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tv   New Day  CNN  November 10, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PST

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many call sare calling systemicm on campus. stephanie elam. >> reporter: the chips here began to fall very quickly. this morning, students at the university of missouri are waking up to a massive shake-up. one that activists say is just the beginning of change. the university system president and the school's chancellor ousted amid racial tensions and weeks of student-led protests. >> please use this resignation to heal, not to hate. >> this is just the beginning in aiding and dismantling systems of oppression within higher education, specifically the um system. >> reporter: effective immediately, the resignation of university president tim wolf who some say failed to adequately address several hate crimes on mizzou's campus.
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>> we didn't respond or react. >> reporter: wolf striking a different tone than the one captured in this tense exchange with students. >> it's because you don't believe that you have the equal opportunity to successfully -- >> you blame us for systemic oppression, tim wolf. >> reporter: even some long-time faculty say racism has been a problem on campus for years. >> i have been called the "n" word too many times to talk about it on camera and to write them all out. >> reporter: tensions reaching a boiling point around mid-september after the student body president posted on facebook that he was called the "n" word, something that happened, he wrote, multiple times on campus. then in mid-october, a swastika painted in feces inside one of the residence halls. by november, second graduate student jonathan butler launching a hunger strike, pledging not to eat until tim wolf resigned. >> a lot of people know how corrupt the system is. they thought i was going to die
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from day one. >> reporter: the football team and their coach also vowing to stay off the field until wolf agreed to step down. >> a young man's life was on the line. basically that's what it came down to. >> reporter: if you take a look behind me, you'll see the tent where students had been protesting had been playing but looking much more quiet this morning. now that many of their demands have been met, chris. >> at least the first, right? now we have to see what happens as a result of this. stephanie, thank you very much. let's discuss the implications and how we move forward. we have christine brennan, cnn contributor, friend of family, nischelle turner. not just an alumna of the university of missouri but "new day" and cnn as well. the president steps down. they say there will be changes. how big a move is this? what could it mean as a big step? >> i think it's a very big deal, chris. if anyone doubted the power of college sports on a campus, i
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don't think we will anymore. all this took was the football team saying they might not play a game and, boom, it's done in a day and a half? >> yes, that is exactly what happened. gary binkle, the head coach at missouri, veteran coach, been there since 2001, revered. he had the power. he had the confidence to be able to say, i stand with my team. it wasn't just these students athletes. that was a big deal. it was also their coach in his 60s saying i'm with the students. you had a united front in the most popular sport, the most popular team on campus, the team that wears missouri on its jerseys. that was a no brainer. i think a very big deal and it's almost like the 1960s have shown up again in terms of spoktrts, activism making a difference on college campus. >> not to mention money.
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there was a million bucks on the line. the president was tone deaf in that video when he basically seemed to blame the kids for systemic racism. you know the campus, let's talk about what happens on that campus. we have the student leader coming on this morning. his facebook post about being called the "n" word on campus was a flash point but is this -- how real is this? i had to call them alleged incidents this morning because they've never really been investigate by the school in any real way. what is the reality on that campus? >> well, you know, i think that unfortunately, peyton's reality is probably a real one for him. i never experienced that. not only graduated from the university of missouri, i grew up in columbia, missouri, never had that experience on campus. did i have that experience in the city? yes, i did. i was called the "n" word and have been before growing up there. i do think that that happens. i have heard of several
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incidents where it's happened. i've had friends that i went to school with that it's happened to. i do think that's a very real reality. if we're being honest, i've been trying to be honest, it's a school that i love and community that i just love. there's never been complete harmony between black and white students on the university of missouri campus, even when i was there almost 20 years ago. it's a very real thing. i think at that point to our detriment as students when i was on campus it was thought as this is just the way it is. kudos to these students for saying it may be the way it is but it shouldn't be and we're going to do something about it. >> you have some 35,000 kids on campus, a small population african-american. if you net it up with all diversity, you get to 15%. you're still dealing with a small ratio. why am i pointing out this statistic, christine? you want to figure out if it's just this campus, something isolated or is it something
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endemic to the education process? yale university, i went there. it was known back 75 years ago when i went about diversity and there are kids calling for the same things they were calling on the university of missouri about. i called some of the people still affiliated with yale. they say, yes, we do have these things. this happened at the fraternity, a black girl walked up there, she said it was white girls only tonight. the fraternity didn't have a great defense for it. what do you think this could mean projected out, christine? >> it's a great question, chris. i'm a northwestern grad. we are talking about 10%, 12%, 15% of our national average is african-american, somewhere in there, i believe. in some ways you want to reflect what's going on in the country but then of course that means you're reflecting some of the bad going on as well. and one would hope that of all
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places on earth, an institution of higher learning, 18 to 22, 23-year-olds and graduate students would be the one place we might find harmony and things working well. i think in many places it is. one of the things we see in sports, that's my area that i cover, is that every game, think of it, every sport you're watching you see athletes, black and white, male, female, working together. and for a common good. in the missouri case, especially, there's gary pinkel, a white man in his 60s agreeing with his athletes who i believe are about half and half, black and white. that's an important conversation. >> go ahead. >> chris, there is a problem at the school. just about a month ago, the dean of the journalism school came to los angeles and he and i had a meeting and we sat down and he laid out the fact that they have a serious diversity problem there. he felt like things needed to be done, needed to be different. asked for my help in trying to
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talk to minority students and help them feel better about their time on campus, bring more minority students there, because it is a problem at the university of missouri. it has been a problem. i was one of very few black students in the journalism school and when i was there. it has been a problem, it is a problem. this is actually when i first became aware of how bad it had gotten was over a month ago. it just -- it hurt my soul but then it also made me think maybe this is the time that change can start to happen when you really get to that point where you feel completely broken, that's when change starts to happen. maybe that's what's happening. >> let's see what happens and to be sure, your beautiful example of the potential of that university, the reputation of university of missouri is certainly strong regardless of this. let's see what happens next. nischelle turner, christine brennan, thank you. the gop candidates are preparing to face off for the
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fourth time at tonight's republican debate. donald trump sharpening some of his attacks on rivals ben carson and marco rubio. it's anybody's guess what might happen on that stage in milwaukee tonight. that's where we find cnn, live with a preview. dusting off the stage, making sure everything is ready to go. how are we looking? >> that's right, michaela. we've seen rumblings between the campaigns overnight there was really a big escalation in the war of words between the bush campaign and rubio campaign which sets the stage for potentially a fiery debate tonight. tonight's debate, a critical moment for candidates in the republican race to the white house. the main stage a bit roomier this time around, former arkansas governor mike huckabee and new jersey governor chris christie bumped off the main stage to the undercard debate. fewer people means more time for each gop hopeful. the network saying they'll allow
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the candidates to respond to each other's criticisms directly. >> this is a strange election, isn't it? >> reporter: going after dr. ben carson over questions about his violent past at his rally in illinois monday night. >> this is the only election in history where you're better off if you stab somebody. what are we coming to? people are getting away with murder. i never saw anything like this. you can say anything about anybody and their poll numbers go up. >> reporter: the billionaire taking on starbucks after they changed their holiday cups. >> maybe we should boycott starbucks. starbucks is taking myrrh ris christmas off. if i become president we'll all be saying merry christmas again. >> reporter: he attacked marco rubio's previous stance on immigration. >> i look at a guy like rubio who's very, very weak on illegal immigration. he was a member of the gang of eight. >> reporter: tonight, rubio may be forced once again to answer
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allegations of messy finances and other attacks coming from his mentor jeb bush. >> jeb bush telegraphed that marco rubio has a target on his back and he's going to be coming after him. >> reporter: fox business, the host of tonight's debate, hoping to draw sharp contrast to cnbc, taking a jab at the previous moderators saying they never really asked real questions. >> i'm not so sure the personal attacks that we're looking for will be there because i'm not sure they will be provided, necessarily. >> reporter: according to "the new york times," the jeb bush super pac is threatening to line up big money as much as $20 million to invest into attacking marco rubio's record. the rubio campaign overnight already responding, questioningly, almost mockingly, how is this the kind of joyful campaign jeb claims he wanted to run? >> it will be fight an interesting night. we'll check back with you later. you can of course be sure to
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tune in tonight, 11:00 p.m. eastern for all of the cnn post-debate analysis, anderson cooper and the best political team around. there's mounting concern this morning about the vetting process of airport employees here in the u.s. following the crash of the russian metrojet flight. authorities are investigating whether an airport insider planted a bomb on that plane. u.s. officials trying to address security gaps at our nation's airports. rene marsh with the latest. >> reporter: at this point, alisyn, we know that the department of homeland security is specifically focused on those overseas airports with direct flights to the united states. airports in places like cairo, kuwait city as well as ahman. but officials here in the united states are sounding the alarm about potential issues that potential insider threat at our own airports, domestic airports. i spoke with one official who says we don't know enough about the close to 1 million airport
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workers right here in the united states. another u.s. official told me that the information collected to vet these airport workers is about the same and equivalent to what a passenger would submit for security clearance for precheck. take a listen to one congressman who's extremely concerned. >> we don't know enough about them. it's troubling that you don't even have the basic biographical data on some of these employees. that has to change. >> he authored legislation which would, number one, increase the number of random checks on these airport workers when they arrive at work as well as do recurring background checks and pass the house. it still has not passed the senate. back to you, chris. >> this new sense of urgency at
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the tsa is a reflection of what happened with the metrojet crash in the sinai. samples of debris have been flown to moscow for analysis. here's the caveat. russian investigators warn it may take weeks or months to conclusively determine what brought the plane down in that peninsula. isis claims its affiliate in the sinai did it in retaliation for russian air strikes in iraq and syria. breaking development overnight, an arrest in the shooting of a texas state judge, a person of interest in the case is now behind bars, taken into custody on unrelated charges. ed lavandera following developments live. what was the arrest under? >> reporter: it is a fugitive warrant that was executed last night in the city of houston, a law enforcement source telling us that this arrest was made late last night. so far, we have not been able to get a name of this person that is being interviewed by
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investigators there. we are told that this is simply described as a person of interest by austin police department officials. and that is because this person has not yet been criminally charge. the law enforcement source, michaela, does tell us there is a connection between this person and judge julie kocurek, the judge shot at friday night as she was returning to her home in her driveway after coming home from a high school football game. this is a case that's really rocked the legal community here in houston. many of her family and colleagues and friends have been saying for the last several days they were convinced that this was a planned, targeted attack based on the work she does here in austin. alisyn? >> ed, thanks so much for all of that. a federal appeals court dealing a decisive blow to president obama's immigration plans. in a 2-1 ruling, the 5th circuit court of new orleans upheld a lawsuit brought by 26 states blocking the president's move to provide up to 5 million immigrants with work permits and
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protection from deportation. the judges ruled that the challenge by the states was likely to succeed in court. all right. here comes the fourth republican debate. sure to be on the agenda, ben carson's past and donald trump's reaction to it. take a listen. >> if you try and hit your mother over the head with a hammer, your poll numbers go up. i never saw anything like it. >> is it that simple? what's really going on there? we have a complete debate, preview for you, ahead. in panama, which is a city of roughly 2 million people, we are having 5,000 new cars being sold every month. this is a very big problem for us with respect to fast and efficient transportation. it's kind of a losing proposition to keep going this way.
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this is a strange election, isn't it? man! you stab somebody and the newspapers say you didn't do it. and you say, yes, i did, i did it! no, you didn't. this is the only election in history where you're bet are off if you stabbed somebody.
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what are we coming to? >> that was donald trump expressing bafflement at this interesting election. what happens tonight when the republicans face off in tonight's debate? let's ask columnist for the daily beast, patricia murphy and cnn political commentator and political anchor at new york one, errol louis. that was a funny pot calling kettle moment where donald trump can't believe this election, it's curiouser and curiouser. what will happen tonight? will the stories and anomalies in ben carson's stories, will someone raise those or not? >> well, first of all, it is undeniably absurd that people are now in the position of saying i won't vote for you until you can admit and prove that you stabbed somebody. it is absurd. on the other hand, telling the truth, which is really what this is about is more important and more serious. i suspect it may come up but frankly, a lot of the most
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recent records, i got an e-mail from armstrong williams who you had on the show yesterday explaining what happened at yale. i'm not going to take time to go down that rabbit hole. >> i read it. it is fascinating. there was a parody about whether or not they had to retake a t t test. most of the kids recognized it as a parody. he did not recognize it was a parody. he showed up. it might show his honesty or discipline or it might show he didn't get the joke. >> his account was accurate. when people start to go down -- along this narrative of saying he's not telling the truth about his past, sometimes he is and sometimes it doesn't really matter. i think that's probably a case where it doesn't really matter. i suspect a lot of it is going to get swept away and they'll settle for attacking the media, which is a pretty reliable applause line in these debates.
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>> let's talk about what it really is about. one suggestion would be these candidates may say they hate this line of questioning but they're more comfortable with it and engendering it than talking about the actual policies they say they want in the debate tonight. what do you expect as a course of dialogue? >> i expect the moderators for fox business will take a different path than the cnbc moderators did. i think if personal attacks come up or questions about people's past or personal indiscretions or personal stories they've been telling, i think that will be candidate to candidate attacks. i think these moderators will keep it on jobs, the economy and topics we saw that didn't come up in it the last debate. i don't think we'll hear a whole lot about fantasy football. we'll hear about taxes, jobs, the economy. with donald trump on the stage, anything could happen and with ben carson scooting away from him in some of the national polls, trump is starting to hit the panic button a little bit. other candidates are starting to panic, a little bit about marco rubio's momentum. these candidates have got to land punches in this debate.
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the moderators probably won't do it but i would not be surprised to see other candidates go after each other. >> want to talk about the numbers? >> yes. there's an interesting maris poll that talks about trustworthiness. the supporters, the voters of ben carson do not have any problem with the discrepancies in his personal story. they don't really believe there are discrepancies. look at this new maris/mcclatchy poll. the more you hear, the more you like, ben carson is way out in front. 67%. the more they learn about him, the more they like him. >> they also knew the least about him to start with. >> but they like what they know and hear. >> that's right. look, that speaks i think in part to his presentation, bedside manner comes in handy. he knows how to soothe people. he's done it for many decades. he projects confidence, authority and compassion. and this is what people like. people respond to it, no question about it.
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the problem for the more abrasive candidates, the more you hear about bush, the less the voters like him. the more you hear from -- >> he's not abrasive. the more you hear about bush the less you like because of something else. >> he got snippy in the last debate when he was going after rubio. it was kind of a sourness. it was not what you want to see. you want to see sunny optimism. he calls himself the hopeful turtle or something like that. which doesn't necessarily connect with people. what we've got where people who once you're in that negative feedback loop, think of what a terrible position it puts you in. it means every day you're going out knowing that you're undoing sales, turning people off. you either have to get a complete re-adjustment and rethink the whole project or you have to try some new strategy which perhaps we'll see tonight in the debate. >> what do you see? i've been slow on talking about jeb too much because he's not registering in the election. when you're covering something, you want to talk about where the momentum us.
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now there's news his pac will come out with attack ads against marco rubio. what do you see in that dynamic with what needs to happen, patricia? >> jeb bush needs to do something big tonight. when he flubbed a couple of attacks from the last debate, we heard from some of his donors that said i am not comfortable with his performance. he has hit the reset button a little bit. those numbers when you have people who the more they find out about you, the less they like you, and jeb bush who had the highest name i.d. and the more people find out about him, he's the least liked candidate when you apply that measurement. he was the candidate advertising the most. voters are hearing more about him and liking him less. and to errol's point, a candidate starts to get up in their head at this point, instead of being yourself, you want people to like you, please your donors. it's such an ugly dynamic for jeb bush. he needs to strip away all of
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these dynamics and go out there and be himself. i don't think voters know who that is. if he can't get to who that person is very, very soon, he'll have serious, serious troubles with donors who would rather back a winner than back a bush. >> maybe even tomorrow. very, very soon like maybe -- >> absolutely. >> errol, i want to talk to you about what the fbn moderators need to do. after the v >> they have to do better. they got so much heat in the last debate, this is almost a guaranteed win. >> does it have a chilling effect in that they have to parse every question so safelily and make sure they just stick to the topics. don't ask ben carson about his past, don't ask marco rubio about his checkbook because they might be accused of going after them. >> i suspect that the moderators and the producers are going to try to make sure that we in the business, meaning other moderators, other news organizations, don't come after them.
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what the candidates do, candidates will do whatever they do. they'll attack the press. we know they'll attack the media. but i think they want to do is make sure they're asking serious questions, that they're properly asked, managing the time properly. that's important. not giving somebody 30 seconds to explain the most important thing in their life. let them talk. >> there's a time limit. there's a 90-second time limit. >> i've done dozens and dozens of debates, including statewide ones, including with your brother. you use it as a guideline. you don't jump in as if they're trying to sort of cheat you or something like that. it's just -- we're giving you 90 seconds, if you take 100 seconds to make your point, that's fine. people who know how to manage time should let a conversation happen. that's what the viewers want. when they start jumping in, buzzers start ringing, they are cutting each other off. that's when you lose the debate and get criticized. >> it's about them.
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you can't control the candidates. to be fair to c in hbc, the question that started all of this to senator cruz where he went on his rant about the media was about fiscal policy. the question was about fiscal policy. he didn't answer it. he decided to go on this rant and that ignited that debate. we'll see what happens tonight. that's the nice part. once it happens, then we'll know for sure. patricia murphy, thank you. errol louis as well. what's your take on what you want to see happen tonight? tweet us using #newdaycnn. or post your question on facebook.com/newday. analysis tonight at 11:00 p.m. with anderson cooper. have you seen this crazy video, a dramatic police chase caught on video. a suspect in a stolen vehicle slamming her car into a police
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a big shake-up at the university of missouri, the chancellor announcing that he's stepping down at the end of the year after racial tensions erupting on campus. that announcement coming hours after tim wolf, president of the whole university system, announced that he, too, was resigning. the football team returns to practice today. they had refused to take the field until the president, tim wolf, resigned. classes will be held as usual today on the campus of spartanburg methodist college in south carolina despite a deadly shooting monday. authorities say a campus police officer investigating a vehicle break-in shot and killed a man who hit him with a car as he tried to flee. they say the officer opened fire out of fear for his life. the shooting prompted a
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temporary campus-wide lockdown. we're learning more about the shootout in louisiana that claimed the life of a 6-year-old autistic boy. a source close to the investigation tells cnn that the deputies saw a physical fight between the dad, chris few and his girlfriend outside of a bar. they say the dad then took off in an suv. but few's lawyers tell the associated press a police body camera shows chris few with his hands up as the officers fired into the car killing his son. the two officers are being held on $1 million bond. a dramatic car chase unfolding in oklahoma. an officer in pursuit of a stolen vehicle. he gets out of his car, the other driver plows into him. enough explaining from me. watch this video. it's all caught on the officer's body camera. >> stop, stop! >> caught on tape, dramatic video of a high-speed chase near an elementary school in tulsa, oklahoma. body cam footage capturing the shocking moments the suspect in
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a stolen vehicle rammed her car into a police officer's patrol car friday afternoon. >> stop, stop! >> the video shows patrol officer matt stacey pulling over to lay down tire spikes but the white suv shows no sign of stopping, accelerating towards stacey and nearly 50 miles per hour. >> stop, stop! >> this officer had to make his decision in less than three seconds what he was going to do. >> the video shows him get back up in pursuit of stacey ann buncy. >> this footage from another officer's body cam shows stacey buncy popping out through the sun roof, ignoring police and yelling obscenities. >> do not move your hand. >> miraculously, officer stacey walking away from the incident with the minor cuts and bruises. >> stop, stop! >> it was pretty wild. it's really amazing that he
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didn't get injured severely. >> oh, my gosh. this is what police have to deal with all the time. you never know what is behind her erratic behavior. >> she took the taser, too. there was obviously something that was changing. >> she parentally pulled into the parking lot of the elementary school at one point. >> it's not that random. one happened on monday. we just reported on it before this story. it's a window into how compressed the time frame is. >> it happens so quickly. >> why didn't he run away, why didn't he do that? he had a split second to figure it out. >> absolutely. they do have to make decisions in a split second. this is what we ask of our law enforcement officers. >> oh, my gosh. litany of charges. what was really motivating her behavior? if it turns out she was an addict, unstable, does she get treated the way everybody else does? yes, right now. is that the right way to handle
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these conversations? bigger conversation. new concerns over an insider security threat. 900,000 workers with unfettered access at america's airports. how vulnerable are we when when fly? we take a closer look, ahead on "new day." the best of everything is even better during red lobster's ultimate seafood celebration
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i want to be very clear that we condemn in the strongest terms palestinian violence against innocent israeli citizens. and i want to repeat once again that it's my strong belief that israel has not just the right but the obligation too protect itself. >> president obama and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu face a meeting face to face at the white house for the first time in more than a year and the first time since the iran nuclear deal. let's talk about this and so much more with senator chris coons. he's a democrat from delaware and a member of the foreign relations committee. thank you for being here on "new day." >> thank you, alisyn. >> what do you think came out of this meeting yesterday? >> i think this was a positive opportunity for president obama and prime minister netanyahu on the world stage to set straight on the record, there are many
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who suggests that strong disagreements over the iran nuclear deal may have permanently frayed the u.s./israel relationship. nothing could be farther from the truth. the meeting between obama and netanyahu yesterday reinforced our strong, deep and lasting relationship. it's stronger than even an important tactical disagreement. they got to work on the important business of making sure the iran deal is fully and forcefully implemented and of working together to ensure israel's qualitative military advantage. >> you're right, obviously israel is a deep and strong ally of the u.s. however, it's no secret there have been personal issues between president obama and netanyahu. do you think that somehow relations are improving? >> yes, i think they are. i do think there hasn't been great chemistry between the two national leaders but the relationships between our defense and intelligence communities and the long and deep relationships between the peoples of our countries, i think will support and sustain
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the working relationship between obama and netanyahu. >> senator, let's talk about our national security. in light of what happened with russian metrojet, the crash there, there is a new look at the 900,000 airport workers. that number is staggering. who knew we had 900,000 airport workers here in the u.s. and their unfettered access to our airplanes. are you worried that something could happen and sneak on board a u.s. airline given that there are so many people connected to -- as we said, the unfettered access at our airports? >> i do think we have to be constantly vigilant. i think we are fortunate that we haven't had a major terrorist incident that's brought down an american plane in the last decade. that's not for a lack of trying by those who would do us harm. we are fortunate to have a strong and robust tsa system but it's got some challenges. given what happened in sharm el sheikh, given the russian plane
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brought down over the sinai, we need to redouble our efforts. i've traveled through the middle east and africa. in some parts of the world, the security standards aren't as ours. the american people need to understand the inconvenience and hassle we all go through when we get on an airplane is for good reason and we have to make sure we secured the perimeters of our airports and taken a hard second look at everyone who has access to an airplane. >> redouble our efforts. you mean here at home, you are concerned about an insider threat? or you're concerned about airports in other countries? >> i'm much more concerned about airports in other countries. the standards are more lax in some countries around the world and that would make it ease jer to get something on to a plane that then ultimately would be in american air space or might be carrying americans. i do think generally we do a strong job in the united states. but there's been some recent studies that suggest there's room for improvement. i have confidence in our homeland security secretary, in
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the tsa but there's always room for improvement. given the number of folks who work in our airports, given the number of flights every day, i think we have to be -- we have to be concerned and we have to be vigilant. >> let's talk about presidential politics. i know you were and are a big joe biden supporter. you were hoping that he would run. now that the vice president has decided not to get in the race, have you decided whether or not you will support one of the other democratic candidates? >> i have. that's right, alisyn. i'm a big joe biden fan and supporter. i was hopeful he would be running for president. i think his voice for our middle class has been unequalled. but i think he's made the right choice for his family. i've had a number of conversations with hillary clinton's policy folks and yesterday i spent some time speaking directly with secretary clinton. traveled together and worked together in my first few years in the senate and across a wide range of issues from college access to manufacturing, from foreign policy to leadership.
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i'm thrilled to be endorsing her today in her run for president. >> that's good news, senator. i mean, that is news i should say. >> that is news. i haven't made the announcement before now. >> thanks for sharing it with "new day." you are officially endorsing hillary clinton. why not bernie sanders? >> you know, bernie, i riched out to bernie and i hope to talk with him in person about it today. i think senator sanders has conducted himself really well in this campaign. he's got some strong ideas. he's got a great record. i like bernie personally. but i just think we need an economic message of optimism and that focuses on growth as well as one that looks with a clear eye about some of the issues of income inequality that bernie has raised. there are folks i'm close to in my community and extended family who are big supporters of bernie sanders. i frankly think that secretary clinton will make the stronger president. i have a closer, longer relationship with her and i'm optimistic that she can win in
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the general election and lead our country well. >> senator chris coons, thanks so much for sharing your endorsement news on "new day." great to talk to you this morning. >> thank you. >> let's get to chris. we go from governing to politics. let's talk truth about what will make a politician pop at the debate tonight. there's no secret about what works and what does not. we will have the strategies laid out for you by those who know, next. no matter how fast the markets change, at t. rowe price, our disciplined investment approach remains. we ask questions here. look for risks there. and search for opportunity everywhere. global markets may be uncertain. but you can feel confident in our investment experience... ... around the world. call a t. rowe price investment specialist, or your advisor... ...and see how we can help you find global opportunity. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. i'm mary ellen, and i quit smoking with chantix. i have smoked for thirty years and by taking chantix,
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the fourth republican presidential debate is tonight. many are wondering how fox business moderators are going to handle it. you'll recall after the last gop debate candidates complained there were too many gotcha questions. i want to bring in frank sesno, and brian 1:teltors.
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i know we hear buzz from the moderators in advance of the debate. the moderators want to be invisible, stay out of way. what is your best advice for them tonight? >> don't be fight that invisible. my advice for them is exactly what they're saying. i think they're right on it, do the job that cnbc should have done, focus on the issues, go for your expertise, be the person getting the candidates to talk to one another, not to talk to you. keep the focus on the things that the network is all about, that the candidates disagree about, the economy, job, taxes, sizable government, right down the middle. >> easy as pie. sounds easy to do. you've had a chance to talk to maria. how is she feeling? what's her game plan for tonight? >> the best moderators make it
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look easy though it's very, very hard. bartiromo told me yesterday she's been in debate prep sessions but she's not changing the strategy on how well it didn't go with cnbc. the goal is always to make this about the viewers and the voters. that sounds easy. it's actually very hard. she also said she agrees with president obama. remember two weeks ago at a democratic fund-raiser obama said if these republicans candidates can't handle the cnbc moderators, how are they going toen hand to handle china and russia? if the candidates do cry foul and accuse the moderators of media bias, even on a fox stage, i have a feeling the moderators will come back with a good response. >> what do you think will happen? are they going to avoid or head on address some of the controversies, whether it's rubio's credit cards or ben carson's violent pass? do you think they'll skirt
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around it or use the tactic of allowing the other candidates -- >> they won't start with the issues, whether they get to them at all or not is another matter. it will start with the substance, then the candidates won't be able to say, look, you haven't talked about the substance because if you get to the controversy, you get to that later. that's where it belongs. if they get to the controversy based on what maria said publicly, they will set the candidates up to take one another on. by the way, the candidates have shown no reluctance to do that. it's getting fight direct and nasty out there. it's not about the moderators. it's about the candidates dealing with the issues. what does george bush say about marco rubio's credit card. >> think about this. number four in for the gop candidates. they've had a chance, right, each time the number is getting slimmer, we only have eight candidates on the stage tonight. they're getting more practice, a little more rehearsal about how this goes. a chance to react to how the
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conversation in america is going post-debate. the moderators as well, too, these guys have a chance to learn from everybody else's mistakes, missteps and also from their successes. brian? >> it's also very personal by the way. some of maria bartiromo recently left cnbc. everybody seemed to agree the debate was disappointing. they've had time to prepare and they want to have a contrast to the past debate. it is personal for them. >> we know substance will be key tonight, frank. obviously. we also know that often times in these debates, people want to make a name for themselves. who are you watching to see if they get some traction tonight? >> first of all, i'm not going to make a name for myself. i think i said george bush when i meant jeb bush. >> that's all right. >> the candidates have to stand on their own. ted cruz has to show that he's not just out there to attack the
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media. marco rubio has to show that his personal past overcomes the way he would manage the nation's finances. donald trump has seen numbers slip. ben carson has been under attack for how he went to school and whether he stabbed a friend. whether and how they go after the substance, they will, they also all have to pop through and in some cases counter the narrative they've encountered on the trail. time is running out. they're now only eight of them up there. this is musical chairs and the music stops at some point and what is this national primary we're experiencing. it's fight extraordinary. >> it is extraordinary special when you think about the topic of whether somebody stabbed their friend as a child is coming up in a presidential debate. my goodness. what times we are in. frank sesno, brian te thank you. we're following a lot of news. as always, let's getting right to it. >> the economic debate we were supposed to have, i think we'll have it. >> everyone tell mez rubio is a
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wonderful speaker. really? jeb bush. i don't mention him anymore. he's not working out. >> jeb bush telegraphed that marco rubio has a target on his back. >> this is just the beginning of aiding and dismantling systems of oppression. >> i didn't look at consequences. it was about helping my players. >> the harder we fight, the greater the reward. >> we never ever would have thought anything like this would be going on to this magnitude. >> this has become something everybody was doing. people make mistakes. it's a big mistake. >> do i think parents should be very concerned? absolutely, yes. this is "new day" with chris cuomo, alisyn camerota and michaela pereira. and good morning, welcome back to your "new day." the spotlight willing on ben carson tonight when republicans gather in milwaukee for the fourth gop debate. carson is neck and neck with donald trump in the latest national polls. and of course as you know, he's
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facing scrutiny as the media digs into several stories about his childhood and his past. >> trump is an interesting study in what's going on. he's marveling at how bizarre the election has been. though he is certainly a big reason for the unique nature of this campaign thus far. he's also baffled that his negative attacks seem to be helping opponents in the polls. that said, it does seem the time for negative attacks may have arrived on the stage tonight. let's go live to milwaukee and bring in cnn's reporter. what is the prediction tonight? is it like clubber lang would say, pain? >> well, chris, we already are seeing rumblings between a few of of the campaigns today. there was really an escalation in the war of words between the bush campaign and the rubio campaign overnight. which certainly sets the stage for what could be a fiery debate. tonight's debate, a critical moment for candidates in the republican race to the white
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house. the main stage a bit roomier this time around, former arkansas governor mike huckabee and new jersey governor chris christie bumped off the main stage to the undercard debate. fewer people means more time for each gop hopeful. the network saying they'll allow the candidates to respond to each other's criticisms directly. >> this is a strange election, isn't it? >> reporter: donald trump giving an early indication he may not be so nice with his chief rival, going after dr. ben carson over questions about his violent past at his rally in illinois monday night. >> this is the only election in history where you're better off if you stabbed somebody. what are we coming to? people are getting away with murder. i never saw anything like this. you can say anything about anybody and their poll numbers go up. >> reporter: the billionaire taking on starbucks after they changed their holiday cups. >> maybe we should boycott starbucks. starbucks is taking merry christmas off. no more merry christmas. if i become president we'll all be saying merry christmas again.
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>> reporter: trump also had guns ablazing for senator marco rubio and his previous stance on immigration. >> i look at a guy like rubio who's very, very weak on illegal immigration. he was a member of the gang of eight. >> reporter: tonight, rubio may be forced once again to answer allegations of messy finances and other attacks coming from his mentor jeb bush. >> jeb bush telegraphed that marco rubio has a target on his back and he's going to be coming after him. >> reporter: fox business, the host of tonight's debate, hoping to draw sharp contrast to cnbc, taking a jab at the previous moderators saying they never asked real questions. the network instead promising a real debate on the economy. >> i'm not so sure the personal attacks that we're looking for will be there because i'm not sure they will be provided, necessarily. >> reporter: the main debate will be two hours long. in a change for tonight, the candidates will also have 60 seconds to respond to any attacks made against them. alisyn, that's double the amount since the last debate. >> okay. that's interesting we'll be
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looking for that tonight. thanks so much, sumlin. we have senator danes, one of three senators who have endorsed senator marco rubio already for president. hi, senator. your tie looks fantastic. >> good morning. >> good morning to you. great to have you here on "new day." are you expecting tonight's debate to be feisty or tame? >> well, i think one thing we know about marco rubio is these day baits, t debates, the more people hear marco rubio, the more they like him. i'm sure there will be moments of contrast and very, very spirited. i'm looking for a chance for the candidates to lay out their vision for a future. for marco rubio to talk about what we need in the next century in america and protect the next generation of the country. >> there was a tense exchange last time between marco rubio and the man that some call his mentor, jeb bush. i want to read to you something
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"new york times" in the this morning. there's an excerpt from an article about how jeb bush's supporters are feeling about marco rubio. here's what it says. for many of mr. bush's longest serving advisers, mr. rubio's run is a betrayal, a few of mr. bush's supporters have taken to calling mr. rubio judas. do you think that resonates with people that he should be running against his mentor. >> the american people don't want to hear the attacks on candidates. they want to hear about the future. marco rubio is a next generation conservative. he inspires and unites this country. that's what the american people are looking for. >> donald trump does not understand the interest in marco rubio or the support of marco rubio, he says. let me play for you what he has just said about senator rubio. >> remember when he was doing the message to the president, remember the thing with the water? this guy gets the greatest
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press. man is he sweating. then all of a sudden, we will fight and we will this. and then they said he did such a great job. oh, he did? some people are lucky or something's going on. or something's going on. explain it to me. >> donald trump wants you to explain it to him. in the past, donald trump has also basically likened senator rubio to president obama, saying that senator rubio don't have much experience either. so explain why you're all in for rubio. >> he is the next generation conservative, will inspire, unite this nation. the more american people hear marco rubio, the more they like him, they like what he says. every time we have a debate, look at the post-debate polls, marco rubio's stock is rising. that's why the attacks are out there against marco rubio. they know he'll be the strongest candidate in the general election and will likely be our
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next president. he has such a great story. his dad was a bartender, his mom was a hotel maid, worked third shift stocking shelves at k-mart. marco rubio understands the plight of american families, the challenges they face every day. the more they hear about marco, the more they like him. >> i believe we do have the marist poll, showing when asked among republican voters which candidate -- the more you hear, the more you like. the very phrase you're using. he comes in there third. he gets -- actually, i think that he might get -- it's hard for me to see. he's second, 58% over donald trump, second only to carson. but i want to ask you about the questions revolving around senator rubio's personal finances. as you know, he's been bedeviled by questions about whether or not he can manage his own money. he has credit card debt. he's talked about this on the campaign trail. do you think that average voters will respond to that? they can relate to having credit
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card debt and having to save for your churn's college or do you think it does say something about him and his ability, if you can't manage your own personal finances, you can't manage the country's finances? >> these are old attacks that have been dismissed repeatedly. marco released two years of old credit card records and "the washington post" looked them over and said there's nothing there. so what it says, though, marco rubio can relate to the average american family. he's not a wealthy man. dad bartender, mom hotel maid. he has four kids and he's fighting like american families fight every day for a better future for his kids and for this country. marco rubio by the way, has no debt other than his mortgage, just like many americans who have a house mortgage. so i think marco rubio can relate, can relate to the american people, to the american families better than any candidate we have running for president. >> senator, do you think it would be out of bounds for the moderators to ask about personal
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issues like this? president of the united states quarterback your entire life is exposed. marco knows that. he ran for the u.s. senate. all these issues were litigated and thoroughly reviewed when he ran for the united states senate six years ago. but i hope they can stay focused on who is going to be the next generation leader for this country. who's got the best ideas, the best vision to grow this economy again and defend our country. there are very, very serious issues here. why are we spending time looking at a few hundred dollar charges on marco rubio's credit cards that have all been paid off versus looking at the trillions of dollars of debt right now, the nice's credation's credit c is sitting at $18 trillion worth of debt, which is slowing this economy. >> thank you. >> good to be here. tonight, watch cnn at 11:00 p.m. eastern for post-debate coverage. sweeping changes at the
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university of missouri this morning. the latest we have the school's president and chancellor, stepping down. what will this mean for students? protesters say change is at the top are a big first step. but it's only one step. it happens to be one not everyone wanted. let's check in with cnn's stephanie elam live from the university of missouri. stephanie, what do we know about how this started? these incidents that went unreported? what was the nature of them? the volume of them? >> reporter: well, chris, when you listen to what the students are saying you hear different complaints about what was wrong. what they were calling for is the figure heads to step down. the issue the racism and be it institutionalized racism is far from over here at mizzou. this morning, students at the university of missouri are waking up to a massive shake-up.
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the university system president and the school's chancellor ousted amid racial tensions and weeks of student-led protests. >> please use this resignation to heal. not to hate. >> this is just the beginning in aiding and dismantling systems of oppression within higher education, specifically the um system. >> reporter: effective immediately, the resignation of university president tim wolf who some say failed to adequately address several hate crimes on mizzou's campus. >> we didn't respond or react. >> reporter: wolf striking a different tone than the one captured in this tense exchange with students. >> systemic oppression is because you don't believe you have the equal opportunity to be successful. >> did you just blame us for systemic oppression, tim wolf? >> reporter: even some long-time faculty say racism has been a problem on campus for years. >> i have been called the "n" word too many times to talk about it on camera and to write them all out. >> reporter: tensions reaching a boiling point around mid-september after the student
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body president posted on facebook that he was called the "n" word, something that happened, he wrote, multiple times on campus. then in mid-october, a swastika painted in feces inside one of the residence halls. by november, second graduate student jonathan butler launching a hunger strike, pledging not to eat until tim wolfe resigned. >> a lot of people know how corrupt the system is. they thought i was going to die from day one. from the moment i made my announcement, people thought i was a dead man walking. >> reporter: the football team and their coach also vowing to stay off the field until wolfe agreed to step down. >> a young man's life was on the line. basically that's what it came down to. >> reporter: if you take a look behind me, you'll see the tents where some of the student activists have been camping out. we are told there are some students sleeping out here. they did get a big help from the
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football team. people respond to what the football players have to say. them weighing in and getting the support of their coach, making a big difference in some change here at mizzou. >> that was a bold move. obviously it made a difference. we'll talk with one of the student leaders right here on "new day," coming up. another big story we've been following, a break for law enforcement in the shooting of a texas state judge outside of her home in austin last week. a person of interest has been arrested on unrelated charges but is connected with judge julie kocurek. police believe that judge may have been targeted. a fraternity at the university of virginia filing a $25 million defamation suit against rolling stone for the now debunked article detailing an alleged gang rape on campus. no comment yet from "rolling
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stone." president obama giving a great big like to facebook. he's posting things like this fun little video. >> there's a fox somewhere on the ground because i've seen it. it's wandered around the oval office. there's a hawk that some kids named lincoln who flies around here. >> that's going to go viral. he went on to encourage everyone to protect the environment, mentioning the dangers of climate change. the president says he wants his account to be a place where he can have real conversations with you. >> does that mean i'm going to get farmville invitations from president obama on facebook? >> i hope not. >> you know what i'm saying. >> he's wrong -- >> you should immediately freeze the screen. you don't believe there's a fox on there? >> i believe there's a fox and a bird named lincoln. what i don't believe is social media is good for real conversations. that's the one thing it's not good for. >> if he has a shot at it, facebook is the place. >> yes. >> it does give you direct
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contact. >> i like this. >> i like this, too. sorry you had to get in the middle of all that. >> i love all of it. >> we have been having a conversation about this top story. we'll talk to a student who the brought attention to the university of missouri's racial issues. that's next. what makes this simple salad the best simple salad ever? heart healthy california walnuts. the best simple veggie dish ever? heart healthy california walnuts.
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and let's move forward together for a brighter tomorrow. >> ex-president wolfe there, the former president of of the university of missouri, the chancellor also stepping down as well in the wake of protests over alleged racist incidents on campus. peyton head is the president of the missouri students association, some 27,000 depend upon his leadership. he joins us now. he's one of the students that led the charge for change. peyton, thank you for joining us on "new day." >> thank you for having me. >> pleasure. the president is gone, the chancellor will transition. >> yes. >> what does this mean for you in terms of the prospect for change? >> i think the process of change is coming. the prospects of change are already here. what's most immediate right now is caring for the students and their mental and social health right now. which is definitely draining. that's one of the things we were trying to address on this campus right now. we are meeting with student
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leaders across the state to look at the policies of shared governance to talk about what the next leaders of our university and university of missouri system will be looking like. >> in the introduction i may have heard i said alleged incidents. that's because, frankly, many of these have not been investigated. you spoke openly about what happened to you, what you were called on campus more than once. you also eloquently talked about different types of diversity and how they can be compromised on campus. you mentioned your mother and lgbt issues as well. what do you know about the actual facts on the ground, on that campus, about things that have happened that the university was aware of and did not act on? >> i think one of the things we have to make sure we're looking at is the experiences of these students. i mean, i don't have the time to sit around and make up things that are happening to me. you saying these things are
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allegedly we don't have the time for that. we are students first and foremost. i need to be receiving my education and these things are blocking students from receiving an adequate education here at the university of missouri system. when we're talking about different things that have happened on this campus, they are evident. we see a swastika drawn not once but twice on this campus. the second time out of feces. that is not something you can say is alleged, sir. >> i agree with you 150%. i'm saying the university doesn't have a good catalog of actions it's taken. that's why i'm saying it's alleged. we only know from people like you that come forward and say it, not that it didn't happen, but they weren't acted upon. my business in the media is populated with tons of alumni from there because it's such an esteemed place. to hear you got called the "n" word and nothing happened is shocking. to what do you account that? >> i think one of the biggest
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things that is the problem is that we see students time and time again talk about these issues. the biggest thing for me as a student body president, i am trying to be pro-active. i have been pro-active in these conversations with our administration. because this is not the first but this is the second incident that's happened to me. the one thing we are trying to get people to understand is that these are not single isolated incidents. that's the university's failure to respond because they are thinking they are single and isolated. this is one incident. you can't blame students on one particular thing. now we are seeing a trend where students are empowered to speak up about the injustices they face on this campus. with that, comes learning on behalf of that administration as to how to respond and react to these incidents. >> you've already made the point, don't just look at us, yes, i'm peyton at the university of missouri, first african-american head of the students here but this is something that's happening on many campuses. then we see at yale, my alma
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mater, the students protesting about the same thing, a flash point and alleged incident at a fraternity involving a woman of color. but are you surprised to see another campus doing the same thing? >> no. one thing i want to clarify you on, i am not the first african-american president here at the university of missouri. i stand on the other shoulders of people who were in this office before me. >> i didn't know that. >> one thing i want people to understand is that we are not seeing more incidents, what we're seeing is students who are empowered to speak about the incidents on their campuses around the nation. the university of missouri is by no means a bad school. what we're seeing right here is that students are empowered to speak up about what is happening here. it's empowering other students around the nation to speak up about what is happening on their campuses as well. the one thing that's great about this school is that we have the opportunity to facilitate dialogue on the things that are happening here and how we are going to work about creating institutional change so that we
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can sell a policy that lets students know these kind of actions and behaviors will not be accepted. i said time and time again that i wouldn't be here, you know, if i didn't love this university. the students who are out here camping love this university as well. they want to see it better for all students who come through these doors. >> i know what i was referring to. the size of the undergrads, having 27,000 kids here, young adults, i'm old so i call you kids. you know what i'm talking about. for you to be the student leader of such a big population is unique. we'll see if it ricochets around the country. what do you think? i know it's not just one thing but if you could point to one thing, if it changes beyond this dialogue and recognition that would make a difference in a real way at missouri, what would it be? >> i think the biggest thing is addressing our curriculum. the way in which we teach students and the way we value diversity and inclusion. right now, when it's something that doesn't seem to apply to students, when it's not personal
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to them, you know, they don't care about understanding other students' experiences or over people's experiences. what i want people to realize is that to be inclusive-minded, to care about different identities is what's going to make us successful in the work force. i have called for a requirement that, you know, focuses on the individual colleges, what are students studying in their majors? diversity in journalism, the way that black people, the way that people of color are portrayed in the media, that's something we can talk about, something for journalism students, nursing school, addressing diversity there. the way you handle, the way you see people affect the kind of health care you're going to give them. we need to make sure these issues are something that students can take home and say, you know, this relates to what i am studying here at the university and what i'll be doing when i get out into the work force. >> how to be a responsible system is something you don't
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just learn in college. >> police stay in touch with us about what happens flex at the university. we'll stay on the story. >> okay. >> thank you for joining us on "new day." >> thank you for having me. >> use #newdaycnn or post your comment on facebook.com/newday. ben carson says the media is unfair to him and the other republican candidates. is it fair for the candidates to use that excuse to avoid answering tough questions during tonight's debate? our panel will weigh in.
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dr. ben carson in the spotlight when the republicans face off for their fourth debate in milwaukee. carson facing intense media scrutiny over several stories he's told about his past. even donald trump thinks the race is getting, quote, weird and strange. each of the candidates should have a little more air time tonight. mike huckabee and chris christie have been relegated to the earlier undercard debate, leaving eight on the stage. russia rocked by a doping scandal. the world anti-doping agency
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accuses moscow of state-sponsored doping that allowed its elite track and field athletes to cheat. the agency now looking at results from the 2012 olympics and calling for russia's track and field team to be banned from the 2016 games. chipotle getting the okay from the health department to re-open 43 restaurants in oregon and washington, linked to an e. coli outbreak. officials say all tests of chipotle's food came back negative for e. coli bacteria. company officials expect to have all the restaurants open again by wednesday or thursday. >> friday night dinner for we. sea world ending its killer whale shows at san diego park by the end of 2016. the company's reputation took a major hit due in part to black fish, a documentary co-produced by cnn films. that film generated a great deal of criticism from lawmakers and advocacy groups. sea world's ceo says it plans on
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re-inventing the attraction. on to politics. ben carson does not like the questions journal ifls have been asking him. he claims the media has been tougher on him than other candidates. is that the case i ask you? i also ask our next guests, bob beckel and matt lewis. great to have you here, gentlemen. matt, i want to start with you. has the field of journalism, has the media been tougher on ben carson than on other candidates? >> i don't think so. i do think there's liberal media bias in the world. i think most of our friends and colleagues in the mainstream media tend to be more liberal but i think that what ben carson has faced is entirely appropriate and fair. i think it's good for the republic. it's good for the republicans, even. to have a candidate who is properly vetted before going up against hillary clinton. at this point now, i think ben
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carson as we've seen things developed, it looks like his memoir was embellished. we're not seeing any smoking gun now. i think he might be better off having gone through this process at the end of the day. >> why are there those ironically on the right side of the media defending ben carson zealously against routine vetting and planting the seeds about they didn't talk about obama that way. what is this, a black comparison now? why is so much of that going on if the vetting is acceptable? >> i do think there is bias. i do not think president obama before he came president was properly vetted. by the way, i think some of this is a matter of -- it's like pornography. you know it when you see it. the thing with bias is, a lot of times it's insidious, the tone that a reporter take when they talk about a republican versus a liberal. i also think republicans are a little bit defensive about this. there have been decades and
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decades where we've seen liberal media bias impact elections. so frankly, i think there's an overreaction. i think there's a circling of the wagons. whenever it's perceived that a republican is being attacked, rather than ask whether or not it's fair, conservatives reflectively push back. sometimes that's counterproductive. >> i want to play something from reince priebus. that is that yes, journalists do ask hillary clinton some questions but they use kid gloves in a way that they don't with ben carson. listen to this. >> in regard to hillary clinton, the media sort of, yes, they cover it but they cover it with a laugh and a wink and a nod. isn't that horrible that she had to sit in the chair for 11 hours? that's the tone of the coverage of hillary clinton. it's a tone of, this is silly, let's move on. whereas with the republicans, it's, hey, can you believe that 40 years ago this happened? or that, hey, this credit card
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over here -- >> bob, is there some merit to that argument? >> none. by the way, matt, that was a good try. look, this is not new. republicans have been using this tactic to turn around and attack reporters for as long as i've been in the political business. their base likes that kind of thing. they all think you all are a bunch of corrupt liberal wine and cheese eating, volvo driving, lesbian loving people. when they take -- >> does it say that in your bio on twitter? >> you have your share of this the other morning, alisyn. you were telling what he said. it wasn't as if you were giving him a question about something that you heard. this is what he wrote and he still couldn't handle it. welcome to the big leagues, dr. carson. he said he's not sure who he stabbed.
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i've been stabbed and i remember who stabbed me. >> it wasn't dr. ben carson, was it? >> no, no. forget all this other stuff. on issues, he can't explain his tax position. he can't explain his middle eastern position. he can't explain his defense position and now he's taken some of the world's great monumets like the pyramids and turn them into grain bins. >> didn't that the prove the point, which is, shouldn't journalists, what ben carson would say is that journalists should be focusing on those things of substance and do away with his personal childhood stories that may have discrepancies. >> if there's enough discrepancies, no, the answer to that is no. the cnbc, those people sat around and must have had a bad night or they got in trouble with husbands and wives. that was ridiculous. fox people will come out and ask serious policy questions. they're not going to do any gotcha stuff so republicans can't pull that off again or at
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least try to do that. from here on out, people ought to ask substantive questions. somebody has to ask donald trump, if he's going to make the 12-foot fence and make the mexicans pay for it. what if they don't pay for it? is he going to invade? >> you're right that we want the answer to it. it doesn't mean we don't ask about it. that's what takes us to the central point here. ben carson is his personal narrative. that is what is fueling his popularity. yes, the more people learn the more they like. i don't need a poll to tell me that. i hear it at home. i'm saying, it is not an unfair question to ask somebody what is central to their existence in a race, right? if you fuel it between this antagonism between the media and the politicians, is that a
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healthy process? >> ben carson doesn't have governing experience. we can't look at that or his past votes or time in government. you look at his biography which he put out there, which is part of his rationale for his candidacy. it's his legacy. if there are questions, if there are embellishments or fabrications, that raises real questions about him. i think it's entirely fair. i would say the answer to the problem of media bias isn't to give ben carson a free ride or a pass, it's to go harder against all politicians. i actually think that journalists and media should do a better job of vetting all the politicians running for office. >> matt, matt -- >> i think it's the last refuge of a failing campaign when you do nothing but whine about bias. >> the democrats, hillary clinton, there have been over 20 hearings from benghazi. this woman has been playing defense because she's been hit from every direction. i mean, the democrats get this a lot, too.
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we don't whine about it, we expect it, you know? you guys have been a policy issue out of it. it's not going to get you very far. and to suggest the democrats are somehow being treated with kid gloves, what is your chairman talking about? do you think he could sit for 11 hours and do that? i doubt it. >> but matt, about that point, hillary clinton, do you think she's been vetted thoroughly over the course of her career in politics? >> i actually do think that hillary clinton compared to barack obama, i think there's a stark con taft there. i think hillary clinton has been vetted much more thoroughly and that the press -- never mind the hard news media. just consider the way that the comedians cover them. remember, barack obama, it was very hard for late night shows, "saturday night live," to parody barack obama. with hillary, you've seen them go out of their way to kind of mimic her and raise questions about her being really ambitious. i think there's a big contrast
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to the way hillary has been vetted versus obama. >> you raise such an interesting point. that's the problem with calling it the media. the media is "snl," the media is "glamour" magazine. when you talk about journalists you talk about obviously the journalists at cnn and elsewhere. that's a different category. but i do think we lump it all together. that's a question for another day. thanks so much. great to talk to you both. >> pleasure. here's a story parents really need to pay attention to. a sexting scandal rocking a colorado high school. how did so many students, we're talking hundred, exchange so many lewd pictures without parents or teachers knowing. you'll get information you need to know, ahead.
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this morning, the fallout of a sexting scandal involving as
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many as 100 kids and hundreds of photos, naked photos of them continues to rock a small community in colorado. what do parents need to know? apparently there's a secretive app kids are using, how do we keep our children safe if this kind of technology exists? here to discuss is ceo and founder of common sense media, james stayer and megan stayer. common sense, what an interesting concept when we're talking about a teenager. this is a whole new ball game, james. there are going to be people that will say what do you think will happen? you give teenage kids smartphones, of course this is going to happen. a lot of people will say there's nothing you can do about this. is that true? >> well, you know, teens as we all know self-reveal before they self-reflect. they do a lot of dumb things. clearly what's happened here, teens who know a lot more about their phones than their parents
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do have discovered vault and they discovered vault apps which have a calculator on the front but also turn out to be a photo app. they took a lot of nude photos. there's a lot we can do about it. first of all as parents, you don't have to be an expert on technology that understand teens will do dumb things and that technology enables this. you have to have good conversations with your kids now. >> here's the thing. this technology is changing so quickly that you might be hip to facebook and instagram and snapchat but that technology left you behind like two years ago. >> that's true. but you can't talk with your kids about what they're doing. and even though their teenagers, i'm the father of four of them, you can have conversations with them about things like the fact that nothing is private on the internet, everything is permanent. you think you're taking a photo and it will disappear after five seconds but it doesn't and there are consequences to your behavior. even if you're not an expert,
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you can be a common sense parent. >> mel, you're a parent as well. i know you have to do that. i want to talk about what we know in terms of consensuaconse. i want to play a little bit of sound from one of the teenagers that gets to the point, you talk about education. listen to what one of the students said about knowledge of how serious this was. >> it has become something that like everybody was doing so nobody really saw something really bad about it. i personally just knew morally that it was wrong but i didn't know legally to the extent of how wrong it was because nobody every really told us. >> even if a kid, mel, has a good moral compass, can they face legal trouble? this could affect them going forward. >> good morning, michaela. good morning, james. first of all, i agree with everything that james said. the answer to your question,
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michaela, can they face legal trouble? absolutely. not only face it, these are felonies. you're talking about creating, possessing and distributing pornography. because so many kids are under age, it's child pornography. one of the things i have to say, so far, i applaud the way law enforcement has been handling this issue because in my personal opinion, these are kids that are emerging in their sexuality, their brains are not fully developed. the biggest issue for teenagers is impulse control and you already have everybody doing it. based on everything we know about human behavior, this is exactly what you can expect in this day and age with kids. and the laws need to be changed. and the number one thing that parents can do is they can start talking and they should start talking early. >> that's it, james. >> 8-year-old, 9-year-old, 10-year-old. >> the challenge is once a kid gets to be being a teenager and
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the door closes to their bedroom a little more often, you don't want to drive them further underground, right? you have to walk a fine line here. >> that's right, michaela. i agree with mel. i'm a former prosecutor by the way. this is not a prosecutored case in my opinion. this is really about a teachable moment for all of us by the way. you're right. we just released a major study, common sense did, that shows that the average teen spends nine hours per day with media and technology, not including time spent in school. they live in a 24/7 media world. as a parent, you may not know everything but this is a teachable moment for all of us. >> okay. >> in understanding that kids are prone to doing stuff like this. you've got to be their guide and parent. >> james and mel, not only a teachable moment, a wakeup call for a lot of parents i'm going to guess, this situation in colorado is a call to action for so many around the nation. thanks for joining us to talk about it. chris? >> it is happening everywhere, michaela. and if parents want to blame it
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on somebody else, it all starts at home. you nailed it in that segment. all right. stunner. i mean, you'll be shocked. late-night comics using the 2016 race to find fresh material. they're joking about this election. what? >> what? >> who's their favorite target this time? i bet you a buck you can't figure it out. diabetes, steady is exciting. only glucerna has carbsteady, clinically proven to help minimize blood sugar spikes. so you stay steady ahead.
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bernie sanders said his seven grandchildren are the joy of his life. and his grandchildren said the very same thing about his grand children. >> all eyes on rising star marco rubio. the florida senator looked incredibly presidential. thanks to his brilliant strategy standing next to jeb bush. >> ben carson apparently has a
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painting of himself with jesus. a painting of himself with jesus. when he heard this, larry king said big deal, i have a selfie with jesus. >> you don't see many going with the larry king punch line. >> you actually do that. >> do i have one of those? >> i feel better about myself. >> so something opened up in an
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. city official. asked its operator jason hardwig to go lower to look at the pipe. >> your drone got swallowed by the hole did it not? >> yes. >> it clipped the side of the trench and ended up in it. the fire department came to the rescue. >> a big long stake with a hook on it basically. yanked it out. for now i-hop is closed and i'm hungry. this sink hole makes me want to sink my teeth into a stack of flap jacks. not a stack of cars. cnn new york. >> i still can't kwetd over that. >> that is a stunning picture. >> and it all connects to pancakes. >> it does. you know who doesn't want to call it a the sink hole? those car owns. top brass resigning at the
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university of missouri concerning racial tension on the campus. was the football team's refusal to play the straw that broke the camel's back? we're going to ask a former wide receiver for the tigers. prepare for challenges specific to your business by working with trusted advisors who help turn obstacles into opportunities. experience the power of being understood. rsm. audit, tax and consulting for the middle market. i started with pills. and now i take a long-acting insulin at night. i take mine in the morning. i was trying to eat right, stay active. but i wasn't reaching my a1c goal anymore. man: my doctor says diabetes changes over time. it gets harder to control blood sugar spikes after i eat and get to goal. my doctor added novolog® at mealtime for additional control.
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the resignation of tim wolf is a glimmer of hope. >> please use this resignation to heal. not to hate. >> from the moment i made my noubs people thought i was a dead man walking. >> i expected actual debate about the economy, jobs, trade, taxes. >> all eyes on ben carson. all eyes on trump. >> this is a strange election, isn't it? man. >> i think it is a very good thing that dr. carson is being tested. >> this is only election in history where you are better off with you stab somebody. >> mounted concern about the vetting process of airport employees here in the u.s. >> some don't even have to basic bio graphical data that. needs to change. >> this is "new day" with chris cuomo. alisyn camerota. and michaela pereira. >> good morning. the chancellor and the president are got another the university
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of missouri over a growing rift concerning race relss on camps. >> and the football team became a catalyst when they vowed to sit out until the president of the university was gone. cnn's stephanie elam is live from university of missouri campus for us. tell us all the latest. >> you have student actists who as you can see have been camping out here to make the point that change needed to happen. on top of that getting that huge help from the football players backed by their coach. >> this morning students at the university of missouri are waking up to a massive shake up one activists say is just the beginning of change. the university system president and the school's chancellor ousted amid racial tensions and weeks of stoound student-led protests. please use this resignation to heal. not to hate. >> this is just the beginning in
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aiding and dismantling system of oppression within higher education. specifically the um system. >> effectively immediately the university president tim wolf who some say failed to adequately address several hate crimes on mizzou's campus. while striking a different tone than the one captured in this tense exchange with students. >> is because you don't believe you have the equal opportunity for success. >> did you just blake us for -- >> even some long-time faculty say racism has been a problem on campus for years. >> i have been called the "n" word too many times to talk about it on camera and to write them all out. >> reporter: attentions reaching a boiling point in september. after the student body president posted he was called the "n" word. something that happened multiple times on campus.
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and a swastika painted in feces inside one of the residence hauls. and the one student pledging a hunger strike. >> a lot of people know how corrupt the system is and they thought i was going to die from day one from the moment i made my announcement. people thought i was a dead man walking. >> the football team and their coach also vowing to stay off the field until wolf agreed to step down. >> a young man's life was on the line and that's what it came down to. >> we're joined now by ladainian washington. thanks for joining us this morning. we've been watching all of the things that are happening at your alma mater here. i'm kuscurious what your reacti as a former student and former tiger, what's your reaction to the resignation of two of the top officials there at the
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school? >> honestly it is very shocking honestly. honestly after all the news broke when the football team basically came out and said, you know, they were going to boycott. i didn't think that the president would resign. the fact he did was very shocking. especially day after coach pinkel and the whole staff got together. very shocking. the news around here definitely went viral real quick and national. >> [ inaudible ]. >> -- been wild. >> i can't say they honest ll l 100% felt he should have been resigned. if anything he took a lackadaisical approach to fixing things. and the fact it took so long for a guy to go on hunger strike and was surprising to me and took the football team to step in and boycott. i don't think that should have been been the plan of action. shouldn't have gotten that far.
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he should have come outl with some plan -- sorry the wind here is crazy. >> we know the head coach for the tigers supported his team's decision to boycott this we know you're not crying it's the wind. >> it's the wind. it's a cold day here. >> i want to play some sound from the head coach. he was really supportive of the team's decision to say hey we're not playing until something happens here. take a listen to coach. >> i just know my players were suffering and they felt awful. and again, i'm like their dad you know. and i'm going to help them in any way i can. they asked me if i would support them. and i said would. i didn't look at consequences that wasst that wasn't about it at the time. it was helping my players and supporting my players when they needed me. >> give us more insight into the locker room. you spent years in there. you have quite a brotherhood and relationship and bond with your coach. how are issues and things like
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this when arise dealt with? >> dealt with, you know, internally. we don't let anything effect the mizzou football family. the fact that coach stepped up shows what kind of leader he is he supports his players. if you are going to be the leader of that football team and the head coach you have to back your players. the fact they thought it was necessary to boycott just goes to show it was a tremendous problem and it's something that real. actions should be taking place. the main thing is we want to raise awareness. it is not a missouri thing. it is not a mizzou thing. it is national on every campus. it is not just a black and white thing. as the minority things. it's something that needs to be fixed. it needs to be brought to attention. something regardless everybody needs to, you know -- it is hard to put yourself in other people's shoes.
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only the minority know what it feels like to be a high in ornin campus. i was a student athlete so i gottigot benefits and they probably treated me a little different so i don't really know what he went through as the student. >> you get a different treatment. football is a big deal in missouri. as being an athlete you are going to enjoy special privileges on campus, respect to your fellow students. what was it like? did you sense there was racial tension on campus when you were there? >> well i think three or four years ago whenever they spinged cotton balls on the black culture center. can --. no he can't. i don't think that's why they asked him to step down. i don't think that's what it was. i think it was his lackadaisical approach to get things fixed to
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come out with a mission statement to say that we're taking the right steps to fix this. i think he turned the blind eye. should he resign, i think that's sad. i heard the demands. there was demands well-being s demands. both sides could have been done a better job. >> you did a great job witt standing all of that wind, make your eyes water tremendously during that interview. >> oh my gosh. i'm so sorry about that. >> no problem. and thank you and hopefully this is the beginning of some healing going on in your campus and big conversations universities around the country. thanks for joining us. well, do you think the republican race has got an little weird? you are not alone. even donald trump says it is getting strange when a candidate has to fight to convince the media he really did stab
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someone. all this as the gop candidates prep for fourth debate tonight in milwaukee. tell us how they are preparing. >> reporter: there's already been rumblings in preparation for tonight's debate. a escalation in the war of words between bush and rubio campaigns which potentially could set the stage for a fiery didn't tonight. >> tonight's debate a critical moment for candidates in the republican race to the white house. the main stage a bit roomier this time around. mike huckabee and chris christie bumped off the main stage to the undercard debate. fewer people means more time for each gop hopeful. the network saying it will allow them to respond to public criticisms directly. donald trump giving an early indication he may not be so nice
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with with his chief rival. going after carson after his questions over his violent past in his rally monday night. >> the only election in history where you are better off if you stab somebody. what are we coming to? people are getting away with murder. i never saw anything like this. you could say anything about anybody. and their poll numbers go up. the billionaire take okay starbuck's after they changed their holiday cups. >> maybe we should boycott starbuck's. no more merry christmas. if i become president we're all going to be saying merry culpable mental state. trump also had guns ablazing for smart marco rubio. >> and then i look at the guy rubio who's very very weak on illegal immigration. >> reporter: tonight rubio may be forced once again to answer allegations of messy finances and other attacks coming from his mentor jeb bush. >> jeb bush has certainly telegraphed that marco rubio has a target on his back and he's
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going to be coming after him. >> fox business, the host of tonight's debate hoping to draw sharp contrast to cnbc, taking a jab at previous moderators. the network instead promising a real debate on the economy. >> i'm not so hur these personal attack it is a we're looking for will be there because i'm not sure they will be provided necessarily. >> and the main debate will be two hours long tonight and the candidates will actually have 60 seconds to respond if any attacks are made against them. that is double the amount of time they were given in the last debate. >> that is what people want to see. the candidates speaking for and about themselves. so they may not bash each other but the gop candidates will certainly bash the current president tonight in including what they say is a failing economy. treasure secretary jack lu says that is poppycock. >> he did not say pop by dopyco.
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the u.s. compared to the rest of the world is doing well. >> we've had consumers. unemployment coming down. strong jobs growth. >> auto sales. >> auto sales have been very strong. we'll seal some months with good numbers and some months with disappointing numbers but the direction over the last six, nine months has really been quite convincingly positive. we could still be doing better. if we didn't have head winds from a weaker global economy, then we would have hoped for, we'd be seeing stronger growth. >> a very strong jobs report on friday. 5% unemployment rate. the real unemployment below 10% for the first time since the crisis. these are two term presidents at this stage in their tenure. barack obama. 8.7 million jobs. gorge bush. look at bill clinton.
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it was a jobs machine, more than $20 million jobs. and under ronald reagan, 12.1 million jobs. i suspect you are going to hear a lot tonight about the obama economy. and it will be a dirty word off the tongue of the republicans. real quickly, i want to point out to my r.a. they have rolled out this new retirement savings plan for anyone who doesn't have a retirement plan at work the government is offering you one here. treasury securities. no minimum, no fees. myra dot governor. >> there are growing concerns about the vetting process of airport employees in the u.s. following the crash of metro
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jet. live at reagan national airport with the latest. >> good morning. i spoke with several u.s. officials who say we simply do not know enough about the close to 1 million airport workers at airports across the united states. another official telling me that the information used to vet here the airport workers is basically on the same level as whether a passenger would have to submit in order to get prechecked clearance at airport security. what most people probably don't realize is that tsa actually relies on airports and carriers. more than 400 of them to do these criminal background chex of these airport workers. while officials are concerned and worried about the possibility of an insider threat at airports here in the united
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states, the tsa had a pretty embarrassing moment at miami international airport adjust last night. we understand from law enforcement officials they lost sight of a passenger with a suspicious bag. and they lost sight of this passenger for hours. we know that this man was able to pass through security check points with a bag that contained cell phones and wires. after that tsa became very concerned. the fbi, police brought in. 50 flights were delayed. nine diverted. police going on board some of these aircraft to find this passenger with a suspicious bag. in the end they got the passenger, they got the bag. the bag was deemed safe. but the question today remains. if tsa thought that that bag was suspicious, how was it that this passenger was able to get through that security check point? how was it that they lost sight of this passenger? >> man, those other passengers do not look happy about having
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to submit to that search on the plane there. thanks so much for all of the background. also breaking news overnight. an arrest in the shooting of the texas state judge. is now behind bars. cnn's ed lavendera is following the story live from boston. what happened overnight? >> reporter: a law enforcement source tells us that the person in houston was arrested oan unrelated fugitive warrant. this person has not been criminally charngd with the attack on the judge here. but investigators and the law enforcement source tells us they do believe this person could very well be connected to this attack on the judge friday night as she was driving back to her home and attacked in the driveway after she had just come home from a high school football game. we have spoken with friends and colleagues over the last few day who have said they are convinced
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this attack was premeditated in retaliation for the work she does here in criminal courts here this travis county in austin, texas. this person now under arrest on an unrelated fugitive charge, being questioned. and investigators, we hope to hear more today about whether or not they are able to prove that this person was connected to this attack on friday night. >> some big questions there. ed thanks. we'll check back. we're also learning more about the shootout in louisiana that claimed the life of the six year old autistic boy. a source close told cnn the deputies saw a physical fight between the dad chris few and his girlfriend outside a bar. they then took o off after his suv. did they know a kid ywas in the car. and a body camera shows few with his hands up at the officers
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into his car killing few's son. the two officers are being held on one million dollars bond. >> if you are jeb bush you are likely feeling the pressure to put on a good performance tonight. we're going to get insight from a man who knows jeb well. ahead. we live in a world of mobile technology, but it is not the device that is mobile, it is you. real madrid have about 450 million fans. we're trying to give them all the feeling of being at the stadium. the microsoft cloud gives us the scalability to communicate exactly the content that people want to see. it will help people connect to their passion of living real madrid.
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this debate is all about one thing -- jeb bush. he's had three bad debates.
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and one more and he's not going to drop out but he'll really be dead man walking. >> the pressure is on. so what will jeb do? here this morning is republican strategist justin safefy. he worked at beb jusheb bush's. you know jeb what. what do we prescribe for him tonight? more of the mild statesmen afraid to break the rules and challenge the moderators or more of the attack dog going after his opponents? >> well i think you are going to see governor jeb bush talk about his record in florida, his accomplishments and lay his case before the people watching the debate about his vision for the future. i don't care you are goi i don't think you are going to see anything different from the past but think he's going to be very forceful.
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>> don't we need to see something dramatically different than in the past. it hasn't registered in the past? in fact i believe his poll numbers have dropped after debates. >> well look, the polls right now are very fluctuating. anything can happen. they have gone up. they have gone down. this is the year in my view anything can happen. no one could have predict where had the polls are right now. and nobody can predict where they are going to be in january or february and march next year. i certainly wouldn't put as much impact as charles did in the lead in. the voters are still evaluating these candidates on a one to one basis. >> they are. but it is not good news in the polls. look at the latest poll. the maris, it asks among republicans who don't you want to vote for. the anyone but him question. trump is at number one.
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37% but jeb bush is not far behind at 32%. doesn't he need to do something dramatically different tonight than just once again lay out where he is in policy? >> well look, that is something that we'll see what he does tonight. i think you are going to see him do the same that he's done before. but i think he's getting more forceful and emphatic about it. does he knees to do something different? that's great pund it talk. he'll though what he's made occupy. what kind of leader he'll be for the country. and at the same time he's going keep taking his message to the people. i guess i would also say voters haven't really settled down on who they are going to vote. are 7 out of 10 in a recent "new york times" poll -- republican
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voters said they may switch by the time they vote. >> speaking of the "new york times" they have an article out this morning talking about the plans of jeb bush's super pack. they are planning to unleash some new attack ads. they are willing to spend a lot of money against marco rubio. let me read an excerpt from that. >> the group's chief strategist boasted of his willingness to spend as much app as 20 million to damage rubio's reputation and halt his sunday sudden assent in the polls. does jeb bush need go after marco rubio more forcely? >> well look, i think he needs to talk about his record. i think there are always in these campaigns every candidate is going to be held responsible for their record. including jeb bush. and no one should be surprised if any candidate has another candidate do compare and contrast and talk about their record. and that includes governor jeb bush. marco rubio, donald trump, ben
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carson. all of the candidates should be put to the test. that is not a surprise to anybody. i think jeb bush has a positive message. i think you are going to see that from him tonight in the debate. and no candidate should be surprised if their record gets scrutinized. >> jeb bush himself has talked about what he believes need to change in the debate. he sat down with us about his thoughts on shifting strategy. listen to this. >> i've got get better at debating i guess, or performing, whatever that's called. and i will. i'm a grinder. >> you keep saying i'm a grinder. what is that's mean. >> that means as i have described it is i eat nails before i have breakfast. i'm focused. i'm competitive. i set high expectations on myself. i knew this was going to be hard. >> he's so tough he eats nails before breakfast. he doesn't even them for breakfast. but that is not our impression of jeb bush that's rambo-like.
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but you know him well. do you think he needs to show how tough he is? >> i think he will. i think he will and i think that as the campaign goes on the debate performance tonight, other times where you will see him on television. when i listen to that clip and watch that clip that is the jeb bush i know. he's ferocious when he needs to be. he's supercompetitive and anyone who counts him out is making a big mistakes. so that is why i think that right now you are going to see the real jeb bush. you are going to see competitive jeb bush. and you are going to see someone who is fighting for the american people, for his vision of the future and who is willing to do what he needs to do to win. >> last, what if he doesn't burst out out pack? might you see his supportsers go elsewhere and donations start to dry up? >> no i don't. i think the people with jeb bush, they believe in him. they believe is the right person
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to lead the party and a general election campaign against hillary clinton. and i think most of the people if not all of the people that are supporting jeb bush know that this is a long campaign. the election isn't going to be decided november 10, 2015. the first votes don't take place in the february 1st 2016. there is a lot that is going to happen between now and then. rick santorum won the iowa caucus in 2012. grin rich in 2012 south carolina. there is a lot of campaign left to go. the people that support bush are with him and they know this is a hard fought fight as it should be. >> thank you. so there is growing speculation that that downed russian jet may have been an inside job. the question, is enough being done to screen airport workers here? we'll give you the facts. edict.. the market. but at t. rowe price,
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so this morning u.s. officials are growing concerned
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about security here at domestic airports. why? speculation that the downing of that metro jet flight was actually an inside job. let's discuss. cnn aviation analyst david suz suesy. we don't know what happened with the accident yet. we'll have to wait. we know it is worthy of assessment here. what is your headline about how vulnerable we are to an insider attack at our airports. >> the airports now in the united states we need to fix it's ban proton problem since 1985 with pan am 103 we had problems with employees smuggling things on to planes. >> i'm taking off my shoes and giving you all this information
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so i can be pre check that. system isn't applied to the employees? >> it does not. they are screened with a criminal history check. that's done when they are first hired. it is never repeated after on a routine basis. there is no reason to do redo that according to the regulations. but as far as getting onto the airplane, many employees are not subject to any kind of screening whatsoever from the time they walk into the airport. >> what was that guy talking about one of the fiofficials saying we're missing some biographical information on the employees. how? >> that sort of thing they should have. that is something that is mandated right now. the criminal history records check. they have to clear that. in order to clear that they have to be an employee. if you were an employee before the statute came into play you had to duet baget your history checked. the fact they don't have that information about employees is
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unacceptable. that means they haven't even followed the rules that there are about doing this. >> car go is a bigger challenge. how? >> absolutely. car go has what they call approved shipping carriers for the airlines. they are people that ship a lot of equipment, a lot of things all the time. so they are under routine surveillance. meaning they don't have to be screened. their packages can go directly from the shipper to the airplane and from the airplane to the delivery point. >> so how big an issue is it? they give us this number. 900,000 people who is jobs allow them largely unfettered access behind the scenes at the nation's airports. what is the real number that we're talking about that you believe is inadequately screened. >> i think all 900,000.
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>> all? >> i think they all need a better level of screening. there are some that should have. and that is people who carry tools and all. but they have to have a more routine background check. peoples lives change but that is never updated. we don't know about that. the challenge comes down to one thing -- >> one fundamental thing -- you can't stop before that. what's the one fundamental thing? >> well it's money. it comes down to who is going to pay for it. some estimates by the government accounting say it could be $8 million per airport just to do this screening on employees. who is going to play for that? tsa doesn't have the budget. they put it to the airports. the airports then charge the airlines. and the airlines charge the customer. >> come on. it is somewhat of a no-brainer that the people who you are hiring to do the checking would be people that you also check. do you know what i mean?
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this report in the homeland security department inspector general says they didn't have proper control, effective controls, to make sure that the workers don't have disqualifying criminal histories and they possessed lawful status and authorization to work in the united states. what kind of initial check would you do that wouldn't tell you that? >> well a criminal history check. that means -- and here is this problem with the routine and the checklist and the check box. yeah we did the criminal history records check. sure we did that. and we found only problems. what do you do with that information? what is the litmus test for this is a good person this is a bad person? so finding o out what that means in that history check is what's in fact you have the. they will say yea i did the check. what happens after that is the challenge? that is what needs to be investigated and this report we have now from the gao, from the attorney general, needs to be dealt with. you can't just send out a report
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and say hey this is all messed up and then not do something about it. that report's been out some time now. we haven't heard a plan. how do you fix it? what are we going to do now? >> that is exactly right. what the accountability comes. especially in an industry that tends to be reactive. plenty of cause fortu reaction now. david soucie thank you. what do you think? how do we make it happen? tweet us #new day cnn. or facebook.com/newday. >> the gop candidates are treat face off tonight. we're going to take a closer look at what ke we can expect.
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here we go with the five things for your new day. the president and chancellor out at a university of missouri, stepping down over a student-led result and racial tensions on campus. the football team refused to play until the president resigned. they are set to resume practice today. and donald trump head lining tonight. dr. carson facing intense media
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scrutiny over stories about his past. security officials here in the u.s. taking a closer look into the vetting process of airport employees following the crash of metro jet 9268. insider attacks a main concern following speculation an airport worker worker spug work worker smuggled a bomb into that airplane. a federal appeals court voting 2-1 against obama's plan to give nearly five million immigrants work permits. and remember you can always get more by visiting "new day" cnn.com. she lost a daughter, her home and had to tough it out on the streets. now one army veteran is making sure no one has to endure the heartbreak that she did.
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today's "impact your world". >> this is what we do. >> pamela know what is it is like to go hungry. the 52-year-old army veteran has made it her mission to help make sure no one else does. >> it is just like an ultimate high. >> today is she is helping prepare meals for families drawing on her experience as the cook in the army. that is when her life took a terrible turn. a friend looking at her two daughters while she was served overseas killed her four-year-old. >> my daughter was hit with a fist and thrown down the stairs. i have memories and i'm reliving my struggle. it hurts sometimes. >> the single mom fell into a deep depression, lost her job and even tried to take ore hen life. >> i was a project mom. going into the military was supposed to i make things better for my family and myself. >> she and her other daughter
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lived on the street for years until they found a charity dedicated to ending homelessness. she got an apartment and treatment. but she still thought about her friends on the streets. >> she is always bringing someone wells the another tough story to us and saying can you help them. >> her dream is to own her own restaurant, buy a home and continue to help veterans. >> to me it is the right thing to do. it is the way i was raised. >> impact your world is brought to you by suffragette. now playing in select theaters.
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big debate tonight. fox business network promising to hold a subjective debate focusing on the economy. how different will it be? let's bring in cnn senior media correspondent, host of reliable sources, and cnn senior media reporter for media and politics. welcome both of you. you have a cavuto and a butteromo. good start. what do you expect tonight? it is fox. does that mean anything? it is also a business network that. gives them a comparative advantage. >> i spoke with mrs. butteromo. she's not going to put with any nonsense from the candidates. i this is foz fox.
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which means the candidates might not complain as much about the questions. fox is a favorite network of conservatives. fox business is a smaller sibling channel. this is the biggest day in their history. a big day to show you have to channel. i have a feeling they know exactly what they are doing. they are not going let it get out of control the way the cnbc debate did. >> do they bring up any of the discrepancies in ben carson's childhood stories or do they not touch it? >> i think they will. in fact i believe bart romo suggested as much to brian just yesterday. the way they do it matters. they have to do it in a very nuanced way. this entire fox business debate is happening in the context of the cnbc debate of the sort of protests against the media, the pushback against the media that we saw from the candidates and from critics after the debate.
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every question the moderators are asking tonight has to be done in a very careful substantive nuanced way. so how they address the issues about ben carson's history is going to be interesting to see. >> what does that sund like? what are those questions then? >> i think it is about tone. about respectful tone. even though the questions can be as sharp as they possibly can be. i think both of you frankly alisyn and chris are experts in that and getting the tone right while challenging these candidates. it is only two hours. eight candidates. two hours. they have longer opportunities to rebuttal and to respond to people. so we'll see how many questions actually are able to get raised -- >> you also have to remember. brian we've been talking about the moderators i would way too much. they have to be present and do their job. they should not be the focus. the focus is what's coming at them? what the toeb of the candidates is. let's apply donald trump as the taste of what is actually working right now and then let's
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talk about how they handle this. >> people are getting away with murder. i never saw anything like that. you can say anything about anybody. and their poll numbers go up. no matter what you do. >> listen to what he just said, dylan. i don't know what's going on. you can say anything about anybody, meaning he attacks people and their polls still go up. you have to remember the mind set of what's being confronted with these moderators. is if they start going at each other that way, not about policy, not about economics, what a moderator to do? you have to let them just go at it, right? >> well yes, certainly there is only so much a moderator can do. it is really funny to hear donald trump say that. because of course he was the one who made this campaign, the sort of unprecedented campaign where you can say anything and get away with it. he really sort of created that this time around. so it is interesting to see him sort of commenting on it as the
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spectator. there is only so much the moderators can do. the most they can hope to the control the debate, ask a ton of questions. and it is a debate. you have to let them go at it a little bit. >> also i hope people listen for what they don't hear. they are going to be asked questions. they know business very well. they have been doing it years. what are you going to do b about tax. listen for what i'll do versus how the current stage stinks and no one else can do it as well. >> and the next question, it's logical for fox business network to say we're just going to stick to policy. we're only going to talk about the sunsbstance. but voters also want to hear about somebody's fast and they like testing temperament. can the moderators really just stick to the caster oil of
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policy? >> i think if they do the reviews will be rather poor. i think you are absolutely right that people do enjoy ty firewor. the personality and the personal conversation about the candidates. the reality is some of these candidates don't even want to talk about substance. soum of these candidates like trump would rather talk about personality and would rather take personal shots at each other. some of these candidates don't even have detail economic policies published yet. so we'll see how much detail they want to share. a difference between a good debate and great debate would be if we learn new things about the candidates. if we can actually see those differences on stage f we can actually have them expressed that will make a successful debate. >> i this i the middle space will be that you will hear cav toe and bart rolo. then you get to the same place,
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competitive advantage and's better than whom. >> right. and there is also the risk that it goes too far into the weeds. too far into policy. and like brian said, there is a reason that 24 or 25 million people are tuning into some of these debates and it is not to hear a policy discussion. people do want those fireworks. so how you have a substantive debate, don't drou the criticism cnbc drew while at the same time creating entertaining television is going to be the challenge. >> i'll -- >> there is a civil war going on in the gop. and these debates are opportunity to see those battles being fought. >> dillon, brian, thank you. >> -- [ inaudible ] >> i spent $7,000 on lunch. good stuff next. we live in a world of mobile technology, but it is not the device that is mobile, it is you. real madrid have about 450 million fans.
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the divorce rate among iraq and afghan vets more than 40% higher than average. those suffering from pts, it
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goes higher. so where is the good stuff? couples therapy for vet, unlimited sessions completely free. the new york center for emotionally focused therapy claims 90% of couples with have significant improvement with help. website on your screen. >> that is amazes. time for newsroom with carol costello. hello. >> hi michaela. have a great day. >> you too. >> thank you. >> something knew new. >> [ inaudible ]. >> oh my gosh. newsroom starts now. happening now in the newsroom, ahead of the debate, candidates come out swinging. >> if you try and hit your mother over the head with a hammer, your poll numbers go up. >> campaigns getting testy. will the media be the target again? plus -- >> i'm resigning as president of the university of missouri. >> a shake up at mizzou. protests bring down top university offia

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