath) hey man! hey peter. (unenthusiastic) oh... ha ha ha! joanne? is that you? it's me... you don't look a day over 70. am i right? jingle jingle. if you're peter pan, you stay young forever. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. ♪ you make me feel so young... it's what you do. ♪ you make me feel ♪ so spring has sprung.
10:29 pm
can a a subconscious. mind? a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought. can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive? if you have high blood pressure many cold medicines may raise your blood pressure. that's why there's coricidin® hbp. it relieves cold symptoms without raising blood pressure. so look for powerful cold medicine with a heart. coricidin® hbp. deals are made over bacon. global trade runs on eggs. we've got breakfast for everybody. paleo people. we got sausage and bacon. vegan? i don't know what that is, but we got a lot of fresh fruit. you call yourself a glutenarian? hey, we've got cereal, bagels, toast,
10:30 pm
everything you can handle. we're insane in the grain! oh, pancakes, huh? i feel you on that.
10:31 pm
you're watching "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. i'm isha sesay. the headlines this hour. take a look at this disturbing
10:32 pm
video. it shows a school resource officer violently arresting a female high school student in a south carolina classroom. cnn affiliate wis reports the student was asked to leave the classroom and when she refused, the officer was called in. he has now been put on leave while the incident is investigated. rescue crews in south air shah are sizing up the damage caused by a magnitude 7.5 earthquake. it hit the region monday afternoon local time. more than 300 people are confirmed dead. mostly in northeast afghanistan and pakistan. the quake was felt in at least five countries. the u.s. navy destroyer has sailed within 20 kilometers of a manmade chinese island. the voyage put the warship in what china considers territorial waters. there's been no comment from china since the ship passed by. and turning to the u.s. presidential campaign, the iowa
10:33 pm
caucuses are less than 100 days away and the democratic front-runners are taking pains to emphasize their differences. brianna keilar recaps a busy weekend in the midwest. >> reporter: bernie sanders making a play for the women's vote on "the view" today. >> if you are among and you have a baby, you have the right to stay home with paid family and medical leave for at least three months. >> reporter: after a busy weekend on the campaign trail. >> i've never been the warm-up act for katy perry before. >> reporter: at a campaign rally in iowa hillary clinton got a little help from her husband and pop star katy perry, trying to inject a little excitement into her campaign. >> time to wake up, america. >> reporter: democratic candidates made the rounds at the state party's annual jefferson jackson den there weekend. bernie sanders sharpening his differences with clinton on trade, the iraq war, and her support for the anti-same
10:34 pm
members marriage law by her husband. >> i will not abandon any segment of american society whether you're gay or black or lati latino, poor or working class, just because it is politically expedient at a given time. >> reporter: and clinton insin knew itting sexism from her top competitor. >> i've been told to stop shouting about ending gun violence. well, i haven't been shouting but sometimes when a woman speaks out some people think it's shouting. >> reporter: that after this line from the democratic debate. >> all the shouting in the world is not going to do what i would hope all of us want. >> reporter: sanders calling foul on cnn's" state of the union." >> i am very proud of my record on women's issues. i certainly do not have a problem with women speaking out. and i think what the secretary is doing there is taking words and misapplying them.
10:35 pm
>> reporter: this is clinton releases a new ad promising to fight for equal pay. >> i'm going to do everything i can to make sure every woman in every job gets paid the same as the men who are doing that job. >> reporter: brianna keilar, cnn, washington. >> and with the latest polls showing a shake-up among the republican front-runner, their campaign jabs are heating up. sarah murray has that. >> reporter: with less than 100 days until the iowa caucuses, the jostling in the jop ranks is taking on a sharper edge. >> carson is lower energy than bush. i don't get it. >> reporter: a mu monmouth university poll gives dr. ben carson a double digit lead in iowa. drawing 32% support. compared to 18% for donald trump. >> i'm just going to have to work a little bit harder in iowa. i was very surprised to see the numbers. >> reporter: carson, the newly minted iowa front-runner, revealing his rougher edges. saying when he was a teenager --
10:36 pm
>> i would go after people with rocks and bricks and baseball bats and hammers and, of course, many people know the story when i was 14 and i tried to stab someone. and, you know, fortunately, you know, my life has been changed. i'm a very different person now. >> reporter: carson recently told erin burnett he still has a lot of fire inside of him. >> you conquered your demons but is there anything that fires you up? that young man that could do those things, that person still in there, right? >> well, i may be fired up, i may just look like i'm fired up. >> reporter: but it's the softer carson that's winning over evangelicals. now trump is taking aim at religion. >> i'm presbytarian. boy, that's down the middle of the road, folks. in all fairness. i mean, seventh day adventists i don't know about. i just don't know about. >> reporter: meanwhile, jeb bush
10:37 pm
who just got pay roll costs by 70% across the board. >> blah, blah, blah. >> you know what they're saying out there? >> reporter: no longer able to hide his frustratitrusfrustrati state of the race. >> i've got a lot of really cool things that i could do ore this than sit around being miserable, listening to people demonize me and me feeling compelled to demonize them. that is a joke. elect trump if you want that. >> reporter: today bush's rallying donors at a texas retreat as he tries to reassure them the race will soon break his way. >> and you know that -- >> reporter: trump continues to hammer him. mocking bush for turning to his family members for help. >> so he's meeting now with mom and dad. no, it's true. he needs counsel. >> reporter: sarah murray, cnn, washington. >> congressional leaders and the white house have reached a budget agreement that could be voted on as soon as wednesday. the deal would lift the national barring limit until march 2017
10:38 pm
and would raise domestic and defense spending. many republicans were furious over the terms, accusing house speaker john boehner of giving away too much. if it passes the agreement gives representative paul ryan some breathing room to take overs a house speaker without an immediate budget battle looming. the world health organization has linked somebec with cancer. that story is just ahead. plus, a royal couple shakes up and stares the prepeople of the latest james bond film. that's coming up later. stay with cnn. type 2 diabetes doesn't care who you are. man woman or where you're from. city country we're just everyday people fighting high blood sugar. ♪i am everyday people. farxiga may help in that fight every day. along with diet and exercise,
10:39 pm
farxiga helps lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. one pill a day helps lower your a1c. and, although it's not a weight-loss or blood-pressure drug, farxiga may help you lose weight and may even lower blood pressure when used with certain diabetes medicines. do not take if allergic to farxiga or its ingredients. symptoms of a serious allergic reaction include rash, swelling, or difficulty breathing or swallowing. if you have any of these symptoms stop taking farxiga and seek medical help right away. do not take farxiga if you have severe kidney problems, are on dialysis, or have bladder cancer. tell your doctor right away if you have blood or red color in your urine or pain while you urinate. farxiga can cause serious side effects, including dehydration, genital yeast infections in women and men, low blood sugar, kidney problems, and increased bad cholesterol. common side effects include urinary tract infections, changes in urination, and runny nose. farxiga. we are everyday people. ♪i am everyday people. yeah. yeah.♪
10:40 pm
ask your doctor if farxiga is right for you and visit farxiga.com to learn how you can get it for free. vo: it happens so often, you almost get used to it. i'd like to make a dep-- we got this. vo: which is why being put first takes some getting used to. ♪ nationwide is on your side nationwide is the exclusive insurance partner of plenti. i'i've been an elementary school teacher for 16 years. it is really difficult to afford living here in san francisco. i went into foster care my freshman year of high school. i think there was like 9 people living in a 3-bedroom house. claudia: 40% of the mission rock housing will be for low- and middle-income families. there will even be housing for people like micaela who are coming out of the foster-care system.
10:41 pm
micaela: after i left the foster-care system, i realized that i just couldn't do it on my own. not knowing where you guys are gonna go that night and just stay, like, it sucked not knowing that. mission rock -- it's completely different from anywhere that i've lived. it looks so much prettier. the atmosphere -- it just gives off possibilities. like, i have a chance. i can print out like six different ways to get to work. i would be proud to have someone like micaela be my neighbor. i would love to have somebody like claudia be my neighbor. claudia: i feel like it's part of what san francisco should be. hello, everyone. walmart may be looking to compete with amazon when it comes to drone delivery. mayor retail company is asking federal regulators for permission to test drones outdoors after several months of indoor testing. a walmart spokesman says it
10:42 pm
plans to test home delivery via drone but initial focus is moving merchandise between distribution centers. amazon got federal approval to start testing drones earlier this year. the world health organization has released a report gorizing tobacco but the meat industry is calling the research alarmist. cnn's fred pleitgen reports. >> the butcher shop in london remains unfazed. he says he hopes the world health organization's warning that processed and red meat are dangerous won't deter his customers. >> are we in fear of what we eat? do we step out the front door? death crossing the road. where do we draw the line? >> reporter: a research division of the world health organization found that processed meat like bacon and sausages and cold cuts, cause cancer. and that eating red meat like
10:43 pm
beef probably causes cancer. the panel's leading scientist says the findings could change dietary recommendations around the world. >> these findings re-enforce guidelines from a number of health authorities including the world health organization. that is that people who eat meat should consider reducing their consumption to reduce their risk of several diseases including cancer. >> reporter: twith h.o. study says consuming 50 grams per day increases the risk of colon cancer by 18%. and placed processed meat in the top category for cancerous substances that also includes cigarettes, arsenal, asbestos. the study has critics as well. north american meat institute calls the conclusions, quote, dramatic and alarmist over reach. robert pickard, member of great britain's meat advisory panel says consumers should know that
10:44 pm
red meat does have health benefits. >> red meat is a particularly nutritious item of food. we don't need large quantities of it, but if we add a little bit of liver to a meat recipe, then that will deliver, in a small quantity, all the vitamins and minerals that a human being needs. >> reporter: w.o. study does not recommend abstaining from processed or red meat but its director says its consumption should be limited. advice, that the london butcher dunken baker should heed, saying it's better to eat meat that's high in quality but moderate in amounts. fred pleitgen, cnn, london. next on "newsroom l.a.," daniel craig and other stars of the latest james bond film hit the red carpet for the world premier in london. we'll get a look at the big debut next. plus, nearly 50 years after the beatles split up, a new version of an old album will be
10:45 pm
released and it looks a lot different. ♪ ♪ the beautiful sound of customers making the most of their united flight. power, wi-fi, and streaming entertainment. that's... seize the journey friendly. ♪ (patrick 2) pretty great.ke to be the boss of you? (patrick 1) how about a 10% raise? (patrick 2) how about 20? (patrick 1) how about done? (patrick 2) that's the kind of control i like... ...and that's what they give me at national car rental. i can choose any car in the aisle i want- without having to ask anyone.
10:46 pm
who better to be the boss of you... (patrick 1)than me. i mean, you...us. (vo) go national. go like a pro. can a a subconscious. mind? a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought. can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive? hand apparently, they also lovee stickers. g. what's up with these things, victor? we decided to give ourselves stickers for each feature we release. we read about 10,000 suggestions a week to create features that as traders we'd want to use, like social signals, a tool that uses social media to help with research. 10,000 suggestions. who reads all those?
10:47 pm
he does. for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this.
10:48 pm
digestive core.r so choose ultimate flora by renewlife. it has 30 billion probiotic cultures. feel lighter and more energized. ultimate flora. more power to your gut.
10:49 pm
♪ . nearly 50 years after they split up the beatles are going through a digital revolution. look at this with me. just look at the restored video on the left side versus the original video on the right side. and these are just some of dozens of beatles videos and tv appearances that are being released next month in a new digitally enhanced version of the beatles one album. paul is here to talk about this. paul, so good to have you with us. talk to us about what went into this restoration. it is such a treat for beatles fans. >> it is. somebody once said these folks went through this, 19 deserve knighthood. they restored this frame by frame. so you had color grading, cleaning up the digital, digital enhanceme enhancement.
10:50 pm
if a video was torn or a film and then you have this audio remix and all of it is great fun and this is the box set. >> wow. >> it's the beatles one, plus all the videos and 23 additional songs. >> it's really, really awesome. you were able to get wonderful insight into how this beatles worked and how they made decisions. tell us about that. >> i spoke with michael and he was the director of four of these videos as well as "let it be" you might recall that rooftop performance. he suggested he was the same age as john lennon so he had a rapport with them but the beatles were extremely insular so he likened it to an odd moment where you might confront animals in a cage. let's take a listen. >> when i gave them the idea for paperback rider the first time it was like throwing a piece of meat into an animal's cage. there were the four of them and they would take the meat and sniff it and toss it to the other one. take a bite. it would just be the four of them to discuss the idea. you were excluded for a while as they chewed over your idea. incredibly insular because, as
10:51 pm
ringo said, only the four of them knew what it was like what had happened. when they really took over the world. >> pretty special stuff. i want us to play a little bit of klt paperback rider" because it's so awesome. let's play a little bit of it and then i just -- i have another question about that song. ♪ paperback writer ♪ took me years to write will you take a look ♪ ♪ based on a novel by a man named leer and i need a job so i want to be a paperback writer ♪ >> it's so good. you forget or i had how good the beatles were. how did the director feel about the process of working with them, the director who directed this particular video? >> he was well aware that at this point in their lives they
10:52 pm
were the most famous people in the world. but he came in with some swagger himself. michael lindsay hog is no spring chicken. he's got a lot of confidence. and so he thought it was a great process but as he said, only they, only they could truly express what they were going through and this sudden and colossal burst of fame that i don't think has ever been replicated in pop culture. >> one of my favorite songs is "hey jude." let's have a taste of that. ♪ remember to let her under your skin ♪ ♪ then you begin to make it better ♪ ♪ better better better better better ♪ ♪ ah >> everyone in the studio is going to be singing it in the next couple of minutes, it's such a great song. and this song and the video, the video in particular, is an example of the beatles being ahead of their time. >> way ahead of their time. so lindsey is having a
10:53 pm
conversation with mccartney and they realize this is such a long winddown to "hey jude" the beatles themselves, four of them, can't carry it. they asked for a very multi-culture audience, a group of people that weren't the standard groupies and hangers on, but let's get people of all colors and ages up there and let's finish "hey jude" with a bang and they did. >> great songs. great videos. this is such a treat for beatles fan. if you're not a beatles fan, you can try it out. when is it released. >> november 7th and merry christmas to a lot of people out there. ha happy holidays. >> thank you. >> my pleasure. well, some news for you. some really big news for you. get ready, hollywood, because ricky gervais is coming back. the british comedian is set to host a 2016 golden globes for the fourth time. gervais is known for quick wit and biting humor that kept stars and the audience on the edge of their seats during past shows. award shows made the
10:54 pm
announcement on twitter psst, with a #he'sback. annual golden globes will air in january. people are quaking in their boots right now. well, the stars are the latest bond movie specter along with the royal family members william, cait, harry, attended the pmere on monday. cnn london correspondent max foster hit the red carpet to catch up with some of the cast. >> you have no authority, none. mexico city. what were you doing there? >> an epic movie in an epic franchise and obviously an epic premier to match here in london. the question is, can specter possibly meet up to expectations when "sky fall" was critically acclaim and commercially successful as well? that was a question i put to the
10:55 pm
leading man, daniel craig. >> we just set out to make the best movie we could. we had so much wonderful success with "sky fall" you've got to use that momentum and you've got to try and do better. >> bond offers one of the last remaining opportunities for truly epic film making on a real scale, which is not computer generated. it's done for real, real special er effects, real stunts. the first ten minutes of the bond movies now. the bar is set high. lyrically i tried to catch what the film was about. so hopefully it will all collide nicely and work together. i just want it to be an epic love song. and i wanted to add a little bit of vulnerability to the character. ♪ >> a massive guest list and topped by the duke of duchess of cambridge and prince harry. you can see them on the screen as they're meeting people involved in the movie and the various charities involved as well. the critics generally really liked this movie.
10:56 pm
they thought it fit well into the genre, massive franchise. but now it's out on general release. we're going to get a sense about what the public thinks. will it be commercially successful. max foster, cnn, london. >> they cannot wait to see it. you're watching "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. i'm isha sesay. stay with us. the news continues on cnn. plaque psoriasis... ...isn't it time to let the... ...real you shine... ...through? introducing otezla, apremilast. otezla is not an injection, or a cream. it's a pill that treats plaque psoriasis differently. some people who took otezla saw 75% clearer skin after 4 months. and otezla's prescribing information has no requirement for routine lab monitoring. don't take otezla if you are allergic to any of its ingredients.
10:57 pm
otezla may increase... ...the risk of depression. tell your doctor if you have a history of depression... ...or suicidal thoughts, or if these feelings develop. some people taking otezla reported weight loss. your doctor should monitor your weight and may stop treatment. side effects may include diarrhea, nausea, upper respiratory tract infection, and headache. tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, and if you're pregnant or planning to be. ask your doctor about otezla today. otezla. show more of you. hi, i'd like to m♪ke a dep-- scanner: rescan item. rescan, rescan. rescan item. vo: it happens so often you almost get used to it. phone voice: main menu representative. representative. representative. vo: which is why being put first... relax, we got this. vo: ...takes some getting used to. join the nation. ♪ nationwide is on your side representative.
10:58 pm
let's give 'em a great breakfast so they can go out there and kick the butt they came here to kick. the reason they hired me is because i care about the details. i care so much it hurts. it's the little things that make your stay awesome. like free breakfast. and pancake technology that i'm pretty sure we stole from the space program. one button. hot pancake. total victory!
10:59 pm
11:00 pm
class and the violence is stirring swift reaction. >> we'll go live to beijing to the reaction to a warship passing into waters. and what you need to know about meat consumption being linked to cancer. a big welcome to our viewers watching around the world. i'm errol barnett with you for the next two hours. this is "cnn newsroom."
11:01 pm
one year after a case that brought simmering issues between u.s. police and minorities to the fore ground, it's one of the big topics being discussed at a gathering of u.s. officials in chicago. they are expected to talk about criminal justice reform. the fbi director has started to address what he says is a growing riff between police and citizens in today's society. >> there's a line of law enforcement and a line of communities we serve, special communities of color, and i feel those lines arcing apart. through the hash tag police lives matter and hash tag black lives matter. each time somebody interprets hash tag black lives matter as anti-law enforcement, one line
11:02 pm
moves away, and each time someone interprets hash tag police lives matter as anti-black, the other line moves away. meanwhile, an episode as added to the discussion. we don't know what led to this incident on monday. surely you've seen this bouncing around social media. our affiliate reports the officer was called into this room when the student refused a request to leave the classroom. many of expressed outrage at the force the officer used with the student while others have defended him pointing to the student's refusal to listen. it's unsettling to watch either way. student safety is and always be the district's top priority. the district will not tolerate any actions that jeopardize the
11:03 pm
actions of our students. the officer has been placed on administrative leave during the investigation. >> sonny hosten joins us along with a former nypd detective. is there anything you see in this video alone that disturbs or bothers you? >> that's a good question. first thing, i don't see the beginning of the video. that's an issue for me. how many times has this officer asked this young lady to get up from the chair. all right? now, as a police officer myself, would i have done it the same way that officer has? no, i would not have. let me make that clear. i would not have acted like he did, but he did act within the law. meaning that an officer can use whatever force is necessary to
11:04 pm
effect an arrest. if you don't come ply with my pish wishes, i'm telling you to get out of the seat twice. i can then do what it takes to get you out of the seat and put handcuffs on you. i'm tired of teachers calling cops when children are unruly in the classroom. the school should have taken care of this child. >> the school says they're disturbed by this. they're launching an investigation. >> then why did they call the police? >> sonny, i see you nodding no. there are two questions, what is legally appropriate and what is right. we don't know what came before the video, but if your view, is there anything that could justify this? >> no. that's why i don't think that's the operative question. i don't think we need to see what happened before. the bottom line is all we need to see is what is on the video, and that is whether or not, to make the legal determination. the legal determination is whether or not the officer used
11:05 pm
the force that was reasonable and necessary to control the situation, to control this child. and i think that we can all agree that what we are seeing is an officer who is sort of out of control, who is choking a child, who is flipping a child over in a chair and then hurling that child like a rag doll across the floor. in my book, in anyone's eyes, that should be just, per se, not only illegal for a police officer but for my human being to treat a child like that. i don't think context at this point matters. i do agree with harry that we in our schools, at least in the united states, are too quick to call in the police to deal with behaif behavioral situations. granted, teachers are not, i think, trained well to deal with these kinds of situations, but there was not a situation for a police officer to be called
11:06 pm
into. >> and for our international viewers, that's a good point to make, because this video issing with seen. it's going viral at the moment. it's happening in the context of police treatment of minorities and the question is if the force is necessary. harry, black girls are six times more likely to be suspended than white girls in schools in the united states. why do you think that is? >> just like, you know, a black is more likely to be arrested in new york city than a white person. they're not behaving. and that's the bottom line. why do you think that police officer was called to that classroom? because that girl was black? this is not a racial issue. let's not inject race into this issue. it's not. it's about police being called because somebody was unruly in a classroom. that person did not submit to that officer and the officer used the force necessary to effect the arrest. >> what do you think explains the punishment that we see
11:07 pm
throughout all years of education? i mean, black kindergartners are more likely to be disciplined than their white counter parts. >> those are the stats. i don't want to make every issue into a race issue. at this point when we look at this particular video, we don't know that race played a factor but when you look at the larger issue, it is clear that while african american young girl students, female students are only about 13% to 14% of the school population, they're arrested 43% of the time, those that are arrested in. >> and they're all innocent? come on. >> there has to be some sort of racial component. black people aren't just criminal by nature, and so i think we have to at least in the united states really start to look at all these underlying factors as to why officers are more apt to arrest african americans. they are more apt to suspend
11:08 pm
african americans and they are more apt to use accessive force with african americans. that is an ugly truth about living in america, and it's something that until we're comfortable talking about, we'll have the problem. >> i don't agree with the interpretation of the statistics. >> that's it. >> that's your interpretation of them. >> and that's why it's great to get you both in on this issue. the officer, himself, has not returned to any schools in the district and is pending an investigation. my thanks to both of you. >> thank you. >> thanks. >> now to another story that's moving right now. a u.s. navy warship has sailed within 20 miles of a manmade island in the south chinese sea. china built the island in a
11:09 pm
disputed part of the sea. china's foreign ministry said it monitored the ship's movement and now called for the u.s. to, coa quote, immediately change its mistake. and not take any provacative act. this isn't a huge surprise. expected in many ways. what details is the u.s. providing about this mission and if it's something that will become routine. >> reporter: well, if you listen to u.s. defense officials, this is -- or this was a routine mission according to the u.s. they conducted a transit within 12 nautical miles. that's one of the reeves that the chinese have turned into a manmade island and claimed to be a coverage territory. we understand there were u.s. aircraft in the air to provide cover and surveillance. u.s. officials are saying this is a routine mission, what they
11:10 pm
call freedom of navigation mission in international waters and they say the point of international waters is countries don't have to consult each other when they enter these waters or pass through. yes, this is not going to be the last one the u.s. navy is going to conduct in terms of traveling through the waters. as we also mentioned, the chinese don't see it that way. the foreign minister responded and called this harming national security endangering the safety of those people on the islands as well as harming regional peace and stability. >> it's a bit of posturing, but what's interesting the is the timing. this is happening weeks after the chinese president made a visit to the u.s. this was likely discussed.iàgy5? >> reporter: that's not aen -- the timing is interesting. actually, before the confirmation of today's news,
11:11 pm
chinese officials have been telling me how angry, frustrating and perplexed they feel about what at the time the impending mission of this nature. they say they consider his visit to the u.s. a very successful one with many agreements reached between the two governments, especially on the economic and cultural exchange fronts but even on this issue, there was no agreement, but there were dialogues and discussions. so they certainly see the relationship to be at a very good place. so they don't understand why the u.s. is doing this now. now, of course, now the u.s. has made this move, this is putting the chinese government in a bind because they have been telling their people it's their territory since ancient times. now you're seeing a lot of patriotic sentiment online asking why the government response has been so weak. so the it's a stalemate. it's a dilemma, but an issue that's not going away soon.
11:12 pm
>> we'll continue to look into this and next year get a report to see what more information we can gather. steven, thanks. now, there is fear anne and uncertainty across much of south asia after a 7.5 earthquake. authorities say at least 306 people were killed mostly in pa pakistan. the quake can be felt in at least five countries. there were worries about aftershocks. >> look at that. footage from a live newscast when the quake first struck monday afternoon local time. we have more from pakistan. >> reporter: the 7.5 is a monster. scenes of devastation. buildings levelled and homes
11:13 pm
reduced to rubble following monday's massive earthquake. among those killed, 12 young girls. they died in a stampede to escape their school building. the quake struck near the city of jam near a border but was felt in cities hundreds of kilometers away. aftershocks continue to shake the capital of kabul, and residents remain on edge. >> it threw people into panic because it seemed to go for a lot longer than the normal just jolts that we'll sometimes get. >> reporter: in afghan cities, hospitals are overrun with the injured. across the border in pakistan, an energy has been declared at hospitals. dozens have died there. but that number is likely to increase. the military and national
11:14 pm
disaster management authority has been activated. buildings also shook in india sending off workers into the streets. the quake was felt as far away as people in the capital who were seeking safety outdoors. with communications down, little is known about the fate of rural communities where the quake was centered. >> it's a difficult terrain. to get information and to get aid to some of the more affected areas is going to be difficult. >> reporter: the last time a quake of this magnitude hit the region ten years ago, more than 80,000 people were killed. >> canadian authorities are looking for one person still missing right now after a whale watching boat sac on sunday on what was apparently calm weather. 27 people were on board. five of them died, all british
11:15 pm
nationals. transportation officials are investigating how it happened. u.s. special forces raid an isis compound to rescue hostages. one of their own is killed. coming up, a rare look inside the prison as it unfolded. and an arrest in connection to a cyber company. and who they ended up with might surprise you. more on that after this. fteen pn car insurance. yeah, everybody knows that. well, did you know that playing cards with kenny rogers gets old pretty fast? ♪ you got to know when to hold'em. ♪ ♪ know when to fold 'em. ♪ know when to walk away. ♪ know when to run. ♪ you never count your money, ♪ when you're sitting at the ta...♪ what? you get it? i get the gist, yeah. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. welcome to today's working world. companies everywhere are working harder and investing more.
11:16 pm
but achieving the right outcomes has never been more difficult. xerox engineers a better way for people, process and technology to work together. improving how the world shops, travels, pleases customers, learns, banks, and stays healthy, so... life works better. work can work better. with xerox. tall kwan.
11:17 pm
cash mir. cash mir.
11:18 pm
11:19 pm
the you're going to want to see this. we're getting a dramatic new look at video of kurdish and u.s. special forces as they raided an isis prison in iraq to free hostages. a u.s. soldier was killed in the rescue mission. jim sciutto has new details on the raid. >> reporter: isis held prisoners freed in a daring joint raid. new helmet cam video shows the raid thursday that led to america's first combat death since 2011. delta force special operators
11:20 pm
alongside kurdish cobra commandos seeing checking people were weapons. inside an isis flag hangs on the wall. then the pop, pop, pop of gunfire has prisoners flee the burning compound. later after the soldiers and hostages are clear, they bomb the compound into rubble. isis released video it sheas shows the resulting damage. the deadly battle was the first time u.s. forces directly engaged isis fighters on the ground in iraq. the hostages thought to be in imminent danger of execution after mass graves had been dug. the freed prisoners now saying they were sent to be executed after morning prayers. the u.s. forces were not meant to directly join the fire fight but when kurdish forces were overwhelmed, they entered.
11:21 pm
and joshua wheeler was mortally wounded. his remains returned home thursday. when asked if u.s. forces were now in combat in iraq, sec tarey carter said to expect more raids. >> we have this capability. it's a great american length. >> reporter: jim sciutto, cnn, washington. the u.s. is also involved battling isis in northern syria. all this week our senior international correspondent is bringing you a series of reports from the syrian front lines. >> reporter: in northern syria, these kurdish fighters are at the core of the latest u.s. plan to defeat isis. they have the courage, but will that be enough? my reports from inside syria coming up on cnn. >> in our next hour, we'll check in with cla ris have a, and
11:22 pm
she'll join us live. join us for that. in the u.s., a judge set bail at 1 million for a woman accused of intentionally driving her car into a crowd at a parade. four people were killed and 47 injured in oklahoma on saturday. adacia chambers faces four counts of second degree murder. prosecutors say they may consider additional charges. her daughter believes she may have a mental health issue. >> i grew increasingly concerned with her inappropriate comments as it relates to information that i shared with her. specific information about her having collided with a motorcycle, her having also collided with other individuals and that there were four fatalities. when this information was shared with her, her inappropriate response to that which could probably more correctly be
11:23 pm
categorized as a flat effect, i guess you would say. in other words, no show of emotion whatsoever. zero response. that is not something that is typical of a normal functioning individual. >> now to the uk where police have made a break in the talk talk hacking case. the company, one of britain's leading phone providers admitted it was the target of a cyber attack that put its customers' data at risk. >> a 15-year-old was arrested in connection with the talk talk hack that could have potentially affected up to 4 million users. the teenager was arrested, not charged. we don't have too many specific details on the arrest at this time. talk talk has issueda statement. i want to read it. they say we can confirm that we've been informed of the arrest. they go onto say it's been a worrying time for the customers and we're grateful for the swift
11:24 pm
work of the police. we'll continue to assist in the ongoing investigation. right now at this point we don't know how many customers have been impacted by this hack, but now what we do know is that this has had real human impact. i spoke to a woman who is a retired nurse who was targeted by a hacker pretending to be a talk talk employee who called her up and convinced her to hand over her banking details. she describes what happened next. >> you lost all of your savings? >> we've lost 8,700 pounds. >> reporter: they asked you for your bank account details because they said they needed to credit you money? >> initially, yes. >> reporter: and then they took more than 8,000 pounds? >> yes. and the second lot is 3,800. >> reporter: it seems you thought this was a talk talk
11:25 pm
employee. >> it all seems feasible. they said it was sensible. it seemed to genuine. and it's as -- you don't know who to believe. >> reporter: what is the feeling like? i can imagine you feel very viola violated. >> i'm 82 and my husband is 83. it means that we're not sleeping properly. my husband had to go to the doctor on friday because he wasn't very well. it's just -- it's affecting everybody, and i don't know that i'll ever trust anybody again. >> reporter: we can't correlate what happened to her to the last talk talk hack, although a spokesperson told me that this would have been the result of a hack that happened before in december that left a lot of customer data out there and vulnerable for anyone to take advantage of. hopefully we will know more in the coming days as police investigate and as we continue to follow the story.
11:26 pm
back to you. thanks, lori. your haeart goes out to that couple. another debate is just a day away and the republican presidential candidates are talking tough. a closer look at their strategies. plus the meat industry is seeing red after a report from health experts links some meats to cancer. that story j just ahead. they speak louder. we like that. not just because we're doers. because we're changing. big things. small things. spur of the moment things. changes you'll notice. wherever you are in the world. sheraton.
11:27 pm
(patrick 2) pretty great.ke to be the boss of you? (patrick 1) how about a 10% raise? (patrick 2) how about 20? (patrick 1) how about done? (patrick 2) that's the kind of control i like... ...and that's what they give me at national car rental. i can choose any car in the aisle i want- without having to ask anyone. who better to be the boss of you... (patrick 1)than me. i mean, you...us. (vo) go national. go like a pro. ♪ ♪ the beautiful sound of customers making the most of their united flight. power, wi-fi, and streaming entertainment. that's... seize the journey friendly. ♪
11:28 pm
(ee-e-e-oh-mum-oh-weh) (hush my darling...) (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) (hush my darling...) man snoring (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) woman snoring take the roar out of snore. yet another innovation only at a sleep number store.
11:29 pm
a warm welcome pack to our viewers here in the states and those of you tuned in from all
11:30 pm
over the world. i'm errol barnett. let's update you on our top stories. we'll start with disturbing video that shows a violent arrest of a female high school student. wis reports the student was asked to leave the classroom. and then the officer was called in. he has been put on administrative leave while it's investigated. a navy destroyer has sailed within 12 miles of an island of china. china says it followed the movement and it's warning the u.s. not to take any action. rescue crews in south asia are searching for more victims of an earthquake. more than 300 people are confirmed dead. the quake struck monday afternoon local time and could
11:31 pm
be felt in at least five countries. police in the uk have arrested a 15-year-old boy on the cyber attack of talk talk. the suspect was picked up in northern ireland. talk talk said it received a ransom demand after the attack. the breach compromised the personal data of millions of its customers. all right. the campaign rhetoric among the u.s. presidential candidates is getting tougher as the iowa caucuses draw closer. the attacks on the republican side are cutting deeper after a shakeup among the front runners. >> reporter: with less than 100 days before the iowa caucuses, the jostling in the gop ranks is taking on a sharper edge. >> carson is lower energy than bush. >> reporter: a new poll gives
11:32 pm
carson a double digit lead in iowa. >> i'm just going to have to work a little bit harder in iowa. i was very surprised to see the numbers. >> reporter: carson, the newly minted iowa front runner, dev l derevealing his rougher edges. saying when he was a teenager. >> many people know the story when i was 14 and i tried to stab someone, and fortunately you know, my life has been changed. i'm a very different person now. >> reporter: but it's the softer carson that's winning over evangelicals. now trump is taking aim. >> i'm pes pa tier yan. that's down the middle. seventh dayed a venntist, i don't know about it. >> meanwhile, jeb bush who just cut payroll costs by 40% across
11:33 pm
the board. >> blah blah. you know what they're sighing out there. watch it. >> reporter: no longer able to hide his frustration with the state of the race. >> i have a lot of cool things i could do other than sit around being miserable, listening to people demonize me and me feeling compelled to demonize them. that's a joke. >> reporter: today he's rallying voters as he tried to reassure them the race will soon break his way, but trump continues to mock him for turning to family members for help. >> so he's meeting now with mom and dad. no, it's true. he needs help. and he was very angry over the week. he said, you know, if this is going to be this nasty let them have trump as president. putin is a nastier guy than me. >> reporter: the businessman
11:34 pm
down plays how his family helped him get ahead. >> it hasn't been easy for me. i started off in brooklyn. my father gave me a small done of $1 million. i had to pay him back with interest. >> joining me to talk about this is ben ferguson in dallas and a proud republican, we should say. ben, let's talk about what's happening on your side to the aisle. with the exception, iowa, donald trump leads in just about every early primary state. he's maintained the lead from the summer. but he said he got a small loan from his father of $1 million that helped him start his business career. >> yeah. >> is this a bit of a problem? isn't that as tone deaf as you can get with working class americans? >> you know, i actually thought he handled his wealth well up until now. there's no reason to hold back. you've been successful.
11:35 pm
you've written best-selling books. you've been able to make millions of dollars off your last name but when you act like you came from nothing. when your father set you up a trust fun and there was reported more than $100 million with the family when they sold some of their assets in brooklyn, and when your dad gives you $1 million, let's not act like that's not a small fortune. most people never get a shot at that. when you act like somehow you came from this really tough life, these are the things that voters can hone in on and say that's a small loan. for me a small loan is 100. i don't think you understand how tough m life is or how tough it is to find a job or whatever that may be. >> he said well it's small compared to what i'm worth now, but that's the point. >> absolutely. >> the other big headline, ben
11:36 pm
carson leading by double digits in iowa in a poll of republican caucus voters there, despite plenty of strange things he said on the campaign trail. he's made bizarre comments. but why do you think he's beating trump by such a large margin in iowa? >> i think he's being real. when he talked about being a 14-year-old kid and trying to stab somebody, there's a lot of people who respect how far he's come away from that. you can't fake being a your surgeon. you have to have an unbelievable work ethic and a great student. you can't just say you're going to be a neurosurgeon and it just happens. i think his story of success in the way he tells it, in comparison to trump, it's a great analogy here, donald trump says i got a million dollar small loan. ben carson grew up in the streets and said i was a tough kid and tried to stab someone,
11:37 pm
and i turned my life around. voters connect with that. they say you did turn your life around. look at what you've accomplished and how many lives you've changed and saved. it's also a style issue. if you're turned off by donald trump and you want someone who's the opposite. ben carson is your guy. >> thank you for your time, ben. >> thanks. >> how about a lighter moment in politics for you. when bernie sanders appeared on "the view" he was asked to address an internet conspiracy theory that he and larry david would be the same person. this is what he said. >> a lot of people are claiming that they've never seen you and him together in the same room at the same time. so i'm wondering if you can clear the air for us. are you larry david?
11:38 pm
are you him? >> really? i have to tell. >> you realize this will destroy my entire campaign. it's true, i am. you have to be honest about this. >> we knew it. >> now, of course, before larry david did this, going on saturday night live, people all over the internet noticed the resemblance. i tend to believe bernie sanders is playing larry david. there you go. some other stories coming up after the break. health officials have issued a huge warning about meat that could make you reconsider what you put on your plate. we'll bring you the details, next. bring us your aching
11:39 pm
and sleep deprived. bring us those who want to feel well rested. aleve pm. the only one to combine a safe sleep aid... plus the 12 hour pain relieving strength of aleve. be a morning person again with aleve pm.
11:40 pm
11:41 pm
uncertainty grip parts of south asia in the wake of a 7.5 earthquake. it was centered in north eastern afghanistan when it struck monday afternoon local time.
11:42 pm
but it was felt across at least five countries. some people fearing aftershocks continue to stay outdoors. at least 306 people died in the quake. to get a better sense of how this quake is affecting the area, i spoke with our meteorologist, pedram javaheri, at the world weather center earlier. you've been telling us how deep this earthquake was. at the same time, it was felt by some 40 million people in several countries in the region. how is that possible? >> it's incredible. when you think about quakes, and this one was over 200 kilometers deep. when you go down that deep, tremendous pressure and heat in place. these quakes as they occur, generate enough heat to where temperature spikes beneath your feet on the order of 1,000 degrees occur in one or two seconds. that allows the rocks to become melted quickly and then you have the expansion of energy, and then you have a lot of people feeling a quake that occurred in
11:43 pm
a remote area but extremely deep. >> let's look at this. one of the great ways to understand this quake is how the plates slammed together and caused it to happen. >> absolutely. you think about this particular part of the world. the indian subcontinent is diving toward the plate. it's moving 40 millimeters a year. that's the same rate as your fingernails. these are constantly in motion. as we bring a cross section into place, once you look beneath the surface of the quake, the continental crest is at the top. that's when the crest is going into one other. down is where the lithosphere. then there's a pressure that leads to the tallest mountains in the world. you bring this up to the surface, you're talking about
11:44 pm
the planet. >> and these mountains are there because of that pop. >> and it's been happening for millions of years and it continues to happen so the mountains are getting taller. >> thanks a lot. >> yeah. >> and if you wish, you can get involved and find out more about the quake and how you can help those affected. just head to our impact page on cnn.com. it will connect you with agencies working in the region right now. all of that at cnn.com/impact. a new report from the world health organization is placing processed meats in the same category as smoking and asbestos for causing cancer. the meat industry is calling the report alarmists. >> reporter: despite the potentially devastating news, some remain unphased. this butcher says he hopes the warning that processed and red
11:45 pm
meats are dangerous won't deter his customers. >> do we step out the front door? we fear death crossing the road. where do we draw the line? >> reporter: a research organization found that processed meat like bacon and sausages and cold cuts cause cancer and that eating red meat probably causes cancer. the panel's leading scientist says the findings could change dietary recommendations around the world. >> these findings change existing dietary guidelines. that is that people who eat meat should consider reducing their consumption to reduce their risk of several diseases, including cancer. >> reporter: the study says consuming around 50 grams of processed meats per day increases the risk of colon cancer by 15%.
11:46 pm
the study has its critics. the north american meat industry, an industry interest groups calls the conclusion dramatic and alarmist overreach. and a member of great britain's meat advisory panel says red meat does have health benefits. >> it's a particularly nutritious item of food. we don't need large items, but if we had a little bit of liver to a meat recipe, it will contribute to minerals that a human being needs. >> they do not recommend an staining from red meat, but they say the consumption should be limited. advice that the butcher believes consumers should heed. it's better to eat good that's
11:47 pm
high in quality. >> for me this report raises additional questions. so earlier i spoke to a doctor about the report. she says the risk linked to red meat can also be dangerous for those who already have cancer. >> there's over 100 studies about the risk of red meat with breast cancer and colon cancer and ovarian cancer. this is not just about cancers of the digestive tracts. this is all cancers y. and the data is real. this is not new news, but we're hearing about it. and i don't think the general public are aware about the dangers of red meat, not just in terms of getting cancer but the more aggressive type of cancers are linked with red meat consumption, and if you continue to eat red meat and you have cancer, you're more likely to have a relapse of your disease. >> you'll hear more of our conversation in the next hour of cnn news room.
11:48 pm
leaders in the white house have reached a budget agreement that could be voted on as soon as wednesday. the deal would lift the national borrowing limit until march 2017 and would raise domestic and defense spending. many republicans were furious accusing boehner of giving away toomp. if this passes, the agreement gives paul ryan some breathing room to take over as house speaker without an immediate budget battle looming. still to come, we'll take you to the world premier of the james bond franchise.
11:49 pm
when it comes to helping you reach your financial goals,t taking small, manageable steps can be an effective... and enjoyable approach... compared to the alternatives. push! i am pushing! sfx: pants ripping how you doing eddie? almost there. small steps. at axa, we'll help you take the next steps, with more confidence. for advice, retirement and insurance, talk to axa today. like limiting where you earn bonus cash back.hings. why put up with that? but the quicksilver card from capital one likes to keep it simple. real simple. i'm talking easy like-a- walk-in-the-park, nothing-to-worry-about, man-that-feels-good simple.
11:50 pm
quicksilver earns you unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. it's a simple question. what's in your wallet? tthey bought the place fourg to mark andmonths agoderson. on what was arguably the scariest day of their lives. neither has any idea what the future holds for them. but they bought into a 30-year mortgage anyway. that was bold.
11:51 pm
they must really believe in themselves. buy in. quickenloans/home buy. refi. power. can a a subconscious. mind? a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought. can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive? welcome to today's working world. companies everywhere are working harder and investing more. but achieving the right outcomes has never been more difficult. xerox engineers a better way for people, process and technology to work together. improving how the world shops, travels, pleases customers,
11:52 pm
learns, banks, and stays healthy, so... life works better. work can work better. with xerox. >> welcome back. get ready. your collective egos are about to get a knock. a british comedian will be hosting the 2015 golden globes. he's known for his quick whit and biting humor that keeps stars on the edge of their seats.
11:53 pm
they made the announcement on twitter saying with the hash tag, he's back. they air in january. if you're a fan of james bond, "spectre" made its world premier on monday night. >> you have no authority, none. mexico city. what were you doing there? >> reporter: what an epic movie in an epic franchise and an epic premier to match. can "spectre" meet up to expectations when the predecessor was successful as well. that was the question i put to the leading man, daniel craig. >> we just set out the make the best movie we could.
11:54 pm
we had so much wonderful success with "skyfall," you have to use that momentum and try to do better. >> reporter: bond offers one of the most epic things that's done for real, real stunts. there's a tradition, isn't there, about the first. the bar is set high. >> i tried to capture with the film was about. hopefully we'll collide nicely. i wanted an epic love song and i wanted a little bit of vulnerability for the character. >> reporter: a massive guest list. you can see on the screen as they meet people involved in the movie and the various charities involved as well. critics, generally like this movie. they thought it fits well into the franchise. for now, it's out on general
11:55 pm
release. we're getting a sense of what the public thinks. will it be commercially successful. >> thanks for that, max. here's some interesting facts about the james bond brand. ian fleming wrote 14 books featuring 007 before his death in 1964. with "spectre" there are 24 official james bond movies. if you add up the revenue from the movies, books and merchandise, it's generated nearly $8 billion. quite incredible. you are watching cnn. you can connect with me on twitter any time. someone is cramming for a test right now. back with another hour of "cnn newsroom" with live reports from iraq, india and russia and more after this short break. please stay with us. of you? (patrick 2) pretty great. (patrick 1) how about a 10% raise? (patrick 2) how about 20?
11:56 pm
(patrick 1) how about done? (patrick 2) that's the kind of control i like... ...and that's what they give me at national car rental. i can choose any car in the aisle i want- without having to ask anyone. who better to be the boss of you... (patrick 1)than me. i mean, you...us. (vo) go national. go like a pro. ♪ ♪ the beautiful sound of customers making the most of their united flight. power, wi-fi, and streaming entertainment. that's... seize the journey friendly. ♪
11:57 pm
(ee-e-e-oh-mum-oh-weh) (hush my darling...) (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) (hush my darling...) man snoring (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) woman snoring take the roar out of snore. yet another innovation only at a sleep number store.
11:58 pm
11:59 pm
outrage and investigation. a police officer is put on leave after a violent arrest of a high school student caught on video.
12:00 am
and say it ain't so. health officials put bacon, ham and other processed meats into the same cancer causing category as cigarettes. welcome to our viewers around the world. i'm errol barnett, and this is "cnn newsroom." >> we'll have those stories in a moment, but we begin this hour in syria where the ongoing conflict is taking an increasing toll on civilians. the u.n. estimates the number of people displaced from their homes has more than doubled to 120,000 in just a single week. the three provinces are in the country's northwest where most of the recent fighting had been taking place. in syria's northeast, kurdish fighters have pushed isis out of their territory. the fighters are now preparing
12:01 am
for a u.s. backed defensive toward isis defenses. we have this report. >> reporter: these men are at the core of america's latest strategy to defeat isis. manning positions along a vast and desolate front line with isis along the haze. they're a force of roughly 40,000 syrian kurds which has dealt decisive blows to isis militants across northern syria. the commander in charge of this front line position in the city of hasika. >> they tried to attack us ten died ago. we were prepared so they didn't
12:02 am
reach thing at the. >> reporter: but they keep trying. isis has control of a village a mile away. the men say isis fighters often go to that building at night over there so they can launch attacks on these positions. the u.s. hopes the ypg will soon move from defense to offense, taking the fight to isis but at makeshift bases, the fighters we saw for lightly armed, poorly equipped, and exhausted from the fighting. and a senior commander knows the battles ahead will be even tougher. can you take raqqa without heavier weapons from the coalition? >> translator: the weapons we have are not high quality. for this campaign, we'll need new heavy weapons. >> reporter: the most important weapon they have but don't want to talk about is this device which helps them get exact
12:03 am
coordinates for enemy positions. it's sent to a kurdish, u.s. operation room, and minutes later, fighter jets come screaming in. one man said he was given a week of training before using the device. who trained you to use this? >> translator: believe me, i can't say. when you finish the training, it's a secret, but they weren't speaking kurdish. >> reporter: a mystery as is so much of the unfolding strategy in this corner of syria. >> and we are joined now live from the regional capital of iraqi kurdistan. how quickly would a russian air strike or strong isis attack reverse all they've been working
12:04 am
toward? >> reporter: well, errol, it's important for the viewers to know that the russians are not attacking the ypg at all. that's because the ypg isn't actually fighting against the regime. in terms of the concerted attack from isis, the ypg does have the advantage of having u.s. and coalition air support, so it's possible they could defend that. the real question here is can the ypg go on the offensive and replicate the successes it's had in kurdish areas in an arab, isis stronghold like raqqa. that is still very much a question. >> and to that question, what about the 50 tons of ammo that the u.s. dropped to help forces there? was that a significant help at all? >> reporter: well, certainly it's a rare demonstration of public support from the u.s. coming out and dropping the 50 tons of ammunition to this new coalition of arab and kurdish forces. from the touring we did across the front lines around the city
12:05 am
and other areas, it's clear that really that's not going to be enough. these men are lightly armed and poorly quipped. they don't have the heavy weaponry and armor piercing weapon weaponry they need to go on the offensive. >> thank you for joining us. and be sure to join us all week as she brings us a series of reports from inside northern syria. we're hearing from some of the hostages rescued from an isis prison in iraq. 70 hostages were freed. four prisoners were set to be executed after morning prayer and were told to write a letter. dramatic video captured the rescue. look at this. one of the hostages says kurdish and u.s. special forces stormed the compound around 2:00 a.m.
12:06 am
the pentagon released video showing a coalition air strike destroying the prison shortly after the mission. a u.s. warship has come within 12 miles of one of china's manmade islands in the south china see. beijing is calling this a threat to china's sovereignty. china built the island in a contested part of the sea. it claims those waters are chinese territory. let's talk to will ripley where the u.s. navy destroyer that passed the island is based. the fear is that the actions of that vessel could quickly kick off a confrontation between these two big military powers. how did this play out earlier today? >> reporter: well, this is something that we know the united states military has been talking about and considering for quite some time.
12:07 am
bag in may, jim sciutto flow over some of the islands that areé(]%há÷ 600 miles from the c mainland. they're areas where they're making their mark. they're put in an airstrip. it appears they're building them up as military infrastructure, and this is certainly troubling for the united states, it's key ally here. one because of the shipping routs in the south china sea but also if they're able to continue to build up this, what are the ramifications when it comes to the region. cf1 o listen to what the pentagon says about this operation where they went within 12 nautical miles of this island. >> this is a military matter, but more broadly, you don't need to consultant with any nation
12:08 am
when you are exercising the right of freedom of navigation in international waters. the whole point of freedom of navigation in international waters is that it's international waters and you don't need to consult with anybody to do that. >> reporter: you heard him talk about the freedom of navigation patrols. this is something that the united states says they will be doing more often around the islands. other areas that are contested as well, errol, and the key difference here, you hear the chinese saying this is your sovereign territory. united states, japan and others refusing to recognize that, saying they're international waters. >> the u.s. is sending a loud and clear message with this move, but you wonder why it's necessary if this was discussed wheen the chinese president and president obama during his recent visit. is this a step back? >> reporter: well, certainly
12:09 am
they did discuss this topic but this is one issue that the united states and china have not been able to agree upon, even though they agreed upon other things during his visit this fall. remember, in the spring the japanese prime minister was also in washington and you can bet that he and president obama talked extensively about not only the south china see but the east china see where there's an ongoing dispute about islands, another disputed territory. it will be interesting to watch in the coming months as the united states with shippings based here in japan, as they concentrate their efforts on the south china sea, what will japan's role be in the east china see. japan just allowed military forces, you see some of their ships behind me, the flexibility and freedom to act in situations like this. there's concern that japan could
12:10 am
get pulled into this dispute as well. >> i know you'll be watching this closely. we all will be. live for us in japan. will, thanks. another big story we're following today, disturbing video out of a south carolina high school. a resource officer yanks a student from her desk, slamming her to the ground and drags her several feet across the floor. watch. why was that necessary? this video has caused an up roar on social media. many say the officer used excessive force while others defend him saying it was the student resisting arrest. the school tridistrict says it' working to investigate the incident in fact the officer has been identified as ben fields xxd administra
12:11 am
leave. >> the student was asked to leave the class several times by the teacher at the school. the assistant principal was there. the officer was called on scene to have the student removed from the location. the student refused and the officer acted the way you saw on the video. now, again, what we saw was just a tidbit of what the video show. we'll look at what happened before it and after. all of that is going to take part in what the sheriff decides. >> we have sonny hosten, and harry. is there anything you see in this video alone that disturbs or bothers you? >> that's a good question. i think here, by watching this, the first thing, i don't see the beginning of the video. that's an issue for me.
12:12 am
how many times has this officer asked this young lady to get up from that chair? all right? now, as a police officer myself, would i have done it the same way that officer has? no, i i would not have. i would not have acted like he did, but he did act within the law, meaning that an officer can use whatever force is necessary to effect an arrest. if you comply with my wishes, i'm telling you to get out of the seat. twice, if you don't get out of it, then i can do what it takes to get you out of the seat and put handcuffs on you. i'm tired of teachers in schools calling cops when children are unruly in the classroom. this should have not been a police incident at all. the school should have taken care of this child, not a police officer. >> the school said they're disturbed by this. they're launching an investigation. >> why did they call the police? >> sonny, i see you nodding no.
12:13 am
there are two questions. what is legally appropriate and then what is right. we don't know what came before the video, but in your view, is there anything that could justify this? >>n,[abñno, and that's why i do think that's the operative question. i don't think we need to see what happened before. the bottom line is all we need to see is what is on the video. and that is to make the legal determination. that's whether or not he used the force that was reasonable and necessary to control this situation. to control this child. and i think that we can all agree that what we are seeing is an officer who is sort of out of control. i do agree, though, with harry, one of the few times i do agree with harry, that we in our schools, at least in the united states are too quick to call in the police to deal with behavior situations. >> and for our international viewers, that's a good point. this video is being seen and going viral at the moment because it's happening in the
12:14 am
context of police treatment of minorities, and the question is if the force is necessary. harry, black girls reason six times more likely to be suspended than white girls in schools in the united states. why do you think that is? >> just like, you know, a black is more likely to be arrested in new york city than a white person. they're not behaving. that's the bottom line. why do you think that police officer was called to that class room? because that girl was black? this is not a racial issue. it's not. it's about policing with called because someone was unruly in a classroom. that student did not submit to the officer. >> i don't want to make every issue into a race issue. at this point when we look at this particular video j we don't know that race played a factor. when you look at the larger issue, which is what you're talking about, it is clear that while african american young
12:15 am
girl students are only about 14% of the population, they're arrested 43% of the time. >> and they're all innocent? come on. >> there has to be some sort of racial component. black people aren't just criminal by nature. i think we have to at least in the united states really start to look at all these underlying factors as to why officers are more apt to arrest african americans. they are more apt to suspend african americans, and they are more apt to use excessive force with ferafrican americans. that's an ugly truth about living in america, and it's something that until we're comfortable talking about, we'll have the problem. >> i don't agree with the interpretation of the statistics. >> they're the statistics. >> it's your interpretation. >> that's why it's great to get you both in on the issue. the officer is not to return to
12:16 am
any schools in the district and is pending an investigation to see what the answers are to these questions. thank you to you both. >> thank you. >> thanks. >> bail is set at $1 million for a woman accused of killing four people in oklahoma. prosecutors say it appears that adacia chambers intentionally drove her car into a crowd. her lawyer says he believes she has a mental health issue. she could face additional charges. fear and uncertainty are gripping a large part of south asia. next, the persistent worries in the wake of a major earthquake. and with his front runner status changed in iowa, donald trump is taking sharper aim at ben carson and his religion. more details on that, after this.
12:17 am
ancestry has come out now they have lifestory. it literally lays out somebody's life, from birth to death. when i was using lifestory, i discovered my great grandmother. she went through a lot. two sons go to fight in world war ii. she lived through the depression. and she made it through all of that. here i am. just because she survived, and she kept going. bring your family story to life like never before.
12:18 am
get started for free at ancestry.com
12:19 am
12:20 am
combing through rubble in south
12:21 am
asia searching for victims of the earthquake. at least 306 people are con officialed dead, mostly in afghanistan and pakistan. the number is expected to rise as authorities reach more remote areas. the quake was near the afghan pakistan border. it could be felt in at least five countries. cnn's new delhi bureau chief joins us from there. unclear how much higher the death toll will death. it could be much higher if the it was in a more densely populated area. what's the extent of the damage at this point? >> reporter: the honest truth is we still don't know. the problem with this quake is that because the epicenter was in a remote part of afghanistan, the areas around it in both pakistan and afghanistan are very remote. communications with those parts of those two countries are not very good on a good day.
12:22 am
it's difficult to get to those places and officials on both sides are saying it could take the best part of one more day to fully comprehend the scope and scale of the damage there. one thing to remember with this is that a number of homes in those parts of afghanistan and pakistan are often built with mud bricks. they're not very strong. they usually can't withstand quakes of this severity. news is trickling in from more remote parts about the scale of the devastation. what we do know is in the big cities, we know about severe tremors, but we also know that buildings didn't really collapse in the big cities,s and perhaps that's why this earthquake may not be as severe as, for example, nepal's earthquake earlier this year, and certainly not as severe as the 2005 earthquake in that region.
12:23 am
>> and at this early stage, most of the deaths are in pakistan and afghanistan. what is the aid and recovery plan so far? has anything been offered up just yet? >> reporter: a lot has been offered up. india's prime minister offered going to help pakistan and afghanistan. even though they're often seen as enemies, both have a history of offering help to each other in times of nap rtural calamiti. he also said he spoke with his counter parts in both places and offered help. but today when we spoke with a national relief authority, they said no requests have been made yet so india is just standing by. it hasn't activated any help to either country.
12:24 am
the damage on india's side of the border is limited. we heard there were power outages but power is back. only one person is reported dead in india. india is stopping by to help, but it hasn't been offered so far. >> an important time for nations to work together, and we'll get a better sense of the damage there in the next day. live in new delhi for us a few minutes before 1:00 p.m. >> i spoke with pedram javaheri at our world weather center about this a bit earlier. you've been telling us how deep this earthquake was, but at the same time it was felt by some 40 million people. >> it's an incredible event. when you think about quakes, this particular one, over 200 kilometers deep. tremendous pressure and heat in place. as these occur, they generate
12:25 am
enough heat to where temperature spikes hundreds of kilometers down occur up to 1000 degrees. and then you the expansion of the energy. you have a lot of people feeling a quake that occurred in a remote area but also extremely deep as well. >> let's look at the topography. one of the great ways to understand is how the tech tonic plates slam together and cause it to happen. >> you think about this part of the world and you have the indian subcontinent diving toward the plates. it's moving 40 millimeters a year. that's the same as your fingernails grow. they're constantly in motion. we'll bring in a cross section. if you look beneath the surface, the continental crest is at the top. that's the motion of the crests
12:26 am
going into one another. now you have it dives beneath a crust. that pressure is going upward leading to the tallest mountains in the world, the you bring this up to the surface, you're talking about the ceiling after our planet and the quakes over -- >> and these mountains are there because of that pop. >> and it's opinion happenibeen millions of years and continues to happen. >> thank you, pedram. >> if you'd like to help, you can contribute if you wish. head to cnn.com/impact. he's no longer the front runner in iowa. no donald trump is stepping up his game. what he has to say about his closest rival ahead. and a new report about
12:27 am
processed meat in a category of things like asbestos and tobacco. their reasoning, next.
12:28 am
12:29 am
12:30 am
a warm welcome back to those of you watching here in the states and all over the world, this is "cnn newsroom." i'm errol barnett. this is your last half hour of the day with me. a u.s. navy destroyer sailed within 12 miles of a manmade chinese island in the n a contested part of the sea. china says it followed the ship's movement and is warning the movement not to take any
12:31 am
action. >> rescue crews in south asia are searching for more victims of a 7.5 earthquake in north and afghanistan. more than 300 people are currently confirmed dead. it could be felt in at least five countries. a disturbing video from a south carolina classroom is circulating on social media and shows a school resource officer violent violently arresting a student. the officer was called in when the student refused to leave the classroom. he has been put on administrative leave while the incident is being investigated. the turkish government says it will have representatives in paris. nick robertsonxd is covering th for us from moscow and joins us live. we've learned turkey will be part of the talks. but there's not much else being
12:32 am
said publicly about these discussions. what do we know? >> reporter: well, we know that over the past few weeks russia began a bombing campaign in syria and in the last week has tried to switch the from a military campaign continuing, the state news agency here says that the asaad forces backed by the russian air power have made gains in the aleppo area, but they're also pushing on the diplomatic front. that's what we're seeing, part of that, if you will, the response to that, and in paris today. you had the meetings in vienna where the turkish prime minister and john kerry, so russia's effort to find a political solution has really generated an increased level of debate among the other powers that are involved here, and, of course, turkey is one of the major regional powers involved and has
12:33 am
an extreme interest in the outcome of what happens in syria. it shares a massive border. the border it feels has been violated by russian aircraft in the last few weeks. i think that they're sending someone to be part of this tells us that russia's effort to shake up the dynamic of what's happening is having an effect. the fact that we don't know what's going to be discussed says a lot. it's not clear a consensus is emerging or what the consensus is. it's complicated, and the core issues, how much president asaad would be in transition, these are divisive issues. >> so you've got the americans, the russians, turkey is involved and the saudis as well. what about iran's role? what the revolution guard
12:34 am
supporting asaad in the country, won't they eventually need to be part of a post asaad plan? >> reporter: we understand from russian state news agency here as well, the foreign ministry saying that lavrov yesterday or at least in the last 48 hours spoke with his counter part about this. we hear that putin has spoken with the saudi king not long after kerry was in saudi arabia visiting the king there. it would be anticipated that iran will have a huge desire to have a strong voice in the outcome and inside syria, of course, it has forces that are supporting asaad at the moment. it's invision grated his byl.
12:35 am
it's russia that seems to be sort of at the head of the diplomatic political initiative here, but iran is going to have a lot to say, and certainly president asaad, if he feels under pressure from russia, as part of what may develop here, if he feels under pressure from russia, his time in power may be limited. he may well turn to iran to help extend his leadership there. he is a key ally to iran at this time. they will want to have a voice. >> we'll see how the talks play out. nick robertson live from moscow this morning. knic nick, thanks. u.s. republican presidential candidate, donald trump has enjoyed front runner status for months now, but new poll numbers show a shift in iowa, and the campaign jabs are heating up.
12:36 am
sara murray as our report. >> reporter: with less than 100 days until the iowa caucuses, the jostling in the gop ranks is taking on a sharper edge. >> carson is lower energy than bush. i don't get it. >> reporter: a new university poll gives dr. ben carson a double digit lead in iowa, drawing 32 % support. compared to 18% for donald trump. >> i'm going to have to work a little bit harder in iowa. i was very surprised to see the numbers. >> reporter: carsen, the newly minted iowa front runner revealing his rough edges saying when he was a teenager. >> i would go after people with rocks and baseball bats and hammers, and when i was 14 kwlr, i tried to stab someone. fortunately my life has changed and i'm a different person now. >> reporter: carson recently said he still has a lot of fire inside of him.
12:37 am
>> is there anything that fires you up? that young man who could do those things, that person is still in there, right? >> i may be fired up. i may not look like i'm fired up. >> reporter: but the it's the softer carson that's winning over evangelicals. now trump is taking aim at carson's religion. >> i'm presbyterian. that's down the middle of the road, in all fairness. seventh day adventist, i don't know about. >> bush who just cut payroll costs by 40 % across the board, no longer able to hide his frustration with the state of the race. >> i got a lot of really cool things i could do other than sit around being miserable, listening to people demon size me and me feeling compelled to demonize them. that's a joke.
12:38 am
elect trump if you want that. >> reporter: today he's rallying donors as he tries to reassure them the race will soon break his way, but trump mocks bush for turning to his family members for help. >> so he's meeting now with mom and dad. [ laughter ] >> it's true. he needs counsel. >> reporter: sara murray, cnn, washington. >> if you're about to eat, wait a few minutes. a new warning about meat could spoil your appetite. details coming up. plus the royal couple shakes up and stirs the premier of the latest james bond film. we'll bring you details on that, later.
12:39 am
12:40 am
12:41 am
welcome back. the world health organization has released a report categorizing processed meats with carcinogens, but the meat
12:42 am
industry is calling the report alarmists. >> reporter: despite the potentially devastating news, a butcher shop in london remains unphased. he says he hopes the world health organization's warning that processed meats are dangerous won't deter his customers. >> do we step out the front door? we fear death crossing the road. where do we draw the line? >> reporter: research division found that processed meat like bacon and sausage and cold cuts cause cancer and that eating red meat like beef probably causes cancer. the responsible's leading scientist says the findings could change dietary recommendations around the world. >> these findings reinforce existing dietary dyguidelines fm a number of organizations around the world. that is people who eat meat should consider reducing their
12:43 am
consumption to reduce their risk of having diseases, including cancer. >> reporter: the who study says consuming around 50 grams of processed meats a day increases the risk of colon cancer by 18%. and the study has critics as well. the north american meat institute calls the conclusions, quote, dramatic and alarmistover reach, and a member of great britain's meat advisory board says red meat has benefits. >> red meat is a particularly nutritious item of food. we don't need large quantities of it, but if we at a little bit of liver to a meat recipe, that will deliver in a small quantity, all of the vitamins and minerals that a human being
12:44 am
needs. >> they do not recommend an staan staining from red meat, but they believe consumers should heed saying it's better to eat meat that's better in quality but moderate in amount. cnn, london. joining me now from new york is a doctor who is a medical correspondent for cure connection. thanks so much for being with us. i have to tell you, this is the point that all us meat lovers freak us. for those of us who love tailgates, we fear we're going to have to grill celery to be safe. how alarmed should we be? >> do as i say, not as i do. do what your doctor tells you. to be serious, we're talking about a risk of multiple cancers. there are risks of red meat with breast cancer, protastate cance.
12:45 am
this is not just about cancers of the digestive tract. the day is real. this is not new news, but we're hearing about it, and i don't think the general public are aware about the dangers of red meat, not just in terms of getting cancer but the more aggressive types of cancers are linked with red meat consumption. >> and with this they say processed meats are in the same category of cigarettes and asbestos but not in the same -- >> they gave warnings about red meat consumption 30 years and now we're hearing about this who report. there are different categories and processed meats are being given a category one warning. those are cancer causing agents. they've been given that label. red meat has been given the
12:46 am
label 2 a which is possibly cars in a jennic. we know it's not just about the amount of red meat that you're eating and how often you're eating it. cured meats, the risk is higher with well done meats. >> the report isn't necessarily saying everyone needs to become a vegetarian. the who does note that red meat still has nutritional value. all these meats do. >> that's right. at the end of the day whenever we hear this kind of a report when we hear about an adverse risk effect, the general public wants to know about the risk. what we know is the magic number is probably 50 grams, so if you're eating 50 grams of red meat a day, that -- >> that's roughly two slices of ham in. >> 50 grams is one, one and a
12:47 am
half to two slices of bacon a day, or one hot dog a day. that increases your risk of colon cancer by 18%. >> and we've seen the processed meat industry is pushing back hard against this. they called this study alarmists, and we know there will be more of that in the days and weeks ahead. for all of us, what should we keep in mind when people try to put down the study? >> i think you have to remember, we look at the quality of medical studies. there are some studies that are small. those are what we call weak studies or they're not controlled clinical trials, but there are many studies that show danger with red meat. the data is real. people get cancer because of genetics and lifestyle. >> quickly, are you a vegetarian
12:48 am
or do you eat meat? >> i'm not a vegetarian. i do eat red meat, but i eat it in small quantities, if i had to go vegetarian, it wouldn't be a difficult decision for me. but the vegetarians are probably excited by this. >> they are. on twitter they're speaking out. as you say, follow your doctor's advice. >> thank you so much. >> so if you shouldn't eat processed meats, what can you eat? our veggie dogs, are they a way to go. head to our website. you know the address, cnn.com. now, he is a secret agent. james bond. stay with us. is your head so congested it's ready to explode?
12:49 am
you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec®-d to powerfully clear your blocked nose and relieve your other allergy symptoms. so, you can breathe easier all day. zyrtec®-d. at the pharmacy counter.
12:50 am
12:51 am
12:52 am
all right. a lot of you are watching from a kenya. this is my favorite story of the day. it's a solid reminder that cheating was not pay. a runner in kenya was arrested after allegedly joining the race near the finish and sprinting into second place.
12:53 am
watch. >> it's going to be a big finish. it's a sprint finish. this is going to be very close. unbelievable. unbelievable. >> it is unbelievable. officials immediately suspicious of that man apparently he wasn't sweating or exhausted after a 26-mile run. he takes off his shoes and argued these blisters on my feet are proof that i ran. i know plenty of people with blisters on their feet. officials say he was hiding in the crowd before joining the race, and he would have won about $7,000 if he hadn't been caught but now he faces charges of fraud. shameful. britain's top secret service agent is making a highly anticipated appearance on the big screen. of course, i'm talking about --
12:54 am
>> bond, james bond. >> all right. that wasn't awkward. the latest installment of the bond series, "spectre" is long overknew f overdue for fans. max foster talked with daniel craig on living up to this success of the series. there's also a couple that stole the spotlight. >> you have no authority, none. an mexico city, what were you doing there? >> reporter: what an epic movie in an epic franchise, and obviously an epic premier to match in london. the question is can "spectre" meet up to expectations when "skyfall" was to successful as well. that was a question i put to the leading man, daniel craig. >> we just set out to make the
12:55 am
best movie we could. we had so much wonderful success with "skyfall," you have to use the momentum and try to do better. >> this is not computer generated. it's done for real, real stunts. there's a tradition. it's the bond movies now, the bar is set high. >> lyrically, i tried to capture what it was about. i wanted it to be an epic love song. and i wanted to add a little bit of vulnerability to the character. >> reporter: well, a massive guest list and topped by the duke and duchess of cambridge and harry. the critics generally like the movie. they thought it fit well into
12:56 am
the genre. the cast is great, but now it's out on general release. we're getting a sense of what the public thinks. will it be commercially successful in max foster, cnn. >> as max alluded to, spect"spe hits the big screen following the highest grossing movie, "skyfall," "skyfall,". t the "spectre" was one of the most expensive movies ever made. my two hours are up. thanks for joining fme for some of it. see you tomorrow. eligible for medicare? cer]
12:57 am
that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and virtually no referrals needed. there's a range of plans to choose from, too, and they all travel with you anywhere in the country. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp,
12:58 am
an organization serving the needs of people 50 and over for generations... and provided by unitedhealthcare insurance company, which has over 30 years of experience behind it. ♪ call today. remember, medicare supplement insurance helps cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. expenses that could really add up. these kinds of plans could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. you'll be able to choose any doctor who accepts medicare patients. and there are virtually no referrals needed. so don't wait. with all the good years ahead, look for the experience and commitment to go the distance with you. call now to request your free decision guide. this easy-to-understand guide will answer some of your questions and help you find the aarp medicare supplement plan that's right for you.
12:59 am
. . . [female announcer] if the most challenging part of your day is the staying awake part, sleep train has your ticket to a better night's sleep. because when brands compete, you save during mattress price wars. save up to $400 on beautyrest and posturepedic. get interest-free financing until 2018 on tempur-pedic. plus, helpful advice from the sleep experts. don't miss mattress price wars at sleep train.
1:00 am
♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ stunning video. a student arrested after been thrown to the ground by a school resource officer. what led up to the violent encounter. breaking overnight. a budget deal with the white house and congress. it could prevent a shutdown, but will it divide the republican party? and u.s. defying china. a navy ship sailing through the waters in china now claimed by the chinese.

248 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on