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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  November 7, 2015 1:00am-3:01am PST

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a deliberate takedown. why european authorities believe a bomb may have caused the deadly crash of flight 9268. plus, a historic meeting between long-time foes. what china and taiwan hope to accomplish in their talks. and later, good grief, charlie brown and the rest of the "peanuts" gang are back in a new dimension on the big screen. from cnn world headquarters, welcome to cnn around the world. i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
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good day to you. we start with the investigation into metrojet flight 9268. european investigator, they are convinced that the crash of that plane was intentional. this according to cnn affiliate france 2. the report says the black boxes indicate everything was fine for the first 23 minutes of flight. then, a sudden blackout which suggests a bomb. aviation analysts say the data would be different if the plane broke apart because of mechanical or structural failures. now we are hearing reports of a vacation flight out of the u.k. that had a very close equal a missile back in august as it approached sharm el sheikh airport. cnn is covering the story from all angles around the world. our senior national correspondent ben wedeman live in cairo, egypt, and dirnl diplomatic editor nic robertson is live in st. petersburg, russia. first to ben in cairo.
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in the coming hours, we expect to hear a statement on the investigation. what can we expect to hear? >> reporter: we're expecting the press conference by the minister of civil aviation in cairo in six hours from now where he's going to say something about the investigation into the crash of the metrojet airliner last sudd saturday. we don't know the details, but indications seem to be pointing to the high probability that this plane was indeed brought down by some sort of explosive device. france 2 reporting it appears the flight indeed was brought down by some sort of bomb. the precise details we don't know. egyptian officials have been hesitant to entertain the possibility that there was an explosive on this plane. in fact, they were shocked
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yesterday when the russian authorities declared that they would suspend all flights to egypt, not just sharm el sheikh, after they saw intelligence provided by the united states about whatever the americans happened to have. what's interesting is this is the front page of a cairo daily. it says -- [ speaking foreign language ] by shakespeare. it reveals how the egyptians are alone in thinking perhaps this was merely a mechanical malfunction. george? >> egypt concerned obviously as russia suspending flights into egypt which relies heavily on tourism. tell us more about a close call with another plane traveling to
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sharm el sheikh airport. >> reporter: that happened on the 23rd of august. it was a thompson airways plane coming from standstead in the u.k. as it approached sharm el sheikh national airport, the co-pilot saw what looked like a projectile heading in the direction of the airplane. he took evatisive action. nothing happened. the british ministry conducted an investigation to the incident. it said it appears it was not a targeted attack but was connected to routine exercises by the egyptian military in the area. this incident which really does raise a lot of questions -- what on earth are military exercises being conducted near a civil airport. this will probably come up, as well, when we go to the press conference by the minister of civil aviation this afternoon. george? >> ben wedeman live for us in
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cairo, egypt. thank you very much for your reporting. now let's turn to cnn's nic robertson, standing by in st. petersburg, russia. nic, good to have you with us. this is a very difficult time for families there. the process of dpreefing and -- of grieving and burying the dead. >> reporter: it's a very tough time for the families. it's made tougher because they don't have answers about why the plane came down and, therefore, what was it that killed their loved ones. they feel that the government is not telling them everything that they know. and the pain for some families is compounded because they've been told that they won't be getting back bodies, that it will be fragments of their loved ones. and they feel they've been told this in a very harsh way. on top of that, they're feeling that the paper, procedures,
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needing to register their loved one is deceased, needing proof from the airline that the airliner itself crashed -- at a very difficult time, the families are feeling there is a very, very painful burden placed upon them. tomorrow there will be a memorial service for the 224 victims. at the cathedral behind me, the bells will toll 224 times for each of the victims. in the meantime, russia has suspended all its flights to egypt. there's an estimated 50,000, possibly tens more thousands, of russian tourists in egypt at the moment. it's a very popular destination. the emergency ministry here is coordinating with a special commission. you have the interior ministry, security services, tourism ministry, transport ministry, finance ministry, the communications ministry, as well as customs officials all involved now in trying to coordinate their response to helping get russia's tourists back. %-p
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so far. for the russian authorities, the next phase now is going to be bringing back all those tourists, as well, george. >> but at this point, so as you mentioned, families, they are waiting for answers. tourists are waiting for answers, as well, nic. just about, you know, getting back home. at the same time, russia's still holding, waiting for egypt which is leading the investigation to come out with a statement. russia not, stating that a bomb might have been in play, correct? >> reporter: no, they're not. we're told putin received an intelligence assessment from british and the united states, that he has talked with president sisi in egypt. what russia's position is is that egypt because that's where the crash took place is investigative lead authority. although russia and egypt have been cooperating extensively,
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and a big point has been made of that here. equally, the point has been made that it must be the egyptians who come out first and talk about the findings of what has been discovered. it seems that russia has become impatient for egypt to put out what is now appears to be apparent, and i think we can interpret from russia's actions suspending flights it takes equally seriously as the british do that flights into egypt this time, particularly sharm el sheikh, are not safe. it increases the russian perception, russian government perception that the terrorism threat, terrorism angle in all of this appears to be the most likely one. george? >> the investigation continues, nic. certainly a lot of people have a lot of questions. at this point where you are, there are a lot of families that are grieving. great loss. nic robertson live in st. petersburg, russia. thank you, nic. as this investigation
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continues to find out exactly what brought this plane down, airlines and their governments have some big decisions to make regarding safety. cnn's brian todd has this report. >> reporter: a disturbing finding -- the downing of the plane appears to be no accident. sounds from the cockpit voice recorder report an explosion. analysis from the flight data recorder reporting no signal of a mechanical problem. the officials tell france 2 the voice recorder shows everything is fine during the first 24 minutes of flight. then in a fraction of a second, a blackout. >> clearly that points to evidence that investigators are going to want to drill down into. the timing of the explosion, any other data that can correlate to time and potentially the location of the explosion. >> reporter: even a small amount of explosives placed in an airline cargo container can have a devastating effect as this test conducted on a fuselage in
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july showed. also, british intelligence says they believe a bomb was placed in the cargo hold of the metrojets plane where luggage is stored, that according to the bbc. that follows what cnn reported this week from a u.s. official -- the belief a bomb was planted in luggage somewhere on the aircraft. suspicion is falling on those with access to sensitive parts of sharm el sheikh airport including the plane's hold. >> the vulnerability of hundreds who have access, if you could extort or turn one of the two of those people to act on your behalf, wittingly or unwittingly through extortion or threats, you can defeat the system. >> reporter: and a striking reversal from vladimir putin. the russian president ordering all flights from russia to egypt suspended after the kremlin says the united states and britain shared intelligence with russia. a russian official tells cnn the suspension will be in place until russian authorities are sure that flying to and from egypt is safe. >> i would avoid the area right now. i definitely don't think that it's a safe place to fly in and
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out of at this moment. but not just because of terrorism but because of the fact that there's unrest in the safety and security system there. >> reporter: some airlines and security agencies are concerned enough that they're taking matters into their own hands. the dutch airline klm says it's not going to allow passengers flying out of egypt to check bags through, at least temporarily. some british carriers are doing the same. the department of homeland security in the u.s. says temporarily at least it will enhance screening for items going on to planes inbound to the united states. brian todd, cnn, washington. are you watching "cnn newsroom." still to come this hour, singapore, it is hosting a historic meeting between the leaders of china and taiwan. ahead, we look at what has kept them apart and where things stand now. plus, sunday's election may be a historic one in myanmar. details on that ahead as "cnn newsroom" continues.
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welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. the leaders of taiwan and china have been leading historic talks in singapore.
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live pictures right now. the president of taiwan speaking. we saw chinese president xi jinping in opening remarks earlier. this type of high-level meeting hasn't happened since the chinese civil war ended in 1949. that's when the two sides separated after the communist victory. the talks in singapore are large ly symbolic are no agreements being signed. we have more from taipei and beijing this hour. first to taipei and matt. i see behind you, there's a great crowd. a protest of sorts. what is the feeling among people there about this meeting? >> reporter: george, the protests here have been going on for hours. as you can hear, intense,
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pointed. these people have quite a strong opinion. for both of them, they are not in favor of it. specifically, they don't like how the meeting came about. they don't like in their minds how there's not enough transparency, enough public consultation, public discussion in order to get both sides of the current administration here in taipei was too secretive. by having this meeting, perhaps not reflective of the broader will of the people here in taiwan. polling consistently indicates that people here in taiwan are relatively okay with the status quo. that would be that there's their isn't a huge relationship, although we've seen trade in these countries come to historic levels. here in this crowd, people have expressed quite a bit of frustration over the meeting. many not happy that it's taking place.
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>> your signal there, we understand that that crowd is loud and vocal. how representative of the group in taiwan would you say the crowd is? >> reporter: i mean, the people here now currently are the ones with things at stake. they certainly have the biggest opinion. we spoke on the debate, this lasted here for two to three hours. we spoke to a couple of shopkeepers along the way. one of the people said he doesn't care about this meeting. that this is historic, but they're having lower level meetings. he says he doesn't see much of a difference after the meetings. for him, he says it's kind of business as usual. he's going about his day, opening up his restaurant to the public. i think that if you talk to
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other people here outside of the protest, your average person here in taipei, i think the opinion you would get is that they're not expecting much if anything to come out of the meeting. they don't expect much change to happen. so because of that, it's business as usual here on the streets in taipei. >> signal breaking up there. we heard everything you said. thank you very much for the reporting. to get a sense of the feeling there in taipei. now to beijing. our reporter there. steven, good to have you with us, as well. we're talking about two very different ghafts have relied -- governments that have relied, as matt mentioned on, the status quo. who what is the sense of the relations now? >> reporter: energy, to illustrate the difference -- george, to illustrate the difference between the two that matt was reporting on, it was entirely blacked out here in mainland china because some did
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not like what they are seeing in terms of the historic meeting. that is part of the problem here, isn't it? despite the ever closer economic and cultural exchanges and relationship, politically the sides have gone growing more and more apart. taiwan has a one party -- [ no audio ] talks about reunification as simply a non-starter. but still, this moment, this handshake between the two leaders of the two sides and the meetings are unprecedented, as you mentioned. really hasn't happened for seven decades. that's why so much attention is being paid. at the end of the day, i think both leaders realize they're not going to change the political realities, the political landscape on either side any
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time soon. mr. about xi he is trying to lay a foundation, create some framework about eventually reunification. george? >> we see the handshake now. an important, symbolic handshake. no agreements have been signed, correct? >> reporter: that's right. the handshake is historic. it's the first time they've met in 70 years. the meeting itself has been -- in being prepared for over two years, it's such a delicate and sensitive matter because as you say, both sides split in 1949 after a bloody civil war. the communists won driving the defeat of the nationalists to the island. both sides claim to be the government representing the entire chinese territory, including the mainland and taiwan. neither recognize the other's
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legitimacy. so -- they never signed any peace accord. technically, they're still at war. it's in that frame of context that made the historic moment so much more amazing. and as mr. xi himself has said, you know, blood is thicker than water, trying to frame the talk in the send of both sides have a shared history and a common lineage. and hopefully this would lead to more talks and eventually reunification, george? >> live in beijing with context and perspective. thank you very much for your reporting there. now moving on to myanmar which is preparing for a historic day on sunday, as well. people there will be voting in what officials are calling the country's freest election in decades. though.ryone is so enthused, - western powers have criticized the legitimacy of the election. myanmar insists it will be fair and a big step in the country's political reform. the party's opposition leader,
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aung san suu kyi, is expected to win the most votes. a landslide would be needed for that party to control the presiden presidency. a powerful cold front is charging across the eastern u.s., chilling everything in its path. let's bring in meteorologist derek van dam to talk more about it. you feel the weather -- >> you feel the change in the weather. the collision of temperatures also bring severe weather. you should see the video out of ft. worth. take a look at this. some footage of a roof completely blown off of a warehouse. scary moments for the individuals inside of the building obviously. this was from an ef-0, an enhanced f enhanced fujita rating from 0 to 5. the weakest of winds in terms of potential damage across the area. nonetheless, again, terrifying moments for those regions. that was in ft. worth, texas. that was late thursday night. this cold front continues to march eastward. here it is on the map behind me.
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it's going to cool the temperatures across the northeast finally because it has been extremely unseasonably warm across the region. it's also bringing a significant amount of precipitation, as well, to an area that's already saturated. in atlanta, we've had a significant amount of rain. several inches the past few days. guess what, folks, another two to four inches for the greater atlanta area. look at this, into the florida panhandle, southeast georgia, into south and north carolina, that's an area that we could experience four to six inches of additional rain. that's roughly 100 to 150 millimeters for our international viewers. this is already a rain-soaked area and a very warm and muggy region, as well. relative humidity values. that's a value of how much available moisture is in the atmosphere, nearing that 100% mark. that's indicative of thick fog that's blanketed the region, as well. here's an interesting statistic for you. we have had a warmer than average november, and november's continued to gets warmer.
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according to climate central, since 1970, our novembers have averaged about 2.3 degrees fahrenheit above what they were roughly 44 years ago. but we can say good-bye that warmth because our cold front continues to march eastward. you see the divide in our temperatures. roughly 20 degrees difference separates louisville to the virginia beach region. if you're located in new york city, you can expect a daytime high of 66 today. it cools off into your sunday. i've got to end off with one quick little statistic. temperatures were record-breaking in new york city. look at what it did to one of the ice rinks in bryant park. people tried to go ice skating. unfortunately, it didn't work out too well because it melted the ice. people were falling left, right -- of course, photographers there to catch every moment, george. >> not pleasant. >> not pleasant. >> i've done that once or twice. >> reporter: you don't want that. maybe the puddles will help your
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fall. >> not really. thank you very much. now, we move on to a story in the u.s. state of louisiana. two police officers there have been arrested in the fatal shooting of a 6-year-old boy this week. investigators say the boy was killed as these officers pursued his father's car on tuesday. the father is hospitalized. police officials had harrowing words about the incident. >> denied the death of jerry me -- jeremy morris. 6 years old. he didn't deserve to die like that. that's what's unfortunate. we took the body camera footage -- let me tell you something, i'm not going to talk about it, but i'm going to tell you this. it is the most disturbing thing i've seen. i will leave it at that. >> the fatal shooting of a 6-year-old boy. the two officers are charged with second-degree murder. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still to come this hour,
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heightened security at sharm el sheikh airport after the devastating plane crash. tourists there aren't sure how and when they will get home. [ male announcer ] eligible for medicare? that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and virtually no referrals needed.
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welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. are you watching "cnn newsroom." glad to have you with us. i'm george howell. this hour, the presidents of taiwan and china shack hands before starting a -- shook hands before starting a historic meeting marking the first high-level contact between both sides since 1949. in opening remarks, mr. xi told taiwan's leader, "we are from the same family."
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the summit in singapore is largely symbolic with no agreements being signed there. the world health organization says sierra leone is now ebola free. since the outbreak started nearly two years ago, the country has had far more cases of the virus than its neighbors. one aid worker says this is the beginning of freedom. european investigators say the black boxes from metrojet 9268 indicate that a bomb brought that plane down. cnn affiliate france 2 also says the recorders don't reveal any signs of mechanical malfunction. a report says an airport worker may have placed that explosive. more than 400 tourist from the u.k. who have been stuck in the sharm el sheikh airport could fly home on saturday. the so-caled rescue flights of the international airport started on friday. it's estimated 20,000 britons are in sharm el sheikh, and it could take ten days to get them all out. cnn's phil black has this report.
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>> reporter: as one british tourist emerged from gatwick airport today, he screamed, "home, sweet home," at the top of his voice. there are many relieved tourists returning to the u.k. this evening from sharm el sheikh. nowhere near as many as there were supposed to be. ultimately, the operation to bring back the stranded tourists has not lived up to the hope or expectation that was planned. it was supposed to be 29 flights full of british tourists making their way back. but only eight were allowed to make the journey. eight planes because of the restrictions at sharm el sheikh airport itself. ultimately, it has affected the airlines differently. five airlines. monaco airway sent out five empty planes hoping to bring them all back today. only four were allowed into sharm el sheikh. and of those, only two were allowed to make the return journey. easyjet had a tougher time. it hoped to send out eight planes. none were allowed into sharm el sheikh. it did, however, have two planes already on the ground.
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they were allowed to fly back. we spoke to some of the passengers who arrived on the easyjet flight into gatwick this afternoon. they all shared a tremendous sense of relief. >> i think i can speak for all the people when i say that david cameron absolutely made the right decision. we felt so much safer when we knew they were involved. >> people were angry, we didn't get information from nobody, easyjet or the british u.k. no one told us anything. >> reporter: what was your sense of security on the ground at sharm el sheikh? >> it wasn't very good. yeah, i can't understand everything. everyone knew they're demented. not safe there at all i don't think. >> reporter: the reason so few british flights are allowed in and out of sharm el sheikh comes to an additional security precaution being enforced by the british government. these returning flights are not allowed to carry checked luggage. they're supposed to be stored and returned separately.
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egyptian officials on the ground say they don't have the storage space for so many bags. the hope and intension of the -- intention of the british airlines in terms of passengers they're trying to move on a daily basis will not be moved until cargo flights are operated to move the bags within a fairly similar time frame. phil black, cnn, at gatwick airport in london. some tourists stuck at sharm el sheikh airport and their relatives back in britain are sharing their experiences on social media. i want to read a few of these. jim carmela writes, "stranded in sharm due to what looks like a whole heap of political posturing. cheers, guys." jason in sheffield, england, tweeted -- "should have been flying to sharm on monday. feel for those stranded out there." and callum tweets -- i hope my family aren't stuck in egypt much longer. i'm starting to miss my mom's
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cooking. and adam writes, "in an all-inclusive hotel with sunny weather, there's no rush to get back." anyone who travels through u.s. airports, you've got to be familiar with taking your shoes off, going through body scanners, and being patted down before you can get into the terminal. may surprise you that there are glaring security holes across this country's airports. drew griffin has the story. >> reporter: 54,000 employees at los angeles national airport report to work without mandatory bag checks, no body screening, and dozens of doors like this where a badge and a code gets you right on the tarmac. think that's scare? put yourself in the shoes of l.a.'s airport police chief, patrick gannon. right now what you have in place doesn't appear to be protection against the lone wolf scenario. >> when you say "lone wolf," are
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you talking about a lone wolf that has access -- credentialed employee -- >> reporter: i'm talking about that guy who walked in with a back pack, a mug. we don't know what's in his backpack or mug. we don't know what is in his heart or head. >> that's correct. >> reporter: does that concern you? >> it concerns me all the time. with 54,000 badged employees who work at a large airport like this, there's no way you're going to have the ability to screen every single person that comes to work in the airport. >> reporter: l.a. tries to minimize the risk by maximizing random checks like this one. airport workers never know when or where spot checks could occur. employees also face background checks, yearly updates, and a system built around everyone watching out for anyone who might seem suspicious. but chief gannon admits, nothing is foolproof. >> as we've been at airports across the country, we have not
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really seen anything that could prevent what atlanta went through which was guns being smuggled on to airplanes. >> no, i agree. i agree that in any airport throughout the united states and here also, there's never a 100% guarantee that somebody who wanted to do something illegal or wrong couldn't make that happen. >> reporter: what happened in atlanta prompted reaction at airports across the country. and you can see why. these are the guns smuggled on to as many as 20 flights by one delta airline baggage handler. authorities say the baggage handler took guns to work in his backpack which was never screened. the motive -- pure profit. selling the guns in northeast cities. atlanta hartsfield jackson's general manager, miguel southwell, testified to a congressional committee the real danger the gunrunning exposed -- the threat of potential
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terrorism. >> we're starting to see that people are being recruit ed to engage in terrorist acts. people being recruited from the united states. now we have a greater insight to the threat. >> reporter: in the wake of last year's gun smuggling incident, atlanta began full airport screening. a sncnn investigation this year found that only two other airport, miami and orlando, require employees to pass through metal detectors just like passengers. >> drew griffin reporting on how weapons are smuggled through the busiest airport. and there was a study after the atlanta incident and found full worker screenings across the u.s. wouldn't lower the risk to the public. instead, they recommend more frequent background checks and random screenings. you're watching "cnn newsroom." ahead, republican presidential
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candidate ben carson, known for his soft-spoken tone. he lost his cool a bit over what he calls a bunch of nonsense coming up. a different republican presidential candidate is hosting "saturday night live." donald trump promises it will be huge, but not too wild.
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in u.s. politics, presidential candidate ben carson is slamming a cnn investigation that questioned the validity of biographical stories that are central to his campaign. carson has said that he was a violent teenager and that religion transformed him. several childhood friends told cnn they had no recollection of the violent incidents in which carson described. on friday, mr. carson lashed out at the media. listen. >> all of you guys trying to
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pile on is actually going to help me because when i go out to these book signings and see these thousands of people, they say, don't let the media get you down. don't let them disturb you. please continue to fight for us. they understand that this is a witch hunt. >> blaming the media, he defended his story of being offered an informal full scholarship to west point military academy. he said he turned it down to become a doctor. despite controversy, carson is seeing his poll numbers rise in the key nominating state of iowa. he has the support of 23% of likely republican iowa caucus-goers. that's a jump from 14% in august. carson trails donald trump who had 25%. marco rubio rounds out the top three with 13%. among likely democratic caucus participants, hillary clinton
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leads with 55%. bernie sanders has 37%. live from new york, donald trump, he is set to host "saturday night live" in just a few hours' time. the american tv show is a comedy institution in this country, but some are not laughing. they are calling for a boycott of the broadcast because plaintiff trump's controversial comments on immigration. as brian todd reports, it's become a political rite of passage in this country. >> reporter: hey there. saturday night is going to be a very big night for trump. he's been preparing for days to host "snl," one of the iconic shows on american tv. he knows a lot is at stake for his campaign. there's also a lot at stake for nbc because they've made the bet that trump will bring in ratings as well as controversy and attention. he's the latest in a long line of candidates making the required stop on late night tv. >> great to be here at "saturday
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night live." but i'll be completely honest -- it's even better for "saturday night live" that i'm here. donald trump on "snl" this weekend. this time instead of promoting his reality tv show -- >> "the apprentice" -- >> reporter: he's promoting his presidential campaign. >> let me say this -- ben carson is a complete and utter loser. >> reporter: these days for white house hopefuls, late-night tv stops are as natural as some speeches in iowa. weekend trips to new york for "snl" camiose are almost a requirement. for hillary clinton's campaign, being on the first episode of this season was a big victory. >> all anyone wants to talk about is donald trump. >> donald trump? isn't he the one that's like, uh, you're all losers? live from new york, it's saturday night! >> reporter: and everyone remembers sarah palin's appearance in 2008. right before the election. with her impersonator, tina fey. >> and i can see russia from my house. who is that?
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>> reporter: one year before palin's appearance, senator barack obama appeared in a halloween sketch. >> may i say you make a lovely bride. >> she's a witch! [ laughter ] >> reporter: in 1994, former president george h.w. bush had a chance to respond to the show's jokes about him. >> his my revenge when the time is right. not now, wouldn't be prudent at that juncture. >> reporter: these politicians know they'll reach millions of viewers by showing a softer side. sometimes it can be quite serious. recall rudy giuliani on "snl's" first episode after 9/11. >> can we be funny? [ laughter ] >> why start now? >> reporter: another famous new yorker, al sharpton, actually hosted the show in 2003 while running for president. >> i like to go clubbing and do like the ladies. >> reporter: trump is the first real front-runner to ever host the show. >> i love what you do. it's great. >> reporter: another mile post in the merging of politics with
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pop culture. now for better or worse, i'm sure many people will be talking about trump, talking about how he performed come sunday morning. back to you. >> brian stelzer reporting for us. and "political man" returns to cnn this weekend. our own jonathan mann will bring you the latest on u.s. politics, the presidential race from the candidates' platforms to the political missteps. in london, you can catch it at 11:30 p.m. saturday. if you're looking for questions about u.s. politics, send them on twitter @politicalplan or use #someman. we'll get to some of -- #answerman. we'll get to some of those questions. the. the "peanuts" together in a new movie.
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charlie brown, his pet companion snoopy, and the rest of dpang are being brought to life in a new 3d movie. jake tapper went to connecticut
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to get the scoop from the animators. it's not often you get the opportunity to start over with a clean slate. this time things will be different. >> reporter: the animators behind the new "peanuts" movie were not starting with a clean slate. >> he did it! >> reporter: like charlie brown, they were also tasked with making things different. the challenge to lure today's audiences which are used to over-the-top special effects and characters with the deceivingly simple smile and dot eyes and relatable characters from "peanuts." beloved by audiences enamored of charles schulz' characters and tv specials for more than 36 years. >> merry christmas, charlie brown! >> reporter: what a task. you could develop serious neuroses trying to bring a classic comic strip into the modern cgi studio.
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the makers rose to the challenge and even decorated their office accordingly. >> when they announced it to the studio, we were elated but terrified at the same time. >> reporter: scott carroll and nick bruno, the animation supervisors, explained to me how daunting this job was. >> seemed like the easiest thing to draw until we started to draw it. >> had to figure out what can we get away with that still looks right in 3d but also looks like the drawings that he drew. >> reporter: back at their desks, the animators explained one of the many challenges those ink-dot eyes. >> if you just have two dots, how do you communicate all that emotion? it's hard enough to get them to look down or to the right. we can change the shape of the eyes themselves to help create a certain emotion. the periwinkles are hugely helpful. >> reporter: periwinkles, the emotive lines to the side. >> good grief. >> reporter: did you try different kinds of eyes? >> we did, yeah. we actually tried at one point 3d eyes. we all were horrified.
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>> reporter: perhaps the biggest challenge is that schulz never planned for the characters to be seen in three dimension. >> we built a character -- if we built a character that worked at all angles, it didn't look faithful to charlie brown. we built specific head poses for the angle that he drew them at. >> reporter: six poses to be exact. >> ooh! >> we have a profile left, sparky left, sparky right, profile right, up when they yell, and then looking down like when he's riding. that's it. snoopy is the most complicated character we have ever built here at blue sky. >> it's like animating picasso really. >> it is. >> reporter: for director steve martino and his team, having charles schulz's son and grandson as writers on the film made staying true to the characters easier. schulz's son was particularly influential for this scene -- >> craig schulz is a pilot. he owns a biplane that's a lot
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like the red baron. he said, let's go up. i want to show you what it's like to do dogfight maneuvers. we went up, and he did stalls, we did loop-de-loops, and it was informative to me. >> reporter: being humble and open to new ideas is a trait the team here picked up in part from a familiar friend -- charlie brown. >> he represents what we all feel and never talk about -- >> reporter: absolutely. we want to feel like we're buttoned up and together. >> charlie brown, he lays it all out there. we get to celebrate his the gentleman beauties of honesty, kindness, and the never-give-up spirit that he's always had. >> reporter: a spirit that remains intact and still loveably insecure -- even in spectacular 3d. [ laughter ] >> reporter: jake tapper, cnn, connecticut. now to other movies. angelina jolie and brad pitt opened the american film institute festival with their
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film "by the sea." jolie wrote and directed it. they play a couple growing apart. it's the first movie in which they act together since "mr. and ms. smith" ten years ago. released in the united states next friday. and gamer got to see the trailer for "warcraft" friday inspired by the popular "world of warcraft." the game franchise about the fantastical land of humans. and we end in moscow where a new homage to the porcelain throne. that's right, we're talking toilets. the new crazy toilet cafe serves food in urinal-shaped bowls -- look at that. and you can actually sit on a toilet while you eat. the owner says they haven't had an empty seat since the opening. talk about a business that will not go down the drain. i am flushed with embarrassment from that. thanks for watching.
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i'll be back after the break with another hour of news from around the world. you're watching cnn, your world news leader.
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unraveling the mystery of metrojet's 9268. initial information from the black boxes suggest a bomb brought that plane down. friends or foes. the presidents of china and taiwan meet for an historic summit. a live report from beijing and taipei on what these talks mean for both nations. firing back, ben carson goes on the offensive after an investigation raises kbe s ques about his fast. from cnn in atlanta, welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world.
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i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now. good day to you. we start with the investigation into the crash of metrojet flight 9268. egypt's foreign minister says new information indicates the plane was taken down by a bomb, and that was not shared with his government. according to cnn affiliate france 2, the cockpit voice recorder showed a sudden blackout during the flight. the jet's data recorder confirms the explosion was not accidental. aviation analysts say the data would be different if the plane had broken apart because of structural or mechanical failure. egypt's foreign minister says he was hoping that that information would be released to egyptian officials and not passed on to the media. and now reports of a vacation flight out of the u.k. that had a close encounter, a close call with a missile back in august as it approached the sharm el sheikh airport. let's start with the latest on
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this investigation. our senior international correspondent, ben wedeman, standing by live for us this hour at cairo, egypt, and we understand in the coming hours, we will hear a statement, a news conference from officials there. what more do we know about what we could hear? >> reporter: at this point we don't know what we're going to hear. the news conference by the minister of civil aviation will take place at 5:00 p.m. this evening at the ministry. so far, no hints of what he might be saying. obviously as you mentioned, the press conference by the egyptian foreign minister expressing frustration that intelligence has not been shared with the egyptian authorities. that intelligence was shared with the russian authorities by american officials yesterday. and that's what precipitated the decision by russia to suspend flights not only to sharm el sheikh but to egypt as a whole, as well. now this comes with this news
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that we've learned today that on the 23rd of august, a british airliner was headed to sharm el sheikh when the co-pilot apparently was -- when they were approaching the airport saw some projectile heading toward the plane. according to the british ministry of transport, the projectile came within 1,000 feet or around 300 meters of that plane before the pilot took evative action. and the ministry of transport put out a statement early this morning saying that their investigation indicated that it was not a targeted attack likely, but rather was likely connected to routine exercises by the egyptian military in the area of sharm el sheikh airport. so this incident rather puzzling, where a surface-to-air missile perhaps is being fired into the vicinity of the civilian airport will probably also come up at that press conference in cairo this
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afternoon. george? >> ben, can you also talk to us about the situation there in sharm el sheikh? you have so many tourists who are waiting to go home. it could take many days before that can happen. can you talk to us about what's happening there? >> reporter: well, we understand that there will be more of these so-called rescue flights coming from the u.k. to take away several hundred british tourists today. yesterday, the projection was more than 20 flights. the authority said they can't handle that level of traffic and don't have the storage facility for what they said was 120 tons of check-in luggage which of course tourist have been told they cannot bring back on the rescue flights. now, the situation at that airport may be further complicated by reports that there are, according to russian
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officials, as many as 79,000 russian tourist in sharm el sheikh. the russian authorities haven't indicated whether they will also be putting on the so-called rescue flights. that's going to cause further turmoil in that already troubled airport. george? >> ben wedeman live in cairo, egypt. thank you very much for your reporting. again, as ben mentioned, a news conference set to happen in the coming hours in cairo. we will learn more about the investigation from authorities there. now let's turn to our international diplomatic editor, nic robertson, who is live in st. petersburg, russia, to talk about how people are handling the investigation there. there are so many questions now. no concrete answers. this is a time when people are grieving there. >> reporter: they are. 224 people died aboard that flight sunday. tomorrow there will be a service at st. isaac's cathedral behind me.
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the bell will toll there 224 times. the pressing questions also about the 79,000 tourist in the holiday resort of sharm el sheikh. russian authorities say they've put in place a hotline for those families who are concerned to call to find out how they can get home. the flight's been suspended. they've had about 400 calls so far. the special commission and emergency ministry have brought on board elements from the interior ministry, the federal security services, the tourism, finance ministry, communications ministry, and customs officials to try to handle this. the russian passengers have also been told they can only bring handheld items back on the flights, that the cargo will travel separately. about 1,200 russian tourist have come back from egypt. the question, of course, for the family members of those 224 people killed aboard the plane, those questions remain. and of course, very difficult
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and painful process with burying their loved ones. in a russian forest, a wife and the dead man's sister. his mother and his father. a family tormented in grief. they've come to bury this 33-year-old, a businessman. remembering a life that ended aboard metrojet flight 9268 as it crashed into the egyptian desert thousands of miles away. every day now more passengers are buried. more bodies are identified. for so many families of victims, closure is still a long way off. the most pressing questions remain unanswered -- why did the plane crash, and what killed their loved ones. >> they want just to know the
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truth. what is really going on. to be honest with what happened. >> reporter: thnatalia rushed bk from new york when she learned her sister was aboard the ill-fated flight. they were close, soul sisters, spiritual. >> i have to show my parents that i'm stloong and to go through -- strong and to go through this hard process. >> reporter: this once-happy family is struggling to get answers from the government. >> they don't give us enough information. they don't want to talk about it. >> reporter: since the moment she arrived, natalia's mother, like her daughter, has been turning to god for support. but the help she needs now can only come from her government. >> i think they have answers,
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but they don't want us to know. that's my opinion. >> reporter: why not? >> because it's hard proof -- >> reporter: you think it might be terrorism? it. >> it's my opinion. i don't know. >> reporter: back in the forest, fatima's family n. now is the time of final good-byes. in the coming weeks, many more families will have such moments. moments hung heavier by unanswered questions. those families will be looking to the press conference in cairo today undoubtedly. the hope that they may get small details, fragments of information that might be helpful, might answer their questions. george? >> her response, "i think they have the answer, but they just don't want us to know," so
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difficult for these families just wanting some understanding of what happened on that flight, as you mentioned. later in cairo.ce is set for - we will, of course, follow it and hope to learn more information. nic robertson live in st. petersburg, russia. thank you very much. anyone who's traveled through the united states and airports here, you're familiar with taking off your shoes, going through the body scanners, or being patted down. so it may surprise you to learn there are some glaring security holes across this country's airports. our senior investigative correspondent, drew griffin, explained. >> reporter: 54,000 employees at los angeles national airport report to work without mandatory bag checks, no body screening, and dozens of doors like this one where a badge and a code gets you right on to the tarmac. think that's scare? put yourself in the shoes of l.a.'s airport police chief, patrick gannon. right now, what you have in place doesn't appear to me to be
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protection against the lone wolf scenario. >> when you say "lone wolf," are you talking about somebody, a lone wolf that has access to the -- >> reporter: i'm talking about -- >> credentialed employees? >> reporter: that guy who walked in with a backpack, with a mug. we don't know what's in his backpack. we don't know what's in his mug and what's in his heart or head. >> that's correct. >> reporter: does that concern you? >> it tornadoes me all the time. with 54,000 badged employes that work at a large airport like this, there is no way that you are going to have the ability to screen every single person that comes to work in the airport. >> reporter: l.a. tries to minimize the risk by maximizing random checks like this one. airport workers never know exactly when or where spot checks could occur. employees also face background checks. yearly updates, and a system built around everyone watching out for anyone who might seem
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suspicious. chief gannon admits nothing is foolproof. >> as we've been at airports across the country, we have not really seen anything that could prevent what happened -- guns being smuggled on to airplanes. >> i agree. i agree in any airport throughout the united states and here also, there is never a 100% guarantee that somebody couldn't who wanted to do something illegal or wrong, couldn't make that happen. >> reporter: what happened in atlanta prompted a reaction at airports across the country. and you can see why. these are the guns smuggled on to as many as 20 flights by one delta airline baggage handler. authorities say that baggage handler took the guns to work in his backpack which was never screened. the motive for the crime -- pure profit. selling the guns in northeast cities. atlanta hartsfield jackson's general manager, miguel southwell, testified to a
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congressional committee the real danger that gun running exposed is the threat of potential terrorism. >> we've started to see that people are being recruited to engage in the terrorist acts. people being included from the united states. now we have a greater insight. >> reporter: in the wake of last year's gunsmuggling incident, atlanta instituted full airport employee screening. a cnn investigation earlier this year found that only two other major u.s. airports, miami and orlando, conduct full employee screenings by requiring employees to pass through metal detectors just like passengers. >> scary situation. gr drew griffin reporting about weapons smuggled through the world's busiest airport, atlanta. he says a tsa study after that incident in atlanta found full worker screenings across the u.s. wouldn't actually lower the risk to the public. instead, they recommend more
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frequent background checks and random screenings. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still to come -- a look at a historic meeting between the leaders of china and taiwan. it's their first high-level meeting in decades. plus, myanmar preparing for an historic election on sunday. what makes this one so significant as "cnn newsroom" continues. yothat's lactaid®.k! right. 100% real milk, just without the lactose. so, no discomfort? exactly. try some... mmm, it is real milk. lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort. same eyes. same laugh. and since she's had moderate alzheimer's disease, i've discovered we have the same fighting spirit, too. that's why i asked her doctor about new once-a-day namzaric™. vo: new namzaric is approved for moderate to severe alzheimer's disease in patients who are currently taking, and can continue to take certain doses of both namenda and donepezil.
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newsroom." i'm george howell. we are following a historic meeting between the presidents of taiwan and china this hour. the first high-level contact develop the two sides since 1949. we saw chinese president xi jinping and the president of taiwan shake hands earlier. very symbolic handshake there. and in opening remarks, mr. xi told taiwan's leader, "we are from the same family." cnn is covering this story from all angles this hour. our matt rivers is live in taipei. and we have a report from beijing as well. matt's in taipei. we saw you last hour and see behind you now that there is a protest of sorts this. what is the feeling among people on the meeting? >> reporter: george, this protest wrapping up behind me after several hours of loud, intense protests through the streets of taipei. at its peak, there were only
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several hundred people as parts of the protest. we've seen far bigger protests here in taipei in the past. relatively small. the people strongly opinionated, very much against the meeting. specifically very much against the way this meeting came about. they accused the president's administration of a lack of transparency and not really having a public discourse about really the overall desire to have this meeting in the first place. people here would argue that the broad public here in taiwan really isn't in favor of closer ties to china and has in most cases been wary of any growing influence from the mainland. that said, the people here very strong opinions. we've talked to other people, more average taiwan residents who say they're skeptical about any results that might come out of a meeting like this. they say even though this is historic, there have been other lower-level meetings in the past that have not changed anything. if you talk to some people here on the streets that weren't part of the protest, they might say to you, eh, so what, business as
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usual. >> matt rivers live in taipei. and matt, thank you very much for your reporting. now let's turn to steven in beijing for us live. good to have you with us. we're talking about two very different governments. one that has been moving toward independence and democracy. and the other very different system. what is the sense of this meeting about cross state relations? >> reporter: george, the sense is that it's better to talk than not to talk. and as we see now, the two leaders actually having dinner behind closed doors. it's a historic dinner after an historic meeting. we don't know what's on the menu. but taiwanese media have reported there are local favorites including rice wine. reportedly the two leaders are drinking some of that, as well. you know, all the warm and fuzzy atmosphere aside, very few expect any major political breakthrough out of the meeting
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for reasons you and matt have mentioned. they are very much growing apart politically while taiwan is such a vibrant democracy. you see these protests on the streets against the meeting. and you see taiwanese media reporting the critics accusing them of using the meeting as a political maneuver. in china, the same media singing the same tune. that the government, they really have not reported any of the controversial aspects of this meeting and have been largely portraying this as a positive historic moment. so really because of this underlying difference, nobody thinks that this is going to lead to any talks on reunification, for example, and mr. mah himself said until and unless china becomes democratic, talks on reunification is a non-starter. i think beth leaders have legacies in mind. they want to talk and lay the foundation to create a framework for future talks about
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reunification. the future generations and happiness of future generations are some of the things they both have stressed in their opening remark. george? >> giving perspective and context there. steven live in beijing. thank you very much for your reporting. matt, thank you for your reporting in taipei. now to myanmar, preparing for what is being called the country's freest election in decades. polls there open in just about 13 hours' time. critics have questioned the legitimacy of the process. they say millions won't be able to vote and point to widespread human rights violations. myanmar's constitution wouldn't even allow one of the leading candidates, oppose leader aung san suu kyi, to assume the presidency if her party wins. the country promises a fair election and says it is working on democratic reforms. rescue officials are looking for survivors after a village is
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engulfed in floodwaters. only one person has been confirmed dead. that number is expected to rise. cnn's shasta darlington has more. >> reporter: more than a dozen people feared dead after a dam burst an open pit mine in central brazil, flooding the nearby town with a tsunami of sludge, burying homes and carrying cars along with it. rescue efforts have continued, but the further we get away from the accident, really the less likely it is that survivors are expected to be found. according to the union leader representing workers at this iron ore mine owned by san marco, there are still 13 people missing. the death toll is expected to rise. also because of the damage done to that nearby town, an area with 200 houses literally submerged. the rescue efforts continue. they've managed to take a lot of people out of the mud -- more than 500 left homeless. part of the problem is this was wastewater. when they do get them out of the
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mud, they've had to decontaminate them. and there's, of course, concerns that this could have long-term effects, health effects on the community and environmental effects in the region. the owners of the san marco mine, we're talking about brazil's valley and australia's bhp billitin, a joint venture, they say they're investigating the cause. of course, following rescue efforts. one particular area that officials have been looking at is actually tremor activity. reported three there were four tremors in the region right around the time that the dam broke. they were mild tremors. authorities investigating if that could have had anything to do with the tragedy. shasta darlington, cnn, rio de janeiro. switching to weather. a powerful cold front is charging crass the eastern part of the u.s., and you can feel the changes here in atlanta. it's been rainy for so long. >> it has.
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we're about to cool off dramatically which we need because it's been just so warm and sticky. unseasonably warm for the entire eastern half of the united states. with that collision of temperatures, cold air behind the cold front and warm air ahead of the cold front, you get severe weather. this was the scene in ft. worth, texas. take a look at this, george. roofs seen blown off of buildings. this was all thanks to an ef-0 tornado, enhanced fujita scale. ranges from 0 to 5, 0 t5 the strongest. we talked about the warmth that is prevalent across the eastern half of the u.s. look at the records that have been set yesterday. many locations including new york city. talking 15 to 20 degrees fahrenheit above where we should be this time of year. side note from climate central, november's the entire month
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cumulatively has been getting warmer since 1970. about 2.3 degrees fahrenheit warmer than overall average temperatures for november back in 1970. so to show what's been taking place in our world lately. it's the cold front responsible for the severe weather earlier this workweek. it's marching eastward. high pressure will clear out the skies by the end of the week and across the new england coast. you can see the division in temperature across the east, louisville, kentucky, 51. new york all the way to virginia beach, upper 60s to lower 70s. a temperature swing roughly thanks to the cold front. you see the low pressure building across the gulf of mexico, as well. that's our next influx of rainfall. and get this, folks -- already saturated part of the southeastern united states get more rain, four to six inches in some locations. that means the possibility of localized flooding into the end
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of the weekend and the start of the workweek. and i mentioned muggy, muggy weather. the relative humidity had has been near 100%. that's allowed for a thick blanket of fog to roll over the region. that looks to start to ease up a bit, as well, as our cold front presses through. new york, if you're located there, temperatures will be about 66, cloud cover, no rain. several gusts of wind expected. and i'll leave with this image. with the record-shattering temperatures, people got out and tried to ice skate at bryant park, downtown new york city. not faring too well. the ice melted into puddles. you know, ice skate don't work well on water. needs to be frozen, doesn't it? >> that's not pleasant. thank you very much. >> thanks. now to the controversial keystone pipeline. the white house has rejected the plan. friday, u.s. president barack obama officially turned down the proposal with the canadian
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company. >> the pipeline would not make a meaningful, long-term contribution to our economy. the pipeline would not lower gas prices for american consumers. in fact, gas prices have already been falling. shipping dirtier crude oil interest our country would not increase america's energy security. >> the u.s. state department has been reviewing the pipeline's construction for several years now. we have the story from washington. >> reporter: president obama rejected the keystone pipeline saying the canadian project would have sent the wrong message to the world on the issue of climate change. the president accepted the recommendation of secretary of state john kerry whose department analyzed the project for nearly seven years. mr. obama acknowledged keystone had become embroiled in politics as republicans said the project would have created u.s. jobs. democrats argued an approval from the white house would have been a damaging defeat in the battle against global warming. in the past, the president had sewed he would turn down the pipeline if it could droibt
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climate change. something his own state department concluded would not occur, not surprisingly, though, the president sided with his own party. here's what he had to say. >> america's now a global leader when it comes to taking serious action to fight climate change. frankly, approving this project would have undercut that global leadership. and that's the biggest risk we face. not acting. >> the president will now take that message to the upcoming global climate summit in paris in a few weeks. white house officials say it would have been very difficult for president obama to go to that summit having approved the keystone pipeline project. both the question behind keystone, transcanada, and the canadian government, expressed disappointment in the president's decision. jim accosta, cnn, the white house. you're watching "cnn newsroom." he is described as a soft-spoken and mellow person. something has made presidential candidate ben carson lose his cool. details on what that was as we continue around the world this hour. this guy from engineering says
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directv is so advanced that you could put tvs anywhere without looking at cable wires and boxes in every room. how are they always one step ahead of us? well, because their technology is far superior. or because they have someone on the inside. is that right, gil? sir, i would never... he's with them! he's wearing a wire. take off his shirt! take off his shirt! oh! ah! alright, i'm putting you in charge of the holiday party. (vo) get rid of cable and upgrade to directv. call 1-800-directv.
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welcome back to our viewers in the united states and around the world. you're watching "cnn newsroom." good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines we're following this hour -- new report indicate the black boxes from metrojet 9268 show that a bomb did bring down the plane. cnn affiliate france 2 says the recorder confirmed there was no accident. and no design of mechanical malfunction. the are the also says an airport worker may have placed the explosive on the plane. the presidents of taiwan and
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china shook hands before starting a historic meeting marking the first high-level contact between both sides since 1949. the summit in singapore is historic with the aim of prom e promoting peace. the world health organization is set to declare sierra leone ebola free. since the outbreak started nearly two years ago, there have been more cases of violence than its neighbors. ebola has killed thousands in the west african country. [ chanting ] >> reporter: and these protests in romania. in a fourth straight day, demonstrators there are calling for an end to government corruption. the protest vs. made an impact. the country's prime minister facing a corruption trial on wednesday.
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right into u.s. politics. republican presidential candidate ben carson is slamming cnn. an investigation that this network did which questioned the validity of claims about his own path. carson said that he is a violent -- was a violent teen, and he claimed that religion transformed him. several childhood friends told cnn they have no recollection of the incident that's carson described. on friday, carson called the report a witchhunts. he defended his claim of being offered a "full scholarship" to west point military academy. listen. >> there was an offer to me. it was specifically made -- >> was it -- >> i interpreted it as an offer. i made it very clear -- i don't remember the names of the people. it's almost 50 years ago. i bet you don't remember all the people you talked to 50 years ago.
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anyway, they told me this was available because of my accomplishment. >> mr. carson said that he turned the offer down to become a doctor. in any case, dr. ben carson is no stranger to making controversial comments here's more. >> reporter: i'm ben carson and candidate for president. >> reporter: from his first steps on the campaign trail, carson has fearlessly admitted -- >> there are a lot of policies that i lack knowledge of. it's a false narrative that you have to know everything. >> reporter: some of these past statements about what he does know are startling. on health care reform -- >> obamacare is is really the worst thing to happen to the nation since slavery. >> reporter: on religion -- >> i would not advocate that we put a muslim in charge of this nation. >> reporter: on how people should respond to a rampaging gunman -- >> i would not just stand there
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and let him shoot me. i would say, guys, everybody attack him. he may shoot me, but he can't get us all. >> reporter: even on the holocaust -- >> i think the likelihood of hitler being able to accomplish his goals would have been greatly diminished if the people had been armed. >> reporter: some of his statements are rooted in his faith and fly in the face of science. dismissing the big bang theory as pure fantasy, speculating about an alternative use for the great pyramids, long considered burial chambers. >> my own personal theory is thatgees ever built the -- that joseph built the pyramids in order to store grain. >> reporter: and his comment about homosexuality and incarceration much more explosive. >> a lot of people who go into prison go in straight, and when they come out they're gay. did something happen while they were in there? >> reporter: carson backed off within hours and apologized saying, "i do not pretend to know how every individual came to their sexual orientation." >> tom foreman reporting.
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dr. carson has repeatedly argued that his words are being deliberately misunderstood. carson and his fans often suggest that critics are overlooking the context and nuance in his statement. carson defends his description of his life story. he is seeing his poll numbers rise in the key nominating state of iowa. a cnn/orc poll shows carson has the support of 23% of likely republican iowa caucus-goers. a jump of 14% in august. he trails donald trump who has 25% and senator marco rubio rounds out the top three at 13%. among likely democratic caucuses, hillary clinton leads with 55%. senator bernie sanders has 37%. be sure to join cnn this weekend for the return of the great show "political man" with our own jonathan mann. a show that brings you the latest on the u.s. presidential race from the candidates'
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platforms to their political missteps. catch it all at 11:30 p.m. tonight, london time. we're also looking for your questions about u.s. politics. tweet them to politicalman or use the hash tag #answerman. jonathan mann will get to some of the questions and answers. we move to the u.s. state of louisiana. two police officers have been arrested in the fatal shooting of a 6-year-old boy this week. investigators say the boy was killed as these officers pursued his father's car on tuesday. the father is hospitalized. police officils had some harrowing words about the incident. listen. >> tonight is about the death of jeremy morris. jeremy morris, 6 years old. he didn't deserve to die like that. that's what's unfortunate. we took some of the body camera footage. let me tell you something -- i'm going to tell you this -- it is
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most disturb thing i've seen. i will leave it at that. >> 6-year-old boy shot and killed. the two officers are charged with second-degree murder. you're watching "cnn newsroom." the oath of office has been sworn. and the new leader gets down to work. we will introduce you to that other canadian named justin, now the most powerful man in the northern country. diabetes, steady is exciting. only glucerna has carbsteady, clinically proven to help minimize blood sugar spikes. so you stay steady ahead. well, right now you can get 15 gigs for the price of 10. that's 5 extra gigs for the same price. so five more gigs for the same price? yea, allow me to demonstrate. do you like your pretzel? yea. okay, uh, may i?
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welcome back. canada's new prime minister took the oath of office this week. justin trudeau is young, 43
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years old. some say inexperienced. he's from a powerful family and dpu up steeped in canadian politics. cnn's global affairs correspondent filed this introduction. >> reporter: justin trudeau is a relatively new face in canadian politics. one with a very popular last name. with a stunning victory in canada's recent general election trudeau ended a decade of conservative rule in canada. he was born in 1971 while his father, pierre, was prime minister. his popularity was so great it was dubbed "trudeau mania," compared even to john f. kennedy. when justin delivered a powerful eulogy at his father's funeral, it sparked talk of a political dynasty. he took his time getting into politics. trying his hand at acting, charity poxing, and even
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coaching bungee jumpers. after his father's death, he became more politically active, winning a seat in parliament in 2008. skeptics said he was too young and inexperienced to become prime minister. by all accounts, he ran a very impressive campaign sweeping the liberals to victory. for years, the prime minister kept the government running smoothly. kept taxes low and ran a robust foreign policy aimed at taking on terrorists. by contrast, trudeau is promising to pull out of counterterrorism in the middle east, restore ties with iran, and wants to bring 25,000 syrian refugees to canada. back home, the father of three intends to raise taxes on the wealthy and double spending on public infrastructure. he also plans to legalize marijuana and push a very aggressive climate change agenda. trudeau has shown he has the star power of his father.
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now he has to prove he has the political chops and ride the new wave of trudeau mania into opportunities for canada. >> that was our elise laughin' reporting from washington. a risky space walk outside the international space station took nearly eight hours to complete. two u.s. astronauts worked to repair a leaky ammonia cooling system on friday. it's been having problems since 2012. after restoring the system to its original configuration and refilling those ammonia tanks, they then inspected their spacesuit for toxic ammonia flakes. fortunately, they did not find any. nasa scientists have revealed some exciting news about the planet mars including what they believe led to drastic changes there over billions of years. cnn's rachel crane breaks it down for us. >> reporter: thanks to the space probe maven, we now have clues in the mystery of mars' shift from a warmer, wetter environment to the cold, dry
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desert it is today. maven has been exploring mars' atmosphere since 2014. one of its main goals is to figure out how and why it got so thin. this low high pressure atmosphere is comprised mostly of carbon dioxide will prevent fresh water from being present. it will boil at ten degrees celsius or 50 degrees fahrenheit on. earth, it boils at 212 degrees fahrenheit. and now, nasa scientists think they know the culprit -- solar winds. they observed a massive amount of ions and gases escaping during solar bursts like corrownal mass ejections. the prevalence and strength of bursts could have had a tremendous influence in the evolution of the martian environment and the thinning of the atmosphere. scientists also observed a unique type of aurora called the
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diffuse aurora in the northern hemisphere. particles collide with a planetary atmosphere along electromagnetic fields. they're not uncommon. in fact, they've been observed above all plan wets a substantial atmosphere -- planets with a substantial atmosphere, even moons. the aurora seen on mars was at the lowest altitude observed on any planet. the nuke characteristics of this aurora -- the unique cakes of this aurora may be determined by the different magnetic field configurations of the planet. as nasa gears up to send astronauts to mars in the 2030s, they hope to gain insights into the paths to give further information into the missions. are you watching "cnn newsroom." ahead, live from new york, u.s. presidential candidate donald trump will host "saturday night live" in the coming hours. his huge personality is no stranger to the show. we'll show you some of the parodies he was inspired by as we continue. woman: my mom and i have the same hands.
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same eyes. same laugh.
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and since she's had moderate alzheimer's disease, i've discovered we have the same fighting spirit, too. that's why i asked her doctor about new once-a-day namzaric™. vo: new namzaric is approved for moderate to severe alzheimer's disease in patients who are currently taking, and can continue to take certain doses of both namenda and donepezil. new namzaric is the first and only treatment to combine 2 proven alzheimer's medicines into a single once-a-day capsule that works 2 ways to fight the symptoms of moderate to severe alzheimer's disease. once-a-day namzaric may improve cognition and overall function and may slow the worsening of symptoms for a while. namzaric does not change how the disease progresses. it shouldn't be taken by anyone allergic to memantine, donepezil, piperidine or any of the ingredients in namzaric. before starting treatment, tell the doctor about any medical conditions they have... including heart or lung problems, seizures, stomach ulcers, bladder, kidney, or liver problems. tell the doctor if the patient will have any procedures involving anesthesia, which may cause muscle problems. other serious side effects may occur,
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including slow heartbeat and fainting; increased stomach acid, which may raise the chance of ulcers and bleeding; nausea and vomiting; difficulty passing urine, seizures, and worsening of lung problems. the most common side effects associated with namzaric are headache, diarrhea, dizziness, loss of appetite, and bruising. woman: mom and i share a lot of moments. and we're making the most of each one. vo: ask your doctor if new namzaric is right for your loved one. the james bond movie "spectre" is now out in wide release in much of the world. it is the most extensive film of the series. one of the reasons for that, it's the cars in the movie. besides 007's astin martin, it
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features dangerous looking jaguars. cnn checked them out. >> reporter: forget about sleek, sexy, and heroic. this car was designed to look menacing. this car is for a villain. meet jaguar cx75, the car used to chase down james bond in the film "spectre." jaguar isn't normally known for super cars, but it convinced director sam mendez that this bad boy concept car was the best choice for racing around rome. david fairbaren was in charge of delivering vehicles to the set and kept them looking pristine. these cars must have gotten really beat up when they were on the shoot. tell me how you made sure they were in good condition for all six weeks. >> for six weeks it was 24/7. we had a nighttime shift supporting the cars. then we had a daytime mechanics
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team that were repairing the cars when we came out and the production team went to bed. i would love to say we had so many cars come back damaged. we designed the vehicle to take various action scenes. we got them back in good condition. just a little service on them. we keep them and show them to the public. >> reporter: this particular model is called a hero. looks nice but doesn't move. it's just for closeup shots. the stunt cars do the action shots. the jaguar cx-75 was used to generate buzz around france, but you won't find it in a dealership. this is the first time jaguar has manufactured a car for a james bond film that will not go into regular production. same thing for 007's astin martin. both companies say these will remain as concept cars only. but insists that other vehicles on the market will incorporate some of their design features.
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cnn money, u.k. >> man, that is a slick car. all right. live from new york, u.s. presidential candidate donald trump is set to host the comedy sketch show "saturday night live." some people are not laughing. they in fact are calling for a boycot of the broadcast because of trump's controversial comments on immigration. mr. trump first hosted "snl" in 2004 when he launched his reality tv show, "the apprentice." his huge personality has inspired many parodies. >> you're fired. and live from new york, it's saturday night. >> you just watch what i do, and i think you'll be blown away. >> i think you're wearing more on your back than most people make in a year. isn't that weird? i just learned yesterday that my own taj mahal in atlantic city wasn't the first taj mahal. but i guarantee you it's the
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best. doesn't everyone show on television what you see every week by five billion people? i have a really great replacement. ladies and gentlemen, mr. darrell hammond. [ applause ] >> the keyboard -- huge. huge, huge. >> it's huge. >> it's huge. >> the ratings for tonight's debate are going to be huge. >> if i turn away from the camera, your ratings will drop five points. watch. [ laughter ] and boom, they're back. >> most of you know who i am already because i'm rich and handsome. first, nobody puts me on the spot. second, i could buy and sell you and your little freak show dog and pony act, whatever this is.
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i won't rule out a run, greta. especially the party that nominates a joke candidate. i might run as an independent. i could beat all them. there's a great american movie called "citizen cane." it's about a man who kicks [ bleep ] to make a ton of movie. i haven't seen the ending, but i assume it ends with him happy and president. i want to be your citizen trump. i don't say outrageous things just for poll numbers. i speak from my heart. >> really? okay, i hear your numbers go down a little this week. >> mexicans are stealing our children. >> whatever you say doesn't matter because i'm gold and you're losers. >> reporter: the many, many faces of donald trump. and we thank you for watching this hour. i'm george howell at the cnn center here in atlanta. for viewers in the united states, "new day" is next. for other viewers around the world, "amanpour" starts in a moment. thank you for watching cnn, the world's news leader.
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. it is the most disturbing thing i've seen. i will leave it at. that. >> emotional reaction to the fatal police shooting of a six-year-old boy, shot while still buckled in the front seat of his father's car. now, two officers are charged with murder. >> new this morning, a disturbing incident involving a british plane now t. pilot says the jet came within 1,000 feet of a rocket as it approached the same airport where metro jet 9268 took off from. >> and ben carson gets agitated with the mediave

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